Friday, October 21, 2016

Canada’s Bombardier to Cut 7,500 More Jobs: Latest cuts—on top of 7,000 layoffs unveiled in February—will result in restructuring charges of $225 million to $275 million



The Wall Street Journal
By DAVID GEORGE-COSH and  JUDY MCKINNON
Updated October 21, 2016 1:53 p.m. ET


Bombardier Inc. plans to shed another 7,500 jobs, or just over 10% of its global workforce, as it focuses on turnaround efforts amid a soft business-jet market and hiccups with its CSeries jet program.

The Montreal-based plane and train maker said the cuts, affecting administrative and nonproduction positions across the company, are expected to save it about $300 million by the end of 2018.

The layoffs are on top of the 7,000 job cuts unveiled in February that targeted operations in both Canada and Europe and were largely split evenly between its plane and train operations. About 2,000 of the job cuts announced Friday are in Canada, a company spokesman said.

Bombardier said it expects the latest reduction to result in a restructuring charge of up to $275 million, starting in the fourth quarter and carrying through 2017. Some of the layoffs will be offset by “strategic hiring” in some of its growth segments, including its CSeries and Global 7000 aircraft lines, a company spokesman said.

Bombardier had nearly 71,000 employees at the end of 2015.

“The actions announced today will ensure we have the right cost structure, workforce and organization to compete and win in the future,” Chief Executive Alain Bellemare said in a release.

To help shore up its balance sheet, Bombardier has been in discussions with the Canadian government over possible funding. Those talks continue, both the company and the government said Friday.

“It’s not a matter of if, but how we are going to proceed with this,” Canada Innovation Minister Navdeep Bains told reporters in Ottawa. ‎He said Bombardier’s restructuring plan is separate from the funding talks.

“Our discussion with respect to [Bombardier’s] billion-dollar request is about future growth opportunities,” Mr. Bains said, noting the focus has been on company growth, job creation and research and development opportunities. He also said the government wants to see Bombardier’s head office remain in Canada.

The turnaround effort has been bumpy for the transportation company, which has bet big on its flagship CSeries, its new single-aisle jet aimed at competing with giants Airbus Group SE and Boeing Co. The CSeries flew its first paying passengers in mid-July with launch partner Swiss International Air Lines, and has received significant orders from North American carriers Air Canada and Delta Air Lines Inc. Still, Bombardier hasn’t announced any recent contract wins and in September cut its 2016 delivery target for the new aircraft by more than half due to engine delays.

The company, which is also contending with a tough business-jet market, last year scaled back production of its biggest models and canceled development of a new version of its smaller Learjet because of weak demand.

To help face its challenges, Bombardier agreed a year ago to give up almost half its stake in the CSeries program to the Quebec government in exchange for a $1 billion investment. It also sold a stake in its train-making division late last year to Quebec pension fund Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec for $1.5 billion.

Analysts say the layoffs will be positive for the company’s long-term outlook and are a sign the company’s management is pushing its turnaround efforts.

Friday’s announcement comes just weeks ahead of the company’s planned release of third-quarter earnings. In its most recent quarter, which ended in June, Bombardier swung to a net loss and posted a nearly 7% drop in revenue.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.wsj.com

Editorial: Iowa State University and Leath have bungled the response to Planegate

Iowa State University: http://registry.faa.gov/N176CF






It’s safe to say the clumsy response of Iowa State University and its president, Steven Leath, to the scandal we’ll call “Planegate” — at this point, it deserves the ubiquitous "gate" suffix — is every bit as damaging to the university’s reputation as the original offense.

The Associated Press reported last month that Leath, a certified pilot, has used one or both of the university’s two airplanes for trips that appear to be partially, if not primarily, personal in nature, and that Leath failed to reimburse the school for damage caused to one of the planes last summer.

All of the missteps that have taken place since Leath’s “hard landing” caused more than $12,000 in damage to the plane are impossible to catalog here, but they began when Leath decided to inform only the Board of Regents’ president, Bruce Rastetter, about the damage to the plane. Rastetter never passed that information on to his fellow regents.

To make matters worse, Leath didn’t pay for the damage to the aircraft last year, and agreed to do so this year only after the matter became public.

If that wasn’t bad enough, when Leath agreed to pay for the damages, he and ISU refused to characterize those payments as reimbursements, instead calling them “donations,” as if this was a generous act of charity on the president’s part.

Leath then promised he would never again fly any “state-owned aircraft,” but didn’t acknowledge that he might have — unwittingly or otherwise — violated state laws and policies restricting the personal use of public assets.

With the controversy surrounding Leath growing, the university then decided to yank from its website the flight records that detail the use of ISU’s two planes. It did so after Leath pledged “to be as open and transparent as possible” about his use of university planes.

Leath’s explanation for scrubbing the site of the flight information was maddening and utterly confounding. He said the records were pulled because they enabled reporters to identify people he was meeting with on his trips out of state. Leath complained that AP reporter Ryan Foley asked “totally inappropriate” questions related to donations Leath claims to have raised as a result of the meetings — suggesting Leath has no familiarity at all with the concept of public accountability.

Leath now says that information from the flight records will be given to anyone who wants it — although, he says, the names of university donors will be redacted. The trouble is, the flight records don’t identify any donors; they list only passengers, who may or may not be donors. Among the passenger names now treated as confidential by ISU: John Dudley, a professional bow-hunter who accompanied Leath on at least four trips.

Now it turns out that Assistant Attorney General Rob Sand made inquiries into Leath’s use of the planes, but his probe was halted after the Board of Regents' attorney contacted Sand’s boss to complain. A spokesman for Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller says Sand’s investigation was inappropriate because police, not prosecutors, generally conduct criminal investigations, and the state can’t bring charges unless a case is referred by a county prosecutor.

The information Sand gathered was forwarded to Story County Attorney Jessica Reynolds, who promptly determined no further investigation was warranted.

Now, belatedly, the Board of Regents is calling for an audit of every flight offered by Iowa State University's Flight Service since Leath was hired in 2012. The audit also will consider whether having ISU continue to operate the flight service is a good use of its limited resources — a basic task that should have been done long ago as part of the regents’ efforts at cost-cutting and improving efficiency.

For taxpayers and ISU supporters, there’s only one good thing that can be said about the school’s response to Planegate: For students working toward a degree in public relations, it provides a textbook example of crisis mismanagement.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.desmoinesregister.com

Cessna A185F Skywagon 185, N7565H: Accident occurred October 20, 2016 in Anchorage, Alaska

http://registry.faa.govN7565H

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Anchorage FSDO-03


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA041
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, October 20, 2016 in Anchorage, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA A185, registration: N7565H
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel equipped airplane reported that during the landing roll the airplane started to veer to the right, he attempted to correct with left rudder, which resulted in a ground loop to the left.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing, right horizontal stabilizer, and right elevator.

The pilot reported that there were no pre impact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

Cessna 152, Kingdom Air Corps, N488E: Incident occurred October 14, 2016 at King Ranch Airport (AK59), Sutton, Alaska

KINGDOM AIR CORPS:   http://registry.faa.gov/N488E

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Anchorage FSDO-03

AIRCRAFT ON A REJECTED TAKEOFF, WENT OFF THE END OF THE RUNWAY INTO A BERM, KING RANCH AIRPORT, SUTTON, ALASKA

Date: 14-OCT-16
Time: 18:00:00Z
Regis#: N488E
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 152
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
City: SUTTON
State: Alaska

Extra EA-300, N7769J: Incident occurred October 15, 2016 in Redlands, San Bernardino County, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N7769J

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Riverside FSDO-21

AIRCRAFT ON TAXI, CANOPY SEPARATED FROM FUSELAGE, REDLANDS, CALIFORNIA.  

Date: 15-OCT-16
Time: 21:00:00Z
Regis#: N7769J
Aircraft Make: EXTRA
Aircraft Model: EA300
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: REDLANDS
State: California

Cessna 152, Sunair Aviation, N49772: Incident occurred October 20, 2016 near Leesburg International Airport (KLEE), Lake County, Florida

B R S LEASING INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N49772

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Orlando FSDO-15


AIRCRAFT LANDED SHORT OF THE RUNWAY INTO THE WATER, LEESBURG, FLORIDA.  


Date: 20-OCT-16

Time: 15:25:00Z
Regis#: N49772
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 150
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
City: LEESBURG
State: Florida



LEESBURG --   Two Sunair Aviation employees pulled a pilot from the water Thursday morning after he crashed near the Leesburg International Airport.

Authorities say a small plane with one person onboard crashed short of Runway 3 and into a marshy area a little after 11 a.m. 

Cody Shackelford and Austin Wyndham​ work at Sunair Aviation, which handles things like aircraft movement and fueling at the airport. 

They said when they heard about the accident, they jumped into a golf cart and drove down to the area. They waded into the swamp up to their necks and started yelling the pilot's name.  

"He finally called us and let us know he was OK, which was a huge relief because you don’t know what you’re walking up on," said Shackelford. 

"He said he was fine. I think he probably made a good landing. He knew it was coming, he popped the door so the door jam didn’t get stuck to make sure he could get out," said Wyndham.  

Wyndham says the man told him he lost power as he was coming in for a landing. 

Authorities say the pilot was evaluated for injuries and refused further medical attention.

The FAA is now investigating.

Source: http://www.mynews13.com




Leesburg, Fla. —  A small plane crashed Thursday morning while coming into land at the Leesburg Airport, fire officials said.

The Leesburg Fire Department said the plane landed short of the runway and ended up in a small pond.

Fire officials said it is unclear why the plane missed the runway.

Cody Shackelford and Justin Windham, who work at the airport, were the first people to go looking for the plane after the crash. 

The men drove a golf cart as far as they could and then ended up wading into deep marshland, not accessible by boat or vehicle.

They said the pilot, who was in his late 70s, was struggling to float by hanging onto lily pads.

Officials said the pilot was the only person on board and was not injured in the crash.

The Federal Aviation Administration is on the scene and investigating the crash.


Story and video:  http://www.wesh.com

Piper PA-60-601P Aerostar, N601UK: Accident occurred October 20, 2016 in Carrollton, Carroll County, Georgia

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N601UK

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Atlanta FSDO-11


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA032
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, October 20, 2016 in Carrollton, GA
Aircraft: SMITH AEROSTAR601, registration: N601UK
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that the purpose of the flight was to reposition the airplane to another airport for refuel. During preflight, he reported that the airplane's two fuel gauges read "low," but the supplemental electronic fuel totalizer displayed 55 total gallons. He further reported that it is not feasible to visual check the fuel quantity, because the fueling ports are located near the wingtips and the fuel quantity cannot be measured with any "external measuring device." According to the pilot, his planned flight was 20 minutes and the fuel quantity, as indicated by the fuel totalizer, was sufficient.

The pilot reported that about 12 nautical miles from the destination airport, both engines began to "surge" and subsequently lost power. During the forced landing, the pilot deviated to land in grass between a highway, the airplane touched down hard, and the landing gear collapsed.

The fuselage and both wings sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot reported in the National Transportation Safety Board Pilot/ Operator Aircraft Accident Report that there was a "disparity" between the actual fuel quantity and the fuel quantity set in the electronic fuel totalizer. He further reported that a few days before the accident, he set the total fuel totalizer quantity to full after refueling, but in hindsight, he did not believe the fuel tanks were actually full because the wings may not have been level during the fueling. 

The "Preflight" chapter within the operating manual for the fuel totalizer in part states: "Digiflo-L is a fuel flow measuring system and NOT a quantity-sensing device. A visual inspection and positive determination of the usable fuel in the fuel tanks is a necessity. Therefore, it is imperative that the determined available usable fuel be manually entered into the system."

Ian McMahon





Ian McMahon was flying his plane to the airport in Carrollton when it ran out of fuel and was forced to land on the highway in Carroll County.















CARROLL COUNTY, GA (CBS46) -   Pilot Ian McMahon lived to tell the story about the time his Piper PA-60-601P Aerostar ran out of fuel forcing him to make an emergency landing in the median along Highway 166 in Carroll County.

“I’m based over in Hampton and I was coming over to Carrollton to fill it up with fuel for a trip and I guess the totalizer was recording inaccurately because it ran out,” McMahon said.  “With no power on this airplane it drops pretty quickly so I had to keep the nose down and keep the speed up and I saw the median and aimed for it.” 

To say he nailed the landing is an understatement. He put the aircraft down safely going 130 miles per hour.
  
“I think I did an okay job, I didn’t hit any cars and I didn’t kill myself,” McMahon said.

Eyewitness Nicholas Izzo couldn’t believe his eyes.  He was driving on the highway when he saw the plane fall out of the sky.

“I looked back in my side view mirror just for curiosity and saw a big puff of dirt smoke and I immediately take a U-turn in the median and come back and check on the pilot, to check on any injuries that may have happened,” Izzo said.

There were no injuries, other than a little back pain for the pilot. 

“Uh you know a day like any other, just crash on a highway. Might as well do it with style,” McMahon said.

And what an ending this was, when McMahon’s wife arrived.  The two embraced and counted their blessings.

Story and video:   http://www.cbs46.com






HAMPTON, Ga., Oct. 21 (UPI) -- A small plane made a bumpy landing on a highway median in Georgia when it ran out of fuel on its way to an airport to refuel.

Pilot Ian McMahon said he was flying from Hampton, Ga., to the West Georgia Regional Airport in Carrollton to fuel up the aircraft for an upcoming trip when the plane ran out of fuel in mid-air.

"I'm based over in Hampton and I was coming over to Carrollton to fill it up with fuel for a trip and I guess the totalizer was recording inaccurately because it ran out," McMahon told WGCL-TV. "With no power on this airplane it drops pretty quickly so I had to keep the nose down and keep the speed up and I saw the median and aimed for it."

McMahon successfully landed on the median between the lanes of Highway 166 in Carroll County.

He said the landing was a bit bumpy due to his 130 mph speed.

"I think I did an okay job, I didn't hit any cars and I didn't kill myself," McMahon said.

McMahon said he suffered some minor back pain as a result of the rough landing, but there were no other injuries.

Story and video: http://www.upi.com



Carrollton motorists got a shock this morning when a small plane was forced to make an emergency landing in the median of the Hwy. 166 bypass near the intersection of Blandenburg Road.

The pilot, identified as Ian McMahon, was not visibly injured but was transported to Tanner Medical Center after complaining of back pain from the impact.

McMahon took off from Hampton in the Piper PA-60-601P Aerostar and said he planned to refuel at West Georgia Regional Airport in Carrollton. However, he ran out of fuel before he reached the airport and both engines shut down.

The emergency landing occurred at around 11 a.m. The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the incident.

Source:   http://times-herald.com

Cessna 172H Skyhawk, N1706F: Accident occurred October 20, 2016 in Carrabassett, Maine

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf  

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N1706F

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Portland, Maine

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA036
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, October 20, 2016 in Carrabassett, ME
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/13/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N1706F
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, after departure, he flew south along a river for about 5 miles. He then turned east toward his destination airport and needed to climb over a mountain ridge. During the climb, the landing gear impacted the top of trees; subsequently, the airplane nosed down and impacted terrain. 

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage. 

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to maintain clearance from trees while maneuvering at a low altitude.

The pilot reported that after departure he flew south along a river for about five miles. He then turned east toward his destination airport, but needed to climb over a mountain ridge. During the climb, the landing gear impacted the top of trees; subsequently, the airplane nosed down and impacted terrain.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage. 

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

CARRABASSETT VALLEY — A Bethel pilot and his passenger were "very lucky" to survive when their airplane lost power and crashed into Poplar Mountain on Oct. 20, a Maine warden said Wednesday.

Pilot Karl Olson, 30, and Michael Orsini, 26, of Raymond took off from Sugarloaf Regional Airport in Carrabassett Valley in a single-engine Cessna C 172, which lost power and plunged propeller-first into trees on the south side of the mountain,  , Warden Dan Christianson said.

Neither Olson nor Orsini was hurt.

“They were lucky. That is for sure,” Christianson said. “It could have been a fatality.”

Christianson said Olson told him the plane lost power and he brought it down as slow as possible into the trees. It "landed on its propeller,” he said.

The trees were small enough that when the plane went into the first tree, it uprooted and basically bent over with the plane into other trees. There was no significant damage; no windows were broken, Christianson said.

Christianson said he received a report of an airplane crash at 2:53 p.m. Oct. 20. Dispatchers told him there were no injuries and no fluids leaking so rescue crews were not called out.

Christianson said he and some of Olson's friends bushwhacked their way from near Ira Mountain in Kingfield nearly three-quarters of a mile to the crash site, which was north of Kingfield and near the Somerset County border. Olson and Orsini had started walking out but Christianson told them to walk back to the plane.

Christianson led investigators from the Federal Aviation Administration to the site the next day.

Jim Peters, representative of FAA Public Affairs for the New England Region, said the plane was headed south for a few miles before turning east and crashing a short time later. He said the crash is classified as an aviation accident, based on the FAA's examination of the aircraft at the crash site. The FAA will continue to investigate on behalf of the National Transportation Safety Board, he wrote in an email. 

“(Olson and Orsini) were very lucky and certainly glad they had their safety harnesses on,” Christianson said.

The fixed wing plane was manufactured in 1966, according to FAA online records.


Attempts to reach Olson on Wednesday were unsuccessful.

Source: http://www.sunjournal.com

Zenith CH-750, N8681: Accident occurred October 20, 2016 in Morristown, Rice County, Minnesota

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Minnesota

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

http://registry.faa.gov/N8681

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA021
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, October 20, 2016 in Morristown, MN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/01/2017
Aircraft: ZENITH CH-750, registration: N8681
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot reported that he had started, warmed up, and then shut down the engine about 1 hour before the accident flight. Shortly after takeoff for the personal flight, the airplane’s engine lost total power. Subsequently, the pilot conducted a forced landing on a hill, which resulted in substantial damage to the nose landing gear, fuselage, and left wing. 

The pilot said that he had fueled the airplane that morning with 82-octane automotive fuel that he had recently purchased from a service station. However, postaccident examination revealed that the fuel was yellow in color and smelled like “aged” automobile fuel. The top spark plugs appeared aged, and the electrodes were corroded, which could have affected engine performance. The airplane was not equipped with a fuel vapor return line to prevent fuel vapor lock. Given that old automotive fuel was found in the fuel system and that a fuel vapor return line had not been installed, it is likely that the engine lost power due to vapor lock. It is also likely that the corrosion of the spark plugs and the spacing of the electrode gaps contributed to the loss of engine power.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A total loss of engine power due to fuel vapor lock. Contributing to the loss of engine power were the corrosion of the spark plugs and the spacing of the electrode gaps.

October 20, 2016, about 1350 central daylight time (CDT), the pilot of a Zenith CH-750, N8681, made a forced landing in a field 3 miles northwest of Morristown, Minnesota, after the engine lost power. The pilot, the sole occupant on board, was seriously injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed. The local flight originated from a private airstrip in Morristown about 1340.

The following is based on two interviews between Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspectors and the pilot. The pilot said he had fueled the airplane that morning with 82-octane automotive fuel that he had recently purchased from a service station. He started the engine and allowed it to warm up but had to shut the engine down when he was called away. He returned about an hour later, started the engine, and took off. When he reached an altitude of about 100 feet AGL, the engine lost power. He turned the electric fuel pump on. The engine restarted momentarily but failed to keep running. He did not remember if he turned the fuel selector valve to the opposite tank. After maneuvering to avoid cattle and a tree, the airplane touched down on its main landing gear. Due to the steepness of the hill and the grass, the airplane came to an abrupt halt. Examination of the airplane revealed the nose gear had collapsed, the fuselage was buckled, and the engine was knocked askew to the right. The left wing had separated from the fuselage and bore leading edge crushing. When asked what he thought may have happened, the pilot said he felt it was a vapor lock due to the time between the first and second engine starts and takeoff. He also stated that the engine had a safety feature that prevented it from starting if the throttle was out of the idle position. He felt that he could have gotten the engine running if he had brought the throttle back to idle but he failed to do so during the emergency.

On October 28, 2016, the airplane and engine were examined at Wentworth Aircraft in Lakeville, Minnesota, under the auspices of a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector. Recovered fuel was yellow in color and had the aroma of "aged" automobile fuel. The top spark plugs were removed and examined. They appeared old and corroded at the electrode ends. The electrode gaps were not consistent. The number 3 plug appeared had a substantial gap, and the number 1 plug had a narrow gap. These were the only mechanical anomalies noted. It was also determined the airplane did not have a fuel vapor line installed.

A Rotax Aircraft Engines flight safety representative verified a vapor lock was a possibility, especially since the owner had not installed a fuel vapor return line and old automotive fuel was found in the fuel system. He stated that the condition and corrosion of the spark plugs and the spacing of the electrode gaps could also affect engine performance. He also stated the engine did not have a safety device installed that would prevent it from starting when the throttle was in other than the idle position.

Examination of the maintenance records revealed the pilot had complied with Service Bulletin SB-912-053-UL on May 24, 2007, mandating the replacement of the fuel pump. However, there was no record that he had complied with SB-912-063-UL that mandated replacing the 5-year life-limit fuel pump.

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA021
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, October 20, 2016 in Morristown, MN
Aircraft: ZENITH CH-750, registration: N8681
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 20, 2016, about 1350 central daylight time (CDT), the pilot of a Zenith CH-750, N8681, made a forced landing in a field 3 miles northwest of Morristown, Minnesota, after the engine lost power. The pilot, the sole occupant on board, was seriously injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed. The local flight originated from a private airstrip in Morristown about 1340.

On October 28, 2016, the airplane and engine were examined at Wentworth Aircraft in Lakeville, Minnesota, under the auspices of a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector. According to his report, fuel was yellow in color and had the aroma of "aged" automobile fuel. The top spark plugs were removed and examined. They exhibited corrosion at the electrode ends, and the electrode gaps were inconsistent in spacing. These were the only mechanical anomalies noted.









(UPDATE 12:30 p.m. Oct 21: This story has been updated with additional information after speaking with Rice County Sheriff Troy Dunn, a representative from the FAA and Rochester St. Mary's Hospital.)

Delbert Voegele, 70, of Morristown, is said to be in "serious, but stable" condition on Friday afternoon at Rochester St. Mary's Hospital according to Rice County Sheriff, Troy Dunn. 

Dunn also noted that Voegele sustained head and upper body injuries during the crash that occurred Thursday afternoon. 

A representative from Rochester St. Mary's Hospital described Voegele's condition as "fair." 

Elizabeth Cory, who works in external communications and public affairs for the FAA, confirmed that the FAA is investigating the crash of a Zenith CH 750 aircraft in a field near Morristown. 

Cory also noted that FAA investigations can take several weeks, even months to complete.

(Story as originally published on Oct. 20)

A 70-year-old man was airlifted to a Rochester hospital Thursday afternoon after the plane he was flying crashed in a pasture.

The crash, which was reported just before 2 p.m., was a result of mechanical issues, according to the Rice County Sheriff’s Office, which along with Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash.

The pilot, who was the lone occupant of the plane, was identified as Delbert F. Voegele, of Morristown. Voegele was found outside of the single-engine experimental plane, which he owned, as emergency responders arrived at 22274 Jackson Ave.

Rice County Sheriff Troy Dunn said Thursday evening that had it not been for Voegele wearing his seat belt, it could have been worse.

After crashing, Dunn said Voegele was able to crawl out of the plane, and witnesses were able to carry him away from the plane, which was leaking fuel, but not on fire.

As the Morristown Fire Department worked to contain the leaking fuel, Voegele was being treated and was eventually airlifted to Rochester St. Mary’s Hospital. Assisting the fire department were Rice County deputies, the Morristown Police Department and North Ambulance.

A spokesperson with the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, after checking with St. Mary’s, said there was no information she could provide related to the patient’s condition.

Dunn classified the injuries as serious, but added that Voegele was stable.

According to the sheriff’s office media release issued after the incident, the plane had just taken off from the property when it encountered mechanical issues.

Dunn said it’s not entirely clear how long the plane had been airborne, as the field in which Voegele crashed was north of his own property.

That will all be part of the investigation. As of 5 p.m. Thursday, FAA officials could be seen examining the aircraft at the site. Dunn said it’s general protocol to call the FAA anytime an aircraft crashes.

A message left with the FAA public affairs office seeking additional information regarding the aircraft was not immediately returned.

Source:   http://www.southernminn.com

Sorrell SNS-7, N31HP: Accident occurred October 20, 2016 in Carson City, Nevada

http://registry.faa.gov/N31HP

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Reno FSDO-11

AIRCRAFT, LIGHT SPORT SORRELL SNS7, DURING STARTUP, SUSTAINED SUBSTANTIAL DAMAGE, CARSON CITY, NEVADA. 

Date: 20-OCT-16
Time: 15:15:00Z
Regis#: N31HP
Aircraft Make: SORRELL
Aircraft Model: SNS7
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Substantial
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: CARSON CITY
State: Nevada.

Van's RV-10, N710GC: Accident occurred October 04, 2016 in Portsmouth, Grafton County, New Hampshire

http://registry.faa.gov/N710GC

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Portland FSDO-65


Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -   National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA052
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, October 04, 2016 in Portsmouth, NH
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: CHAUDOIN GEORGE S RV 10, registration: N710GC
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that he landed the airplane fast and long, and was unaware that the grass runway was “extremely” wet. He further reported that the airplane was unable to slow down before exiting the end of the runway and impacting a dirt road. 

A postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the nose gear had collapsed and the firewall sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported that there were no pre impact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to go around after recognizing that the airplane was high and fast, which resulted in a long landing on a wet runway and a runway excursion. 

Cessna 172H Skyhawk, N3943R: Incident occurred October 20, 2016 in Greensboro, Guilford County, North Carolina

http://registry.faa.govN3943R

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Greensboro FSDO-39

AIRCRAFT ON TAXI PROPELLER AND WINGTIP STRUCK GROUND, GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Date: 21-OCT-16
Time: 02:27:00Z
Regis#: N3943R
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: GREENSBORO
State: North Carolina

Mooney M20K, N231MK: Incident occurred October 20, 2016 in Yakima County, Washington

http://registry.faa.gov/N231MK

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Spokane FSDO-13

Aircraft landed gear up, Yakima, Washington.  

Date: 20-OCT-16
Time: 19:25:00Z
Regis#: N231MK
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20K
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: YAKIMA
State: Washington.

Kerrville-Kerr County Airport, Mooney business, customer service advances

Jimmy Burrow (above) refuels a plane on the taxiway with Jet-A fuel from a tanker truck, while the owner/pilot finishes filing his flight plan and other business inside the terminal and Kerrville Aviation.



Bruce McKenzie, general manager of the Kerrville-Kerr County Airport, provided an update on the local “regional airport;” and Robert Dutton, chief manufacturing officer at Mooney International, Inc., added the newest advances at the airplane manufacturing plant.

Airport

McKenzie said the local airport now handles about 50,000 operations per year, take-offs and landings, which averages more than 100 per day.

“We are open 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days per year,” he said.

In the terminal building and Kerrville Aviation, the “fixed base operation” is open to serve pilots and passengers from 5 a.m. to 9 p.m. all seven days per week including Thanksgiving and Christmas, he said.

McKenzie said about 163 airplanes are based at the local airport.

Some are housed in larger hangars that also are tied to repair services, or choose to tie down outside on the taxiway.

“There are now 28 T-hangar spaces on the airport, and the newest set of 12 is two years old,” McKenzie said. “We are full and still have a waiting list. That’s good.”

He said they plan to build another 10-12 spaces in FY18, and whoever is on the waiting list then will get the first calls.

“The FBO at Kerrville Aviation is operating ‘space-available only’ now,” he said.

“We have several San Antonio operations who keep their jets here, for various reasons. If their offices or operations are on the Interstate-10 corridor, they say they can get here to Kerrville quicker than they can drive into San Antonio,” McKenzie said

“And when they get here, they can depart in their airplanes faster than they can at San Antonio,” he said.

“They seem to like the ambiance here. We can handle their fuel and catering and some maintenance at Kerrville Aviation.”

He said the airport property includes about 528 acres, and is enclosed with about 6.5 miles of chainlink fences, “to keep out the deer and the antelope,” in this area an actual problem between the native Whitetail and other exotic wildlife.

“And we know feral hogs are close and are watching that situation. We check those fences frequently.”

McKenzie said they recently completed a resurfacing project of the 6,000-foot runway, which was resealed, restriped, and renumbered. That longer runway is “12-30” for its magnetic bearing; and the 3,600-foot runway is numbered “3-21.” The shorter one was resurfaced in October last year.

Another recent project performed at the Airport Board’s direction was the demolition of a 10,000-square-foot building on the Mooney Aircraft campus that was badly deteriorated. That demolition was completed by Oct. 8.

McKenzie said he and two other people work for the Airport Advisory Board.

“Six years ago we were taking almost a quarter-million dollars from the city and county owners of the airport to operate this. Because of this board, who made the decision to run this as a business, we’ve made a dynamic turn-around. Our one agenda is to make this airport better,” he said.

The current Airport Board members are Steve King, president; Corey Walters, vice president; Ed Livermore; Bill Wood; and Kirk Griffin.

“Now in FY17, we asked for just $21,000 from each owner. Our hope and desire is to go through the budget process and not ask for anything from them again,” McKenzie said.

They also have two flight instructors working with clients at the airport property.

He said the board sets the standard and gives tasks to him, following their purpose of trying to make the airport self-sufficient.

To that end, they have leased out some buildings and spaces (including the former Alamo Colleges welding school, now Flyin’ Diesel Performance), and have 16 vehicles parked in the long-term lot near the terminal with owners paying a rental fee to have their vehicles waiting when they fly in.

Other income includes the “fuel flowage fee.”

“For every gallon of fuel sold, we get 9 cents, and that’s from about 400,000 gallons of fuel per year.”

That fuel is of two types, “100 low lead” and “Jet A.”

McKenzie said jets are fueled with the Jet A, while piston-powered planes fly on low-lead.

Future project

McKenzie said the next plan on his books is for Kerr County to construct a connecting road from Peterson Farm Road to the old “paint hanger” at Mooney (airport property) for public access, as the Airport Board plans to renovate the old hanger into four more plane storage spaces.

Then the City of Kerrville has told him they will repave around the old hanger and rebuild the taxiway to the building.

MAPA conference

More immediately, on Oct. 19-13, the Mooney Aircraft Pilots Association will hold their 41st annual conference this year in Kerrville, the MAPA Homecoming.

McKenzie said to help them, the shorter runway will be closed and the attending owner-pilots will tie down their planes off the sides of that runway.

Association President Trey Hughes said planes will begin arriving today, Wednesday, easily 50-75 planes. The Inn of the Hills is the host hotel where there will be vendors Thursday, and seminars Friday on owning, operating and maintaining their Mooney aircraft.

On Saturday, members are invited to Mooney and the airport for an “airplane beauty contest” on the runway, and lunch and tours at the Mooney factory. Awards will be presented at an evening banquet, one each on 10 different models.

Hughes said he has pre-registered 75-80 couples, and sometimes they have pilot-owners attending from Canada, New Zealand and Europe.

Distances being what they are, he said pilots can fly in do-able hops from Europe and back, while those across the Pacific Ocean usually fly commercially to attend.

Mooney

Dutton said Friday that they’ve built the last of the single-door Mooney jets, and have the last two waiting for delivery to new owners.

And they are introducing the new Mooney Ultra in two models, the Acclaim twin turbo and the Ovation.

“All the planes from now on will be the new two-door cabins, the Mooney M-20 Ultra.” And the new “composite material” cabin formed in a three-dimensional shape takes the place of about 300 parts they used to manufacture individually.

The cabin interior has been redesigned to include owner-ordered leather seats, also hand-made in the factory. And Dutton said they are still waiting for Federal Aviation Administration certification, apparently a long federal process.

Local employees are manufacturing an average of two finished planes per month.

Mooney now employs about 158 people in Kerrville, and about another 60 in Chino, Calif.

They also have a new president and CEO with Dr. Vivek Saxena replacing Dr. Jerry Chen who is moving to a senior advisory role.

Dutton said Chen laid a tremendous foundation, along with the entire Mooney team, both in Kerrville and at the research and development facility in California. Dutton expects Saxena to take the company up yet another level.

Sutton said they’ve invested heavily in new equipment and plant facilities, including a drying room for use themselves and now for creating parts ordered by other people and companies.

“Mooney is now considered a one-stop shop for parts and fabrication,” Dutton said, “and Mooney is fairly rapidly becoming known for overhead rates being relatively low and for providing quick turn-around.”

With new and repaired roofs complete, they also are changing and adding equipment, modular offices and other improvements.

But they are still outsourcing new planes to be painted.

Dutton said now that the old administration building is gone, they eventually hope to establish a “Mooney Heritage Center” in a remaining building where the public can visit exhibits about Mooney airplanes. But that’s probably at least two to three years down the road.

Source:   http://www.hccommunityjournal.com