Saturday, May 14, 2016

Incident occurred May 14, 2016 at Memphis International Airport (KMEM), Tennessee

MEMPHIS, TN -

An American Airlines plane flying from Nashville to Dallas made an emergency landing at the Memphis International airport Saturday afternoon.

The airline said that a "smell of smoke" was reported in the cabin.

The Memphis International Airport said the plane landed in Memphis at 12:45 p.m. without incident and has since departed. 

The airline does not know what caused the "smoke smell," but are looking into the cause, said Laura Masvidal, American Airlines communication representative. 

Original article can be found here:   http://www.localmemphis.com

Incident occurred May 14, 2016 at Barnstable Municipal Airport (KHYA), Hyannis, Massachusetts

HYANNIS - A Cape Air plane landed safely at Barnstable Municipal Airport after experiencing problems with the engine during flight.

Hyannis firefighters responded to the airport at 12:22 p.m. with a fire truck and an ambulance, said Hyannis fire Capt. Mark Storie.

The six-passenger aircraft had two people onboard, he said. During the flight, the plane began experiencing "intermittent power problems" and "potential engine failure," he said.

The plane landed at the airport without incident, he said.

Original article can be found here: http://www.capecodtimes.com

Beech C23 Sundowner, N3724Y: Accident occurred May 14, 2016 near Delano Municipal Airport (KDLO), Kern County, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:  
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fresno, California 

http://registry.faa.gov/N3724Y

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA113 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 14, 2016 in Delano, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/01/2017
Aircraft: BEECH C23, registration: N3724Y
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot was on a multi-leg, solo, cross-country flight. He stated that, while in cruise on the last leg of the flight, the engine began to sputter, so he switched the fuel selector from the right tank position to the left tank position.  Shortly after switching fuel tanks, the engine experienced a total loss of power and the student performed a forced landing to an orange orchard. First responders reported that there was no fuel leaking from the airplane, and no fuel was observed in the airplane’s fuel tanks.

The student stated that, before the flight, he had filled the fuel tanks to the filler tabs, which equated to 37.4 total gallons of useable fuel. Review of performance information for the airplane revealed that the airplane would have used about 35.4 gallons of fuel at the time of the accident. However, variations in wind or engine power settings may have resulted in a higher fuel consumption on the accident flight. 

In a subsequent interview, the student pilot stated that he had exhausted the fuel in the right tank and could not restart the engine before the forced landing.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilot’s inadequate preflight and inflight fuel planning, which resulted in a total loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion.

On May 14, 2016, about 1100 Pacific daylight time, a Beechcraft C23 "Sundowner" airplane, N3724Y, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing, following a loss of engine power, in an orange orchard near Delano, California. The student pilot sustained minor injuries. The airplane was owned by a private individual and operated by the student pilot as a personal, cross-country flight under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the flight.

The student pilot stated that he departed from the Bakersfield Municipal Airport (L45), Bakersfield, California, and flew to the west side of the valley practicing maneuvers before flying to Porterville Airport (PTV), Porterville, California, for a quick stop. The pilot then departed PTV, destined to Shafter Airport – Minter Field (MIT), Shafter, California. While en route, in the vicinity of Delano, the pilot stated that the airplane engine began to sputter. He switched the fuel selector from the right tank position to the left tank position. Shortly after he switched fuel tanks, the engine lost total power and he could not get it restarted, so he initiated a forced landing to an orange orchard. During the forced landing the airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. 

The pilot stated that he had filled the fuel tanks to the filler tabs, which equates to 37.4 gallons of useable fuel. Review of performance information for the make and model airplane revealed that, based on the reported fuel onboard the airplane at the beginning of the day, the airplane would have used about 35.4 gallons of fuel at the time of the accident.

First responders to the accident scene reported that there was no fuel leaking from the airplane, and no fuel was observed in the airplane fuel tanks.

In a later telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge, the pilot stated that he had run the right fuel tank out of fuel and couldn't get the engine primed before the forced landing occurred.

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA113
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 14, 2016 in Delano, CA
Aircraft: BEECH C23, registration: N3724Y
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 14, 2016, about 1100 Pacific daylight time, a Beechcraft C23 "Sundowner" airplane, N3724Y, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing, following a loss of engine power, in an orange orchard near Delano, California. The student pilot sustained minor injuries. The airplane was owned by a private individual and operated by the student pilot as a personal, cross-country flight under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the flight.

In a telephone conversation with a National Transportation Safety Board investigator, the pilot stated that he departed from the Bakersfield Municipal Airport (L45), Bakersfield, California, and flew to the west side of the valley practicing maneuvers before flying to Porterville Airport (PTV), Porterville, California, for a quick stop. The pilot then departed PTV, destined to Shafter Airport – Minter Field (MIT), Shafter, California. While en route, in the vicinity of Delano, the pilot stated that he switched the fuel selector from the right tank position to the left tank position. Shortly after he switched fuel tanks, the engine lost power and he could not get it restarted, so he initiated a forced landing to an orange orchard. During the forced landing the airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. The pilot estimated that he had 22 gallons of fuel per fuel tank prior to departure. 

A detailed examination of the airframe and engine are pending.



DELANO, California   --   The Kern County Fire Department confirms a plane went down in Delano this morning leaving one person hurt.

The single engine aircraft was discovered in the middle of an orchard just before 11 a.m. off Browning Road and Schuster Road.

KCFD says one person was hospitalized with minor to moderate injuries.

Original article can be found here: http://www.kerngoldenempire.com




DELANO, Calif. - The Kern County Fire Department is reporting that a plane crashed just south of Delano this morning.

The call came in just before 11 AM this morning, reporting that a single engine aircraft had gone down just south of Delano Airport.

Local authorities say that the plane landed in an orchard and that only the pilot was onboard; they were conscious when authorities arrived and were transported to the hospital with moderate injuries.

This is the third plane crash in Kern County in the last 24 hours; yesterday, one plane crash landed in Mojave and another flipped on a runway in Cal City.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.turnto23.com


BAKERSFIELD, Calif. (KBAK/KBFX) — A spokesperson for the Kern County Fire Department says a plane went down just before 11 a.m. on Saturday in an orange orchard on Browning Road and Schuster Road.

KCFD Battalion Chief Joe Appleton said they found one person conscious and alert in the single-engine plane. He was taken to a hospital with moderate injuries.

This is the third time a plane has gone down since Friday afternoon.

Original article can be found here: http://bakersfieldnow.com

Wolf Pitts S-2SW, N24CD, Greco Air Inc: Fatal accident occurred May 14, 2016 at Dekalb-Peachtree Airport (KPDK), Chamblee, DeKalb County, Georgia

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Preliminary Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Greco Air Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N24CD

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Atlanta FSDO-11

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA182
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 14, 2016 in Atlanta, GA
Aircraft: GREG CONNELL PITTS S-2SW, registration: N24CD
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 14, 2015, about 1647 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Pitts S-2SW, N24CD, collided with terrain during an aerial display at DeKalb-Peachtree Airport (PDK), Atlanta, Georgia. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and a post-crash fire. The airplane was registered to a corporation and was operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an air show flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The local flight originated from PDK about 1640.

The pilot of the Pitts was performing air show maneuvers and was part of a flight of two, with the other show pilot flying an MX2 airplane. An initial examination of video provided by witnesses indicated that the Pitts pilot performed a crossing maneuver with the MX2 over the airfield, and then he pulled up into a loop. As the Pitts descended out of the loop, the wings rocked back and forth as the MX2 approached from the opposite direction. Immediately prior to ground impact, the Pitts appeared to begin a level-off maneuver.

The airplane impacted the grass infield between runways 21L and 21R. The wreckage debris field was about 500 feet in length, and was oriented on a heading of 235 degrees. The main wreckage consisted of the fuselage, empennage, and the right wing. A post-crash fire consumed a majority of the main wreckage. A parachute was found in the cockpit seat and there were no indications of deployment. The left wing upper and lower surfaces were separated from the main wreckage during the impact sequence and were not burned.

Flight control continuity was established from the ailerons, elevator, and rudder surfaces to the cockpit controls. All fractures to the flight control connection rods exhibited signatures of overstress. The fuel tank was breached from fire and impact; however, some residual fuel was observed. The wooden propeller blades were separated at the hub and were splintered. Engine internal continuity was confirmed from the propeller flange to the rear accessory drives. Compression and suction was observed on all cylinders when the crankshaft was rotated manually. The spark plug electrodes exhibited normal wear and color when compared to a spark plug inspection chart. Both magnetos were removed and produced spark on all leads when tested.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane multi-engine land, airplane single engine land, and instrument airplane ratings. He also held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) repairman, experimental aircraft builder certificate and was the registered builder of the accident airplane. The pilot held a FAA second-class medical certificate with no restrictions. The pilot reported 1,800 total hours of flying experience on his medical certificate application that was dated June 17, 2015.

The reported weather conditions at PDK at 1653, about 6 minutes after the accident, included few clouds at 7,000 feet, visibility 10 statute miles or greater, and surface wind from 290 degrees at 17 knots with gusts to 25 knots.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Greg Connell and Gary Ward.



ATLANTA — An Augusta-area pilot is dead after a plane crash at an air show in Atlanta Saturday.

It happened at the Good Neighbor Day Open House Airshow at the DeKalb Peachtree Airport.

Friends and family confirm that Greg Connell was the pilot of the plane.

Connell grew up in North Augusta.

Connell and pilot Gary Ward were doing an opposing pass when something went wrong.

“Something didn’t go exactly according to plan. I pulled up to de-conflict and Greg flew underneath me. I had no idea that Greg had crashed like a second later,” Ward said.

Ward kept flying and became confused when he didn’t hear Connell talking back to him via radio.

“I stayed airborne another five minutes then they finally cleared me to land and so it was not until I landed and got out of my airplane to find out really how bad it was,” Ward said.

Now, Ward and the rest of Connell’s large circle of friends are mourning a man who they say was someone you could count on.

Many knew Connell through his local heating and air company, but Ward says Connell’s true passion was flying.

“Just like me, he was passionate about aviation. And, you know, we lived airplanes. That was our life. Greg probably worked to support his flying habit,” Ward said.

Connell grew up around planes and started flying them himself as soon as he could.

“Greg came from a flying family. His dad flew and Greg started flying at early age. Probably 16 or so,” Ward said.

Ward says Connell was also passionate about his country.

“Greg was a true-blue American. He believed in the country. He believed in the principles this country were founded on and was a very patriotic individual,” Ward said.

A prominent business owner, an accomplished pilot, and most importantly, a tried and true friend.

This loss is being felt throughout the community.

“He had a great circle of friends. He was greatly loved by these friends. And he’s going to be greatly missed,” Ward said.


Story and video:   http://wjbf.com

Witness took a picture before takeoff of the Wolf Pitts S-2SW plane that crashed at Dekalb-Peachtree Airport (KPDK).


What’s left of the Wolf Pitts S-2SW plane is towed away after today’s fatal crash at Dekalb-Peachtree Airport (KPDK).






DEKALB COUNTY, Ga. —  DeKalb Fire Rescue has confirmed to Channel 2 Action News that there was a fatal plane crash at Peachtree-DeKalb Airport Saturday afternoon.

The fatal crash took place at the Good Neighbor Day Stunt Show. 

Witnesses say a biplane was engaged in a maneuver and was unable to pull out of a dive. Police believe high winds may have been a contributing factor to the accident.

Police say the pilot did not survive the crash. Officials confirm the pilot is from the Augusta area.

Friends have identified the pilot as Greg Connell of Greg Connell Airshows.

Airport officials say this is the first crash they've had at PDK during the 30 years the airport has been hosting air shows.

Both the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board have been called to investigate this crash.

Channel 2 Action News spoke with Starr Jones of Atlanta who was at the air show with her daughter.

"It happened right in front of where I was standing. It was awful," Jones said. "The announcer said, 'A plane has crashed. Please cover your children's eyes and turn away.'"

Jones said she turned her daughter away from the scene of the crash and told her, "Let's say a prayer for that person."

Moments later Jones said the announcer told the crowd the show was shutting down.

Interim DeKalb County CEO Lee May issued the following statement:

"A tragedy occurred as professional pilots entertained and educated thousands today.  Our thoughts and prayers are with the family and friends of the pilot who lost his life."

Story and video:  http://www.wsbtv.com



CHAMBLEE, Ga. -- DeKalb County fire and police officials have confirmed to 11Alive that a pilot died, Saturday, after a fatal crash at an area airshow.

The crash happened when an airplane attempted a stunt at DeKalb Peachtree Airport in Chamblee during the 2016 Good Neighbor Day Airshow that was being held at the airport from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Officials at the airport said that weather was clear at the time that the plane came down and that they had never had a crash of this type in 30 years.

The cause is still unclear.

A witness tells 11Alive that the crashed plane was a biplane but few more details are available at this time and the name of the pilot is being withheld pending notification of next of kin.

DeKalb Public Safety Director Cedric Alexander called the crash tragic and feared there would be great trauma for the families watching as the plane came down - and for the family of the pilot.

Interim county CEO Lee May also reacted following the crash.

"A tragedy occurred as professional pilots entertained and educated thousands today," he said. "Our thoughts and prayers are with the family and friends of the pilot who lost his life."

The Federal Aviation Administration has been called to further investigate the crash along with several local law enforcement and emergency agencies.

While information is still fluid at least one thing is clear: The flight community at PDK is now in mourning.

Read more here: http://www.11alive.com



The pilot of a plane was killed Saturday afternoon when it crashed during an air show at DeKalb Peachtree Airport, officials said.

The crash occurred near the end of the Good Neighbor Day Air Show and Open House at PDK, about 4:49 p.m. The crash occurred while the pilot was performing aerial acrobatics.

The pilot was from the Augusta area, airport director Mario Evans said at a media briefing. His identity was not released, pending notification of next of kin.

It was the first accident in the air show’s 30-years-plus history, officials said.

“It’s a traumatic incident,” Evans said. “I knew the pilot personally, so I don’t want to go any further. I’m just emotional.”

There was no thought that anyone else was in the plane, DeKalb Public Safety Director Cedric Alexander said.

Officials said they have no idea at this point what caused the crash. Evans said there was some wind, but said, “That’s a normal day for us.”

“It is very, very tragic,” Alexander said. “There was a large crowd that was still here watching the air show when this occurred, so we know this is going to be very traumatic to a lot of people who witnessed this unfortunate event.”

“There were a lot of fire and police and civilian personnel who were here as well, and any time something like this happens, it is so tragic, and our hearts and prayers go out to the family of this pilot.”

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are involved in the ongoing investigation.


Story and video:   http://www.ajc.com



Atlanta, Georgia:   One person -- the pilot -- was killed Saturday afternoon when a biplane crashed during an air show at a metropolitan Atlanta airport, DeKalb County public information officer Shiera Campbell said.

The biplane and another aircraft were performing stunts in tandem during the next-to-last performance of the day at the Good Neighbor Day Open House Airshow at DeKalb Peachtree Airport, said CNN Digital news writer Melissa Gray, who attended the show with her family and witnessed the crash.

"They had just crossed in the sky and were about to cross each other close to the ground when the blue plane, having reached the lowest point of the loop, simply went into the grassy median between the two runways," Gray said. "It immediately split apart, with the front of the plane rolling a few times in a fireball."

Fire trucks immediately responded and put out the fire, Gray said. The announcer said the show in Chamblee was over and the crowd left.

"It happened directly in front of the crowd," she said. "There were no gasps from the crowd. It was if everybody could not believe what they had just seen."

Another CNN employee, Senior News Editor Amanda Watts, also witnessed the crash and heard gasps from those near her.

Watts said the plane had been "kind of squirrelly, like it was out of control. Then it went straight into the ground."

Campbell said the name of the pilot is not being released until next of kin are notified.


Story and video:  http://www.cnn.com



















DEKALB COUNTY, GA (CBS46) -  CBS46 has learned the pilot of a plane died during a crash at an airshow in DeKalb County.

One plane crashed during the Good Neighbor Day Airshow at DeKalb-Peachtree Airport Saturday evening.

Authorities say a stunt plane was performing aerial acrobatics at the PDK Good Neighbor Day Airshow, and crashed. There was only one person aboard the plane.

Officials with DeKalb County say this is the first accident in 30 years of the PDK airshow.

Story and video: http://www.cbs46.com 

Air Tractor AT502, Gerik AG LLC, N1546Z: Fatal accident occurred May 14, 2016 in West, McLennan County, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA181 
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Saturday, May 14, 2016 in West, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: AIR TRACTOR INC AT 502, registration: N1546Z
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

After completing an aerial application flight, the commercial pilot was returning to the base airport over 15 nautical miles away when the airplane impacted terrain and was consumed by a postimpact fire. Although the wreckage was significantly fragmented and damaged by fire, no evidence of any preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures of the airframe or engine were noted that would have precluded normal operation. Examination of the accident site and wreckage revealed cellular tower guy wire and right wing damage that was consistent with the pilot's failure to maintain clearance from the guy wires while intentionally flying at a low altitude in visual meteorological conditions.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to see and avoid cellular tower guy wires. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s decision to operate at low altitude.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On May 14, 2016, at 1345 central daylight time, an Air Tractor AT-502 single-engine agricultural airplane, N1546Z, impacted terrain after striking cellular tower guy-wires near West, Texas. The commercial pilot, who was the sole occupant, sustained fatal injuries, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by Gerik Ag LLC, Aquilla, Texas, as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 aerial application flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight departed the Hillsboro Municipal Airport (INJ), Hillsboro, Texas, at 1205.

According to local authorities, the operator, and a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, while traveling north towards INJ after completing an aerial application operation, the airplane's right wing collided with two cellular tower guy-wires. The airplane impacted terrain and a post-impact fire consumed the airplane.

Several witnesses reported they observed the airplane flying at a low altitude. Two witness reported seeing "something fall from the airplane" and "the plane looked like it dropped something." 

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 75, held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land, multi-engine land, and instrument airplane ratings. The pilot's most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on April 27, 2016, with the following limitations: Must wear corrective lenses and possess glasses for near and intermediate vision.

According to the operator, the pilot had accumulated 17,640 flight hours, and 248 hours in the accident airplane make and model.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane was a 1992 Air Tractor AT-502, serial number 502-0180. The airplane was powered by a Pratt and Whitney PT6A-34AG turboprop engine, rated at 750 horsepower, and equipped for agricultural operations. The airplane was issued a restricted category special airworthiness certificate on June 15, 1992.

According to the operator, the airplane underwent its most recent annual inspection on February 20, 2016, at a total airframe time of 10,515 hours. The engine had accumulated 22,712 total hours and 16,267 hours since overhaul.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1335, the INJ automated weather observing system (AWOS), located about 15 miles north of the accident site, reported the wind from 360 degrees at 17 knots, gusting to 21 knots, visibility 10 miles, sky clear, temperature 20 C, dew point 13 C, and an altimeter setting of 30.13 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane wreckage was located about 650 feet northeast of the cellular tower in grass terrain. The main wreckage, which consisted of the fuselage, empennage, and wings displayed impact and thermal damage. The post-impact fire consumed the main wreckage and grass terrain to the southeast of the main wreckage. The wreckage distribution path was on a measured 50 degree heading. The initial ground impact mark was a shallow crater that contained the propeller hub with 2 blades and portions of the engine cowling. One propeller blade was separated and located about 30 feet to the northwest of the main wreckage. The cockpit was located about 45 feet from the initial ground impact mark. All major airplane components were located at the accident site.

The fuselage displayed thermal and impact damage. The forward fuselage and cockpit was fragmented, and the instrument panel was destroyed by fire. The seat frame was intact and the seatbelt/shoulder harness webbing was consumed by fire. The seatbelt buckle and shoulder harness connectors were found not buckled together. The airplane was not equipped with an inflatable pilot restraint system.

The right wing displayed thermal damage and the outboard two leading edge panels were separated. Portions of the right wing tip were located near the base of the cellular tower. The outboard end of the wing structure that remained with the main wreckage was bent aft about 60 degrees, consistent with an in-flight wire collision. The left wing displayed thermal and impact damage. The left aileron and flap remained partially attached the wing structure.

The empennage displayed thermal and impact damage. All flight control surfaces remained partially attached to their respective stabilizers.

Flight control continuity was partially established due to impact and thermal damage. Flap position could not be determined due to thermal and impact damage.

The engine displayed thermal and impact damage. The exhaust case and stacks displayed forward to aft crush damage. The engine was separated near the "D" flange, which separated the inter-stage baffle from the engine. The inter-stage baffle showed circumferential rubs and heat discoloration, consistent with contact between the compressor and power turbines.

The engine propeller flange remained bolted to the propeller hub and separated from the engine. Two propeller blades remained attached to the hub and one propeller blade was separated. The separated blade displayed chordwise scratches and leading edge damage. The blade tip was separated, and the blade was curled from leading to trailing edge.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

According to local authorities, the pilot was found about 60 feet from the main wreckage and outside of the fire consumed area. The pilot was not wearing a helmet at the time of the accident.

An autopsy was performed on the pilot by the Southwestern Institute of Forensic Sciences at Dallas, Office of the Medical Examiner, Dallas, Texas. The listed cause of death was blunt force injuries.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological testing on the pilot. The tests were negative for all screened drugs and alcohol.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

SatLoc Global Positioning System (GPS)

The accident airplane contained a SatLoc GPS unit that was recovered from the accident site and sent to the NTSB vehicle recorders laboratory for data extraction. Due to the thermal and impact damage, no data was available for the accident flight. 

Tower Information

According to the cellular tower owner, the tower height was 246 feet above ground level (agl) and constructed in 1997. The tower was unpainted (metallic/steel color), and contained a medium intensity beacon and 3 side markers located at the top of the tower. Five guy wires supported tower on three sides.

The current aviation sectional chart listed the tower at 255 feet in height agl and 892 feet in height mean sea level.

FAA Guidance on Minimum Safe Altitudes 

14 CFR Part 91.119 Minimum safe altitudes: General.

Except when necessary for takeoff or landing, no person may operate an aircraft below the following altitudes: 

(a) Anywhere. An altitude allowing, if a power unit fails, an emergency landing without undue hazard to persons or property on the surface. 

(b) Over congested areas. Over any congested area of a city, town, or settlement, or over any open air assembly of persons, an altitude of 1,000 feet above the highest obstacle within a horizontal radius of 2,000 feet of the aircraft. 

(c) Over other than congested areas. An altitude of 500 feet above the surface, except over open water or sparsely populated areas. In those cases, the aircraft may not be operated closer than 500 feet to any person, vessel, vehicle, or structure. 

GERIK AG LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N1546Z

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Fort Worth AFW FSDO-19


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA181 

14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Saturday, May 14, 2016 in West, TX
Aircraft: AIR TRACTOR INC AT 502, registration: N1546Z
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On May 14, 2016, at 1345 central daylight time, an Air Tractor AT-502 single-engine agricultural airplane, N1546Z, impacted terrain after striking cellular tower guy-wires near West, Texas. The commercial pilot, who was the sole occupant, sustained fatal injuries, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by Gerik Ag LLC, Aquilla, Texas, as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 aerial application flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight departed the Hillsboro Municipal Airport (INJ), Hillsboro, Texas, at an unknown time.


According to local authorities and a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, while traveling north towards INJ, the airplane's right wing impacted the top two cellular tower guy-wires. The tower height was reported as 246 feet agl. The airplane impacted terrain approximately 400 yards from the tower and a post-impact fire consumed the airplane.


At 1335, the INJ automated weather observing system (AWOS), located about 15 miles north of the accident site, reported the wind from 360 degrees at 17 knots, gusting to 21 knots, visibility 10 miles, sky clear, temperature 20 C, dew point 13 C, and an altimeter setting of 30.13 inches of mercury.


Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.





GLEN ROSE, Texas (KWTX) Funeral services have been scheduled for a Grammy-nominated musician from Glen Rose who died when his crop duster crashed over the weekend north of the town of West.

The pilot of a crop-dusting plane that crashed over the weekend north of the town of West was a Grammy-nominated musician who had a long career as a singer and songwriter.

John Allen Seay, Jr., 75, of Glen Rose, died after his plane hit a wire on a cellphone tower and crashed at around 1:50 p.m. Saturday at 1155 Hvalenka Rd.

He was ejected from the plane.

Visitation will be from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday at Wiley Funeral Home at 504 Holden St. in Glen Rose.

A graveside service will be at 2 p.m. Saturday in the Cross and Grave Ranch Family Cenetery.

Seay had a decades-long career as a singer/songwriter and occasional actor.

For much of his career, Seay performed under the name Johnny Sea.

According to Seay’s website, he was 17 when he recorded his first record in 1959.

At the age of 18, he joined the Louisiana Hayride, a radio and later television country music show broadcast from Shreveport, La.

Elvis Presley performed on the show and even made his first television appearance there.

Seay had several hits in the 1960’s, recording for six major labels.

In 1966, he released the song "Day For Decision" on Warner Brothers Records.

The song was nominated for a Grammy Award, but lost to a collection of recordings by Edward R. Murrow.

In the late 1960’s, the singer began performing under his given name Johnny Seay again.

He had two more country hits for Columbia Records and was profiled in Life Magazine.

Seay spent his later years away from the spotlight, living as a cowboy on a ranch In Texas.

His family says he had more than 30 years of crop dusting experience and more than 18,000 hours of flying time.

He walked away from a crash in July 1983, his website says.

Seay’s daughter posted a message on the website that says, “Our hearts are completely broken. The greatest man I ever knew, died on the afternoon of Saturday, May 14th doing what he loved. He was in a plane crash while crop-dusting in West, TX. He was 75 years old.”

Seay leaves behind nine children and 14 grandchildren.


A crop-duster pilot from Glen Rose died in the crash of his aircraft at 1:49 p.m. Saturday near 1155 Hlavenka Road in West, a Texas Department of Public Safety spokesman said.

Senior Trooper D.L. Wilson identified the victim as John Allen Seay, 75. The airplane struck a guide wire on a power pole and went down, Wilson said.

He did not say whether the pilot died at the scene or if he was transported to a hospital. The National Transportation Safety Board, which investigates the cause of aircraft accidents, could not be reached for comment Saturday.

Original article can be found here: http://www.wacotrib.com



WEST, TX (KWTX) Emergency crews were on the scene of a single-engine plane crash in the town of West Saturday afternoon that killed a 75-year-old pilot.

Officials said the victim, John Allen Seay Jr., of Glen Rose, was in a crop duster circling the air, when he struck a wire on a cell phone tower and crashed.

Seay was ejected from his plane and died at the scene.

The crash happened at 1:49 p.m., at 1155 Hvalenka Road.

Original article can be found here: http://www.kwtx.com








WEST, Texas (AP) - The pilot of a crop duster has died as his plane crashed in a Central Texas field and caught fire.

McLennan County Sheriff Parnell McNamara tells television station KCEN the pilot was dead at the scene Saturday afternoon near West, about 20 miles north of Waco.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Lynn Lunsford says the plane clipped a guy wire for a cell phone tower, crashed and then ignited.

He says the FAA will investigate and that the National Transportation Safety Board has been notified.

The name of the pilot hasn't been immediately released.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.12newsnow.com




WEST -- The pilot of a crop duster was killed as his plane crashed in West Saturday afternoon.

The pilot was identified as 75-year-old John Allen Seay of Glenn Rose, Texas. He died at the scene after he was ejected from the plane, according to McLennan County Sheriff Parnell McNamara.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Lynn Lunsford said that the plane clipped a guide wire for a cell phone tower, causing it to crash and ignite a fire. Lunsford said that the FAA will investigate and that the National Transportation Safety Board has been notified. 

Story and video: http://www.kcentv.com

Globe GC-1B Swift, N78193: Accident occurred May 14, 2016 near Green Landings Airport (WV22), Hedgesville, Berkeley County, West Virginia

http://registry.faa.gov/N78193 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Baltimore FSDO-07

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA184
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 14, 2016 in Hedgesville, WV
Aircraft: GLOBE GC 1B, registration: N78193
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 14, 2016, at 1310 eastern daylight time, a Globe GC-1B, N78193, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain while attempting to depart from Green Landings Airport (WV22), Hedgesville, West Virginia. The pilot and passenger received minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual in accordance with Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The pilot stated that he conducted a run up and taxied to the grass strip runway for takeoff. He said that the takeoff was uneventful and during climbout all engine indications appeared normal. When the airplane reached 100 feet above the ground, he said that it banked sharply to the left and he attempted to level the wings but was unsuccessful. The nose of the airplane pitched down and collided with the ground.

A witness reported that he watched the airplane perform a run up prior to takeoff. He noticed the runway windsock was indicating gusty winds and a slight quartering tailwind. As the airplane began its takeoff roll it drifted to the left of the centerline and rotated. The engine was at full power and the airplane was at a high pitch as it began climbing rapidly. The witness observed a rapid aileron input and the airplane "stalled."

Initial examination of the airplane by a West Virginia State Trooper revealed that it came to rest in the front yard of a residence. Both wings were buckled and the horizontal stabilizers were broken away from the empennage. The airplane was recovered from the accident site and retained for further examination.


HEDGESVILLE, W.Va. — The small plane that crash-landed in a Hedgesville-area front yard shortly after takeoff Saturday had just been purchased and was being flown to Florida, where the owner lives, West Virginia State Police said Sunday.

Pilot Jason Stickler and co-pilot John Broderick, both of Ormond Beach, Fla., were treated for minor injuries at Berkeley Medical Center in Martinsburg, W.Va., and released, Trooper Conner said Sunday.

Conner said he did not know which man purchased the plane, but the pair were trying to fly it back to Florida on Saturday afternoon when the incident occurred.

Ormond Beach is along the east coast of Florida, north of Daytona Beach.

The Globe GC-1B aircraft crashed on departure from Green Landings Airport in the Hedgesville area on Saturday at 1:10 p.m., according to an email from Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman Arlene Salac.

The FAA is investigating the cause of the crash, which occurred within view of the private airstrip's hangars.

West Virginia State Police Cpl. M.D. Gillmore said Saturday that it appeared the single-engine plane had some sort of mechanical failure.

Gillmore said the plane might have flipped two or three times before coming to rest in the front yard of a house at Chisholm Drive and Tinning Court, which is near Little Georgetown Road, near Spring Mills.
Police said the plane came to rest about 20 feet from the house, which is in the North Ridge subdivision.

The residents were home, but were not injured, police said.

http://www.heraldmailmedia.com









HEDGESVILLE, W.Va. --  A small plane crashed into a Hedgesville neighborhood on Saturday afternoon, but no one was seriously injured.

The accident happened at about 1:10 p.m. on the 200-block of Chisholm Drive, according to Berkeley County emergency dispatchers. The aircraft “veered a certain way,” they said, before landing in the front yard of a home.


The pilot and a passenger suffered minor injuries, and were both taken to Berkeley Medical Center for treatment. No one else was hurt, dispatchers said.


The incident happened just blocks away from Green Landings Private Residential Airpark.


In October of 2011, a Connecticut man was killed when his plane crashed into a home on Chisholm Drive. Harry Weber had constructed his aircraft himself, and took off from Green Landings Airpark. Witnesses said the plane got up to about 15 feet, and then took a dive.


West Virginia State Police is handling the investigation, and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has also been contacted for assistance.


Original article can be found here: http://www.your4state.com



HEDGESVILLE, W.Va. — Two men escaped serious injury when a small plane crash-landed in a yard shortly after taking off from a private airstrip Saturday afternoon.

"Thank the Lord, it didn't kill anybody or hit a house," said West Virginia State Police Cpl. M.D. Gillmore.

The single-engine aircraft took off from a private airstrip, Green Landings Private Residential Airpark. The airstrip's hangars are within view of the crash site, estimated by Gillmore to be about a half-mile away.

"It appears that it suffered from sort of mechanical failure," Gillmore said. "It looks like it may have flipped two or three times" before coming to rest in the front yard of a house at Chisolm Drive and Tinning Court off Little Georgetown Road, near Spring Mills, he said.

Police said the plane came to rest about 20 feet from the house, which is in the North Ridge subdivision.

It appeared that the aircraft dug into the ground, uprooting some shrubs before it stopped.

The male pilot and male co-pilot were taken to Berkeley Medical Center in Martinsburg, W.Va., for treatment of what were believed to be minor injuries, Gillmore said.

The residents of the house were home at the time. They were "pretty shaken up" but not injured, Gillmore said.

The investigation has been transferred to the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board.

Original article can be found here: http://www.heraldmailmedia.com