Wednesday, January 10, 2018

AeroMéxico 668, Boeing 737-800: Incident occurred January 09, 2018 at San Francisco International Airport (KSFO), California

SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration is investigating why an Aeromexico flight from Mexico City nearly landed on the wrong runway at San Francisco International Airport Tuesday morning, ABC7 News has learned. 

Aeromexico Flight 668 was given clearance to land on Runway 28R at SFO Airport, but for unknown reasons, the pilots aligned the Boeing 737-800 with the runway next to it, 28L.

At the same time, a Virgin America Airbus A320 was stopped on Runway 28L awaiting take-off to Kona, Hawaii, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

When Air Traffic Controllers noticed the mistake, they ordered the Aeromexico flight to abort the landing one mile from the airport. The pilots complied with the order and landed safely after making a second approach to SFO.

The Virgin America flight departed without incident.

Air Traffic Control audio reviewed by ABC7 News indicated the pilots acknowledged the correct runway they were told to land on.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the Aeromexico pilots had been using their instrument landing system during the approach, which provides guidance to the pilots when landing in low visibility.

The Federal Aviation Administration plans to interview the pilots as part of their investigation.

Aeromexico has not yet commented on the incident.

Tuesday's incident follows a near mishap in July 2017 when an Air Canada flight from Toronto almost landed on a taxiway at SFO that was crowded with planes.

The FAA is investigating the Air Canada incident along with the National Transportation Safety Board.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://abc7news.com

NZONE Skydive: Accident occurred January 10, 2018 in Lake Wakatipu, New Zealand



A parachute malfunction may be to blame for tandem skydivers crashing into Queenstown's Lake Wakatipu. 

The instructor was pulled from the water, but the other man remains missing. 

Emergency services responded to the incident involving Queenstown skydiving company NZONE in Jack's Point, in the Drift Bay area, at 1.42pm on Wednesday.

The instructor was taken to Lakes District Hospital with minor injuries. 




About 12 boats, a helicopter, two small planes and a jet ski searched the lake for the missing man until about 4.40pm.

Coastguard, the harbourmaster and water taxis were involved. 

A shoreline search involving LandSAR and the Coastguard was suspended about 6.30pm.

"The commission is tracking the continuing search and rescue operation, and deploying two investigators, expected to arrive on the scene as soon as practicable on Thursday," a TAIC statement said.

Police said they would assess the situation from 9am Thursday. 




NZONE, which operates in Jack's Point, suspended further jumps after the incident.

The firm said a "highly-experienced instructor, who had completed thousands of jumps", was finishing a tandem jump with a male customer when they landed in a the water.

"Appropriate authorities are conducting an investigation," the company said. 

Business development manager Derek Melnick earlier said: "We reported to the authorities and and they are attending."

In January last year, NZONE tandem skydivers Sasa Jojic and Sasa Ljaskevic, both from Serbia, were hospitalised after they crash-landed during a staff training jump. They jumped from 4500 metres and attempted a low turn when coming into land. 

Story and photos ➤ https://www.stuff.co.nz

Tulare County Supervisors to keep track of sheriff's department's aviation program



Tulare County Supervisor Kuyler Crocker wants to keep track of the money spent on the sheriff’s department’s aviation program.

On Tuesday, Crocker, the board’s newly-appointed vice-chairman, asked Assistant Sheriff Tom Sigley to provide a written update on money used for the department’s two planes.

“The request to the sheriff’s department was to know how much of an investment has been made into the aviation program,” he said. “We, as the board of supervisors, see the individual transactions. And when the transactions are made months apart, it’s hard to get a scope of the investment.”

Sigley said he planned to respond to Crocker’s request. So far, the sheriff’s department has spent about $ 1.25 million, with about $300,000 from the county’s general fund, Sigley said. The rest of the money spent came from an insurance payout and allocations from seized forfeitures.

Crocker said the sheriff’s department aviation program has support from supervisors.

“The reason I wanted the update is that this highlights we are committed to crime prevention,” he said. “This is a prime example we are committed to the aviation program.”

Earlier this week, supervisors approved the sheriff’s department’s request to seek bids on a thermal-imaging camera to be installed on the department’s newly-purchased plane. Sigley said money from Department of Homeland Security will be used to help pay for the camera and its installation.

“What we are asking for is not new money,” he said.

Crocker said the sheriff’s department actively seeks out federal grants, a move that reduces local expenditures.

“We are always looking for support from our federal partners,” he said. “We are always actively looking for opportunities.”

Providing law enforcement and other county employees with the best technology available makes a difference, Crocker said. Recently, the sheriff’s department helped Woodlake police captured two individuals who were trying to avoid arrest by hiding in tree groves.

“They followed them in a rural area,” Crocker said. “They followed in an area that’s hard to search. It is critical.”

The sheriff’s department has the same equipment as the California Highway Patrol, Crocker said.

After getting the supervisors’ approval, the sheriff’s department will return for an additional request to authorize the purchase. The sheriff’s department said it is expected it will take up to eight months to get the equipment installed. 

Story and photo ➤ http://www.visaliatimesdelta.com

Cessna TR182 Turbo Skylane RG, N756FZ, registered to M and S 182 LLC and operated by Pacific Skies Aviation: Accident occurred August 08, 2016 at Zamperini Field Airport (KTOA), Torrance, California -and- Incident occurred October 02, 2017 at Hawthorne Municipal Airport (KHHR), California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Long Beach, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N756FZ

Location: Torrance, CA
Accident Number: WPR16LA163
Date & Time: 08/08/2016, 1508 PDT
Registration: N756FZ
Aircraft: CESSNA TR182
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing gear collapse
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On August 8, 2016, at 1508 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna TR182, N756FZ, experienced a right main landing gear collapse after landing at Zamperini Field Airport (TOA), Torrance, California. The airplane was registered to M and S 182 LLC and operated by Pacific Skies Aviation under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The certified flight instructor and the commercial pilot undergoing instruction (PUI), were not injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right horizontal stabilizer. The local instructional flight departed TOA about 1338. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The flight instructor reported that he was demonstrating a normal landing to the PUI. As the flight approached the runway, he extended the landing gear and configured the airplane for a normal landing. The landing checks were called out and a green light was verified indicating that the landing gear was extended. The flare and initial touchdown were normal. Shortly after the airplane touched down, the airplane listed to the right. The airplane entered into a 180o skidding turn before coming to a stop.

Two witnesses located at the airport reported seeing the airplane on final approach with its right main landing gear not fully extended.

A Federal Aviation Administration inspector from the Long Beach Flight Standards District Office reported that when he arrived on site, he observed the airplane on the runway with the nose and left main landing gear down and locked. The right main landing gear was fully retracted. During the recovery process, the airplane was lifted and the right main landing gear freely fell into trail. A mechanic then manually placed the right side gear in the down and locked position. The airplane was lowered onto the landing gear and subsequently towed from the runway to a secured location.

During a postaccident examination, the airplane was placed on jacks to facilitate a gear swing test. The landing gear was cycled multiple times with no anomalies noted. The landing gear indicator lights inside the cockpit illuminated during the landing gear extension. 

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Commercial
Age: 41, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/30/2015
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/12/2016
Flight Time: (Estimated) 9000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 300 hours (Total, this make and model), 8700 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 150 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 50 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 20, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/26/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/15/2016
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 315.7 hours (Total, all aircraft), 127.4 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N756FZ
Model/Series: TR182 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1979
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: R18201069
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/15/2016, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3100 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3730.8 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-540-L3C5D
Registered Owner: M and S 182 LLC.
Rated Power: 235 hp
Operator: Pacific Skies Aviation LLC.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KTOA, 90 ft msl
Observation Time: 2208 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 279°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 18°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots, 270°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.81 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Torrance, CA (TOA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Torrance, CA (TOA)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1338 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: ZAMPERINI FIELD (TOA)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt; Concrete
Airport Elevation: 103 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 11L
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5001 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 33.801111, -118.335000 (est)

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA163
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, August 08, 2016 in Torrance, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA TR182, registration: N756FZ
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 8, 2016, at 1508 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna TR182, N756FZ, sustained substantial damage subsequent to a landing gear collapse at Zamperini Field Airport (TOA), Torrance, California. The airplane was operated by Pacific Skies Aviation under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The certified flight instructor (CFI) and commercial pilot undergoing instruction (PUI), were not injured. The local instructional flight departed Torrance, California. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed.

The CFI reported that during landing the right main landing gear collapsed resulting in the airplane ground looping. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing and to the right horizontal stabilizer.

Witnesses reported seeing the airplane on final approach with its right main landing gear not fully extended. The airplane was recovered for further examination.


Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Los Angeles, California

Aircraft landed gear up.

Date: 02-OCT-17
Time: 22:20:00Z
Regis#: 756FZ
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C182
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: HAWTHORNE
State: CALIFORNIA 

Bell 429 GlobalRanger, N1SP, registered to and operated by State of Delaware: Fatal accident occurred July 11, 2016 at Delaware Coastal Airport (KGED), Georgetown, Sussex County, Delaware

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N1SP

Tim McClanahan

Location: Georgetown, DE
Accident Number: ERA16LA253
Date & Time: 07/11/2016, 1850 EDT
Registration: N1SP
Aircraft: BELL 429
Aircraft Damage: None
Defining Event: Miscellaneous/other
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 3 None
Flight Conducted Under: Public Aircraft 

On July 11, 2016, about 1850 eastern daylight time, a hoist system operator was fatally injured after falling from a Bell 429 helicopter, N1SP, while performing external hoist operations at Delaware Coastal Airport (GED), Georgetown, Delaware. The commercial pilot and two other crewmembers were not injured, and the helicopter was not damaged. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local public flight, which was operated by the Delaware State Police.

The purpose of the flight was for an emergency response team to complete recurrent rescue hoist training. The three-person team included a rescue specialist, a system operator, and a safety officer. During an evolution, the rescue specialist would be lowered from the helicopter. The system operator, located on the helicopter's skid, would retract the hook back into the helicopter, and the pilot would then return the helicopter to the original hover position in flight. Then, the rescue specialist would cue the crew to return to the target area (where the rescue specialist was located). The system operator would extend the hook, the rescue specialist would connect himself to the hoist, and the system operator would raise the rescue specialist back into the helicopter. Each crewmember was required to perform 3 evolutions as a rescue specialist and a system operator to complete the training. After completing three evolutions, the pilot would land the helicopter; the crew would rotate positions and restart the process. The system operator wore a full body harness and was tethered to the interior of the helicopter through a strap with a carabiner that attached to a D-ring on the harness. The security of each member's safety harness was to be checked before each takeoff during the performance of the second rescue checklist.

According to each of the crewmembers, the accident flight was the seventh evolution of the day, and the first flight where the fatally-injured crewmember acted as the system operator. After the restraints were checked and verified secure, the helicopter lifted off the ground and flew to the practice area on the airfield. As the helicopter hovered about 100 ft above ground level, the system operator requested and was granted permission by the pilot to move to the helicopter skid. The system operator stepped onto the skid and subsequently fell from the helicopter. The pilot stated that throughout the accident sequence, the crew was not rushing while they completed the checklists.

The pilot landed the helicopter immediately and the rescue specialist and safety officer initiated patient care on the system operator. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 36, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/01/2015
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/14/2016
Flight Time:  766 hours (Total, all aircraft), 200 hours (Total, this make and model), 164 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft) 

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, rotorcraft helicopter, and instrument helicopter. His most recent second-class medical certificate was issued in August 2015. He reported 766 total hours of flight experience, of which 200 hours were in the accident helicopter make and model. His most recent flight review was dated March 14, 2016, and his most recent Hoist Class D External Load Designation Certification was completed on June 15, 2016.

The rescue specialist, safety officer, and system operator were all qualified both as system operators and rescue specialists. All three individuals had most recently completed hoist operation training on June 15, 2016. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BELL
Registration: N1SP
Model/Series: 429
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 57184
Landing Gear Type: Skid
Seats: 5
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Turbo Shaft
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney Canada Ltd.
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: PW207D1
Registered Owner: STATE OF DELAWARE
Rated Power: 610 hp
Operator: STATE OF DELAWARE
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

According to FAA records, the helicopter was issued an airworthiness certificate on January 14, 2014, and registered to the government in November 2014. It was equipped with two Pratt and Whitney Canada PW207D1, 610 shaft horsepower engines.

The system operator wore an Aerial Machine and Tool Corp. H1037-BL/M full body harness rated to 2,900 pounds. It incorporated 4 tether points; 2 on the front of the harness and 2 on the back. Each tether point incorporated a D-ring that could attach to a carabiner connected to the interior of the helicopter. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: GED, 51 ft msl
Observation Time: 1854 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 5°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 16°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots, 60°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.07 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Georgetown, DE (GED)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Georgetown, DE (GED)
Type of Clearance: Unknown
Departure Time: 1845 EDT
Type of Airspace: 

The 1854 recorded weather observation at GED included wind from 060° at 6 knots, visibility 10 miles, clear skies below 12,000 ft above ground level, temperature 28°C, dew point 16°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.07 inches of mercury. 

Airport Information

Airport: DELAWARE COASTAL (GED)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 53 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Vegetation
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Straight-in 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal, 3 None
Aircraft Damage: None
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 3 None
Latitude, Longitude: 38.687500, -75.359167 (est) 

Medical And Pathological Information

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological testing of the fatally injured crewmember. Fluid and tissue specimens tested negative for ethanol and other drugs. 

Tests And Research

Examination of the system operator's full body harness by an FAA inspector revealed no evidence of failure or suspicious marks. No webbing, hardware, or stitching damage was noted on the harness. In addition, an examination of the restraint system secured to the interior of the helicopter revealed no anomalies, and all hooks and carabiners operated without anomaly. 

Additional Information

The following items were listed in the Essential Hoist Operations Checklists used by the crew and were relevant to how the crew was tethered to the helicopter.

Safety Checklist #1
"8. Restraints SECURED"

Rescue Checklist #2
"5. SO & Safety are TETHERED, ANCHORED & DOUBLE CHECKED.
6. RS 1 & 2 on restraint."

After the accident, the operator modified the Rescue Checklist #2, to include an additional check that the Safety Officer and System Operator are tethered and anchored to the helicopter.



Firefighters, EMS and paramedic personnel from around the state salute the body of volunteer firefighter Tim McClanahan as it arrives at the Medical Examiner's office.



NTSB Identification: ERA16LA253
14 CFR Public Use
Accident occurred Monday, July 11, 2016 in Georgetown, DE
Aircraft: BELL 429, registration: N1SP
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 3 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 11, 2016, about 1850 eastern daylight time, a hoist system operator was fatally injured after a fall from a Bell 429 helicopter, N1SP, while performing external hoist operations in Georgetown, Delaware. The commercial pilot and two other crewmembers were not injured and the helicopter was not damaged. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local public-use flight operated by the Delaware State Police.

The purpose of the flight was for an emergency response team to complete recurrent rescue hoist training. The three-person team consisted of a rescue specialist, a system operator, and a safety officer. After the rescue specialist was lowered from the helicopter, the helicopter landed, and the rescue specialist would then reboard the helicopter.

The team members periodically rotated positions and duties, and a different team member would then be lowered as the rescue specialist. The security of each member's safety harness was checked before each takeoff.

The accident flight was the seventh iteration of the day, and the first flight where the fatally injured crew member acted as the system operator. After the restraints were checked and verified secure, the helicopter lifted off the ground, moved to the practice area, and then the system operator requested and was granted permission to move to the helicopter skid. The system operator stepped onto the skid, and then fell from the helicopter.

The pilot landed the helicopter immediately and the rescue specialist and safety officer initiated patient care on the system operator.

The hook and restraint system were retained for further examination.

Cessna 152, N5331B, registered to US Aviation Group LLC and operated by a private individual: Accident occurred July 07, 2016 at Bridgeport Municipal Airport (KXBP), Wise County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Irving, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N5331B

Location: Bridgeport, TX
Accident Number: CEN16LA259
Date & Time: 07/07/2016, 2030 CDT
Registration: N5331B
Aircraft: CESSNA 152
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 7, 2016, about 2030 central daylight time, Cessna 152 airplane, N5331B, was damaged during a landing at the Bridgeport Municipal Airport (KXBP), Bridgeport, Texas. The private rated pilot and pilot rated passenger were not injured and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to US Aviation Group LLC and was operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated without a flight plan. The flight originated from Denton Enterprise Airport (KDTO), Denton, Texas, about 1945.

According to the pilot, on the third touch-and-go to runway 18 at KXBP, the ground run was longer and the airplane had difficultly climbing away from the runway. He saw that the flaps were still at 30° despite the flap handle being in the up position. The pilot then maneuvered to land to runway 36 at KXBP, but was higher than normal while approaching the runway. He slipped the airplane down and the airplane floated down the runway. The airplane touched down near the end of the runway and the when the brakes were applied, the pilot lost control of the airplane. Swerving left and right, the airplane exited the side of the runway. The nose wheel got stuck in the soil and the airplane nosed over coming to rest inverted.

The flap actuator motor, jackscrew, and flap tube assembly were sent to Textron Aviation for an examination. Under the auspices of inspectors from the Federal Aviation Administration, the jackscrew was unboxed and examined. The flap tube assembly on the flap actuator motor was found fully extended and bound. The tube assembly was freed mechanically, and the flap actuator motor was able to move the tube assembly normally. Further examination did not find a reason for why the tube assembly had become bound. No anomalies were detected with the jackscrew or the flap actuator. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 21, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/11/2014
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 115 hours (Total, all aircraft), 11 hours (Total, this make and model), 39 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 11 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 11 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N5331B
Model/Series: 152 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1979
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 15283839
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1676 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: O-235-L2C
Registered Owner: US AVIATION GROUP LLC
Rated Power: 110 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KXBP, 851 ft msl
Observation Time: 2035 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 174°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C / 22°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots, 160°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.85 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: DENTON, TX (DTO)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: BRIDGEPORT, TX (XBP)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1945 CDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: BRIDGEPORT MUNI (XBP)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 863 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 36
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4004 ft / 60 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop 

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 33.180278, -97.828611 (est)

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA259
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 07, 2016 in Bridgeport, TX
Aircraft: CESSNA 152, registration: N5331B
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 7, 2016, about 2030 central daylight time, a Cessna 152 airplane, N5331B, was damaged during a landing at the Bridgeport Municipal Airport (KXBP), Bridgeport, Texas. The private rated pilot and pilot rated passenger were not injured and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to US Aviation Group LLC and was operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated without a flight plan. The flight originated from Denton Enterprise Airport (KDTO), Denton, Texas, about 1945.

According to the pilot, on the third touch-and-go to runway 18 at KXBP, the ground run was longer and the airplane had difficultly climbing away from the runway. He noticed the flaps were still at 30-degrees despite the flap handle being in the up position. The pilot made a 180-degree turn to land on runway 36. After the airplane landed the pilot applied the brakes, the airplane swerved and exited the side of the runway. The nose wheel dug in the soil and the airplane nosed over coming to rest inverted.

The airplane was retained for further examination.

Cessna 150L, N1567Q: Accident occurred June 29, 2016 near Atlanta Regional Airport / Falcon Field (KFFC), Atlanta, Georgia

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N1567Q



Location: Peachtree City, GA
Accident Number: ERA16LA235
Date & Time: 06/29/2016, 1930 EDT
Registration: N1567Q
Aircraft: CESSNA 150
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On June 29, 2016, at 1930 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 150L, N1567Q, experienced a total loss of engine power and was substantially damaged during a forced landing after takeoff from Atlanta Regional Airport (FFC), Peachtree City, Georgia. The student pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a visual flight rules flight plan was filed for the solo instructional flight, which was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

In a telephone interview, the pilot stated that she performed the preflight inspection, engine start, run-up, and takeoff from runway 31 with no anomalies noted. At 400 ft above ground level, the engine "sputtered, and then stopped." The pilot selected a golf course for the forced landing, and touched down on a slightly rolling fairway lined with trees. During the rollout, the airplane clipped trees and struck a small berm, which collapsed the nose landing gear.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed substantial damage to the engine firewall. The engine was rotated by hand at the propeller. The magnetos produced spark at all eight spark plugs. A compression check was performed, and thumb compression was confirmed on all but the No. 3 cylinder.

The No. 3 cylinder was removed, and severe impact damage was noted on the dome of the piston and the cylinder head. The exhaust valve was separated at the stem, and the intake valve was fractured, with about 50 percent of the valve head separated. Pieces of the valve were recovered in the exhaust manifold. Both valves and their associated fragments were forwarded to the NTSB Materials Laboratory in Washington, DC for examination.

Fracture analysis of the No. 3 cylinder exhaust valve revealed fatigue failure of the valve stem transition area at the valve head. The remaining fracture surfaces observed on the valves were due to overstress.

The pilot held an FAA student pilot and third-class medical certificate, issued on December 22, 2015. She reported 41 total hours of flight experience, of which 38 were in the accident airplane.

The two-seat, single-engine, high-wing airplane was manufactured in 1971 and was equipped with a Continental O-200 series engine. The airplane had been operated for about 410 hours since its most recent annual inspection was completed on July 5, 2015, at 3,488 total airframe hours. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 17, Female
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/22/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  41 hours (Total, all aircraft), 38 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N1567Q
Model/Series: 150 L
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1971
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 15072867
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/05/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1601 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 408 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3488 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: O-200 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: FFC, 807 ft msl
Observation Time: 1953 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 310°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 22°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.93 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Peachtree City, GA (FFC)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Peachtree City, GA (FFC)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1930 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: ATLANTA RGNL FALCON FIELD (FFC)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 807 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry; Soft
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 33.373611, -84.584722 (est)

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA235
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 29, 2016 in Peachtree City, GA
Aircraft: CESSNA 150, registration: N1567Q
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 29, 2016, at 1930 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 150L, N1567Q, experienced a total loss of engine power and was substantially damaged during a forced landing after takeoff from Atlanta Regional Airport (FFC), Peachtree City, Georgia. The student pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a visual flight rules flight plan was filed for the solo instructional flight, which was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

In a telephone interview, the pilot stated that she performed the preflight inspection, engine start, run-up, and takeoff from runway 31 with no anomalies noted. At 400 feet above ground level, the engine "sputtered, and then stopped." The pilot selected a golf course for the forced landing, and touched down on a slightly rolling fairway lined with trees. During the rollout, the airplane clipped trees and struck a small berm, which collapsed the nose landing gear.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed substantial damage to the engine firewall. The engine was rotated by hand at the propeller. The magnetos produced spark at all eight spark plugs. A compression check was performed, and thumb compression was confirmed on all but the No. 3 cylinder.

The No. 3 cylinder was removed and severe impact damage was noted on the dome of the piston and the cylinder head. The exhaust valve was separated at the stem, and the intake valve was fractured, with about 50 percent of the valve head separated. Pieces of the valve were recovered in the exhaust manifold. The airplane and its engine were secured for a detailed examination at a later date.

The pilot held an FAA student pilot and third-class medical certificate, issued on December 22, 2015. She reported 41 total hours of flight experience, of which 38 were in the accident airplane.

The two-seat, single-engine, high-wing airplane was manufactured in 1971 and was equipped with a Lycoming O-200 series engine. The most recent annual inspection was completed on July 5, 2015, at 3,488 total airframe hours.

Mooney M20J 201, N201KY: Accident occurred February 22, 2016 near Whiteman Airport (KWHP), Pacoima, Los Angeles County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Van Nuys, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N201KY



Location: Pacoima, CA
Accident Number: WPR16LA074
Date & Time: 02/22/2016, 1334 PST
Registration: N201KY
Aircraft: MOONEY M20J
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On February 22, 2016, at 1334 Pacific standard time, a Mooney M20J, N201KY, experienced a loss of engine power after takeoff and the pilot made a forced landing onto a city street near Whiteman Airport (WHP), Pacoima, California. The airplane was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The private pilot was not injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage during the accident sequence. The local personal flight departed Pacoima about 1330. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot reported that about three minutes after takeoff the engine started to run rough. He contacted the tower controller and advised that he was turning back. While on short final, he pulled back on the power and the engine lost power. The pilot was able to re-start the engine but it again lost power. The pilot was unable to make it to the runway and subsequently initiated a forced landing to a city street. During the landing, the airplane struck a moving car and numerous parked vehicles; substantially damaging both wings and the fuselage.

The airplane was recovered to a secured facility for a postaccident engine examination. The engine was visually examined and determined that an engine run was possible. The engine was subsequently mounted onto an engine test stand. No modifications were accomplished except to add oil which had leaked out during storage. The engine started and was run at 2,700 rpm and 28 inches of manifold pressure. A magneto check was accomplished which recorded a 50 rpm drop. When the rpm was reduced to 1,200 rpm, it was noted that the engine ran lean.

A review of the maintenance logbooks revealed a discrepancy as to when the last annual/100 hour inspection was accomplished. An entry dated 6/15/15 identified a recoding tach time and total time in service of 2,052 hours. A sticker had been applied to the page indicating "Remove plugs check compression. Removed injectors and cleaned and inspected IAW 100 hr and was determined to be in an airworthy condition." There was no mechanics signature, certificate number and Inspection Authorization identified for return to service.

A previous hand written entry dated 2/1/13, indicated that the engine had been inspected in accordance with a 100 hour inspection and was determined to be in an airworthy condition. This entry revealed the appropriate mechanic signature and certificate number. The mechanic reported that he did not inspect the engine on 6/15/15. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 62, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/01/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/25/2015
Flight Time: 952 hours (Total, all aircraft), 176 hours (Total, this make and model), 952 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 17 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 14 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 11 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: MOONEY
Registration: N201KY
Model/Series: M20J NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1978
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 24-0462
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/01/2013, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2899 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2052 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-360 1A
Registered Owner: CORBETT JOSHUA J
Rated Power: 200 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KWHP, 1003 ft msl
Observation Time: 2136 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 320°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / -7°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 14 knots/ 21 knots, 330°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Pacoima, CA (WHP)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination:  Pacoima, CA (WHP)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1300 PST
Type of Airspace: Class D 

Airport Information

Airport: WHITEMAN (WHP)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1003 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 30
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4120 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  34.254722, -118.408611 (est)

Henry Corbett, seen above in a red checked shirt, experienced a loss of engine power in the Mooney M20J 201 and made a forced landing on the streets of Pacoima near Whiteman Airport. The aircraft is owned by Corbett’s son Joshua, seen above right in court on charges that he stalked actress Sandra Bullock, below right.














NTSB Identification: WPR16LA074
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, February 22, 2016 in Pacoima, CA
Aircraft: MOONEY M20J, registration: N201KY
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On February 22, 2016, at 1334 Pacific standard time (PST), a Mooney M20J, N201KY, experienced a loss of engine power after takeoff and made a forced landing onto a city street near Whiteman Airport (WHP), Pacoima, California. The airplane was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The private pilot was not injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage during the accident sequence. The local personal flight departed Pacoima about 1330. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot reported that after takeoff the engine started to run rough, and as he was attempting to return to the airport, the engine lost power. The pilot was able to land on a city street during which time the airplane struck a moving car and numerous parked vehicles; substantially damaging both wings and the fuselage.

The accident site was documented by the Los Angeles Police Department. Inspectors from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Flight Standards District office (FSDO) responded to the site and assisted in coordinating the recovery of the airplane. The wreckage was secured for further examination.