Sunday, August 26, 2018

Piper PA-25-260 Pawnee, XB-EGL (and) Piper PA-25-235 Pawnee, XB-DVX: Fatal accident occurred July 22, 2018 in Namiquipa, Chihuahua, Mexico

CEN18WA305A
LAVIA ARGENTINA S.A. PA-25-260

CEN18WA305B
LAVIA ARGENTINA S.A. PA-25-235





La Fiscalía Zona Occidente informó que cerca de las 9:30 de la mañana de este día chocaron dos aeronaves que realizaban maniobras en la zona, en un campo agrícola cercano a la brecha conocida como Cerro Pelón.

Al llegar los oficiales encontraron los restos de las avionetas y a un lado de ellas el cuerpo de un masculino que fue identificado como Manuel de Jesús P. A.

El accidente ocurrió cuando los pilotos fumigaban un sembradío de maíz en donde todavía se percibe un fuerte olor a veneno que contenían las aeronaves.

Paramédicos trasladaron al hospital San Isidro en El Terrero, Namiquipa a Jesús Gúmaro L. T, sin embargo a causa de las heridas lo trasladarían a la ciudad de Chihuahua.

En el lugar se solicitó la presencia de personal de Aeronáutica civil para hacerse cargo de la investigación de las causas de este percance.

http://tiempo.com

Robinson R44 Raven II, SP-MAP: Fatal accident occurred July 11, 2018 in Domecko, Poland

NTSB Identification: CEN18WA268
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Wednesday, July 11, 2018 in Domecko, Poland
Aircraft: Robinson R44, registration:
Injuries: 2 Fatal, 1 Serious.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.


On July 11, 2018, at 0736 coordinated universal time (UTC), a Robinson Helicopter R-44 II helicopter, SP-MAP, impacted terrain near Opole, Poland. 2 occupants were fatally injured, and 1 occupant was seriously injured.


The investigation is under the jurisdiction of the Government of Poland. This report is for information purposes only and contains only information released by the Government of Poland. Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:


State Commission on Aircraft Accident Investigation

ul. Chalubinskiego 4/6
00-928 Warsaw, Poland





W Domecku koło Opola rozbił się śmigłowiec. Dwie osoby zginęły. Trzecia osoba został przewieziona do szpitala. Informację w tej sprawie dostaliśmy od słuchacza na Gorącą Linię RMF FM.

Do zdarzenia doszło niedaleko miejscowości Domecko. Według wstępnych informacji, na pokładzie śmigłowca, który spadł kilkadziesiąt metrów od drogi, były trzy osoby. Dwie z nich nie żyją. Trzecia osoba została przetransportowana do szpitala.

Jak informuje dziennikarz RMF FM, była to prywatna maszyna, ale nie wiadomo jeszcze, do kogo należała. Rozbiła się około 60 metrów od drogi i 30 metrów od najbliższych zabudowań. 

https://www.rmf24.pl

Horizon Air ends more than three decades of flight service to Lewiston, Idaho



Lewiston’s up-and-down relationship with commercial air carriers hit a new low Saturday, when Alaska Air Group’s Horizon Air subsidiary ended service to the Lewiston-Nez Perce County Regional Airport after 35 years.

The move leaves Delta/SkyWest as the sole air carrier still serving the Lewiston market. It currently only flies to Salt Lake City.

About a dozen Horizon employees were on hand for the company’s final day of operations here, which included one arrival from Seattle and two departures to Boise and Seattle. Besides high-fiving passengers and thanking them for their support, they also took group photos in front of the planes.

“They’re a great group of people,” said Jerry Price Mars, who worked for Horizon for three years and came to see the last flight. “They’re like a big family. A couple of them have worked there almost 30 years.”

That’s almost as long as Horizon has been in the Lewiston market. The company began service here in 1983, making it one of the airport’s longest-serving air carriers.

In recent years, however, Horizon flights were typically only about 60 percent full, compared with 85 percent system-wide. That prompted the company to announce in March that it was pulling out of Lewiston.

Passengers Saturday were still trying to figure out how that will affect their travel schedules in the future. If they can’t make a connection out of Salt Lake City, they may have to drive to Pullman or Spokane —adding another layer of stress, complexity and cost to their travel plans.

“I know Pullman is only 30 to 40 minutes away, but it’s a lot more convenient (flying out of Lewiston),” said Makaylin Jardin, a Lewis-Clark State College transfer student who was flying home to Hawaii for a friend’s wedding.

On her return flight, she said, “I’m probably going to have to fly into Pullman and ask my boyfriend to pick me up. Before, he could have just dropped my car off at the airport.”

About half the passengers leaving on Horizon’s last flight to Seattle arrived in the area by cruise ship.

“I don’t know what people are going to do next week,” said Virginia Thresh of Grass Valley, Calif. “The only other option would be to rent a car or take the bus offered by the cruise line up to Spokane.”

State Sen. Dan Johnson, R-Lewiston, arrived on Horizon’s last flight from Seattle. He’s been a steady customer of the airline – particularly during the legislative session, when he buys a block of tickets to fly back-and-forth to Boise.

“I’d buy a half-dozen tickets for about $50 one-way,” he said. “A Delta flight’s probably going to cost about $300, so I’ll be driving.”

Horizon is hardly the first airline to pull out of the Lewiston market, but the loss of its Boise and Seattle flights represents a major change from 1994 – the airport’s 50th anniversary – when passengers had multiple destinations to choose from.

“Record levels of passenger activity were reached in 1993, as more than 84,000 customers passed through the doors of the terminal building,” noted former Airport Manager Robin Turner, in a lengthy history of the airport he wrote for its 50th anniversary celebration. “In 1994, the Lewiston-Nez Perce County Airport is the only small community airport in the northwestern United States having direct service to every hub (in the region), including Boise, Portland, Seattle and Spokane.”

However, Turner’s report also highlighted the constant up-and-down nature of commercial air service in Lewiston – from the 1930s and ‘40s, when it wasn’t clear the community even wanted its own airport, to the deregulation era in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s, when a half-dozen small regional airlines and larger air carriers came and went in rapid succession.

“Ever hear of Air Pacific?” asked a Lewiston Tribune story in 1983. “How about Execuair? No? Well, try on Tri-State Airways.”



Execuair offered flights to Boise and Pullman in 1978. Gem State Airlines provided service to Lewiston for about 11 months in 1978 and ‘79. Big Sky Airlines offered flights to Missoula for a short time, while Mountain West flew to Boise during the winter of 1980-’81. Cascade Airways was one of the more stable companies, providing service to Lewiston for about 17 years, from 1969 to ‘86.

The fickle character of the airline industry itself is also apparent from one of Lewiston’s greatest success stories – Zimmerly Airlines, which brothers Bert and Fred Zimmerly started here.

Local historian Steve Branting noted that the company was just the second regional airline in the nation to be certified by the Civil Aeronautics Board to provide service to small communities. It began offering flights from Lewiston to Boise on a trial basis in 1944, as soon as the airport was open for operation. Passengers had to crawl through a barbed wire fence to get to the plane, where they handed the fare directly to the pilot. The cost was $17.75 one way.



Zimmerly Airlines later became Empire Air Lines, which merged with West Coast Airlines in 1952. Subsequent mergers resulted in the company being renamed Air West, then Hughes Air West, then Republic Airlines, which finally pulled out of the Lewiston market in 1982. Republic later became part of Northwest Airlines, which merged with Delta.

“The initial airline service in Lewiston worked because of a minimal regulatory environment, and because the aircraft and airline companies were small and appropriate to the market,” noted Turner, in an updated history he wrote before retiring in 2014. “They were able to continue service regardless of the underlying economic viability because the federal government subsidized them … In 1978, Congress deregulated the airline industry and the handwriting was on the wall. The subsidies would end and airlines would, for the most part, have to survive as private companies. They were in charge of their own economic destiny, free to move into or out of markets. With that, service to many smaller communities proved to be financially (unsustainable) with the large aircraft of the day.”

The best way for communities to avoid that fate, he said, is to take care of the air carriers they have.

Former Lewiston City Councilor Jesse Maldonado was also a passenger on Horizon’s last flight from Seattle. He said people on the plane were clearly disappointed when it was announced that was the company’s final arrival in Lewiston.

“Hopefully they’ll be back,” he said. “I think that’s what everyone is working towards.”

Story and photo gallery ➤ https://lmtribune.com

Bellanca 8KCAB Super Decathlon, C-GDLP: Fatal accident occurred July 12, 2018 near Buttonville Municipal (CYKZ), Ontario, Canada

Dr. Shehbaz Butt 


NTSB Identification: CEN18WA320
14 CFR Unknown
Accident occurred Thursday, July 12, 2018 in Toronto, Canada
Aircraft: Champion 8KCAB, registration:
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.


On July 12, 2018, at 2359 universal coordinated time, a Bellanca 8KCAB, Canadian registration C-GDLP, declared an emergency and impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from the Toronto/Buttonville Airport (CYKZ), Ontario, Canada. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and a post impact fire.


The accident investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the Canadian government. This report is for informational purposes only and contains only information released by or obtained from the Canadian government. Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:


Transportation Safety Board of Canada

200 Promenade du Portage
Place du Centre, 4th Floor
Hull, Quebec K1A 1K8
Canada
Web site: http://www.tsb.gc.ca





Shehbaz Butt, a Toronto-area doctor who was known for his mountain climbing attempts on the world’s highest peaks, has died in a plane crash.

The 46-year-old father of four, who worked as an anesthesiologist, was flying a small plane that went down near Buttonville Municipal Airport on Thursday evening.

A friend, Joe Raftis, confirmed that Dr. Butt was the plane’s pilot. “He was quite the adventurer … a genuinely nice person. I’m just lucky to have met him,” Mr. Raftis said.

Dr. Butt’s death was also announced in a staff e-mail at his workplace, Markham Stouffville Hospital.

“It is tragic news to hear of this loss of a long-standing MSH physician. We know he will be sorely missed,” the e-mail said.

For the past eight years, Dr. Butt had attempted to reach the summits of the highest mountains on all seven continents. His bid to climb Mount Everest in April of 2014 coincided with an avalanche that killed 16 Sherpas. Calling off the climb, he instead helped treat the injured guides.

Mr. Raftis said that Dr. Butt had been taking piloting lessons and had his own hangar and runway at his suburban home.

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada has sent a team of investigators to the scene.

Alexandre Fournier, a TSB spokesman, said that a small plane had just left a Buttonville runway Thursday evening when the pilot radioed that he had problems and did a right turn back toward the airport. The nose of the plane dropped and it crashed southwest of the airport.

The aircraft, a 1980 Bellanca 8KCAB, a two-seat single-engine plane commonly known as a Super Decathlon, belonged to Dr. Butt, according to Transport Canada records.

Dr. Butt, who spoke English, Punjabi and Urdu, was born in Pakistan.

He was one of four children raised by a single mother, Mr. Raftis said, adding that they were all encouraged in their studies, with the other siblings becoming a dentist, a pharmacist and a computer scientist.

After the family moved to Canada, he attended high school in east-end Toronto, graduated from the University of Ottawa in 1997, then did post-graduate training in anesthesiology at the University of Toronto. A year after completing his residency, he joined Markham Stouffville Hospital in 2003.

Even when he was still in medical school, he was an outdoors person. He told Mr. Raftis that he would go on camping trips and study in the evening with his laptop in his tent.

According to a blog for his Everest expedition, Dr. Butt became interested in mountain climbing after speaking with a cancer patient who had returned from climbing Mount Kilimanjaro.

He decided to climb the highest peak of each continent. In 2010, he reached the summit of Kilimanjaro in Tanzania. The following year, he was in Russia, climbing Mount Elbrus, followed by Indonesia’s Mount Puncak Jaya in 2012 and Mount Denali in Alaska in 2013.

He was not a reckless thrill seeker. In 2011, Dr. Butt was three quarters of the way up Mount Aconcagua in the Andes but turned back because of high winds. He returned in 2016 and reached the summit with his wife, Ramona, and Mr. Raftis.

The two peaks he did not reach were Everest and Mount Vinson Massif in Antarctica.

Dr. Butt and Mr. Raftis, the owner of the Hiker’s Haven sports store in Oakville, had met through their mutual love for the outdoors.

When they attempted their Everest climb in 2014, Dr. Butt also used the trip to raise money for his hospital.

They were at the southern base camp, getting acclimated to the high altitude when, around 6:50 a.m. they heard the sound of an avalanche.

Rescue helicopters began flying back dead and injured Sherpas. Dr. Butt and six other climbers who were also physicians helped look after the wounded so they could be airlifted to a Kathmandu hospital.

He helped stabilize a man left unconscious by head trauma. He treated a guide for a broken leg and another with broken ribs and kidney injuries.

“This has been a very tragic and moving experience … I feel like I left a little of myself there,” he told The Globe and Mail afterward.

Mr. Raftis said Dr. Butt had talked about returning to Everest next year.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com

Cessna 172M Skyhawk, operated by Epix Aviation, N1537U: Accident occurred August 26, 2018 at New Kent County Airport (W96), Quinton, Virginia

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Richmond, Virginia

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N1537U

Location: New Kent, VA
Accident Number: ERA18LA233
Date & Time: 08/26/2018, 1610 EDT
Registration: N1537U
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On August 26, 2018, about 1610 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172M, N1537U, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain at New Kent County Airport (W96) in Quinton, Virginia. The student pilot was seriously injured. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and no flight plan was filed for the solo cross-country instructional flight that departed from Chesapeake Regional Airport (CPK), Norfolk, Virginia, about 1510. The airplane was operated by Epix Aviation under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the operator, this was the pilot's second flight of the day. He had previously flown the accident airplane with his flight instructor performing practice maneuvers. The accident flight was a solo cross country with an intended route of CPK-W96-CPK.

A witness located outside the main hangar at the W96 fixed base operator (FBO) heard the accident airplane's engine, looked up and saw the airplane in a steep left turn with the nose "about 40 degrees down". It then descended out of view behind the hangar, shortly thereafter he heard sounds of an impact. Based on his description, the airplane had apparently approached runway 29, however he did not see it perform a go-around, or a touch-and-go landing, prior to his observation of the steep left descending turn. By policy, the operator does not permit student pilots to perform touch-and-go landings on solo cross-country flights.

About 700 feet south of the runway centerline at midfield, the airplane struck a power line, impacted terrain and three different sections of fencing while crossing a road, before coming to rest nose down in the grass adjacent to the FBO parking lot. The path from the initial ground scars to the main wreckage site was 65 feet long and oriented along a heading of about 85° magnetic.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Inspector revealed that all major components of the airplane were present at the accident site. The forward fuselage was crushed aft and remained in a 90-degree nose down attitude. The empennage was completely separated just aft of the rear window and folded downward relative to the fuselage with the tail resting on the ground. Both wings were substantially damaged and crushed aft and the left wing was partially separated near its root. An outboard section of left wing and aileron about 3 feet long was completely separated from the remainder of the wing.

Flight control continuity was established from the cockpit area to the control surfaces. The flaps were found in the retracted position and the elevator trim tab displaced about 1" trailing edge up (airplane nose down direction).

All engine controls (throttle, mixture, carburetor heat) were found in the full forward positions. The fuel selector was found in the "both" position. One propeller blade had leading edge gouge marks from about mid span to the tip while the other blade was inaccessible underneath the wreckage.

A review of airplane maintenance logbooks revealed that the most recent airframe 100-hour inspection was performed on June 8, 2018. The aircraft total time was 9787 hours, which was about 85 hours prior to the accident. The most recent engine 100-hour inspection was performed on August 7, 2018, about 27 hours prior to the accident, at the time when the newly overhauled engine was installed.

According to flight school records, the student pilot had accumulated 40 hours of total flight experience, all of which was in the same make/model as the accident airplane, of which 5 were as pilot in command.

At 1615, the reported weather at W96 included wind from 220° at 3 knots.

The airplane was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N1537U
Model/Series: 172 M
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Epix Aviation
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: W96, 121 ft msl
Observation Time: 1615 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / 20°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots / , 220°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.13 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Norfolk, VA (CPK)
Destination: New Kent, VA (W96)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  37.501389, -77.126111 (est)



NEW KENT COUNTY, Va. -- The pilot of a small plane that crashed at the New Kent County Airport Sunday afternoon was seriously injured, according to Virginia State Police.

Troopers were called to 6901 Terminal Road just before 4:15 p.m.

"The troopers preliminary investigation reveals that the pilot of a Cessna 172M Skyhawk was coming in for a landing," Sgt. Keeli L. Hill with Virginia State Police said. "Just prior to touching down, the pilot veered to the left striking some guide wires."

Officials said the victim was transported to an area hospital with serious but non-life threatening injuries.

No other injuries were reported.

Troopers said the FAA has been notified, as is procedure, and that the cause of the crash remains under investigation.

Story and video ➤ https://wtvr.com

NEW KENT, VA (WWBT) -  The pilot of a single-engine Cessna plane is recovering after being seriously injured during a plane crash in New Kent County. 

Virginia State Police were called around 4:12 p.m. to 6901 Terminal Road. 

Police say the plane was coming in for a landing, but just before touching down the pilot veered to the left striking some guide wires. 

The pilot was taken to the hospital with serious but non-life threatening injuries. 

The Federal Aviation Administration has been notified. 

The cause of the crash remains under investigation. 

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.nbc12.com

Grumman HU-16C (UF-1) Albatross, N1955G: Incident occurred August 25, 2018 off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina

On departure aircraft struck unknown object in water on mission to drop a weather buoy.


Stargazer Aero Inc


https://registry.faa.gov/N1955G


Date: 25-AUG-18

Time: 18:09:00Z
Regis#: N1955G
Aircraft Make: GRUMMAN
Aircraft Model: HU 16
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: CAPE HATTERAS
State: NORTH CAROLINA

Alerted by the Coast Guard, the crew of a 754-foot cargo ship took five people aboard Saturday after a damaged seaplane was forced to land in the Atlantic 460 miles southeast of Cape Hatteras.

Uninjured, they were later transferred to a guided missile destroyer for the trip back to the U.S.

The seaplane originally left Elizabeth City Saturday morning. It made the emergency landing after hitting an object during takeoff and damaging the aircraft’s front node, according to a Coast Guard statement.

The plane was doing research for Johns Hopkins University, Petty Officer 3rd Class Shannon Kearney, a spokesperson for the Coast Guard 5th District, said Monday. It was not clear at what point in the trip the damage was done.

Everyone aboard put on their life jackets, the Coast Guard said.

Watchstanders at the Coast Guard’s 5th District command center were alerted by the International Emergency Response Coordination Center and an HC-130 Hercules aircraft was launched from the Air Station in Elizabeth City.

The Coast Guard used the Automated Mutual Assistance Vessel Rescue System to divert the nearby 754-foot Liberian bulk carrier Polar Peru. The crew took the five people aboard Saturday night.

Meanwhile, the U.S. Navy sent the destroyer Mason to rendezvous with the Polar Peru to shuttle the passengers back to the United States. The destroyer had been conducting operations with Carrier Strike Group 12, which is based in Norfolk.

Coast Guard personnel from station Mayport were scheduled to meet the Mason Monday morning to take the passengers to Mayport, Fla.

Lt. Daniel Dunn, the command duty officer at the 5th District command center, urged mariners enroll in Automated Mutual Assistance Vessel Rescue System.

“We would also like to commend the crew on how prepared they were for an emergency situation,” he said in the statement. “They had all the required safety equipment, like life jackets, to ensure they would survive while response units were en route.”

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.witn.com

Mooney M20J 201, N201RD: Incident occurred August 26, 2018 at Herlong Recreational Airport (KHEG), Jacksonville, Florida • Incident occurred March 04, 2018 at Myrtle Beach International Airport (KMYR), Horry County, South Carolina • Incident occurred October 10, 2016 at Person County Airport (KTDF), Roxboro, Person County, North Carolina

http://registry.faa.gov/N201RD



Jacksonville police say a pilot and passenger sustained minor injuries when their small single-engine airplane made a hard landing Sunday at Herlong Recreational Airport on the city’s Westside.

The pilot told police he had to make an emergency landing immediately after taking off about 11:30 a.m. from Runway 7 at the airport, 9300 Normandy Blvd., the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office said.

The Sheriff’s Office said he told them that he lost all power about 300 feet off the ground. He tried to land the 1977 four-seat Mooney M20J aircraft just east of the runway in a grassy field. But the plane skidded to a rest just east of the runway, according to the Sheriff’s Office.

Federal Aviation Administration investigators were en route to the scene to interview the pilot and passenger, whose names weren’t released. The Sheriff’s Office is assisting in the investigation, police said.

The plane is registered to an owner in Morristown, Tenn, according to FAA records.

Original article ➤  http://www.jacksonville.com



A pilot and passenger are safe Sunday after their plane lost power while 300 feet in the air, according to the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office. 

It all started when the pilot took off from runway 7 at Herlong Airport at 9300 Normandy Boulevard but lost all power at about 300 feet in the air, says JSO. He attempted to land the plane in a grassy field east of the runway, but JSO says the plane skidded to a stop. The pilot and his one passenger sustained very minor injuries.

Federal Aviation Administration is leading an investigation into the incident with assistance from JSO.

JSO says the plane is a 1977, 4-passenger Mooney M20J aircraft.

Original article ➤ https://www.firstcoastnews.com

March 04, 2018: Tire blew on landing, aircraft then went off the runway into the grass.  

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Carolina

Date: 04-MAR-18
Time: 16:13:00Z
Regis#: N201RD
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20J
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MYRTLE BEACH
State: SOUTH CAROLINA























Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Greensboro

October 10, 2016:  Aircraft landed gear up.

Damage:  Prop strike, engine stoppage, belly damage, some sheet metal damage to wings

Date: 10-OCT-16
Time: 18:00:00Z
Regis#: N201RD
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20J
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ROXBORO
State: North Carolina

Cessna 172N, N5396D: Accident occurred September 15, 2017 at Falwell Airport (W24), Lynchburg, Virginia

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Richmond, Virginia

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N5396D

Location: Lynchburg, VA
Accident Number: GAA17CA540
Date & Time: 09/15/2017, 2000 EDT
Registration: N5396D
Aircraft: CESSNA 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Hard landing
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that, during landing the airplane approached with "extra speed" and ballooned in the landing flare. He added that, "instantly my training took over" and he applied power to go-around, but then also remembered you "cannot go around" when landing in this direction, at this airport, due to terrain and obstacles. He further added that, he then reduced power to idle and "stalled the airplane to the ground" and impacted the remaining runway hard. Subsequently, he taxied the airplane to the ramp without further incident.

The ailerons, wings, and firewall sustained substantial damage.

During a telephone conversation with the NTSB investigator-in-charge, the pilot reported that he had flown into this airport numerous times prior to the accident and knew that, "once you get to the powerlines you are committed to landing." The power lines were located about one 1/4 nautical miles from the runway threshold.

The pilot did not report that there were any preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The Federal Aviation Administration Chart Supplement for the airport stated in part: "Land Rwy [runway] 28 (west) tkf [takeoff] Rwy [runway] 10 (east). The pilot reported that the landing was on runway 28.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 24, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/13/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/20/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 351 hours (Total, all aircraft), 7 hours (Total, this make and model), 194 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 88 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 31 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N5396D
Model/Series: 172 N
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1979
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 17272562
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2400 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines:  1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-320 SERIES
Registered Owner: 3 AMIGOS FLIGHT CLUB LLC.
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLYH, 938 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 5 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2354 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 220°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 9000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 350°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.11 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / 17°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Hanover, VA (OFP)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Lynchburg, VA (W24)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1900 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: FALWELL (W24)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 939 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 28
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2932 ft / 50 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Go Around; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  37.378056, -79.122222 (est)

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA540
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 15, 2017 in Lynchburg, VA
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N5396D
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, during landing the airplane approached with "extra speed" and ballooned in the landing flare. He added that, "instantly my training took over" and he applied power to go-around, but then also remembered you "cannot go around" when landing in this direction, at this airport, due to terrain and obstacles. He further added that, he then reduced power to idle and "stalled the airplane to the ground" and impacted the remining runway hard. Subsequently, he taxied the airplane to the ramp without further incident.

The ailerons, wings, and firewall sustained substantial damage. 

During a telephone conversation with the NTSB investigator-in-charge, the pilot reported that he had flown into this airport numerous times prior to the accident and knew that, "once you get to the powerlines you are committed to landing." The power lines were located about one 1/4 nautical miles from the runway threshold.

The pilot did not report that there were any preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The Federal Aviation Administration Chart Supplement for the airport stated in part: "Land Rwy [runway] 28 (west) tkf [takeoff] Rwy [runway] 10 (east). The pilot reported that the landing was on runway 28.

Piper PA-25-260, N8578L: Accident occurred June 11, 2017 in Hood River County, Oregon

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N8578L

Location: Hood River, OR
Accident Number: GAA17CA331
Date & Time: 06/11/2017, 1630 PDT
Registration: N8578L
Aircraft: PIPER PA25
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel exhaustion
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Glider Tow

The glider tow pilot reported that, during preflight the fuel indicator read "2/3 full" and he had a "brief discussion" with the previous pilot who had just completed numerous glider tow flights, without refueling. He added that a fuel "dipstick" was not available, and a visual check of the fuel quantity was not complete during preflight. He further added that on the 10th glider tow flight, which was about 2 hours of flight time, he noted a "low fuel indication in flight just prior to glider release." Subsequently, the glider released and during the return to the airport, about 2 nautical miles from the runway, about 1,900 above ground, the engine lost power.

The pilot reported that due to the quartering headwind aloft he did not believe he could make the runway, so he attempted to land on an open pasture, but struck trees and impacted terrain about "50 yards short of [the] pasture."

The fuselage, elevator, and both wings sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 55, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Single
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/15/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/30/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 317.6 hours (Total, all aircraft), 7.7 hours (Total, this make and model), 255.9 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 18.7 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 9.7 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: PIPER
Registration: N8578L
Model/Series: PA25 260
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1969
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 25-5004
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/09/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2900 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 13229.8 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: O-540-G1A5
Registered Owner: HOOD RIVER SOARING
Rated Power: 260 hp
Operator: HOOD RIVER SOARING
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: K4S2, 638 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2335 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 140°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 11000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility (RVR): 
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots / 15 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 280°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.91 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 20°C / 8°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Hood River, OR (4S2)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Hood River, OR (4S2)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1630 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: KEN JERNSTEDT AIRFIELD (4S2)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 638 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  45.665000, -121.521111 (est)