Thursday, October 31, 2019

Ground Collision: Cessna 208B Super Cargomaster, N926FE and Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N274MM; accident occurred October 31, 2019 at Daniel K. Inouye International Airport (PHNL), Honolulu, Hawaii



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.


Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu

https://registry.faa.gov/N926FE

Location: Honolulu, Hawaii 
Accident Number: ANC20LA003
Date & Time: October 31, 2019, 13:00 Local 
Registration: N926FE
Aircraft: Cessna 208 
Aircraft Damage: Minor
Defining Event: Ground collision 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air taxi & commuter - Non-scheduled

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial 
Age: 68,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Multi-engine land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane; Helicopter 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With waivers/limitations 
Last FAA Medical Exam: February 12, 2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: August 29, 2019
Flight Time: (Estimated) 3500 hours (Total, all aircraft), 940 hours (Total, this make and model), 1279 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 70 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 32 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private 
Age: 68,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land 
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None 
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With waivers/limitations 
Last FAA Medical Exam: May 14, 2018
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: January 12, 2018
Flight Time: (Estimated) 405 hours (Total, all aircraft), 340 hours (Total, this make and model), 285 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 37 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 24 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N926FE
Model/Series: 208 B 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1987 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal 
Serial Number: 208B0026
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle 
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: September 16, 2019 AAIP 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 8750 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Turbo prop
Airframe Total Time: 13738.7 Hrs at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney
ELT: C126 installed, not activated 
Engine Model/Series: PT6A-114A
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 675 Horsepower
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand air taxi (135)
Operator Does Business As: Operator Designator Code: HSYA

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N274MM
Model/Series: 172 S 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2003 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal 
Serial Number: 172S9320
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle 
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 100 hour 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2450 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated 
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-L2A
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 180 Horsepower
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot school (141)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PHNL,7 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 22:53 Local 
Direction from Accident Site: 342°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 2500 ft AGL 
Visibility 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 170° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.84 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 21°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Honolulu, HI (HNL ) 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Lihue, HI (LIH ) 
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 13:00 Local
Type of Airspace: Class B

Airport Information

Airport: DANIEL K INOUYE INTL HNL 
Runway Surface Type:
Airport Elevation: 12 ft msl 
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Minor
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A Aircraft
Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 21.313055,-157.925277(est)

https://registry.faa.gov/N274MM


Location: Honolulu, HI
Accident Number: ANC20LA003B
Date & Time: 10/31/2019, 1255 HST
Registration: N274MM
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On October 31, 2019, about 1254 Hawaii-Aleutian standard time, a turbine-powered Cessna 208B airplane, N926FE, impacted a Cessna 172, N274MM during ground operations at the Daniel K Inouye International Airport (HNL) Honolulu, Hawaii. The Cessna 208 sustained minor damage and the Cessna 172 sustained substantial damage. The solo commercial pilot of N926FE, and the private pilot and passenger of N274MM were not injured. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and N926FE had filed an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan, and N274MM had no flight plan filed. N926FE was registered to Federal Express Corporation and operated by Corporate Air as flight 8974, an on-demand cargo flight under the provision of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135. N274MM was owned by a private individual and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot of N926FE reported that, while holding on taxiway "C" Charlie for runway 26R, his airplane was positioned approximately 50 feet behind N274MM. With the condition lever set at low idle and the power lever set all the way aft at idle, he applied the parking brake and his attention was diverted from outside of the airplane to inside of the cockpit. While his attention was inside the airplane, he was startled by a noise and vibration, looked up, and realized his airplane had taxied into the back of N274MM. He then shut his airplane down, called tower, and egressed from the airplane.

The pilot of N274MM reported that, while holding for departure, the airplane was struck from behind by N926FE. He added that, there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with N274MM that would have precluded normal operation.

Both airplanes were recovered for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N274MM
Model/Series: 172 S
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Honolulu, HI (HNL)
Destination: Honolulu, HI (HNL)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 21.327222, -157.905833 (est)


A private Cessna and a small FedEx plane collided on a taxiway at the Daniel K. Inouye International Airport.

There were no injuries and no flight delays.

The taxi-way that the collision happened on is closed until they clear the scene.

FedEx released the following statement:

“FedEx Flight 8974, a feeder aircraft en route from Honolulu to Lihue, Hawaii, was involved in an incident with a small Cessna aircraft this afternoon while taxiing for takeoff. We are grateful no one was hurt. Maintenance is evaluating our aircraft, and we are fully cooperating with investigating authorities.”

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.khon2.com

HONOLULU, Hawaii (HawaiiNewsNow) - Authorities are investigating after a small FedEx cargo plane rear-ended a Cessna 172 waiting to take off at Honolulu’s airport on Thursday.

No injuries were reported, and the crash didn’t impact airport operations, a Department of Transportation spokesman said.

The incident happened about 1 p.m. on a taxiway.

The cargo plane ― a single-engine Cessna Caravan ― only had the pilot on board, while the Cessna had a pilot and passenger.

The FAA said it’s investigating the incident.

Original article ➤ https://www.hawaiinewsnow.com

Van's RV-4, N425JW: Fatal accident occurred October 31, 2019 in Middleburg, Clay County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida
Lycoming; Atlanta, Georgia

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N425JW

Location: Middleburg, FL
Accident Number: ERA20FA025
Date & Time: 10/31/2019, 1730 EDT
Registration: N425JW
Aircraft: Vans RV 4
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On October 31, 2019, at 1730 eastern daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built Vans RV-4, N425JW, was destroyed after it impacted power lines near Middleburg, Florida. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight, which originated from Haller Airpark (7FL4), Green Cove Springs, Florida, at 1715.

The airplane was located in a construction clearing in a heavily wooded area. Power lines were observed on the ground near the wreckage. The wreckage path began where the power lines had been located and continued for about 450 ft on a 270° course. A post-accident fire consumed the airplane. The wreckage was inverted and oriented about a 320° heading. The wings were separated from the fuselage, and only about 4 feet of the wing tips remained. The wooden propeller was fragmented, and power line impression marks were found on the propeller blades. The vertical stabilizer was located about 230 ft from the main wreckage. Parts from the engine cowling, rudder and canopy were found scattered in the wreckage path. The cockpit, instrument panel, and firewall were all destroyed by the fire.

The engine accessory case was consumed by fire; the magnetos, fuel pump, vacuum pump, and oil filter were destroyed. The engine crankcase and cylinders were intact. The top spark plugs were removed and a lighted borescope was used to examine the cylinder walls, valves and piston heads. No anomalies were noted. The propeller was rotated by hand and thumb compression was established on all cylinders. Valve train continuity was established throughout the engine by observing movement of the rocker arms and rear accessory case gears. The carburetor was removed and disassembled with no anomalies noted.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airman records, the pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and airplane multi-engine land. The pilot was issued an FAA basic medical certificate on March 26, 2019. He reported 17,868 hours of total flight experience at that time.

According to FAA airworthiness records, the two-seat, single-engine, low-wing airplane was manufactured in 1993. It was powered by a Lycoming O-320-A1A, 180-horsepower engine. The airplane was registered to the pilot in July 2010. According to the maintenance records, the most recent condition inspection was completed on January 9, 2019. At that time, the airframe had accrued 835.7 hours since new and the engine had 835.7 hours since major overhaul.

The 1735 recorded weather observation at Palatka Municipal Airport (28J), Palatka, Florida, which was located about 23 miles east of the accident site, included wind 250° at 3 knots, broken skies at 4,100 ft, and visibility 10 statute miles. The temperature was 29° C, the dew point was 22° C; and the altimeter setting was 29.97 inches of mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Vans
Registration: N425JW
Model/Series: RV 4 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: K28J, 10 ft msl
Observation Time: 2135 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 23 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 22°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots / , 250°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 4100 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.97 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Green Cove Springs, FL (7FL4)
Destination: Green Cove Springs, FL (7FL4)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 30.012500, -81.780000 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

Tim O'Laughlin 


GREEN COVE SPRINGS, Florida  - A pilot who was killed in a Thursday evening plane crash that knocked out power to parts of Clay County would have turned 73 Friday.

While investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board and the Florida Highway Patrol have not identified the pilot, friends told News4Jax his name was Tim O'Laughlin. He was the only person in the two-seat plane at the time. 

State troopers said the single-engine plane took off from Haller Airpark in Green Cove Springs about 5:15 p.m. Thursday and crashed miles away in the woods off County Road 218 in Middleburg.

Close friends described O'Laughlin as a well-liked and experienced pilot who was respected in the community. He learned to fly in the Navy and then flew commercially for various airline companies, including Northwest Airlines and Delta, according to his LinkedIn profile. 

He served in the Navy as an aviator from 1968 to 1997, retiring as a captain. 

"He had a great sense of humor and lots of skills," said Pat Lee, a fellow pilot and friend from Haller Airpark.

Lee said O'Laughlin loved his family and aviation. He frequently flew with a group of Clay County pilots.

"Tim was one of our wingmen, and a really good friend and a great loss," Lee said. "He was a really great neighbor. He was a great pilot and it's shocking to all of us because we have no idea."

State troopers and the NTSB are investigating the cause of the fiery crash. The investigation could take a year. A wrecker removed the plane Friday and took it to a storage facility. A medical examiner would make positive identification of the body, according to FHP Sgt. Dylan Bryan.

There were no witnesses apparently, so no one reported the plane crash at the time. However, it took down power lines in a field off C.R. 218 and that knocked out electricity for a lot of people in the area. When utility crews with Clay Electric came to find out why, they made the discovery.

The military veteran leaves behind a wife and a son, as well as many friends, who are now left wondering why this happened.

"As far as I know he was in great health," Lee noted. "Tim took really good care of his airplane. It was a beautiful airplane."

He flew a homebuilt single-engine, 2-seater RV-4 plane. Lee said O'Laughlin did not build the aircraft, but maintained it meticulously. He was also an avid camper with his motor home.  

"Every day you try to minimize the risks," Lee remarked. "It's what we've been doing all our lives. We're not daredevils. We're not test pilots. We fly really safe procedures and airplanes."

Friends said O'Laughlin spent his free time doing flyovers and memorials for veterans and pilots who passed away. It's now time for his fellow airmen to remember him.

Friends and fellow pilots said they are planning a memorial service and flyover in his honor. They have not yet set a date because they want to make sure it works for his family members. 


Story and video ➤ https://www.news4jax.com


Tim O'Laughlin 

CLAY COUNTY, Florida - Thousands of homes were without power in Clay County after an experimental aircraft crashed into electrical equipment on Thursday night, according to Clay County Fire Rescue.

The Florida Highway Patrol said one person was on board and that person died in the crash. The scene was on County Road 218 near Shadowlawn Elementary School.

Fire Rescue said the Van's RV-4 hit a transmission line and caught fire. The plane went down in a dense wooded area.

The victim was not immediately identified.

According to the Clay Electric, about 6,000 homes were affected at the height of the outage. By 8:30 p.m., the utility's outage map showed power had been restored.

It's unclear what led to the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.news4jax.com



The pilot of an experimental aircraft is dead after crashing into a power line in Clay County Thursday, according to the Florida Highway patrol.

FHP said the single occupant of the Van's RV-4 died after the plane crashed in a densely wooded area off of County Road 218 and Henley Road.

Over 6,000 customers were without power in Clay County when the crash happened, according to Clay Electric.


Clay County Fire Rescue said the Van's RV-4 crashed approximately a mile into the woods off of County Road 218 between Green Cove Springs and Lake Asbury. 


The plane hit a transmission line and caught fire, firefighters said.

The Clay County Sheriff's Office said the plane crash was reported near 2943 County Road 218 in Lake Ashbury and the Shadowlawn area. Deputies were on the scene investigating the incident.


Florida Highway Patrol is the primary agency investigating the incident, according to the sheriff's office.


Please avoid the area as they investigate.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.firstcoastnews.com

Piper PA-32R-301T, N181AG: Fatal accident occurred October 31, 2019 near Barkley Regional Airport (KPAH), Paducah, Kentucky

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Louisville, Kentucky
Piper; Vero Beach, Florida
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

https://registry.faa.gov/N181AG

Location:Paducah, KY
Accident Number: ERA20FA026
Date & Time: 10/31/2019, 1926 CDT
Registration: N181AG
Aircraft: Piper PA32R
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On October 31, 2019, at 1926 central daylight time, a Piper PA32R-301T, N181AG, was destroyed during a forced landing following a total loss of engine power while on approach to the Barkley Regional Airport (PAH), Paducah, Kentucky. The private pilot, who was also the owner of the airplane was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight which originated at the Mitchell Municipal Airport (MHE), Mitchell, South Dakota, about 1628, and was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Preliminary information obtained from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed the purpose of the flight was for the pilot to return to PAH, which was his home airport, after a hunting trip. In a telephone interview, a representative from the fixed-base-operator at MHE stated that the accident airplane arrived on November 27, 2019, and he serviced the airplane with 31 gallons of fuel, which filled the tanks. He further commented on the smoothness of the engine as the airplane approached the fuel pumps.

Preliminary radar and voice communication information from FAA air traffic control (ATC) facilities for the accident flight revealed the airplane was receiving flight following services from the Memphis Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) and all communications were routine before the ARTCC controller issued a frequency change to the local controller at PAH.

In an interview at the accident site, the local controller said he was familiar with the pilot and the accident airplane. He said that the pilot checked in on the tower frequency and he provided the pilot with the current altimeter, wind, and active runway information. The pilot informed him that he was "lined up" for a straight-in landing to runway 14 which he requested, and the controller approved. The controller advised the airplane was "cleared to land" which the pilot acknowledged. Approximately 1.5 minutes later, the pilot advised, "I've lost power." The controller asked the pilot if he thought the airplane would reach the runway, and the pilot responded, "Yes." Soon after, the pilot advised, "I'm not going to make it, I'm in the trees." There were no further communications from the accident airplane.

The airplane collided with trees and terrain, aligned with runway 14 at PAH, about 1.5 miles prior to the landing threshold.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single engine land. His most recent FAA third class medical certificate was issued November 13, 2013. The pilot reported 120 total hours of flight experience on that date. Interpolation of FAA and aircraft records revealed the pilot had an estimated 570 total hours of flight experience, of which 450 hours were in the accident airplane make and model.

According to FAA airworthiness records, the airplane was manufactured in 2006 and was powered by a Lycoming TIO-540-AH1A, 300-horsepower engine. Its most recent annual inspection was completed February 19, 2019 at 1,588.7 total aircraft hours.

The airplane wreckage was examined at the site, and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The wreckage path was oriented about a 140° heading and was approximately 100 ft in length. The initial tree strike was about 60 ft above the ground, where the outboard 8 ft of the left wing was observed suspended.

The main wreckage came to rest adjacent to a railbed on approximately a 090° heading. The baggage compartment, cockpit, cabin area, the inboard sections of each wing, and the empennage were consumed by post-crash fire.

The instrument panel and engine control quadrant were consumed by fire. The T-bar assembly exhibited thermal damage but the aileron and stabilator cables remained attached to their respective attachment points on the T-bar assembly. The rudder pedals were thermally damaged, and the rudder control cables remained attached. Flight control continuity was established from the rudder pedal assembly to the rudder. Stabilator control continuity was established from the T-bar to the stabilator. Right aileron control continuity was established from the T-bar to the right aileron bellcrank. Left aileron continuity was established from the T-bar and through overload separations to the left aileron bellcrank. Measurement of the electric flap actuator jackscrew corresponded to a wing flap setting of 40° (full flaps).

The nose landing gear remained attached to the engine mount and was partially extended during recovery. Thermal damage was observed to the nose wheel assembly. The engine cowlings remained attached to their attaching points and exhibited impact and thermal damage. The induction air filter was impact-damaged and the alternate air door was in the "open/alternate air position."

The engine was rotated by hand at the propeller, and continuity was confirmed from the powertrain through the valvetrain to the accessory section. Compression was confirmed on all cylinders using the "thumb" method. Borescope examination of each cylinder revealed signatures consistent with normal wear and lubrication. The magnetos sustained thermal damage. There were removed and rotated by hand, but neither produced spark. The fuel pump was removed, actuated with a drill, and drew and expelled air into the intake port and out of the output port. The fuel inlet screen and the fuel injector nozzles were clear and absent of debris.

The turbocharger was removed, and both the compressor and exhaust impellers rotated freely and displayed no visible damage.

The fuel lines were consumed by fire and the fuel selector valve exhibited thermal damage. The fuel selector control lever was observed near the right fuel tank position. However, examination of the fuel selector valve revealed the selector plate was out of the detent and not fully seated in the right fuel tank position. The fuel selector valve's bowl was thermally damaged, and its filters were consumed by fire. Further examination of the selector valve revealed its lever was seized in position. Upon disassembly, the selector plate indicated an intermediate selector valve position.. During disassembly, when the selector valve could be rotated and was placed in the left or right fuel tank position detent, it was noted that the associated ports were unobstructed.

At 1853, the weather recorded at PAH included winds from 250° at 3 knots, clear skies, visibility 10 statute miles, temperature was 0°C, dew point -3°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.27 inches of mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N181AG
Model/Series: PA32R 301T
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Cloud Hugger Transportation Llc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: PAH, 410 ft msl
Observation Time: 2353 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 0°C / -3°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots / , 250°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.27 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Mitchell, SD (MHE)
Destination: Paducah, KY (PAH)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 37.103333, -88.817222 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

Dr. Clint Hill, MD



MCCRACKEN COUNTY, Kentucky — In the crisp, cool fall air, there was a somber silence along the railroad tracks on Metropolis Lake Road on Friday as investigators continued working to figure out what caused Dr. Clint Hill's plane to crash the night before. 

Hill's plane took off from Mitchell South Dakota around 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, and it was last seen that night around 7:20 p.m. near Paducah. It crashed near railroad tracks several miles away from Barkley Regional Airport. Hill died in the crash.

"Just a tragic event," McCracken County Sheriff Matt Carter said.

Carter and his deputies are working with federal investigators from the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board to find out what happened. He said at this point it's too early to know what caused the crash. It's a case that's tough to deal with.

"We just ask that the community keep this family in our thoughts and prayers during this very difficult and tragic time," Carter said.

Hill was very well known throughout the Local 6 region. He was a spinal surgeon at the Orthopedic Institute of Southern Illinois and Western Kentucky. Friends and family are heartbroken that Hill is gone.

"He was just a good man who did good work," Orthopedic Institute CEO Greg Thompson said.

Thompson knew Hill well. He said anyone who knew Hill felt a personal connection to him.

"If you got to meet Dr. Hill, you had a story, because that man left you with some sort of impression that you would never forget. That's the type of person he was," Thompson said.

Thompson said there will never be another Dr. Hill.

"He was a unique individual that this region will never be able to replace," Thompson said.

In addition to Hill's medical background, he was also a NASCAR pit-crew member for four years, and served in the Army National Guard for nine years. Hill leaves behind a wife and five children.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wpsdlocal6.com





PADUCAH — One person was killed when a plane crashed near Barkley Regional Airport in Paducah Thursday night. 

Airport Authority Board Chair George Bray confirmed a plane went down off of runway 14. 

The plane crashed near railroad tracks in a wooded area, which McCracken County Sheriff Matt Carter says is just south of Woodville Road and west of Metropolis Lake Road. 

A firefighter at the scene told Local 6 the pilot of a plane died in the crash. 

Carter confirms that the pilot was killed, and says there was only one person in the plane. He says investigators are working to identify the pilot and notify the family. 

Barkley Regional Airport Manager Dennis Rouleau says the plane is a general aviation aircraft, not a commercial plane. He says the craft went down north of the airfield.

The plane is a Piper PA-32R Saratoga, which is a small, single-engine aircraft. Airport Marketing Director Eddie Grant says the plane was on final approach to the airport when it crashed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration have been alerted about the crash and will assist local authorities in the ongoing investigation. 

Grant says the airport is still open and operational, and commercial flights are continuing as scheduled. 

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wpsdlocal6.com

Beech 95-B55 (T42A) Baron, N228PL: Accident occurred October 31, 2019 at Freeman Field Airport (3JC), Junction City, Geary County, Kansas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Wichita

Aircraft landed, gear collapsed and veered off runway into the grass. 


Heritage Pentecostal Church


https://registry.faa.gov/N228PL


Date: 31-OCT-19

Time: 15:00:00Z
Regis#: N228PL
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 55
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: JUNCTION CITY
State: KANSAS

GEARY COUNTY — A small plane was involved in an accident just after 10 a.m. Thursday in Geary County.

The Kansas Highway Patrol reported the landing gear malfunctioned on a 1968 Beech 95-B55 piloted by John E. Burgess, 55, Colorado Springs, Corado, at the Freeman Field Airport in Junction City.

Burgess and a passenger Matthew D. Watson, 30, Port Arthur, Texas, were not injured. The accident remains under investigation.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.hayspost.com

Kansas Highway Patrol
Case 2019-016346
Crash Information
Date: 10/31/2019
Time: 10:00

County: Geary
Location Description: 540 W. 18th St, Junction City/ Freeman Field Airport

Investigated by: K367
Type: Non Injury

Crash Narrative: plane accident/ front landing gear malfunctioned.

Medical Event: Beechcraft 58 Baron, N959CM; fatal accident occurred October 31, 2019 near Ocala International Airport (KOCF), Marion County, Florida

Peter Morrow
~

Chris Allen Belcher
~



















Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida
Textron; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Ocala, Florida 
Accident Number: ERA20FA022
Date and Time: October 31, 2019, 11:31 Local
Registration: N959CM
Aircraft: Beech 58
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Medical event
Injuries: 2 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Flight test

Factual Information

On October 31, 2019, at 1131 eastern daylight time, a Beechcraft BE-58, N959CM, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Ocala, Florida. The private pilot and passenger were fatally injured.

An individual on the ground was seriously injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 maintenance test flight.

The pilot had flown into Ocala International Airport Jim Taylor Field (OCF), Ocala, Florida, the day before the accident with a friend. According to the friend, the flight was normal, but the right engine’s fuel flow meter was fluctuating between zero and high while the other engine instruments were normal. The following day, the pilot asked a mechanic to look at the fuel transducer. The mechanic removed the fuel flow transducers from both engines and reinstalled them on the opposite engine to determine if there was an instrument indication problem or an actual fuel flow sensor issue. After performing the maintenance, the pilot and mechanic performed several test runs of the engines without incident. They then conducted a flight test together.

A review of air traffic control communications provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that the pilot requested a taxi clearance at 1124 and asked if there was a block of airspace near the airport where he could conduct a maintenance test flight. The ground controller told the pilot that there were no restricted areas and he could choose where he would like to go. The pilot responded that he would conduct the test west of the airport. The ground controller cleared the pilot to taxi to runway 18; however, the pilot initially taxied to runway 26 and the ground controller twice provided the pilot directions to runway 18.

After takeoff, the pilot was cleared to make a right turn to the west, which he did not acknowledge. Several seconds later, the controller repeated the clearance, which the pilot again did not acknowledge, and the pilot turned left onto an easterly heading. On the third attempt to contact the pilot, the controller asked if he was “alright” and the pilot responded, “say again.” The controller asked where the pilot was going and the pilot reported that he was going to the west; the controller stated “no, you’re not, you’re heading to the east sir.” The controller again issued instructions to the pilot to proceed on course to the west; the pilot did not acknowledge. Seeing that the airplane was continuing to the east, the controller asked the pilot his intentions. Several seconds later, about 2 minutes after takeoff, the accident airplane transmitted, “niner charlie mike, we need to return to the field sir.” This was the last communication from the airplane.

Numerous witnesses saw the airplane after it departed. Some of these witnesses said it was flying north at a low altitude before it entered a steep inverted dive. Other witnesses reported the airplane spinning to the left as it descended. One witness said that the airplane was on fire, while another witness said that the left propeller was not turning.

Data downloaded from a handheld GPS found in the wreckage revealed that, after takeoff, the airplane entered a left turn and never gained more than 418 ft in altitude. During the last minute of flight, the airplane’s groundspeed varied from 95 to 107 knots before the data ended at 1131. 

Video recovered from a parked car near the accident site captured the airplane rotating counterclockwise as it impacted a four-lane divided highway. The airplane’s right wing struck the ground first before impacting a moving vehicle. The airplane then skidded across two lanes of traffic, struck a concrete curb, then spun 180° before coming to rest in a vacant lot. The deflection of the rudder just before ground impact was estimated to be 20º±4º to the left, in the direction of rotation. No airframe or engine fire and/or smoke was observed in the video.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane multiengine land, airplane single-engine land, airplane single-engine sea, and instrument airplane. According to the pilot’s logbook, he had accumulated about 7,800 total hours of flight experience and completed a flight review on October 4, 2019. On February 19, 2019, he was issued a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third class medical certificate with a limitation for corrective lenses.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

On-scene examination revealed that the airplane traveled about 150 ft from the initial impact point. All major components of the airplane were located at the accident site and a postimpact fire consumed the fuselage. Continuity of the ailerons, elevator, and rudder was established from each of the respective control surfaces to the cockpit. The flaps and landing gear were retracted. 

Located near the initial impact point was a ground scar that was consistent with an imprint of the airplane’s nose, fuselage, both engines, both propellers and both wings. Three distinct slash marks, consistent with propeller contact, was observed in the asphalt near where the right engine impacted the road. Another slash mark was observed adjacent to where the left engine impacted the road.
Both wings sustained impact damage and their respective fuel tanks were breached. The fuel selector handle and the valves for each wing fuel tank were found in the “on” position.

The left engine remained attached to the airframe and sustained extensive impact and thermal damage.

The crankshaft was capable of rotation; however, due to impact damage to the camshaft gear, it could not be rotated completely. Subsequent borescope examination of the engine, pistons, and cylinders revealed no anomalies. The throttle metering assembly was damaged by thermal and impact forces.

Examination revealed that the throttle control arm was installed backward from the normal position; however, the throttle and metering assembly spring was intact, held tension, and operated normally. No additional anomalies were discovered on the engine or components that would preclude normal engine operation.

The three-bladed propeller assembly sustained extensive impact damage and a portion of the hub remained attached to the crankshaft. One blade remained attached to the hub, and the second and third blades had separated and were found with the wreckage. The blade that remained attached displayed chordwise scratches and curling at the tip. Of the two blades that separated, one exhibited twisting deformation, leading-edge gouges, and chordwise scratches. The other blade exhibited minor chordwise scratches near the blade tip and minor twisting deformation.

The fuel flow transducer remained attached to its installation point and displayed thermal damage. The fuel flow inlet nut was finger-tight and able to be moved by hand; however, the fuel line and nut displayed thermal damage. The transducer was removed and examined; air was blown into the inlet and it flowed through the transducer freely. Disassembly of the transducer revealed no obstructions or other anomalies.

The right engine separated from the airframe and was found just forward of the right wing. Due to impact and thermal damage, the crankshaft could not be rotated. The engine was completely disassembled, which revealed no preimpact anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

The three-bladed propeller assembly sustained significant impact damage. One blade remained partially attached to the hub and exhibited chordwise scratches, forward deformation, and tip curling. The other two blades had separated and were found with the wreckage. Of the two blades that separated, one had a large portion of the tip missing in addition to chordwise scratches, leading-edge gouges, twisting and S-bending deformation. The blade and a recovered portion of the blade tip displayed chordwise scratches, twisting and forward bending deformation, and leading edge gouges. The other blade was also missing a tip of the blade and exhibited chordwise scratches, leading edge gouges, and displayed twisting and S-bending deformation.

The fuel flow transducer remained attached to its installation point and remained relatively intact. The transducer was removed and examined; air was blown into the inlet and it flowed through the transducer freely. Disassembly of the transducer revealed no obstructions or other anomalies.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Medical Examiner Districts 5 & 24, Leesburg, Florida, performed an autopsy on the pilot. The cause of death was multiple blunt force injuries. Severe abdominal aortic atherosclerosis was identified.

The FAA’s Forensic Sciences Laboratory performed toxicology testing on the pilot’s tissue and blood samples, which identified diazepam (commonly marketed as Valium) and its psychoactive metabolites nordiazepam and oxazepam in the pilot’s liver and muscle tissue. The non-sedating high blood pressure medication valsartan was also detected in liver and muscle.

Toxicology testing performed for the medical examiner’s office detected diazepam at 96 nanograms per milliliter (ng/mL), nordiazepam at 94 ng/mL, and delta-9- tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) at 0.69 ng/mL in the pilot’s chest blood.

Diazepam is a sedating benzodiazepine available by prescription as a controlled substance and used to treat anxiety and is also useful to help treat muscle spasms, alcohol withdrawal, and seizures. It is metabolized to the active metabolites nordiazepam or temazepam. These compounds are further metabolized to the active metabolite oxazepam. Diazepam and its metabolites carry the warning that they may impair the mental and physical ability to perform hazardous tasks. The therapeutic range of diazepam and nordiazepam is 100 to 2,000 ng/mL in the blood. Diazepam has a half-life of 21 to 82 hours; nordiazepam has a half-life of 25 to 200 hours.

The marijuana plant (cannabis) contains chemicals called cannabinoids; THC is the primary psychoactive cannabinoid compound. THC's mood-altering effects include euphoria and relaxation. In addition, marijuana causes alterations in motor behavior, perception, and cognition. Significant performance impairments are usually observed for at least 1-2 hours following marijuana use, and residual effects have been reported up to 24 hours.

THC is rapidly metabolized, but the rate of metabolism is not linear and depends on the means of ingestion (smoking, oil, and edibles), potency of the product, frequency of use, and user characteristics. THC is fat soluble, so is stored in fatty tissues and can be released back into the blood long after consumption. So, while the psychoactive effects may last a few hours, THC can be detected in the blood for days or weeks. Thus, low blood level test results do not necessarily reflect recent use and cannot be used to prove that the user was under the influence of the drug at the time of testing.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private 
Age: 73,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Single-engine sea; Multi-engine land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None 
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: February 2, 2019
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: October 4, 2019
Flight Time: (Estimated) 7800 hours (Total, all aircraft)

Passenger Information

Certificate: 
Age: 50, Male
Airplane Rating(s): 
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): 
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s):
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): 
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification: 
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech 
Registration: N959CM
Model/Series: 58 Undesignated 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1996 
Amateur Built:
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: TH-1792
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle 
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection: March 18, 2019
Annual Certified Max Gross Wt.: 5500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 61 Hrs
Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1979 Hrs as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-550-C31B
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 300 Horsepower
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC) 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: OCF,89 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 11:40 Local 
Direction from Accident Site: 340°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 2200 ft AGL
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 200°
Turbulence Severity
Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 24°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Ocala, FL (OCF) 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Ocala, FL (OCF)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 11:28 Local 
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: Ocala Intl-Jim Taylor Field OCF
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 89 ft msl 
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 18 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 7467 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Fire: On-ground
Ground Injuries: 1 Serious 
Aircraft Explosion: On-ground
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal, 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 29.141666,-82.194168


Location: Ocala, FL
Accident Number: ERA20FA022
Date & Time: 10/31/2019, 1130 EDT
Registration: N959CM
Aircraft: Beech 58
Injuries: 2 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Flight Test

On October 31, 2019, at 1130 eastern daylight time, a Beechcraft BE-58, N959CM, was destroyed after it impacted a vehicle and terrain shortly after takeoff from Ocala International Airport-Jim Taylor Field (OCF), Ocala, Florida. The private pilot and a passenger were fatally injured; one occupant in the vehicle was seriously injured. The airplane was owned and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 post-maintenance test flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed OCF at 1128.

According to witnesses, the pilot and a passenger intended to fly a multi-leg cross-country flight to Yuba County Airport (MYV), Marysville, California, and they flew from Punta Gorda Airport (PGD), Punta Gorda, Florida to OCF the day before the accident. The passenger reported that during the flight to OCF the right engine fuel flow meter consistently fluctuated from zero to high; however, the engine's performance and all other indications appeared normal. An airframe and powerplant mechanic at OCF examined the airplane and subsequently removed the fuel flow transducer from both engines and reinstalled them on the opposing engine to determine if there was an instrument indication problem or an actual fuel flow issue. The pilot and mechanic performed several post-maintenance engine run-ups with no apparent anomalies and then intended to conduct a test flight.

At 1111, an airport security camera recorded the airplane on the ramp in front of a hangar next to the fuel farm with both engines operating. The airplane then taxied to runway 18. About 1128, the airplane departed runway 18, turned left and exited the camera view as it flew in an easterly direction.

The OCF air traffic controller reported the airplane appeared lower and slower than expected, and that he had instructed the pilot to proceed westbound. The controller queried the pilot regarding the airplane's heading, the pilot responded they were heading to the west as instructed, and the controller advised that the airplane was flying eastbound. The controller instructed the pilot to proceed westbound. The airplane continued to fly to the east and the pilot advised the controller that they needed to return to the airport. No additional details for the reason of their request to return to the airport was communicated and no emergency was declared.

Several witnesses near the accident site reported that the airplane was flying southeast at a lower altitude than normal. The airplane continued a "shallow" left turn to the north, towards OCF. The airplane's wings were wobbling after it completed the turn north, then it leveled off briefly before "nose diving" towards the ground where it impacted a six-lane asphalt highway and struck two vehicles before coming to rest. Additional witnesses reported that the airplane was spinning to the left as it descended.

Video recovered from a nearby vehicle equipped with a camera showed the airplane approach from the southeast in a left spinning descent as it impacted the highway. The airplane stuck the road in a nose and right wing low attitude. During the impact, the fuselage struck a vehicle that was travelling in the westbound lanes. The airplane then skidded across the eastbound lanes, struck a concrete curb, then spun around towards the south as it exploded and became engulfed in flames.

The airplane came to rest in a vacant lot, about 2 miles from the approach end of runway 18.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane multiengine land, airplane single engine land, airplane single engine sea, instrument airplane. According to the pilot's logbook, the pilot had accumulated about 7,800 hours of total flight experience and completed a flight review on October 4, 2019. On February 19, 2019, he was issued a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third class medical certificate with a limitation; must wear corrective lenses.

According to FAA airworthiness records, the airplane was issued a standard airworthiness certificate in the normal category on September 5, 1996. The airplane was an all-metal, six-seat, multiengine airplane equipped with two Continental IO-550-C31B, 300-horsepower engines that each drove a McCauley 3-blade constant-speed propeller.

At 1140, the weather conditions reported at OCF included clear sky, wind from 200° at 7 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, few clouds at 2,200 ft, temperature 29°C, dew point 24°C, and an altimeter setting was 30.06 inches of mercury.

The first impact site on the highway exhibited a complete imprint of the airplane that consisted of gouges and scrapes that formed an outline of the nose, left and right wings, left and right engines, fuselage and empennage.

The right engine impact point showed the outline of the engine and propeller spinner in addition to three distinct sequential gouges consistent with propeller blade impact gouges outboard of the engine.

The left engine impact point showed one 3 ft gouge adjacent to where the left propeller spinner impacted.

The wreckage was examined at the accident site, and all major components and flight control surfaces were accounted for at the scene.

The fuselage, cockpit and instrumentation were consumed by postimpact fire. The throttle quadrant exhibited severe thermal damage. All six of the engine power, propeller and mixture controls were located in their most aft position.

The flight controls in the cockpit and all flight control surface attachment points remained attached. Flight control cable continuity of the ailerons, elevator and rudder was established from each of the respective control surfaces to the cockpit. The flaps remained attached to the wings and were in the retracted position and the cockpit flap control was found in the up position.

The fuel selector handles, and fuel selector valves for their respective engines/fuel tanks were found in the on position. Both fuel tanks were breached during the impact

The main landing gear was found in the up and stowed position. The landing gear control in the cockpit was damaged by impact and fire and its position could not be determined.

The left engine was attached to all its mounts and found attached to the left wing in an upright position. It exhibited impact and postimpact fire damage. All cylinders remained attached to the crankcase. The engine could not be rotated by hand. The spinner remained attached to the flange and was crushed and split open on the bottom side where it rested on the ground. The top of the spinner was relatively intact. The three-blade propeller hub was fractured by impact forces. Two of the blades detached from the hub. The remaining blade was discovered in a near neutral position and it exhibited, several gouges, leading edge scrapes and was curled inward.

The right engine detached from the firewall and was discovered 3 ft forward of the right wing in an upside-down position. It exhibited impact and postimpact fire damage. All cylinders remained attached to the crankcase. The engine could not be rotated by hand. The spinner was torn from the flange in multiple locations and was partially connected. The three-blade propeller hub assembly was severely fractured by impact forces. Two of the blades detached from the hub. The remaining blade exhibited bending and twisting deformation as well as chordwise scraping and leading edge damage.

The four remaining propeller blades were recovered at the scene in various locations around the wreckage site with one of the blades striking a vehicle. One of the blades exhibited little damage and was relatively free of leading edge damage or gouging. The remaining blades showed bending, twisting deformation, scraping and leading edge gouges.

The airplane was recovered and retained for additional examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech
Registration: N959CM
Model/Series: 58 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Caribbean World Resorts Ltd
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: OCF, 89 ft msl
Observation Time: 1140 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 24°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 2200 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / , 200°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.06 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Ocala, FL (OCF)
Destination: Ocala, FL (OCF)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Explosion: On-Ground
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal, 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 29.141667, -82.194167




Chris Allen Belcher, 50, passed away October 31, 2019. Chris was born in Nashville, TN, on December 10, 1968, to Janet Dube'. He proudly served and retired with the United States Air Force after 23 years as Flying Crew Chief.  

Hobbies included, Amateur HAM radio, Krav Maga, Taekwando, and photography.  

He is survived by his loving wife, Ramona Lesley Belcher; son, Tom Belcher (Abigail); daughter, Hannah Belcher; mother Janet Dube'.

Memorial service will be 10:00 am, Friday, November 8, 2019, at Countryside Funeral Home, Anthony, FL, with Pastor Wayne Hunter officiating. He will be laid to rest following the service in Florida National Cemetery, Bushnell, FL with Military Honors at 12:30 p.m. Arrangements are under the care of Countryside Funeral Home, Anthony, Florida.

Peter Morrow


It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Peter Morrow, co – owner of Jamaica Inn. Mr. Peter, as he is affectionately known, died on Thursday, October 31, 2019 in a plane crash in northern Florida. The entire Jamaica Inn family mourns this loss.  On behalf of our Board of Directors, Management team and Employees, we extend our deepest sympathies to Morrow family.

Kyle Mais, General Manager of Jamaica Inn, issued the following statement on behalf of the Jamaica Inn team:

As you all know, Peter was an integral part of the Jamaica Inn family who brought his remarkable passion, intuition and love for people to the Jamaica Inn brand.  Mr. Peter lived a wonderful insightful life and enjoyed being on property sharing the benefits of the Jamaica Inn’s special atmosphere with all guests who come into our care. No words can adequately express our sadness regarding Sir Pete’s passing or the great privilege we had of working with him. We will honor his life and legacy by continuing to work hand in hand as a family making sure his beloved Jamaica Inn continues to flourish and bring joy and happiness to all who pass through.



Peter Morrow’s Early Life

Peter first came to Jamaica as a very young boy when his father Charles Morrow built and opened the Montego beach hotel that opened in the very early 50s. He enjoyed running up and down the halls knocking on guest room doors which of course irritated his father and the guests! As a teenager he loved spending time over the holidays at the Montego Beach where there were always plenty of young ladies on holiday as well!

After living and studying in London and Paris he started his hotel career in the 60s by working the night shift at The Roosevelt Hotel in New York City. He then moved on to the Equinox House in Vermont followed by a stint at the Ritz Carlton in Montreal. He was lucky to then spend time working at The Coral Reef Club in Barbados under the sharp eye of Budge and Cynthia O’Hara where he learnt even more about the inner workings of the hotel business. Having a great base in hotel work he switched direction and opened a business with his brother Eric in the other old Morrow family business which were retail stores called Morrow’s Nut House and they owned and operated a chain of those stores in malls across the states and the U.K.

When Mr. Morrow senior retired, Peter and his brother took over the operation of the Jamaica Inn in the 1980’s and he loved his time there forever looking at new ways of keeping an classic hotel running and current yet not changing the ambiance and essence for which is still known around the world. He took great pleasure in meeting guests from everywhere and talking to them about life, philosophy and politics. To demonstrate his love of engagement, he recently took umbrage with the fact that the Inn introduced coffee makers in our rooms as it perhaps meant less people to talk to in the early mornings.

He sat in the same chair every day where he could observe all the comings and goings and keep a interested eye on the operation to ensure that we delivered the very best service possible while at the same checking in with the team to ensure they were happy, enjoying their jobs and taking great pride in working at the Inn. His greatest love however was flying and he had his pilot’s license at the age of 15 way before he had a driver’s license. He literally flew every day that he possibly could and would think nothing of flying somewhere for a cup of coffee or lunch. We take solace in knowing he left us doing what he loved best.














OCALA, Florida — Two people were killed Thursday after a small plane clipped an SUV and crashed just off a busy state highway near a shopping center off Interstate 75 in Ocala.

The crash happened on Southwest College Road, also known as State Road 200, near the Marketstreet at Heathbrook shopping center.

The plane, a Beechcraft Baron, was taking off for a maintenance flight from Ocala International Airport but ran into trouble, police said. As the pilot tried to land the plane on S.R. 200 in front of a shopping center, it clipped a gold SUV and crashed on the side of the roadway.

The two people aboard the plane were killed. Police identified them as pilot Peter Morrow and mechanic Christopher Belcher. Morrow had taken off in Punta Gorda and had decided to stop in Ocala to dodge bad weather. On the way there, he reported "an issue" and decided to have it looked at, an Ocala Police detective wrote in a report.

On the ground in Ocala, Morrow and Belcher tested the plane but couldn't replicate the problem, so they decided to take it on a maintenance flight. The plane crashed just before noon.

The person inside the SUV was injured and told investigators he thought another vehicle hit him. He was transported to a hospital.

“One of the other things that we are taught as pilots is to make sure that we don't endanger the lives of others as much as possible, so definitely attempting to minimize that was some thoughtfulness on the pilot's part,” said Any Chan, founder of Right Rudder Aviation.

A witness who contacted us said they saw the plane hit a Toyota SUV, land hard on the sidewalk and burst into flames.

Pictures sent to us from someone at the site show firefighters spraying water on a smoldering wreck just off the street, with police blocking the roadway.

Another eyewitness who said they work in the area tells us it appeared that power lines were down. They said there were black scorch marks on the roadway, and there was a burning pile of metal on the side of the road.

Florida Department of Transportation officials urged motorists to be prepared for traffic delays in the area "for an unknown length of time." All lanes of S.R. 200 between 60th and 40th finally opened up again Thursday night. 

The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the crash.