Wednesday, December 28, 2016

San Diegans are tired of airport noise and tired of complaining

Point Loma, Mission Beach and La Jolla residents at an Airport Noise Advisory Committee meeting on Dec. 21, 2016. 



Even the most prolific complaint writer is fatigued.


Steve Crow, a Point Loma Heights resident of 10 years, complained about airplane noise far more than anyone else in 2016, filing 20,068 complaints. In February alone, he filed 4,084 complaints, as many as 251 in a day. In November, he lodged 39.


"It really just started two years ago," Crow said about planes flying over his neighborhood. "But I've stopped logging complaints because it wears on you."


Crow was working from home when he began submitting hundreds of complaints a day. He said he made calls to city council members and local politicians only to receive a "stock response" each time.


"You're up against an industry and you're just residents, that's all you are," he said. "You've got to dedicate time to something else. Do you move? Yeah, probably. I don't want to, but there's just not going to be a resolution."


An airport authority spokeswoman said an improvement in operations is responsible for the recent downturn in complaints, as well as heightened community awareness of flight paths and daily airport operations.


Explaining the increase

In late 2015, complaints began to rise from several a month to thousands as the Federal Aviation Administration rolled out its plan for the SoCal Metroplex, a project that would alter arrival and departure flight paths at 19 Southern California airports.

For San Diego, the proposal meant departing planes, after taking off toward the west, would turn sooner and fly closer to previously quiet neighborhoods. However, after months of negative feedback from the community, the FAA placed the turning point almost two miles south of the peninsula, farther south than its current location.

Airport authority spokeswoman Rebecca Bloomfield said there were no actual changes in airport operations at the time, and it was the proposal that caused an immediate increase in noise complaints.

Documents provided by the airport authority tell a different story. They show early turns below 6,000 feet and curfew violations, two main causes for noise in Point Loma and nearby neighborhoods, have increased since 2014.

"When they say there was no change, that worries me," said Casey Schnoor, a member of an airport noise subcommittee. "When you look at the data, things were changing."

Early turns occur when air traffic controllers either instruct a pilot to turn before reaching an established waypoint, or approve a pilot's request to do so. The points were created to keep flights on a route straight off the peninsula and around it to avoid unnecessary noise while taking off.

At a November airport noise meeting, FAA officials said controllers allow early turns for three reasons: weather, safety, and most concerning for the committee members, distance between planes, known as separation.

Dr. Lila Schmidt, a physician and Point Loma resident, told FAA officials in November that spacing planes out will cut down on noise, "but you won't have as much money coming into San Diego."

She suggested air traffic control - responsible for incoming and outgoing flights on the runway - only permit flights to depart every five minutes, which she said would allow planes to avoid bunching up and would reduce early turns.

In response, Barry Davis, an air traffic manager for the FAA, told her "that will never happen" because passengers will have to wait too long on the runway before taking off.

In a recent report, inewsource found airlines are paying an increasing number of fines for breaking the Airport Authority rule that says planes can't take off between 11:30 p.m. and 6:30 a.m.

Although fines are higher and more frequent than in previous years, violations have increased from 47 in 2014 to 55 through November of this year.

How the airport authority responds

"There's only so many things the airport can do," airport authority spokeswoman Bloomfield said. The takeoff curfew is not an FAA rule.

Bloomfield told inewsource the authority can only make recommendations to the FAA, air traffic control and airlines on issues like early turns and curfew violations. She said once flights are on the runway, the FAA is in charge. Air traffic control directs planes on when to depart and when it is safe to make a turn.

The airport authority can't stop flights from taking off after 11:30 p.m., but it can levy fines of up to $30,000 if the local rule is broken, Bloomfield said, and airlines have long been aware of the curfew.

To combat community concern over noise, the airport authority recently increased the frequency of airport noise meetings from quarterly to every other month and created a subcommittee allowing the public to communicate directly with FAA officials.

But community members who continue to submit noise complaints say that effort may not be enough.

"Every meeting we get told, 'we'll look into it,'" Schmidt said. "I just want to hear 'we fixed it.'"

Reed more here:  http://www.cbs8.com

Allegiant Air apologizes for diverted Ogdensburg flight

OGDENSBURG - Allegiant Air has offered an apology to passengers for a Christmas Eve flight originally bound from Ogdensburg to Florida that was forced to land in Syracuse because of a mechanical problem.

A spokeswoman for Allegiant Air confirmed that the Dec. 24 flight from Ogdensburg experienced a midair mechanical problem that forced the pilot to land at Hancock International Airport in Syracuse.

Allegiant Air Flight 1711 departed Ogdensburg at 12:40 p.m. enroute to Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport when the flight’s captain made a decision to reroute the plane to Syracuse, according to Allegiant Air Spokeswoman Krysta Levy.

“The aircraft experienced a mechanical issue in flight, and the captain diverted to Syracuse Hancock International Airport,” Ms. Levy said in a statement. “The aircraft landed safely and was met by airport fire crews as a precaution.”

The Allegiant Air spokeswoman did not elaborate on the nature of the mechanical issue that forced the diversion of Flight 1711.

Ms. Levy said there were 160 passengers and six crew members on the flight, and that all of those on board deplaned safely at the Syracuse terminal gate.

A replacement aircraft was dispatched to carry the passengers on to their final Fort Lauderdale destination, according to Ms. Levy. She said the passengers landed in Fort Lauderdale at 8:45 p.m. local time on Christmas Eve.

She said the airline apologized to the passengers for the disruption of service. “We sincerely apologize to our passengers for the inconvenience and disruption to their plans,” Ms. Levy said. “Passengers were provided $100 vouchers for future travel on Allegiant as well as food service in the gate area.”

Ogdensburg Bridge and Port Authority Executive Director Wade A. Davis praised Allegiant Air for its handling of the Christmas Eve incident, and the role the airline is playing in helping spur economic activity in the region. “Ogdensburg International Airport is accomplishing great things for the local economy and safety in aviation is number one,” Mr. Davis said in an email. “OGS commends the professionalism of Allegiant to make the right calls to keep the traveling public safe. Thanks to these professionals, flights out of OGS are operated safely and efficiently.”

Story and comments:  http://www.watertowndailytimes.com

Ogdensburg International Airport close to getting $1 million from FAA for having 10,000 outbound passengers

OGDENSBURG -- The Ogdensburg Bridge and Port Authority is close to winning a $1 million bonus from the Federal Aviation Administration that they are all but calling it a done deal.

“We’re forecasting 10,225 enplanements” for the year at Ogdensburg International Airport, said OBPA Executive Director Wade Davis on Wednesday, which would exceed the 10,000 passengers on outbound flights in 2016 that the FAA said would be needed to claim the big bonus.

“We’re going to be very close,” Davis said.

If they don’t make 10,000 enplanements their bonus will be $150,000 that the OBPA can use for airfield improvements and equipment purchases.

Davis wouldn’t give us an exact number as of today, but with three Allegiant Air flights to Florida through Saturday of about 150 passengers each and up to 27 passengers a day with Cape Air flights to Albany and Boston, he was comfortable with the 10,225 number by midnight Saturday night, “depending on weather,” Davis said.

A promotion the OBPA announced in November will account for 150 passengers. Anyone traveling on Allegiant and Cape Air out of Ogdensburg who bought two or more outbound tickets at once would get a “two-for-one” ticket deal, and as of Wednesday, about 150 ticket buyers had taken advantage of that.

“We have not hit 10,000 yet, but we are on track,” he said. “We’ve never hit that number. We’re very excited about it.”

“The weather in the North Country is certainly a concern, so I don’t want to say we’ll get there for certain, but we’re fairly sure we’ll make it,” Davis said.

A runway extension completed this year allows Allegiant jets to land and take off from Ogdensburg, so the airline started up their low-cost flights to Florida from the airport. Money was also put into improvements to the terminal building and parking areas.

On Dec. 24, an Allegiant Ogdensburg-to-Ft. Lauderdale flight made an unscheduled landing in Syracuse.  Davis referred questions about the incident to Allegiant public relations staff who did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

However, WWNY reported the plane suffered mechanical problems of an undisclosed nature and passengers were transferred to another plane to complete their journey.

Source:   http://northcountrynow.com

Cessna 172B Skyhawk, N6941X: Accident occurred December 28, 2016 near Sauk Prairie Airport ( 91C), Prairie du Sac, Sauk County, Wisconsin

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report  - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N6941X

FAA Flight Standards District Office: MILWAUKEE


NTSB Identification: CEN17LA090
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, December 28, 2016 in Prairie Du Sac, WI
Aircraft: CESSNA 172B, registration: N6941X
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 28, 2016, about 1230 central standard time, a Cessna 172B single engine airplane, N6941X, registered to a private individual, sustained substantial damage after it struck roadway signs while attempting to taxi after a successful emergency landing. The private pilot and one passenger were not injured. The flight was being conducted under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed throughout the area and a flight plan was not filed. The flight originated from the Prairie Du Sac Airport (91C) about 1130.

The pilot reported that he was flying locally at 4,500 feet after departing from 91C. The engine started to run rough and the pilot applied carburetor heat. He decided to return to the airport for a precautionary landing. About 4 miles from the airport, and lined up for landing on runway 18, the pilot increased the engine throttle, but had no response. He decided to land the airplane on US Highway 12, about 1 mile from the airport. After landing on the roadway and coming to a stop, the pilot started the engine and attempted to taxi off the roadway. While taxiing, the airplane struck 3 road signs and an iron fence, resulting in structural damage to the left wing.

The local Sheriff closed the highway as the airplane was loaded onto a trailer and transported to 91C where it was examined by an FAA inspector. Approximately 4-5 gallons of fuel were present in each wing tank. Small amounts of water were present in the fuel from both wing sumps and the gascolator. The engine was started, ran normally, and both magnetos checked within normal limits. The fuel appeared to be automotive fuel.

The pilot confirmed that he used automotive fuel. Initial review of the logbooks did not disclose that the airplane was approved for the use of automotive fuel.





PRAIRIE DU SAC – No one was injured Wednesday when a plane made an emergency landing on U.S. Highway 12 near the Sauk Prairie Airport.

At about 12:30 p.m., a southbound 1961 single-engine Cessna headed to the airport lost power over the Baraboo Bluffs, prompting the pilot to land unexpectedly. The plane touched down on Highway 12's southbound lanes near the intersection with Sauk County Highway Z.

The pilot, 69-year-old pilot Stephan L. Arnold of Madison, restored power after the landing and attempted to take off, but hit a road sign, causing the plane to cross the median and come to rest on the east side of U.S. 12 next to Sauk Prairie Cemetery. Arnold and his passenger were unhurt.

A pair of witnesses, Anthony Kirkus and wife Meg of Wisconsin Dells, were driving north on U.S. 12 when they saw the plane headed for their car’s windshield.

Kirkus said “the plane touched down right as we passed it going the other way, it was crazy.”

The plane did not show any outward signs of having a problem, aside from flying extremely low, Kirkus said. “Just before it landed, we saw this low-flying plane that almost hit a set of wires going across the highway,” Kirkus said. “It just missed that and then we said, ‘Well, this is definitely landing on Highway 12.’”

Deputies directed vehicles around the landing site Wednesday afternoon, temporarily slowing traffic on U.S. 12. The plane sustained moderate damage and was towed to the airport.

The Sheriff’s Office was assisted by several agencies, including Sauk City Fire, Sauk Prairie EMS, Sauk Prairie Police, the county Highway Department, the state Department of Transportation and the Federal Aviation Administration.

Source:   http://www.wiscnews.com




SAUK CITY, Wis. - The Sauk County Sheriff's Department said a plane made an emergency landing on U.S. Highway 12 just north of Sauk City on Wednesday afternoon.

Two people were in the aircraft when the plane made the landing just before 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, according to the sheriff's department. No injuries were reported.

A sheriff's chief deputy told News 3 that the plane had taken off from the Sauk-Prairie Airport in Prairie Du Sac.

The pilot, a Madison man, told deputies he lost power and landed on the road. When he regained power, he tried to take off again and hit a sign post, the official said. There was some damage to the plane, which was being towed back to the airport Wednesday afternoon.

The highway where the plane landed is just north of an airport outside of Sauk City.

A stretch of Highway 12 was closed briefly after the landing but was reopen before about 1 p.m., officials said.


Source:   http://www.channel3000.com















Anthony Kirkus was driving, his wife, Meg, was in the passenger seat, and an airplane was headed for their car's windshield.

This was Wednesday just after noon as the couple was driving north on Highway 12 near Highway Z outside of Prairie Du Sac, adjacent to Sauk Prairie Airport and a cemetery.

"The plane touched down right as we passed it going the other way. It was crazy," said Kirkus, who lives in Wisconsin Dells.

Stephen L. Arnold, of Madison, was operating the 1960 single-engine Cessna when the plane lost power, prompting the emergency landing, the Sauk County Sheriff's Office said. Arnold and a passenger were not injured, the Sheriff's Office said.

"Just before it landed, we saw this low-flying plane that almost hit a set of wires going across the highway," Kirkus said. "It just missed that and then we said, 'Well, this is definitely landing on Highway 12.'"

"It was coming straight at us, and I thought a little optimistically that it was going to land nearby because it was not really lining up with us and then it came down," he said.

Arnold, 69, attempted to take off from the highway after the plane regained power, the Sheriff's Office said. But the aircraft struck a road sign, sending it over the median before stopping on the east side of the highway.

The moderately damaged plane was towed to the nearby airport, the Sheriff's Office said.

Source:  http://host.madison.com

Columbia LC42-550FG, N1222G: Accident occurred December 08, 2016 in Singapore, Singapore

AIRCRAFT GUARANTY CORP TRUSTEE:   http://registry.faa.gov/N1222G

NTSB Identification: WPR17WA040
Accident occurred Thursday, December 08, 2016 in Singapore, Singapore
Aircraft: CESSNA 350, registration: N1222G
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On December 8, 2016, about 1743 local time, a Cessna 350, N1222G, had the brakes catch fire during taxi following an aborted takeoff at Seletar Airport, Singapore. The owner/pilot was operating the airplane under the provisions of the Singapore Civil Aviation Regulations.

Preliminary information received from the government of Singapore indicated that the pilot had rejected the takeoff above 70 knots, and was taxiing back to the parking bay. During the taxi, the pilot felt as though he had lost brake authority. The airplane departed the taxiway center line, and started veering to the left. The pilot then applied the left brake as he was heading towards a parked Cessna 172. The airplane turned 180 degrees, and ended up taxiing towards another jet aircraft that was being towed into a parking bay opposite the Cessna 172. The pilot applied the left brake again, and came to a halt in the middle of Taxiway WB5. The main landing gears caught fire; the fire was subsequently extinguished. There was significant heat damage at the belly and the main landing gears of the airplane.

The accident is under the jurisdiction of and is being investigated by the Transport Safety Investigation Bureau (TSIB) of Singapore. As the State of Manufacture of the airplane and engines, the NTSB has designated a U.S. accredited representative to assist the TSIB in its investigation.

All inquiries concerning this accident should be directed to the TSIB of Singapore:

Transport Safety Investigation Bureau (TSIB)
#048-058 Passenger Terminal Building 2
Singapore Changi Airport
Singapore 819634

This report is for information purposes only, and contains only information obtained for, or released by, the government of Singapore.

Cessna 195 Businessliner, N4426C: Incident occurred January 10, 2017 at Field's Field Airport (7TA0), Tomball, Harris County, Texas

http://registry.faa.gov/N4426C

FAA Flight Standards District Office: Denver

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, WENT OFF THE RUNWAY INTO A DITCH, TOMBALL, TEXAS 

Date: 10-JAN-17
Time: 19:07:00Z
Regis#: N4426C
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C195
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: TOMBALL
State: TEXAS

Maule MX-7-235 Star Rocket, N56681: Accident occurred December 15, 2016 in Willow, Alaska

http://registry.faa.gov/N56681

FAA Flight Standards District Office: ANCHORAGE FSDO

AIRCRAFT CLIPPED A SNOW BANK ON TAKEOFF NEAR WILLOW, ALASKA.

Date: 15-DEC-16
Time: 20:00:00Z
Regis#: N56681
Aircraft Make: MAULE
Aircraft Model: MX7
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: WILLOW
State: ALASKA

Robinson R22 BETA, N7095A: Incident occurred December 27, 2016 in Snowflake, Navajo County, Arizona

http://registry.faa.gov/N7095A

FAA Flight Standards District Office: SCOTTSDALE

WHILE LANDING ON A FLATBED, THE ROTOR STRUCK THE HEAD OF A PERSON ON THE GROUND.

Date: 27-DEC-16
Time: 23:41:00Z
Regis#: N7095A
Aircraft Make: ROBINSON
Aircraft Model: R22
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SNOWFLAKE
State: ARIZONA

FAA Flight Standards District Office: SCOTTSDALE FSDO, CA

AIRCRAFT LANDED IN A PASTURE AND WAS POWERING DOWN WHEN THE GROUND CREW PERSON WHO WAS TO REFUEL THE AIRCRAFT WAS STRUCK IN THE BACK OF THE HEAD BY A ROTOR BLADE, REQUIRING TRANSPORT TO A HOSPITAL AND AT LEAST TWO STITCHES. OCCURRED IN SNOWFLAKE, ARIZONA.

Date: 27-DEC-16
Time: 23:41:00Z
Regis#: N709FA
Aircraft Make: ROBINSON
Aircraft Model: R22
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: STANDING (STD)
Operation: 91
City: SNOWFLAKE
State: ARIZONA

Air Tractor AT-602, N602L: Accident occurred December 27, 2016 Willows, Glenn County, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N602L

FAA Flight Standards District Office: SACRAMENTO FSDO


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA042
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, December 27, 2016 in Willows, CA
Aircraft: AIR TRACTOR INC AT 602, registration: N602L
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 27, 2016, about 1553 Pacific standard time, an Air Tractor AT-602, N602L, was substantially damaged during a forced landing at Willows-Glenn County Airport (WLW), Willows, California. The commercial pilot was not injured. The airplane was owned and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the cross-country flight that departed Medlock Field Airport (69CL), Davis, California at approximately 1527. The personal flight was destined for WLW. 

According to the pilot, he was returning the airplane to his home airport after a recent annual inspection. At the conclusion of the 25 minute flight, the pilot initiated a straight-in approach to runway 31 and slightly reduced the throttle. Immediately, he heard a "pop" noise, and observed a reduction in airspeed. When the pilot advanced the throttle to full power the engine power and airspeed did not change and the airplane began to sink rapidly. Further attempts to recycle the throttle were unsuccessful. As the airplane approached a canal on the south end of the airport, the pilot deployed the wing flaps and the main landing gear touched down on a gravel road beyond a ditch. The tailwheel impacted the ditch and the airplane flipped over and came to rest inverted. 

Postaccident examination by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed substantial damage to the rudder and left wing spar. 

The wreckage was retained for further examination.

Piper PA-32-300, Sacred Heart Medical Group, N4107R: Incident occurred December 27, 2016 at Big Bear City Airport (L35), California

SACRED HEART MEDICAL GROUP INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N4107R

FAA Flight Standards District Office: RIVERSIDE FSDO, CA

AIRCRAFT NOSE GEAR COLLAPSED UPON LANDING CAUSING PROP STRIKE.

Date: 28-DEC-16
Time: 01:33:00Z
Regis#: 4107R
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA32R
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
Aircraft Operator: SACRED HEART MEDICAL GROUP
FAA FSDO: RIVERSIDE
City: BIG BEAR

State: CALIFORNIA

AIRCRAFT'S NOSE GEAR COLLAPSED UPON LANDING AT RUNWAY 26 AT BIG BEAR AIRPORT, CALIFORNIA.

Date: 28-DEC-16
Time: 02:15:00Z
Regis#: N4107R
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA32
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: BIG BEAR
State: CALIFORNIA

Our aircraft didn't enter wrong bay at Indira Gandhi International Airport: SpiceJet



Budget carrier SpiceJet on Wednesday dubbed as "completely false and incorrect" media reports that its aircraft had entered the wrong bay at the Indira Gandhi international airport here a day earlier.

On Tuesday morning, two aircraft of IndiGo and SpiceJet came face to face on the taxiway, which could have led to an accident.

"Sections of the media report that the SpiceJet flight SG 123 operating on the Delhi-Hyderabad route entered the wrong bay yesterday (Tuesday)... the flight concerned never at any point in time enter the wrong bay, but was following Air Traffic Control (ATC) instructions at all times," a SpiceJet spokesperson said in a statement.

"Such reports, citing unnamed ATC sources, are completely false and incorrect," he said.

The SpiceJet aircraft, in fact, did not enter any bay at all and was on the taxiway when the crew saw another aircraft approaching and alerted the ATC, the spokesman said.

Meanwhile, the Airports Authority of India (AAI) -- which provides communication, navigation and surveillance, and air traffic management services at the IGI airport -- derostered a Surface Management Controller following the incident. 

Source:   http://www.business-standard.com

Low-cost foreign airlines expand in United States, but Dallas/Fort Worth left out so far

For residents in Los Angeles, New York, South Florida and other major metropolitan areas, catching a flight to Europe has likely never been cheaper, thanks in part to the rise of a new breed of low-cost international airlines headlined by Norwegian Air Shuttle.

This group, which also includes Icelandair and WOW air, has brought the unbundled model used domestically by airlines like Spirit and Frontier to the trans-Atlantic market, offering one-way fares as low as $180 targeted toward leisure travelers.

The trio of airlines has grown rapidly over the last five years and now combine to connect more than a dozen U.S. cities to London, Scandinavia and beyond. Although they represent a sliver of the total trans-Atlantic traffic, they exert a disproportionate downward pull on fares and have eyes on continued expansion in the coming years.

But so far, North Texas travelers have been left out of the low-fare frenzy, due to a combination of geography, competition and market dynamics. And there’s no sign any of these airlines will be touching down at local airports any time soon.

“We won’t see the benefit of this as much because really Dallas is perfect for business long-haul travel but not great for leisure long-haul. The coasts are better for [that],” said Rick Seaney, CEO and co-founder of Dallas-based booking site FareCompare.

The idea of low-cost trans-Atlantic air service traces back decades to the likes of Laker Airways and People Express Airlines. But those carriers never amounted to more than a few planes serving limited routes before being driven out of the market in the 1980s by larger airlines, said aviation analyst Robert Mann.

There was also Icelandic Airlines, a precursor to today's Icelandair, which became known in the 1960s as the "Hippie Express" for shuttling American college students to Europe on the cheap.

Norwegian Air, which launched U.S. service in 2013, has made use of the new generation of highly-efficient planes and engines, like the Boeing 787, to make long-haul flights more economical.

Icelandair and WOW air, which is also based out of Iceland, have used geography to connect U.S. travelers to Europe with one-stop service through the island’s Keflavik International Airport. Like the rest of the airline industry, all three have benefited from low fuel prices over the last several years.

Initially, the airlines largely focused on coastal U.S. cities, including Los Angeles, San Francisco, Boston, New York, Washington, D.C., and Miami. But they’re slowly adding more inland destinations such as Minneapolis, Denver and Pittsburgh.

Their route maps tend to favor cities with large volumes of originating passengers, including leisure markets like Orlando and Las Vegas, as well as regions with secondary airports like Oakland, Calif., and Fort Lauderdale, Fla., that don’t have a dominant trans-Atlantic carrier.

Norwegian in particular is poised for even more growth after the Department of Transportation this month approved the company’s Irish subsidiary Norwegian Air International to begin operating flights to the U.S.

The decision, which took three years of deliberation, was fiercely contested by major U.S. airlines and their unions, who warned that the arrangement would undermine wages and safety standards -- claims Norwegian Air denied.

The approval opens the door for Norwegian to connect U.S. passengers to even more destinations in Europe. The carrier plans to add 20 more 787s to its long-haul fleet over the next two years and is establishing crew bases in Fort Lauderdale and New York.

While the growth of these airlines has caught the attention of legacy U.S. carriers, they’re unlikely to threaten the dominance of antitrust-immunized partnerships like the one between American Airlines and British Airways on trans-Atlantic flights.

Still, these low-cost options can cause headaches as they siphon off price-sensitive customers needed to fill out legacy carriers’ planes carrying high-value business travelers.

That could prompt carriers such as American, Delta and United to expand the new no-frills basic economy fares that are being introduced on domestic flights to their international routes, Mann said. Much like their low-cost competitors, these basic economy fares offer a low ticket price, but charge additional fees for everything from checked bags to seat assignments.

As for North Texas, the region lacks most of the market characteristics that have drawn in Norwegian Air and its brethren.

DFW International Airport is a major hub for connecting travel, but lacks the volume of originating traffic or draw for leisure travelers of other airports around the country. There’s also the matter of American Airlines’ dominance, a battle low-cost carriers so far have avoided at DFW and at Delta’s hub in Atlanta.

“You can kind of poke at the dragon from a slight distance, but you really don’t want to go in its face,” Mann said. “It’s just not a good idea.”

Dallas does have a secondary airport in Love Field, but international flights aren’t allowed there under terms of the Wright Amendment Reform Act.

That means North Texans wanting to head to Europe are for now largely left with American Airlines or one of its Oneworld alliance partners, unless they want to get creative.

“As a leisure consumer,” Seaney said, “one of the options you have is splitting your ticket purchase up by getting to the coast and then buying one of these lower-cost tickets to Europe.”

Read more here:   http://www.dallasnews.com

Epic LT, Independent Technologies, N669WR: Fatal accident occurred December 27, 2016 at Spruce Creek Airport (7FL6), Port Orange, Volusia County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report   -   National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Independent Technologies Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N669WR

FAA Flight Standards District Office: ORLANDO FSDO


NTSB Identification: ERA17FA074

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, December 27, 2016 in Port Orange, FL
Aircraft: INDEPENDENT TECHNOLOGIES INC EPIC LT, registration: N669WR
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On December 27, 2016, about 1757 eastern standard time, N669WR, an experimental amateur-built Epic LT, sustained substantial damage when it impacted terrain while executing an instrument approach to Spruce Creek Airport (7FL6), Port Orange, Florida. The private pil
ot and his passenger were fatally injured. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight that originated at the Millington Regional Jetport (NQA), Millington, Tennessee about 1558 and was destined for 7FL6. An instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the personal flight conducted under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Several witnesses observed the accident. According to a witness, who was driving to the airport's café, he saw the airplane's landing lights as it approached the airport. The airplane was about 100 feet above the ground and in a left turn. The airplane then climbed back into the fog layer and disappeared from view. The witness said, "I didn't hear anything for a few seconds. Then I heard a very loud distinct corkscrewing sound, very familiar to a spinning plane at an airshow. I then saw two wing-tip lights fall through the clouds straight down and heard an extremely loud thud."

Another witness, who was also a Designated Pilot Examiner, said he saw the airplane when it broke out of the overcast about 200 feet above ground level (agl). At that time, the airplane was about 1/8th of a mile to the north of the final approach course. He said the airplane then suddenly pulled up and banked to the right over the airport into the fog, before it descended in an inverted flat spin to impact.

A third witness said he heard a loud engine noise so he went out onto his lanai and looked up. He saw the airplane emerge from the fog in a 70 to 80-degree nose down "fully developed spin," The witness said the airplane made three rotations before he lost sight of it behind trees followed by the sound of an impact.

Review of preliminary radar data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that over the final 46 seconds of flight, the airplane approached the airport on a north-easterly heading just north of the final approach course. At 1756:01, the airplane was abeam the runway numbers at an altitude of 100 feet mean sea level (msl) before it initiated a climbing right turn to 200 feet msl over the airport. The airplane continued to turn right and descended back down to 100 feet msl before it climbed back up to 300 feet while still in the turn. At 1756:33, the airplane leveled out and began to climb on a northeasterly heading. Over the next 13 seconds the airplane climbed to 800 feet making a shallow turn to the right followed by a turn to the left before the data ended at 1756:47. The last radar return was near-coincident with the location of where the airplane impacted the ground.

The airplane came to rest inverted at the base of an approximately 50-foot-tall tree on the front lawn of a private residence. All major flight controls were accounted for at the site and there was no post-impact fire. The airplane collided with tree limbs during the impact sequence. An outboard section of the left wing, a section of the left wing's fuel line, tail section and the rudder separated from the airframe. There was little evidence of forward movement of the airplane.

Examination of the airframe revealed the carbon-composite fuselage sustained extensive fracturing. Both wing fuel tanks were breached and a strong odor of jet fuel permeated the wreckage. Flight control continuity was established for all major flight controls to the cockpit. The landing gear was in the fully down and locked position and the flaps were fully extended. The fuel selector was set to the left wing fuel tank.

The engine and the four-blade propeller assembly remained attached to the engine. When the engine was separated from the airframe, fuel was observed draining from the main fuel line.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single and multi-engine land, and instrument airplane. His last FAA third-class medical was issued on December 2, 2016. At that time, he reported a total of 5,635 total flight hours.

Weather reported at 7FL6 at 1755 was calm wind, visibility 2.5 statute miles, mist, temperature 19 degrees C, dewpoint 19 degrees C, and a barometric pressure setting of 30.18 inches Hg. 7FL6 is not equipped to provide ceiling heights.

Weather reported at New Smyrna Beach Municipal Airport, (EVB), New Smyrna Beach, Florida, about 5 miles east of the accident site at 1750, was wind from 090 degrees at 4 knots, visibility 1/4 statute mile, fog, overcast 100 feet, temperature 19 degrees C, dewpoint 19 degrees C, and a barometric pressure setting of 30.18 inches Hg.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.







NEW LONDON – Funeral services for a New London woman and a Spicer man killed this week in a Florida plane crash are being planned as family and friends mourn their deaths.

The crash Tuesday night of the 2009 single-engine Epic LT plane – which left the Willmar airport earlier that day – killed the pilot, Daryl Ingalsbe, 67, of Spicer, and Deb Osborn Solsrud, 51, of New London.

The two were traveling to Ingalsbe’s second home in Spruce Creek, located near Daytona Beach, Florida.

Ingalsbe was president and CEO of Independent Technologies Inc., which is based in Blair, Nebraska, but has multiple branches, including a facility in New London.

According to its website, the company sells communication and diagnostic products for telecommunications, power utilities, cable TV, energy and information technology markets.

The company issued a brief statement Thursday saying they had “suffered a tragic loss” when Ingalsbe died in the plane crash.

“We offer our sincerest condolences and prayers to Daryl’s family, friends and his family of employees,” the statement said.

“We also offer sincerest condolences and prayers to the family and friends of his very good friend, Deb Solsrud of New London, who also died in the crash.”

Nephew Scott Ingalsbe said his uncle “cared a lot about his employees and his family” and that his employees “were all kind of like family.”

Daryl Ingalsbe and his twin brother, Dave, grew up with “very little” but joined the Army together, studied electronics together and started the business together with several other partners, said Scott Ingalsbe, who is Dave’s son.

Last year the team celebrated 30 years of being in business.

“They were proud of that, and rightly so,” said Scott Ingalsbe, adding that his uncle remained “humble” despite his business success.

“I think of my Uncle Daryl as an extremely hard-working guy,” he said. “Nothing was ever given to him.”

He said Daryl Ingalsbe had just spent Christmas with his grandchildren and other family members and was making one of his frequent trips to Florida when the crash happened.

Solsrud, who was a well-known and respected professional and volunteer, worked as the community survey program director for School Perceptions, a public opinion research firm for schools. In the past she had been the marketing director for Ridgewater College.

Solsrud was an active volunteer in the New London-Spicer School District where district officials praised her work to pass a technology levy for the district and for being a charter member of the Parent Teacher Organization.

Ingalsbe and Solsrud had traveled together on the experimental plane before, including a 21-day trip around the world in July with about a dozen other pilots flying similiar Epic airplanes.

By all accounts, Ingalsbe was an experienced pilot, had no history of accidents and had a medical certification on his license that was up to date, according to information from the Federal Aviation Administration.

Preliminary accident information indicates Ingalsbe was attempting to land the plane on a private airport called Spruce Creek as fog was rolling in, reducing visibility.

According to aeronautical charts, the small airport is not equipped with services that would help pilots land in inclement weather, unlike the Daytona Beach International Airport located about seven miles away.

The Daytona Beach News-Journal reported Thursday that heavy fog in the area at the time of the crash had diverted several commercial flights from Daytona Beach International Airport. Investigators did not say if weather was a factor in the crash.

According to the records of the flight pattern, Ingalsbe left the Willmar airport around 12:30 p.m. Tuesday and landed at the Millington, Tennessee, airport at about 2:30 p.m. Central Standard Time. The plane stayed on the ground for less than a half-hour before taking off for the final leg of the trip to Florida.

Records indicate the plane was traveling at 27,000 feet and made a steady descent to the runway.

Audio between Ingalsbe and a control tower does not indicate there is any concern or problem, said Robert Katz, a corporate pilot and instructor from Dallas, Texas, who closely watches airplane accidents to use as a teaching tool for himself and other pilots.

“Nothing is out of the ordinary in that audio. He’s not panicking,” Katz said. “You won’t get any clues from that audio.”

As the plane approached the airport, it was traveling 90 mph at 200 feet when it accelerated and ascended to 700 feet as it apparently missed an attempt to land on the runway. The last reading at 5:57 p.m. shows the plane at 900 feet.

The plane crashed at 5:58 Eastern Standard Time in a residential area, narrowly missing two homes. No one on the ground was injured.

Katz said it can be risky landing at private airports at night and in fog when there are not FAA-approved instrument approach procedures in place. He said it’s possible Ingalsbe became disoriented in the fog, became incapacitated for some reason or perhaps the plane ran out of gas.

He said every accident offers unfortunate lessons for other pilots.

The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash.

Funeral services for Solsrud will be at 11:30 a.m. on Jan. 3 at the Max A. Sass & Sons Funeral Service in Muskego, Wisconsin. Visitation will be held a half-hour prior to the service.

Funeral services for Ingalsbe are pending with the Campbell-Aman Funeral Home in Blair, Nebraska.

Source:   http://www.inforum.com





Daryl Ingalsbe of Spicer, left, and Deb Solsrud of New London, pose for a photo in Moscow.


WILLMAR – A Nebraska-based company said this morning that its president, Daryl Ingalsbe, of Spicer, and Deb Solsrud of New London, were killed Tuesday in a plane crash near Inglasbe’s second home in Port Orange, Florida.

In a statement issued this morning, Independent Technologies, Inc. confirmed that Ingalsbe, 67, was killed in the accident.

The company “suffered a tragic loss” when Ingalsbe died in a plane crash near his home in Spruce Creek, Florida,” the statement read.

The flight originated Tuesday morning from Willmar and crashed in a residential area of Spruce Creek, located Port Orange, Florida.

“We offer our sincerest condolences and prayers to Daryl’s family, friends and his family of employees,” the statement said.

“We also offer sincerest condolences and prayers to the family and friends of his very good friend, Deb Solsrud of New London, who also died in the crash.”

According to the Volusia County Sheriff’s Office, the 2009 single-engine Epic LT plane crashed in fog just before 6 p.m. in a front yard of a fly-In community of Spruce Creek.

The plane narrowly missed two houses. No one was injured on the ground.

A relative also confirmed today that Ingalsbe was piloting the plane on the night of the crash.

In July of this year Ingalsbe and Solsrud were part of a 21-day flight around the world where they flew in Ingalsbe’s experimental airplane.

Solsrud is being remembered for her involvement in the New London and Spicer communities, including her volunteer work with the NL-S School District.

A statement issued Wednesday by the school district said Solsrud’s “dedication to education and the betterment of our NLS community will be sorely missed.” 

Source:   http://www.wctrib.com


Debra "Deb" Osborn Solsrud


Deb tragically passed away on December 27, 2016 in a small plane crash in Florida at the age of 51.

Deb wishes to be best known for her humor, love of adventure and compassion. Deb was born on August 4, 1965 to Guy and Louise (nee Sterling) Osborn in Minneapolis, MN. At the age of 6, the family moved to Milwaukee, WI where she resided until her college days. She received her B.A. in Journalism at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where her love of adventure truly began!

She returned to Minnesota when she was 31, but her love of the Green Bay Packers always followed her.

Deb's career in marketing and communications expanded over three decades in education. She hoped to leave the world a better place, so she intended to give back to her favorite charities upon her passing.

Deb loved to create, and will be remembered for her baking, knitting and pulling of weeds in her garden so she could have a successful canning year.

Deb truly wishes to thank her family and friends who laughed with her and stood by her side - you mean more to her than you realize. (Besides, one of you needs to take her dogs!)

Deb is survived by her two children, Emma Jean age 14 and Connor Anthony age 13. They were her pride and joy; to whom she gave her heart. She hopes to pass on her humor and love of traveling to each of them, as well as her compassion. She is also survived by her dogs Shiloh and Buster, parents Guy and Louise (nee Sterling) Osborn from Muskego, WI, brother Doug (Kenosha, WI), and sisters Laurie (Steve) from Muskego, WI and Judy (Joel) from Iowa City, IA. Further survived by nieces and nephews, cousins, other relatives and friends.

A Memorial Gathering will be held at Max A. Sass & Sons-Westwood Chapel on Tuesday Jan 3 starting at 11AM until the Memorial Service at 11:30AM. A private family burial will take place at Wisconsin Memorial Park at a later date.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests memorials be made to a trust account set up for the children or to the New London Spicer School District (www.nls.k12.mn.us) or to Girls United which is in conjunction with the New London Spicer School District and serves youth of the middle school age. 


Source:   http://www.maxsass.com

Daryl Ingalsbe, pilot, talks in October about the views he had when he flew around the world. Ingalsbe remembers Russia being the most different place he visited. That experimental plane that crashed Tuesday in the front yard of a home in the Spruce Creek Fly-In community is reportedly owned and manufactured by Independent Technologies, which lists Daryl Ingalsbe as the owner and CEO.



Company sends out statement about death of Daryl Ingalsbe:

"Independent Technologies, Inc. suffered a tragic loss on Tuesday December 27th2016 when our President, Daryl Ingalsbe, died in a plane crash near his home in Spruce Creek, Florida. We offer our sincerest condolences and prayers to Daryl's family, friends and his family of employees. We also offer sincerest condolences and prayers to the family and friends of his very good friend, Deb Solsrud of New London, Minnesota, who also died in the crash."

PREVIOUS STORY:

The pilot in Tuesday's double-fatal plane wreck "crashed on go around after a missed approach," Eric Weiss, spokesman for the National Transportation Safety Board, said Wednesday.

Weiss said that was all he could confirm about Tuesday evening's plane crash in the Spruce Creek Fly-In pending the outcome of the investigation.

The identities of the two people killed were not confirmed Wednesday afternoon as law enforcement officials were still trying to locate next of kin, according to the Volusia County Sheriff's Office.

Records show the plane is owned by Daryl Ingalsbe, who has a home in the Fly-In and is the president and CEO of Independent Technologies, Inc., based in Nebraska.

The New London-Spicer School District in Minnesota posted to the district's Facebook page that the community was mourning the loss of former parent-teacher organization president Deb Solsrud "who passed away when the small plane she was traveling in crashed in Volusia County."

Brad Andersen with Independent Technologies said the company could not comment Wednesday but would issue a statement today.

Ingalsbe and Solsrud took a 21-day trip together around the world in the experimental plane in July, according to the West Central Tribune, a Minnesota newspaper.

Spruce Creek Fly-In Plane Crash


Emergency crews were summoned to the private community about 6 p.m. Tuesday when witnesses reported a plane had crashed on Taxiway Lindy Loop.

Volusia County Sheriff Ben Johnson said the pilot, believed to be a resident of the Fly-In, narrowly missed hitting a couple of houses.

"It looks like there's not going to be any survivors in this," a 9-1-1 caller said.

The flight of the Epic LT single-engine aircraft originated out of Tennessee's Regional Jetport, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Another 9-1-1 caller said the plane entered the thick fog and came out in "an inverted flat spin."

A plane in an inverted flat spin is like "a falling leaf," Joe Friend, manager of Spruce Creek Airport, said Wednesday.

"The airplane is not considered to be flying at that point," Friend said.

A visibility of 2.5 miles was reported to the National Weather Service from the Spruce Creek Airport at 5:55 p.m., shortly before the deadly crash. The dense fog affected the schedules of planes that were supposed to land Tuesday afternoon and evening at Daytona Beach International Airport.

A Delta flight from Atlanta scheduled to arrive in Daytona Beach at 4:45 p.m. wasn't able to land until 5:30 p.m. while another Delta flight out of Atlanta scheduled to land in Daytona Beach at 8:46 p.m. was diverted to Orlando where it landed at 9:36 p.m., said Jay Cassens, director of business development at Daytona's airport.

An American Airlines flight originating from Charlotte and scheduled to land at Daytona at 9:13 p.m. was canceled.

Cassens said he was surprised to see another American Airlines flight out of Charlotte landed in Daytona on time at 5:18 p.m. when less than 1 mile of visibility had been reported.

Friend said without the Fly-In having its own tower, details about the severity of weather conditions are only so precise from air traffic controllers working 11 miles to the north in Daytona Beach.

Nine other fatalities have been reported at the Fly-In since 1993, according to FAA records. Thirty-nine aviation accidents have been investigated there since 1982.

Yellow police tape had been strung up across both ends of Lindy Loop in an effort to keep the curious at bay Wednesday afternoon. Lindy Loop is a taxiway that runs parallel to the Fly-In's runway and is only separated from the flight strip by a row of houses.

Security guards stood at both ends of the street as residents flocked to the scene to take pictures and shoot video of the downed plane, even if from a distance.

A yellow crane stood in place in front of the house ready to lift the destroyed aircraft from a front yard on Lindy Loop. Once the plane was secured, a handful of NTSB investigators began to yell instructions at the crane operator.


The plane slowly became airborne, it's crushed nose visible as it lifted over the trees and swung around toward the street. It was gently lowered onto the bed of a truck and the onlookers began walking away.

Source:   http://www.news-journalonline.com



Daryl Ingalsbe

Deb Solsrud




NEW LONDON – The New London-Spicer School District is mourning the loss of a community member who was reportedly killed Tuesday in a Florida plane crash.

A statement issued Wednesday by NLS Director of Communications Megan Field says that Deb Solsrud died when the small plane in which she was traveling crashed in Volusia County in east central Florida.

According to the Volusia County Sheriff’s Office, a 2009 single-engine Epic LT plane crashed in heavy fog just before 6 p.m. in a front yard in the Spruce Creek Fly-In community of Port Orange, Florida.

The pilot and Solsrud were killed.

The plane is reportedly owned by Independent Technologies, which lists Daryl Ingalsbe as the president and CEO.

Ingalsbe, a pilot, has a home in Spicer and Florida.

When contacted at the Independent Technologies headquarters in Blair, Nebraska, a representative said the company was not prepared to make a statement today regarding Ingalsbe but would likely do so on Thursday.

In July, Ingalsbe and Solsrud took a 21-day trip around the world together in the experimental plane.

In its statement, the NLS school district said Solsrud was a “loving parent” and involved community member.

She was a charter member and former president of the NLS Parent Teacher Organization, coordinated the inaugural event for the Girls United program that served middle school-aged girls and she worked to pass the technology levy for NLS several years ago.

“As a strong supporter of the technology levy, Deb led the charge informing and gaining community involvement and support,” according to the statement. “Deb’s dedication to education and the betterment of our NLS community will be sorely missed.”

Source:   http://www.wctrib.com


Deb Solsrud

Daryl Ingalsbe


The pilot in Tuesday's double-fatal plane wreck "crashed on go around after a missed approach," Eric Weiss, spokesman for the National Transportation Safety Board, said Wednesday.

Weiss said that was all he could confirm about Tuesday evening's plane crash in the Spruce Creek Fly-In pending the outcome of the investigation.

The identities of the two people killed were not confirmed Wednesday afternoon as law enforcement officials were still trying to locate next of kin, according to the Volusia County Sheriff's Office.

Records show the plane is owned by Daryl Ingalsbe, who has a home in the Fly-In and is the president and CEO of Independent Technologies, Inc., based in Nebraska.

The New London-Spicer School District in Minnesota posted to the district's Facebook page that the community was mourning the loss of former parent-teacher organization president Deb Solsrud "who passed away when the small plane she was traveling in crashed in Volusia County."

Brad Andersen with Independent Technologies said the company could not comment Wednesday but would issue a statement Thursday.

Ingalsbe and Solsrud took a 21-day trip together around the world in the experimental plane in July, according to the West Central Tribune, a Minnesota newspaper.

Emergency crews were summoned to the private community about 6 p.m. Tuesday when witnesses reported a plane had crashed on Taxiway Lindy Loop.

Volusia County Sheriff Ben Johnson said the pilot, believed to be a resident of the Fly-In, narrowly missed hitting a couple of houses.

"It looks like there's not going to be any survivors in this," a 9-1-1 caller said.

The flight of the Epic LT single-engine aircraft originated out of Tennessee's Regional Jetport, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Source:  http://www.news-journalonline.com


Daryl Ingalsbe


PORT ORANGE, Fla. - Two people were killed in a plane crash Tuesday evening in Port Orange, officials said.

The pilot and a passenger were on board a 2009 Epic LT single-engine aircraft that went down at the Spruce Creek Fly-In, officials said. The plane came close to hitting several homes.

The aircraft stalled while trying to land, said officials with the Volusia County Sheriff’s Department. Something went wrong, but the specifics aren’t clear.

Sheriff’s officials said the wreck took place about 6 p.m. in the area of 22 Taxiway Lindy Loop.

The plane was "in an inverted flat spin when he came out of the fog," a witness told officials. "He came right over the house. I knew he was in trouble."

While the plane crashed into a yard, it missed striking any homes in the neighborhood. No injuries were reported on the ground.

"It looked like it was right at the front door of the house. God bless them it didn't go into the houses there," Pat Waggnor who lives in the area said.

Witnesses told National Transportation Safety Board officials the plane crashed after missing its approach.

Local authorities will release the names and conditions of the people who were in the plane.

The flight originated at Millington Regional Airport in Tennessee, officials said.

The Federal Aviation Administration and NTSB will investigate the crash.

Investigators were on scene documenting the wreckage, searching for clues, and interviewing witnesses to determine the cause of the crash.

It may take up to a year to determine the cause of the crash, NTSB Public Information Officer Eric Weiss told News 6.

Crews removed the wreckage from the site Wednesday evening. 

Source:   http://www.clickorlando.com



WILLMAR – A plane reportedly owned by a Spicer businessman crashed in a residential neighborhood in Florida Tuesday night, killing both people on board.

According to the Volusia County Sheriff’s Office, the 2009 single-engine Epic LT plane crashed in heavy fog just before 6 p.m. in a front yard in the Spruce Creek Fly-In community of Port Orange, Florida.

The plane narrowly missed two houses.

No one on the ground was injured but two people in the plane were killed.

The names of the victims have not been yet released but according to a story published in the Dayton Beach News-Journal, an Epic aircraft with the FAA registration of N669WR left Willmar on Tuesday and after stopping in Tennessee was scheduled to arrive at Spruce Creek at 5:58 p.m.

That experimental plane is reportedly owned and manufactured by Independent Technologies, which lists Daryl Ingalsbe as the owner and CEO.

Besides having a residence in Spruce Creek Fly-in, Ingalsbe also has a home in Spicer.

Earlier this year, the West Central Tribune featured Ingalsbe in an article about a 21-day trip around the world where he flew his fixed wing, single-engine turboprop Epic airplane – along with his partner and New London businesswoman, Deb Solsrud – with two dozen other aviation enthusiasts.

Named the “Odyssey,” the trip was the first of its kind to incorporate experimental aircraft and included other owners of Epic planes as well as a documentary film crew. That trip, which was expected to be recognized by Guinness World Records, began July 7 and included stops in 21 cities in countries on three continents.

In a post to the Facebook page, the Volusia County Sheriff’s Office said a witness who reported the crash said he saw the aircraft fly into the fog and that the plane was “in an inverted flat spin when he came out of the fog.”

Volusia County Sheriff Ben Johnson told the News-Journal it looked like the plane stalled or came down in a spin.

"It came pretty much straight down," Johnson said. "It appears as though it barely missed two houses."

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.

Source:   http://www.wctrib.com




Two people were killed Tuesday evening when an airplane crashed into the front yard of a home in the Spruce Creek Fly-In community.

The plane crashed on Taxiway Lindy Loop just before 6 p.m., said Andrew Gant, a Volusia County sheriff's spokesman.

The Epic LT, high performance, all carbon fiber, single-engine turboprop aircraft, crashed on approach to Runway 5 at Spruce Creek Airport, Kathleen Bergen, spokeswoman for the Federal Aviation Administration, said via email.

The identities of the two victims would be released after their families were notified, Gant said. No other injuries were reported.

A 9-1-1 caller told a dispatcher he saw the plane fly into the fog and when it came out it was "in an inverted flat spin."

"He came right over the house - I knew he was in trouble," the caller said.

The dispatcher asked the caller if he thought anyone was injured to which the caller responded: "They're probably dead."

Another 9-1-1 caller told a dispatcher it looked like there wouldn't be any survivors.

Volusia County Sheriff Ben Johnson said it looked like the plane stalled or came down in a spin.

"It came pretty much straight down," Johnson said. "It appears as though it barely missed two houses."

Johnson said one of the victims was apparently someone who lives in the fly-in community.

"At the time, I think the fog was starting to set in," the sheriff said. "The FAA will investigate this to find out what really happened."

The flight originated out of Millington Regional Airport in Tennessee, Bergen said.

According to Flight Aware, a flight tracking website, an Epic aircraft, N669WR, departed Millington Regional Jetport in Tennessee at 2:58 p.m. Tuesday and was scheduled to arrive at Spruce Creek at 5:58 p.m.

The fog started rolling into the Port Orange area before 5 p.m. Tuesday.

"The fog is developing over the nearshore Atlantic because of a combination of cooler water and relatively warmer air," said John Pendergrast, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Melbourne.

The Weather Service received an automated observation from the airport at Spruce Creek at 5:55 p.m., Pendergrast said. "The weather observation at the time indicated it was 2.5 mile visibility, with no wind and 100 percent humidity," Pendergrast said. "You can conclude from that there was obscuration of visibility."

Information on the Epic Aircraft website indicates Daryl Ingalsbe of Spruce Creek owns one of its aircraft. Volusia property records show Ingalsbe owns a home in the Fly-In.

The FAA registration for N669WR indicates it was a fixed wing, single-engine turboprop owned and manufactured by Independent Technologies Inc. of Bend, Oregon. Records on file with the Florida Department of State list Ingalsbe as an officer in the company, Independent Technologies.

The registration states the Epic Aircraft plane is classified as an experimental aircraft, in the category of amateur built, which covers a broad range of aircraft within the agency's classification system.

The plane had flown into Tennessee earlier Tuesday from Willmar Municipal Airport in Willmar, Minnesota, the flight tracking service reported.

On Monday, the plane was flown from Fremont, Nebraska to Minnesota, the reverse of a flight the plane made on Friday. Flight Aware shows the plane was flown from Spruce Creek to Willmar, Minnesota on Dec. 18.

The National Transportation Safety Board also was notified, the Sheriff's office stated.

Source:   http://www.news-journalonline.com

































PORT ORANGE, Fla. - A man and women were killed in a plane crash Tuesday at the Spruce Creek Fly-In community in Port Orange, Volusia County Sheriff’s Office deputies said.

The Epic LT, high performance, all carbon fiber, single-engine turboprop aircraft, crashed in someone’s front yard at about 6 p.m. in the area of 22 Taxiway Lindy Loop.

“It kind of went over the trees and I didn’t see anything. We just heard a loud boom,” said witness Jane Loewinger.

The plane was coming from Millington Regional Airport in Tennessee.

A witness told a 911 dispatcher he had seen the plane fly into the fog and that the plane was “in an inverted flat spin when he came out of the fog."

Albert Michael said he watched the plane try to land twice in foggy conditions.

Volusia County Sheriff Ben Johnson said weather may have been a factor.

“It may have been the fog. It could be involved,” he said.

The plane crashed into a yard, but did not hit the home.

No injuries were reported by anyone on the ground.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board will investigate what caused the crash. 

The victims were not identified.

Source:   http://www.wftv.com