Sunday, March 17, 2019

Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II, registered to Classic Solutions Inc and operated by Phoenix Test Flight LLC as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 flight, N424TW: Fatal accident occurred March 17, 2019 near Delaware Municipal Airport (KDLZ), Ohio


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbus, Ohio
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama
Textron; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N424TW

Location: Plain City, OH
Accident Number: CEN19FA100
Date & Time: 03/17/2019, 1745 EDT
Registration: N424TW
Aircraft: Cessna 421
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Business 

On March 17, 2019, about 1745 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 421B airplane, N424TW impacted terrain near Plain City, Ohio. The commercial rated pilot, sole occupant, was fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to Classic Solutions, Inc. and operated by Phoenix Test Flight, LLC, as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 flight. The flight departed Dayton (KDAY), Dayton, Ohio about 1720, en route to (KDLZ) Delaware, Ohio.

A preliminary review of radio communications revealed the pilot was in contact with air traffic control and there was no record of a distress call. The pilot requested runway 28 RNAV approach at KDLZ. The pilot also reported that he was encountering icing. The controller cleared the flight to 2,500 ft. Shortly afterwards, the airplane made a left turn, and radar and radio communication were lost.

The airplane impacted a rural field about 8 miles southwest of the KDLZ airport. Ground impact scars and wreckage were consistent with a left-wing low impact. The wreckage path was orientated on about a 140-degree heading. From the initial impact point, the airplane crossed a two-lane road before impacting two wooden utility poles. The main part of the wreckage came to rest at the base of the second utility pole, about 395 ft from the initial impact point. The wreckage path was about 850 ft long with the wreckage highly fragmented along the wreckage path. There was not a post-crash fire.

After documentation of the accident site, the airplane was recovered for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N424TW
Model/Series: 421 B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Phoenix Flight Test
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDLZ
Observation Time: 2135 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 1°C / 0°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 400 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots / , 80°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 1600 ft agl
Visibility:  3 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.02 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Dayton, OH (KDAY)
Destination: Delaware, OH (KDLZ) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 40.188333, -83.204444 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Lt Col  (retired) Matthew "Rip" Hayden

Matthew Alan Hayden
August 22nd, 1974 – March 17th, 2019

Matthew Alan Hayden was born on August 22nd, 1974 and passed away on March 17th, 2019.  No services are scheduled at this time.  In the care of Tobias Funeral Home - Belmont Chapel, Dayton, Ohio



PLAIN CITY — An experienced Air Force fighter pilot from Arizona died Sunday when a Cessna plane he was flying in snowy weather crashed in a field off Route 42 in Union County.

Matthew A. Hayden, 44, of Phoenix, had taken off from Dayton International Airport at 5:17 p.m. and was headed to Delaware Municipal Airport in Delaware County, according to the Union County sheriff’s office.

The Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II was owned by Classic Solutions Company Inc. in Bakersfield, California. Hayden had just picked up the plane at the Dayton airport, Union County Sheriff Jamie Patton said. He said Hayden was flying to Delaware to meet a friend and was expected to move on from there to another destination.

The eight-seat Cessna he was flying went down at 5:42 p.m. near Route 42 between Harriott and Bell roads in Jerome Township, about 7 miles northeast of Plain City and near the Delaware County line. The aircraft broke into hundreds of pieces in the field.

A witness heard the plane descending and then the crash, and called 911 as he headed to the scene. He stayed on the phone as he came upon the wreckage.

Patton said friends of Hayden’s told authorities that he had only recently retired from the Air Force as a lieutenant colonel. Hayden was a 1998 graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy and a renowned military pilot and flight instructor. He had served as a test pilot in both the F-16 and F-35 fighter jets and had piloted the F-16 in Operation Iraqi Freedom. The public-affairs office at Luke Air Force Base in Arizona, where he last served, said officers who knew Hayden were all saddened by the news Monday.

His list of accomplishments is long, and the Air Force said he had more than 2,500 flight hours in at least 30 types of aircraft. He made his mark as a test pilot in experimental aircraft, and he had been, before his retirement, a commander of the 56th Training Squadron at Luke.

Craig Hatch, an investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board, arrived on the scene about noon Monday. He said it’s too early to say whether the snowy weather on Sunday was a factor in the crash.

Hatch said Hayden reported no problems over his radio before the crash.

Debris stretched across fields on both sides of Route 42. Power poles were also sheared off or otherwise damaged. Route 42 from Route 33 to the Delaware County line was closed until about 4 a.m. Monday for the investigation. The highway was shut off again in the afternoon for about two hours while investigators gathered evidence; it reopened about 3:30 p.m.

Hatch said he hoped to have all the wreckage cleared away Tuesday. He said the full investigation could take a year.


Story and video ➤  https://www.dispatch.com


Lt Col (retired) Matthew "Rip" Hayden 


MARYSVILLE, Ohio — Authorities have identified an Arizona pilot who was killed when the small plane he was flying crashed into a farm field in Ohio.

The Union County Sheriff's Office said Monday that 44-year-old Matthew Hayden, of Phoenix, died Sunday night when the Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II crashed off Route 42 near the border of Union and Delaware counties.

According to Luke Air Force Base, Hayden was a Lieutenant Colonel with the 56th Training Squadron.

Hayden's bio stated he was one of the most experienced F-35 pilots in the world, and has flown and instructed new pilots at Luke AFB since the inception of its program.

Hayden also made history as the first Luke AFB pilot to reach 500 flying hours in an F-35 Lightning II.

Union County Sheriff Jamie Patton says the former Air Force pilot took off from Dayton International Airport on Sunday evening and was headed to Delaware Municipal Airport in central Ohio when the plane crashed shortly before 6 p.m.

Patton says the plane was owned by Classic Solutions Company Inc., out of Bakersfield, California.

An investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board says it's too early to determine what caused the crash.

Story and video ➤ https://www.abc15.com




UNION COUNTY, Ohio — Authorities say one person died when a small plane crashed into a farm field in Union County.

Chief Deputy Tom Morgan of the Union County Sheriff's Office said that the plane skidded across a road and hit a utility pole and lines after crashing Sunday. That caused a power outage in the village of Plain City, northwest of Columbus.

It was snowing and overcast at the time of the crash. The plane was identified as a Cessna 421C Golden Eagle. Chief Deputy Morgan said it was "totally destroyed."

The sheriff's office identified the deceased pilot as 44-year-old Matthew A. Hayden, of Phoenix, Arizona.

The cause of the crash is unknown. The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are assisting in the investigation.

Story and video ➤ https://www.10tv.com



MARYSVILLE, Ohio (WSYX/WTTE) — A man was killed when a Cessna 421 twin-engine airplane swung low over rural Union County on Sunday, violently crashing into utility poles along Route US-42. The victim was later identified as 44-year-old Matthew Hayden of Phoenix.

The crash left a debris field stretching 400 yards wide on either side of the roadway, according to the Union County Sheriff's Office.

"(The plane) is totally destroyed. Literally, hundreds of pieces everywhere," said Chief Deputy Tom Morgan. "When it crashed into the farm field, it continued across US-42 and struck utility poles and utility lines."

The crash shattered at least one pole and brought down wires, leading to widespread power outages. Morgan said that most Ohio Edison customers in Plain City were impacted. An outage map for Union Rural Electric Cooperative showed about 2,500 more customers without power in Jerome Township and Concord on Sunday evening.

The Federal Aviation Administration joined the investigation Sunday night, which will aim to determine where the aircraft originated from and where it was headed.

During the time of the crash, Union County was swathed in a small but intense band of snowfall that made for whiteout conditions on local roadways at times. Morgan said further snowfall after the crash had hampered the early stages of the investigation, as debris quickly became covered with snow.

Only one witness is known to have heard the crash, according to Morgan. Any other witnesses are asked to call the Union County Sheriff's Office at (937) 645-4110.

Story and video ➤ https://myfox28columbus.com


MARYSVILLE, Ohio — One person was killed when a Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II swung low over rural Union County on Sunday, violently crashing into utility poles along Route US-42. The pilot has not yet been identified.

The crash left a debris field stretching 400 yards wide on either side of the roadway, according to the Union County Sheriff's Office.

"(The plane) is totally destroyed. Literally, hundreds of pieces everywhere," said Chief Deputy Tom Morgan. "When it crashed into the farm field, it continued across US-42 and struck utility poles and utility lines."

The collision shattered at least one pole and brought down wires, leading to widespread power outages. Morgan said that most Ohio Edison customers in Plain City were impacted. An outage map for Union Rural Electric Cooperative showed about 2,500 more customers without power in Jerome Township and Concord on Sunday evening.

The Federal Aviation Administration joined the investigation Sunday night, which will aim to determine where the aircraft originated from and where it was headed.

During the time of the crash, Union County was swathed in a small but intense band of snowfall that made for whiteout conditions on local roadways at times. Morgan said further snowfall after the crash had hampered the early stages of the investigation, as debris quickly became covered with snow.

Only one witness is known to have heard the crash, according to Morgan. Any other witnesses are asked to call the Union County Sheriff's Office at (937) 645-4110.

Story and video ➤ https://abc6onyourside.com







Delaware, Ohio - The Federal Aviation Administration and the Union County Sheriff's Office is investigating a deadly plane crash that happened near U.S. 42, yesterday.  

According to the Union County Sheriff's Office, at about 5:42 pm, Sunday, dispatchers began receiving several 911 calls reporting a plane crash on U.S. 42, between Harriott and Bell roads.

When emergency crews arrived on scene, they found the crash site stretching approximately 400 to 500 yards.  

A preliminary investigation has revealed the plane crashed in a farm field on the west side of U.S. 42 and continued across the roadway, striking several utility poles before coming to a rest in a farm field on the east side of U.S. 42.

Deputies say the Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II broke apart in several hundred pieces. 

One person was pronounced dead from the crash, but their identity has not been confirmed.  

The Federal Aviation Administration continues to investigate, but according to deputies the weather at the time of the crash was light snow with overcast skies. 

Story and video ➤https://www.nbc4i.com

Hughes 369HS, registered to and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight, N119T: Accident occurred March 17, 2019 in Newberg, Yamhill County, Oregon

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Hillsboro, Oregon
Rolls-Royce Corporation; Indianapolis, Indiana
MD Helicopters; Mesa, Arizona

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N119T

Location: Newberg, OR
Accident Number: WPR19LA097
Date & Time: 03/17/2019, 1605 PDT
Registration: N119T
Aircraft: MD HELICOPTER 369
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 17, 2019, about 1605 Pacific daylight time, a McDonnel-Douglas, 369HS helicopter, N119T, experienced a loss of engine power and subsequently impacted terrain and rolled onto its right side about 2 miles north-west of Newberg, Oregon. The private pilot and passenger were not injured. The helicopter was substantially damaged to the fuselage and tail boom. The helicopter was registered to and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed about the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from the South Lewis County Airport (TDO) at 1445 and was destined for a landing area located about 17 miles south-west of Portland, OR, and from there to McMinnville, Oregon.

The pilot stated that he had taken off from TDO with about 170 pounds of fuel on board. He flew two passengers to a private property which was about 38 minutes away. He dropped off the two passengers and picked up a different passenger. During the takeoff, the low fuel light began to flicker on and off, and about six minutes into the flight, the engine lost power. The pilot initiated an autorotation and cycled the fuel boost pump in an attempt to regain power. Upon touchdown, the helicopter rolled onto its right side. The pilot and the passenger exited the helicopter unassisted.

The helicopter came to rest in an open field, and there was no post-impact fire. The pilot stated there were no mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. The helicopter was relocated to a secure location for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: MD HELICOPTER
Registration: N119T
Model/Series: 369 HS
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Does Business As: Iron Eagle Helicopters
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Toledo, WA (KTDO)
Destination: McMinnville, OR (MMV) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:



A pilot and his passenger walked away from the crash of a small helicopter Sunday in Newberg.

According to a release from the Newberg-Dundee Police Department, Robert Taylor, 46, of Washington, and his brother, Aaron Taylor, 43, of Beaverton, were flying from Beaverton to McMinnville when the aircraft lost power and Robert Taylor had to make an emergency landing.

"Upon arrival, both occupants of the rotorcraft had exited on their own, miraculously without injury," the release said. "The pilot's quick thinking and extensive flying background can be credited for their survival of this crash."

The aircraft came to rest near the intersection of Bell Road and Highway 219 in northern Newberg. Although the craft received extensive damage, it did not strike any buildings or individuals on the ground.

Fire personnel from the Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue department responded to the scene, but neither the aircraft nor the grass beneath it caught fire. TVF&R officials said no fuel was found to have leaked from the aircraft.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board, the federal agencies responsible for investigating aircraft crashes, have been contacted about the crash. The aircraft was released back to Robert Taylor at the scene.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://pamplinmedia.com



Two brothers survived a helicopter crash late Sunday afternoon in Newberg, police said.

Robert Taylor, 46, was flying the helicopter from Beaverton to McMinnville with his brother Aaron when the rotorcraft lost power, the Newberg-Dundee Police Department said. 

Taylor performed an emergency landing in a field on the southwest corner of Highway 219 and Northeast Bell Road, just inside the city limits. 

The helicopter sustained major damage.

While the helicopter sustained major damage, the men got out on their own and were uninjured, police said.

Police said the pair survived thanks to Taylor’s quick thinking and extensive experience flying.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.oregonlive.com




NEWBERG, Oregon — Two people survived a helicopter crash Sunday afternoon in Newberg, police said.

The crash happened about 4:12 p.m. in a field near Highway 219 and Northeast Bell Road. 

Newberg-Dundee Officer Brian Hagen said both occupants exited the helicopter on their own after the crash, "miraculously without injury," even though the helicopter sustained serious damage.

The pilot, 46-year-old Robert Taylor, from Washington, and his brother, 43-year-old Aaron Taylor, from Beaverton, were flying from Beaverton to McMinnville when the helicopter lost power, forcing Robert to maneuver and emergency landing.

"The pilot's quick thinking and extensive flying background can be credited for their survival of this crash," Hagen said.

There were no fuel leaks from the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.kgw.com

Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee, N9592W: Incident occurred March 17, 2019 near Kerrville Municipal Airport (KERV), Kerr County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

Made emergency landing on a highway.

Texas Skies Flight School LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N9592W

Date: 17-MAR-19
Time: 20:45:00Z
Regis#: N9592W
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 28 140
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: KERRVILLE
State: TEXAS







A Helotes man was attempting a required cross-country trip when his only engine went out on his flight school rented plane and he was forced to land in the middle of Highway 27 as he attempted to reach the Kerrville Municipal Airport.

“I almost made it,” pilot Elias Strikos said standing only a few feet from the runway


Strikos said he took off from Boerne Stage Airfield en route to Junction.


“I had full tanks. The engine cut out at about 4,500 feet when I switched fuel tanks from right to left,” Strikos said. “I Had to make turn back to Kerrville and it just wasn’t enough (to reach the airfield).”


Instead, Strikos was forced to land without power about 300 feet from the Kerrville Municipal Airport runway in the middle of the highway.


Strikos said he was looking for a place to land when realized he was not going to make it over the fence and in to the airfield.


“I saw the cars and as soon as they saw me coming in, they moved to the side and I had a clear path to land,” Strikos said.


According to Strikos, he was approximately four miles west from Kerrville when he was forced to make the turn, traveling without power the entire way.


Strikos said he has been flying on an off for about eight years.


“I’m actually on my first cross-country solo in order to get my license,” Strikos said.


The Kerrville Fire Department, Kerr County Sheriff’s office, Kerrville Police Department and Texas Department of Public Safety responded to the scene of the accident, where no injuries were reported.


Officers remained on the scene directing traffic, while officials with the Federal Aviation Administration were expected to arrive and conduct and investigation.


Original article ➤ http://www.hccommunityjournal.com 




KERRVILLE – A plane has made an emergency landing on Highway 27 across from the Kerrville Municipal Airport in Kerrville at around 3:45 p.m. after having fuel problems, according to authorities who responded to the scene.

No injuries have been reported.

Traffic has been slowed down on Highway 27 near the airport while first responders work the scene.

Story and video ➤ https://texasbreaking.com

Loss of Control on Ground: Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N17SJ; accident occurred December 27, 2018 at Sugar Land Regional Airport (KSGR), Houston, Texas


Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N17SJ 



Location: Sugar Land, TX
Accident Number: GAA19CA119
Date & Time: 12/27/2018, 1300 CST
Registration: N17SJ
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of Control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 


Analysis 

The solo student pilot reported that, while taking off for a stop-and-go landing, he applied full power, and the airplane drifted left. He corrected with right rudder, but the airplane continued left. He reduced power to idle to abort the takeoff, but the airplane "continued out of control to the left." He applied brakes and opposite rudder, but the airplane exited the runway to the left and struck an airport sign, the left main landing gear separated, and the airplane came to rest about 200 ft past the sign.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing lift strut.

The student reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The student pilot's failure to maintain directional control during takeoff, which resulted in a runway excursion and impact with a sign.

Findings

Aircraft
Directional control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Student pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Sign/marker - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Takeoff
Loss of control on ground (Defining event)
Attempted remediation/recovery

Takeoff-rejected takeoff
Runway excursion
Part(s) separation from AC
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Student Pilot Information 


Certificate: Student
Age: 40, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/22/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 98 hours (Total, all aircraft), 98 hours (Total, this make and model), 17.3 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 13.4 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 9.1 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information 


Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N17SJ
Model/Series: 172 S
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1999
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: 172S8344
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2300 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: IO-360SER
Registered Owner: Anson Air Llc
Rated Power:
Operator: Anson Air Llc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSGR, 84 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1853 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 200°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 310°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.75 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / 11°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Sugar Land, TX (SGR)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Sugar Land, TX (SGR)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1215 CST
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information


Airport: SUGAR LAND RGNL (SGR)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 82 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 35
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 8000 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Stop and Go

Wreckage and Impact Information
Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None

Latitude, Longitude:  29.622778, -95.656667 (est)

Cessna 150H, registered to a private individual and was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a visual flight rules instructional flight, N7095S: Accident occurred March 16, 2019 at Talkeetna Airport (PATK), Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N7095S

Location: Talkeetna, AK
Accident Number: ANC19LA015
Date & Time: 03/16/2019, 1650 AKD
Registration: N7095S
Aircraft: Cessna 150
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On March 16, 2019, about 1650 Alaska daylight time, a Cessna 150 airplane, N7095S, sustained substantial damage during an off-airport, emergency landing, shortly after takeoff from Runway 1 at the Talkeetna Airport (TKA), Talkeetna, Alaska. The certificated flight instructor and one student sustained no injuries. The airplane was registered to a private individual and was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a visual flight rules instructional flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from TKA, about 1645.

During a telephone conversation with a National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator on March 16, the flight instructor reported that the purpose of the flight was to provide an introductory flight lesson to a prospective new student. She added that she was in the right seat, and the student was in the left seat at the time of the accident.

The flight instructor said that during the first takeoff run, condensation formed on the airplane's windscreen, so she aborted the takeoff and taxied back to the end of Runway 1 for a second attempt, using all 3,500 feet of available runway. She said that during the second takeoff attempt, just after becoming airborne, the nose of the airplane pitched up unexpectedly, so she pushed the control yoke full forward to lower the nose, but with no response. She said that she then asked the student for assistance in holding the yoke forward while she attempted to apply nose down elevator trim.

The flight instructor then observed the approaching tree line ahead, and unable to correct the nose high attitude of the airplane, she reduced the engine power to idle and selected an area of tree covered terrain as an emergency landing site. The airplane subsequently settled into the trees and came to rest near a road. The occupants were able to egress without further incident.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, both wings, and the empennage. The airplane was removed from the accident site and transported to a secure location for further examination.

The closest weather reporting facility was the Talkeetna Airport. At 1653, the METAR was reporting, in part: wind calm; visibility 10 statute miles, overcast clouds at 10,000 ft; temperature 32°F; dew point 23°F; altimeter 29.28 inches of mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N7095S
Model/Series: 150 H
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PATK, 356 ft msl
Observation Time: 1653 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 0°C / -5°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm / ,
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 10000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.28 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Talkeetna, AK (TKA)
Destination: Talkeetna, AK (TKA) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 62.333056, -150.078611 (est)

TALKEETNA, Alaska (KTUU) - Two people are safe after surviving a plane crash in Talkeetna.

It happened on Saturday at around 4:13 p.m. near Beaver Road in Talkeetna.

Talkeetna Air Traffic Control reported a 1967 Cessna 150H went down after taking off from the Talkeetna Airport.

The pilot reported the plane experienced mechanical failure and went down shortly after take-off. Once the plane hit the ground, it slid to a stop against a group of trees, according to the trooper dispatch.

The two people on board the Cessna 150H reported no injuries and declined medical attention. 

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.ktuu.com

Two people walked away uninjured from a plane crash involving 1967 Cessna 150H near Beaver Road in Talkeetna.

According to Alaska State Troopers, the agency responded to the area around 4:13 p.m. after Talkeetna Air Traffic Control reported the plane went down after taking off from the Talkeetna airport.

"The pilot reported the plane experienced mechanical failure and went down shortly after take-off, after hitting the ground the plane slid to a stop against a group of trees," an online dispatch states.

Emergency medical personnel responded, but both occupants refused care. 

The FAA was notified and took control of the scene, troopers stated.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.ktva.com

Loss of Control in flight: Cessna 172C Skyhawk, N8487X, accident occurred December 20, 2018 at Center Municipal Airport (F17), Shelby County, Texas

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N8487X 


Location: Center, TX

Accident Number: GAA19CA123
Date & Time: 12/20/2018, 1430 CST
Registration: N8487X
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The pilot reported that, during the landing flare, a wind gust "lifted the wing up 90 degrees." She then leveled the wings and added full power. When the wings were leveled, the airplane was above a drainage ditch between the runway and parallel taxiway. She realized that the airplane would not gain enough airspeed to "make the [taxiway]," so she intentionally aerodynamically stalled the airplane to "prevent flipping" it. The airplane descended and impacted the drainage ditch.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right and left wings.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The airport's automated weather observation system reported that the wind was from 310° at 14 knots, gusting to 23 knots. A weather station located about 2 miles southwest of the airport reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was from 311° at 2.7 mph (about 2 knots), gusting to 12.1 mph (about 11 knots). The pilot was landing the airplane on runway 35. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's exceedance of the airplane's critical angle of attack during landing in gusting crosswind conditions, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall.

Findings

Aircraft
Angle of attack - Capability exceeded (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Crosswind - Effect on operation
Gusts - Effect on operation
Object/animal/substance - Contributed to outcome

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Other weather encounter
Loss of control in flight (Defining event)
Attempted remediation/recovery
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 30, Female
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/17/2014
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/16/2018
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 163.5 hours (Total, all aircraft), 163.5 hours (Total, this make and model), 108.4 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 13.5 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N8487X
Model/Series: 172 C
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1962
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 17248987
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/01/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2250 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 45.33 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-300-D
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 145 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KOCH, 355 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 32 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2056 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 241°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 22 knots / 30 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 320°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.8 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 15°C / 2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Mc Pherson, KS (MPR)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Center, TX (F17)
Type of Clearance: VFR; VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 1100 CST
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: CENTER MUNI (F17)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 318 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 35
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5501 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  31.835278, -94.157222 (est)