Friday, February 23, 2018

Nigeria: Police can’t arrest herdsmen for grazing cattle on airport runways –Commissioner

The Nigeria Police Force has said it cannot arrest herdsmen who allow their cattle to stray onto and graze on airport runways in the country.

The Commissioner of Police, Airport Command, Mustapha Dandaura, stated this in an interview with our correspondent on Friday.

He said herdsmen could only be arrested in states where the anti-open grazing law was effective.

However, Dandaura said that all policemen and other security officials at the airports had been instructed to stay on high alert to prevent a situation whereby cows would take over airport runways.

He said, “It’s only in states where the anti-open grazing law is in place that herdsmen can be arrested for allowing their cattle to graze on airport runways. Apart from those states, we have not been told to start arresting herdsmen.

“But we have already alerted our men at the airports to ensure such incident does not occur again. The state police commands have also been carried along and everyone is on the alert.

“We can’t have a situation whereby cows would be straying onto and grazing on airport runways because it is embarrassing. Everyone is now on the alert and it’s going to be prevented.”

Last Saturday, an Air Peace flight from Lagos had been prevented from landing at the Akure Airport, Ondo State as cows took over the runway.

It had taken the efforts of airport security and other aviation workers to clear the runway before the airplane landed.

The Federal Airports Authority of Nigeria had apologised to the airline affected and suspended the head of aviation security at the airport following the bizarre incident.

A similar incident had occurred in November 2016 when a fully-loaded plane belonging to Air Peace had to abort landing at the Sam Mbakwe Airport, Owerri, Imo State when the pilot discovered that the runway had been invaded by cows.

Before the Owerri episode, an Air France plane was reported to have collided with cows at the runway of the Port Harcourt International Airport.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://punchng.com

Boeing B75N1 Stearman, N62438: Accident occurred February 23, 2018 near Zephyrhills Municipal Airport (KZPH), Pasco County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Location: Zephyrhills, FL
Accident Number: ERA18LA086
Date & Time: 02/23/2018, 1415 EST
Registration: N62438
Aircraft: STEARMAN B75
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On February 23, 2018, about 1415 eastern standard time, a Boeing B75N1 Stearman, N62438, was substantially damaged during forced landing, after it experienced a total loss of engine power during approach to Zephyrhills Municipal Airport (ZPH), Zephyrhills, Florida. The certificated commercial pilot was not injured, and the passenger received minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed for the flight that departed Leesburg International Airport (LEE), Leesburg, Florida, at 1330.

The pilot reported that after checking to see if any aircraft were in the traffic pattern, he radioed that he was on a "straight-in" approach to runway 23. He said that the airplane was on the final approach leg of the traffic pattern about a 1/4 mile from the runway at an altitude of 1,500 ft above ground level when the engine began to "sputter" and then "quit." He attempted perform a forced landing on a road; however, just before touchdown the airplane's right wing collided with a traffic light pole. The airplane immediately descended and collided with the ground.

Initial examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the engine separated from the airframe. In addition, the right wing was separated from the fuselage. The airplane was recovered and retained for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: STEARMAN
Registration: N62438
Model/Series: B75 N1
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: MILLER BRYAN D
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: ZPH, 89 ft msl
Observation Time: 1415 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / 16°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 5000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.29 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: LEESBURG, FL (LEE)
Destination: ZEPHYRHILLS, FL (ZPH)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  28.228056, -82.156111 (est)



PASCO COUNTY Fla. (February 23, 2017) - At approximately 2:15 PM Pasco Fire Rescue 911 received a call of an aircraft emergency on Chancey Rd at CR-54.

When Firefighters arrived on scene they reported a single engine bi-plane in a ditch with 2 passengers laying on the ground.


Firefighters evaluated the victims, and the pilot of the aircraft declined medical attention. The passenger of the aircraft was transported to the hospital with minor cuts.


The pilot reported that he was traveling from Leesburg FL to Zephyrhills FL when he experienced engine trouble. The pilot reports that he attempted to land the aircraft on Chancey Rd when he clipped a stoplight, and crashed into a ditch.


Firefighters checked the aircraft for hazards, and turned the scene over to law enforcement


On scene of a plane down in the intersection of CR-54 and Chancey Rd.


-2 occupants on board the plane
-Plane made an emergency landing on the side of Chancey Rd
-1 Passenger taken for minor cuts
-Pilot is not injured
-All hazards have been mitigated

Pasco County Fire Rescue









ZEPHYRHILLS (FOX 13) - A biplane crashed along a Pasco County road this afternoon, sending one person to the hospital with minor injuries.

The plane, which appears to be an old Boeing Stearman, flipped onto its side after trying to land along Chancey Road near Highway 54, just north of the Zephyrhills Airport. Witness Lee Wheelbarger said via Twitter that the bright yellow plane may have hit a traffic light while making an emergency landing, causing the aircraft to flip.

A Pasco Fire Rescue spokesperson said two people were aboard the plane. The pilot was not hurt but a passenger was being taken to a hospital for treatment of "minor cuts."
  
The Stearman was a type of biplane produced in the 1930s and 1940s that served as the primary trainer for many WWII-era pilots.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.fox13news.com

Piper PA-32R-300 Cherokee Lance, C-GYGY: Fatal accident occurred February 22, 2018 in Monticello, San Juan County, Utah

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania
Piper Aircraft
Transportation Safety Board of Canada; Edmonton, AB

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://wwwapps.tc.gc.ca

Location:  Monticello, UT
Accident Number: WPR18FA095
Date & Time: 02/22/2018, MST
Registration: C-GYGY
Aircraft: PIPER PA32R
Injuries: 4 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On February 22, 2018, at an unknown time, a Piper PA-32R-300 airplane, Canadian registry C-GYGY, was destroyed when it impacted terrain under unknown circumstances near Monticello, Utah. The private pilot/owner and the three passengers were fatally injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Undetermined meteorological conditions prevailed. No flight plan was filed for the flight.

The pilot and passengers were all Canadian citizens, and resided in Alberta Canada. According to the pilot's daughter, the pilot typically wintered with the airplane in the southern United States (US). On a return trip from the US to Alberta in the airplane in very early February, the pilot left the airplane at Cut Bank International Airport (CTB), Cut Bank, Montana in the US, reportedly because adverse weather prevented the aerial completion of the trip. The airplane remained hangered at CTB until February 21, when the pilot and passengers drove to CTB to begin the flight journey that would include the accident leg.

The passengers included the pilot's friend, the pilot's son, and a friend of the pilot's son. The pilot was the only licensed pilot on board, but his 28 year old son was reported to have at least some flight experience. According to the pilot's daughter, the son's experience, in combination with other passengers' lack of flight experience, likely resulted in the pilot's son occupying a cockpit seat for the trip.

The flight destination was Albuquerque New Mexico, for the purpose of enabling the pilot to examine an airplane for possible purchase. The pilot's daughter stated that as she understood it, the pilot planned to fly from CTB to Albuquerque in one day, and she was not aware of any planned stops. However, due to unspecified weather, the flight landed at Grand Junction Airport (GJT), Grand Junction, Colorado, and the group overnighted in Grand Junction. According to the fixed base operator (FBO) at GJT, the pilot had requested a fuel top-off on February 21, and the airplane was serviced with 17.6 gallons of fuel that same day. The pilot was not in attendance for the refueling. To date no other fueling records have been located.

According to GJT air traffic control tower information, on February 22, the airplane departed to the northeast at 0937 mountain standard time. To date, no further communications between the airplane and any air traffic control facilities have been located.

About 2200 on February 22, in response to a concerned party, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an Alert Notice (ALNOT) stating that the airplane was overdue. About 0215 on February 23, the US Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (AFRCC) reported that an emergency locator transmitter (ELT) signal had been detected in the vicinity of La Sal Junction, Utah. Multiple ground and airborne searches were initiated during that day. At 1649 on February 23, previously unknown aircraft wreckage was located by a Civil Air Patrol search aircraft. Law enforcement personnel arrived at the scene soon thereafter, and the wreckage was confirmed to be that of the missing airplane.

The wreckage was located in a field about 10 miles southeast of Monticello, Utah. The debris field was oriented on a magnetic track of about 085°, and was about 550 feet long. The site elevation was approximately 6,800 ft above mean sea level (msl). An investigative team mapped the debris field and conducted an initial wreckage examination. Both wings had fracture-separated from the fuselage. All major components of the airplane, including all flight control surfaces, were identified at the scene. The landing gear damage was consistent with it being retracted at the time of impact. The engine had fracture-separated from the fuselage. No evidence of any pre-impact mechanical deficiencies that would have precluded continued flight were observed. No evidence of any pre-or post-impact fire was observed. The wreckage was recovered on February 27 for transport to, and subsequent detailed examination at, a secure facility.

The pilot held a Transport Canada (TC) private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. Flight time records indicated that as of February 9, 2018, the pilot had about 597 total hours of flight experience. His most recent TC Category 3 medical certificate was issued in February 2018.

TC information indicated that the airplane was manufactured in 1976, and was equipped with a Lycoming IO-540 series engine. The most recent annual or 100-hour inspection was completed in September 2017. The pilot was in the process of selling the airplane, and an undated advertisement stated that the airplane had a total time (TT) since new of 2,744 hours. The propeller TT was listed as 32 hours, and the engine "time since overhaul" was cited as 682 hours. The advertisement noted that the airplane was equipped with an autopilot, and an engine monitor with recording capabilities. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: C-GYGY
Model/Series: PA32R 300
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:  None
Departure Point:  Grand Junction, CO (KGJT)
Destination: Albuquerque, NM

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 3 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  37.781667, -109.173333 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Clint Kaupp, Bill Kaupp, Tim Mueller, and Ron Mckenzie. 

Bill Kaupp and his wife of 43 years, Paula Kaupp.

Clint Kaupp, pictured with his niece Maggie. 

Ron McKenzie, pictured with his two granddaughters. 

Tim Mueller, pictured with his nephew Jack. 











GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. (KKCO/KJCT)-- UPDATE: Shortly after 5 p.m. Friday Civil Air Patrol confirmed to KKCO the plane was found, and there were no survivors.

UPDATE: Civil Air Patrol search and rescue teams are looking for the plane in the area of Dove Creek, near the Colorado, Utah border.

Crews are using a signal from the plane’s emergency beacon to triangulate its location, but rough canyon terrain and snow in the area are making it difficult, according to the Civil Air Patrol.

Original Story: A plane that left the Grand Junction Regional Airport on Thursday went missing from radar soon after takeoff.

Pilot Bill Kaupp of Alberta, Canada and three others were on the plane when it left GJT, according to his son Jon Kaupp, who spoke to KKCO over the phone.

According to a news release from the Civil Air Patrol, the single-engine Piper Lance was headed for Albuquerque, New Mexico. Aircrews searching for the plane were forced to turn back Friday because of snow, according to the mission incident commander in New Mexico, Lt. Col. Jon Hitchcock.

According to Civil Air Patrol, a ground team from Montrose was sent to the search area 130 miles southwest of Grand Junction.  The AFRCC at Tyndall AFB tasked CAP to assist in locating a missing Piper Lance that left Grand Junction, CO, headed for Albuquerque, NM, on Thursday. A CAP ground team has been dispatched from Montrose, CO, headed to the search area 130 mi southwest of Grand Junction.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.nbc11news.com

Beechcraft B100 King Air, C-GIAE, Island Express Air Inc: Incident occurred February 23, 2018 at Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), British Columbia, Canada

http://m.regosearch.com/GIAE





At least two people were sent to hospital with non-life-threatening injuries after an airplane went off the runway at Abbotsford International Airport on Friday.

The plane went off radar while taking off around noon and was soon found just off the taxiway near a raspberry field, airport general manager Parm Sidhu said. The field is located just west of the intersection of Walmsley Avenue and Clearbrook Road.


Sidhu said that there were no serious injuries among the 10 people – two crew and eight passengers – on board a charter flight from Island Express Air which was headed to California.

Of the passengers, six were uninjured, Sidhu said. Two had minor injuries while another two were sent to hospital but did not have life-threatening injuries.

Two or three small children were among the passengers, and at least one person was seen with cuts to their face.

Ambulance, police and fire crews were dispatched to the scene.

Sidhu said the cause of the incident is unknown at this time and that he wasn’t able to speculate whether the snowy conditions were a factor.

“It could be a combination of factors,” he said.

The Transportation Safety Board will be investigating the accident.

The accident delayed one flight originally scheduled to depart just before 1 p.m.

For more on airport times, click here.

Original article  ➤  https://www.surreynowleader.com





An Island Express Air plane skidded off the runway at Abbotsford International Airport early Friday afternoon as heavy snow blanketed the Lower Mainland.

Airport general manager Parm Sidhu said 10 people were on board. None had life-threatening injuries.

"Around 12 o'clock, we received notification that an aircraft had gone off radar," he said. "We inspected the airfield and we found a Beechcraft B100 King Air north of the runway."

Sidhu said two of the passengers were taken to hospital and two others were treated for minor injuries at the scene.

The Transportation Safety Board has been notified of the accident. The cause is unknown at present. People from a variety of nearby businesses said visibility at the airport was very poor because of blowing snow.

At one point, firefighters, police and paramedics had set up a command post on site.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.cbc.ca

Airlines Are Booming, So Why Are Investors Worried? Investors worry that expansion plans and rising costs are threatening profit



The Wall Street Journal
By Robert Wall
Updated February 23, 2018 7:57 a.m. ET


Global airlines are cruising through one of the industry’s big booms, but investors are already growing worried they may end up squandering it.

British Airways parent International Consolidated Airlines Group SA reported Friday record net profit, joining a host of global airlines, including United Continental Holdings Inc. and American Airlines Group Inc., enjoying strong earnings amid greater-than-expected passenger growth.

But IAG, which operates BA, Ireland’s Aer Lingus and Spanish carriers Iberia and Vueling, also said it would increase capacity, a measure of seats sold over distance flown. The expansion, 6.7% this year, was ahead of the company’s midterm target and caught investors by surprise.

IAG shares were down almost 5% in midday trading in London, as shareholders worried that the expansion plans could cut into profit.

The drop follows similar shareholder angst in the U.S. United Continental, the No. 3 U.S. airline, spooked investors last month when it announced greater-than-anticipated expansion plans, sending shares down 11% on the day and dragging down other airline stocks. Airline shares slid further when American Airlines and Southwest Airlines Co. last month signaled that costs were rising.

“Airlines have gone out of fashion, with weakening capacity discipline in the U.S. domestic market and the fuel price rallying,” HSBC said this week.

The turbulence is hitting airlines after a period in which a combination of factors have helped lift the industry—one that is been particularly vulnerable to boom-bust cycles.

In recent quarters, carriers in the U.S. and Europe, the two largest contributors to collective industry profit last year, have delivered bumper earnings through a combination of low fuel prices, control of costs, and restrained growth. As passengers started taking to the skies in record numbers, big airlines have been able to raise ticket prices, lifting shares.

The bull market has affected the larger air-transport industry. Boeing Co. and Airbus SE are cranking out jetliners at an unprecedented pace to satisfy airlines clamoring for planes. Banks and private investors have flooded the market for plane financing.

But airline investors have turned skittish more recently, fretting about rising fuel prices, excessive expansion plans, and creeping costs.

IAG Chief Executive Willie Walsh insisted passenger unit revenue will grow despite the boost in seats-for-sale and that the company would deliver “accretive sensible growth.” British Airways, IAG’s biggest profit contributor, would only expand around 3% this year, he said.

Operating profit should rise again this year to a record, Mr. Walsh said, underpinned by the improvement in passenger unit revenue and currency-adjusted nonfuel unit costs. To signal its confidence, IAG also announced a €500 million ($615 million) share buyback.

Air France-KLM last week reported record operating earnings, though the net result was dented by pension charges. The airline also disclosed plans to lift capacity. Shares tumbled 6.4% on the day.

Rising fuel costs are a growing concern. IAG expects its fuel expenses this year to rise by €500 million to around €5.1 billion, compared with 2017. “We are worried about fuel prices,” IAG Chief Financial Officer Enrique Dupuy said Friday. Air France-KLM said its fuel bill would also be higher in 2018.

Shares in Southwest Airlines, the No. 1 U.S. budget carrier, are down 12.4% this year. Air France-KLM shares have tumbled more than 25%, and Deutsche Lufthansa AG, which reports 2017 earnings next month, is down more than 10%.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wsj.com

Cessna 180, N2934A: Accident occurred February 17, 2018 in Big Lake, Alaska

Analysis

The pilot reported that, after landing on a snow-covered, off-airport landing site, he was positioning the airplane for parking. He added that the left ski broke through the ice, followed by the right ski. He reported that he had not seen the area of "soft/thin" ice before taxiing.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's selection of unsuitable terrain for landing, which led to both skis breaking through the ice while positioning the airplane after landing.

Findings

Personnel issues
Decision making/judgment - Pilot (Cause)
Monitoring environment - Pilot

Environmental issues
Snow/slush/ice covered surface - Decision related to condition (Cause)
Snow/slush/ice covered surface - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Taxi
Miscellaneous/other (Defining event)

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska


Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N2934A


Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board


Location: Big Lake, AK

Accident Number: GAA18CA136
Date & Time: 02/17/2018, 1230 AKD
Registration: N2934A
Aircraft: CESSNA 180
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Miscellaneous/other
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that, after landing on a snow covered
, off airport landing site, he was repositioning the airplane for parking. He added that the left ski broke through the ice, followed by the right ski. He reported that he had not seen the area of "soft/thin" ice before taxiing.


The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.


The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 


Pilot Information


Certificate: Commercial

Age: 52, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/19/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/12/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 5344 hours (Total, all aircraft), 2172 hours (Total, this make and model), 5258 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 11 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA

Registration: N2934A
Model/Series: 180 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1953
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 30134
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tailwheel
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/12/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2550 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3078.6 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: C126 installed, activated, aided in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-470-A
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 225 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions

Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PANC, 132 ft msl
Observation Time: 2053 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 27 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 156°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 400 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: -9°C / -12°C
Lowest Ceiling:  Broken / 20000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots, 40°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.74 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point:  ANCHORAGE, AK (LHD)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Big Lake, AK
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1130 AST
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 None

Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  61.580000, -150.410000 (est)

Cessna 172S Skyhawk N6042Z, registered to L&G Skycatcher LLC: Incident occurred February 22, 2018 in Myakka, Manatee County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa

Aircraft reported engine trouble and landed on a dirt road.

L&G Skycatcher LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N6042Z

Date: 22-FEB-18
Time: 19:15:00Z
Regis#: N6042Z
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172S
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: EMERGENCY DESCENT (EMG)
Operation: 91
City: MYAKKA CITY
State: FLORIDA

Piper PA-44-180 Seminole, N2084A, registered to Sunrise Aviation Inc: Incident occurred February 22, 2018 at Jacksonville International Airport (KJAX), Duval County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando

Aircraft experienced nose gear collapse on landing.

Sunrise Aviation Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N2084A

Date: 22-FEB-18
Time: 21:22:00Z
Regis#: N2084A
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 44 180
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: JACKSONVILLE
State: FLORIDA

Delta Air Lines, Boeing 737-900: Incident occurred February 22, 2018 at Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport (KATL), Georgia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta

Flight 2081: Aircraft was parked, unattended van rolled into the aircraft during deboarding.

Delta Air Lines Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N804DN

Date: 23-FEB-18
Time: 01:55:00Z
Regis#: N804DN
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 737 932ER
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: STANDING (STD)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: DELTA
Flight Number: 2081
City: ATLANTA
State: GEORGIA

Lufthansa, Boeing 747-800, D-ABYO: Incident occurred February 22, 2018 at John F. Kennedy International Airport (KJFK), New York

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; New York 

Flight 401:  Returned to KJFK due to engine failure. Landed and taxied without further incident. 

Date: 23-FEB-18
Time: 00:49:00Z
Regis#: UNK
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: B748
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: LUFTHANSA AIRLINES
Flight Number: 401
City: NEW YORK
State: NEW YORK

United Airlines, Boeing 737-900, N30401: Incident occurred February 23, 2018 at Green Bay–Austin Straubel International Airport (KGRB), Brown County, Wisconsin

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee

Flight 878: Slid off the runway on landing due to weather.

http://registry.faa.gov/N30401

Date: 23-FEB-18
Time: 10:16:00Z
Regis#: N30401
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 739
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: UNITED AIRLINES
Flight Number: 878
City: GREEN BAY
State: WISCONSIN

Flight 878: After landing slid off the runway, damaged airport light.

Date: 23-FEB-18
Time: 09:05:00Z
Regis#: N30401
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 737 924
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: UNITED AIRLINES
Flight Number: 878
City: GREEN BAY
State: WISCONSIN




GREEN BAY, Wis. (WBAY) - A Boeing 737 slid off the runway while landing at Austin Straubel International Airport Friday morning.

The plane was carrying 180 passengers and seven crew members. There were no reports of injuries.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating.

The United Flight 878 was flying from Houston to Minneapolis-St. Paul when it was diverted to Green Bay due to bad weather.

The plane was landing at Austin Straubel International Airport when it slid off the runway by 250 feet at 3 a.m.

The passengers were moved off the plane and were taken to a terminal.

Tom Miller, Director of Green Bay Austin Straubel International Airport, said passengers and crew got off the plane by using a portable set of stairs.

Passenger Carly Zierden from Duluth said officials told her they could choose to take a bus to Minneapolis-St. Paul or take a flight later in the day.

"You could kind of tell the difference between the runway and the ground. We were making-- we were slowing down, but then you could feel kind of the brakes not have any more traction and we continued off the runway into the field. It was a pretty scary experience, I'd say but, they turned the lights on and just made sure everyone was ok after," said Zierden.

Here is the full statement from Miller:

"At approximately 3:00 a.m. today, a United Airlines Boeing 737-900 was landing at Green Bay Austin Straubel International Airport (GRB) and ran off the end of the runway by about 250 feet. The plane was carrying 180 passengers and seven crew members. There were no injuries and everyone safely exited the aircraft using a portable set of stairs. They were then transported to the terminal building by bus and alternate transportation is being arranged for the passengers.

Flight 878 originated in Houston, Texas and was headed for Minneapolis, Minnesota. It was apparently diverted to GRB because of bad weather. The situation has been reported to the FAA, which is investigating."

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wbay.com




GREEN BAY, Wis. -- A plane headed for MSP International Airport was forced to make an unscheduled landing in Green Bay and slid off the runway early Friday morning, passengers said.

It happened just after 3 a.m. at Green Bay's Austin Straubel International Airport. The airport fire department was forced to come in and get people off the plane.

United Flight 878 took off from Houston and was first diverted to Madison. It took off from Madison just after 1:15, and after circling Minneapolis several times, the pilots came to Green Bay to try and land.

KARE 11 viewer Mike Henderson sent a video showing passengers getting off the plane on the runway. They were then loaded into buses.

No one was hurt.

United Airlines gave the following statement to our sister station KHOU in Houston Friday morning:

Severe weather caused UA878 operating from Houston to Minneapolis to divert to Madison, WI. The flight took off from Madison; however, severe weather again caused a diversion to Green Bay, WI where it left the runway. There were no injuries and we have arranged transportation for passengers from the aircraft to the airport terminal. We apologize to our customers and have provided hotel accommodations.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.kare11.com