Sunday, June 16, 2013

CRJ1000 NextGen aircraft's Ferry Flight from Mirabel to the Paris Air Show

 

 Published on Jun 16, 2013 

CRJ1000 NextGen aircraft's ferry flight from Mirabel to the Paris Air Show Le Bourget

Big guns blaze in wide-body war

June 16, 2013 10:15 pm 

By Andrew Parker

The Financial Times

The focus of this week’s Paris air show at Le Bourget shifts to the intensifying battle between Airbus and Boeing in the lucrative long-haul jet market.

The last show, in 2011, was dominated by Airbus and a slew of orders for its revamped short-haul passenger jet, the A320neo.

In this latest duel, Airbus is vowing to cut Boeing’s lead in the wide-body twin-engine market with its new A350 passenger jet. The Toulouse-based manufacturer is hoping to make a statement of intent by having a test model do a fly-past at the show. The US group is underlining its determination to stay on top by considering launching in Paris the latest and biggest version of its twin-aisle Dreamliner jet – the 787-10.

Increasing demand for these more fuel-efficient aircraft in an era of high oil prices highlights how Asian, European and US airlines are placing big bets on rising air travel to support the most profitable parts of their businesses – long-haul flying.

But with the eurozone still in recession and global economic growth forecasts being cut for this year, some analysts are questioning whether record levels of aircraft production at Airbus and Boeing are sustainable. The companies delivered jets worth about $88bn to customers last year, and some analysts argue that Airbus and Boeing risk over-saturating the market if production continues at current rates. Still, the civil aerospace industry looks relatively healthy compared with the defence sector.

Western governments have made austerity-inspired cuts to defence spending, prompting US and European weapons makers to increase their efforts to secure deals in emerging markets such as India.

One potentially large source of growth – the development of unmanned aerial vehicles for the next generation of combat aircraft as well as civilian uses – is facing strong political and regulatory headwinds. So-called drones will attract some attention at the Paris air show this week, but the big deals are likely to be in the wide-body passenger jet market, which usually generates higher profit margins than the single-aisle equivalent.

Fabrice BrĂ©gier, Airbus’ chief executive, recently scoffed at Boeing’s response to the A350-1000 – the largest version of the European manufacturer’s new twin-aisle jet that is due to enter commercial service in 2017.

Boeing is proposing a major overhaul of its popular 777 wide-body twin-engine aircraft, but Mr BrĂ©gier noted the US manufacturer had not finalised the details. “This aircraft [the A350-1000] is real – this aircraft is not a paper tiger ... it will come alive in 2017,” he said.


Still, Airbus knows the A350 carries all the same large-scale development risks as the Dreamliner.

Boeing reeled in January when US regulators triggered a global grounding of the 787 after lithium-ion batteries on two Dreamliners burnt. This was the first time such draconian action had been taken in 34 years.

The flying ban was lifted only in April after major modifications to the Dreamliner battery system were approved – and this affair was the last thing Boeing needed given the 787 entered service more than three years late in 2011 due to a step change in technology and materials.

Like the Dreamliner, the A350 is made mainly from lightweight carbon fibre reinforced plastic in order to reduce fuel burn, rather than traditional aluminium alloy. And also like the Dreamliner, the A350 is running behind schedule.

The A350-900, the first version of the Airbus jet, is due to enter service in the second half of 2014, which would represent a delay of up to 18 months compared with the original timetable.

With more products in the pipeline than Airbus, Boeing can increase its lead in the wide-body twin engine market, says Randy Tinseth, senior marketing executive at the company’s commercial aircraft unit. “We have a great opportunity to grow our market share,” he says. “With a full array of products ... we actually ... box in [Airbus].”

Once the 787-10 is in service, there will be three versions of the Dreamliner, carrying between 210 and 320 passengers. And the proposed overhaul of the 777 – dubbed project 777X – is expected to involve two new versions of the aircraft.

This compares with how Airbus is planning three versions of the A350.

But while Boeing could be better positioned in this market by having a total of five new generation aircraft compared to Airbus’ three, it is not a certain victor. For example, Airbus has the potential to boost its market share by having its A350-1000 in service sooner than Boeing’s 777X models.

Some analysts argue these models risk undermining the company’s venerable 747 jumbo, and hurt sales of Airbus’ flagship A380 superjumbo.

This underlines how the new generation of more fuel-efficient aircraft could have far-reaching consequences for some of the industry’s most famous workhorses.

Nick Cunningham, analyst at Agency Partners, a research firm, says: “The 777X will clearly undermine the few remaining prospects for the latest version of the 747 passenger jet, and it will also narrow the niche role of the A380.”

The latest version of Boeing’s jumbo – the 747-8 that carries up to 500 passengers – has an order backlog of just 55 aircraft, partly because the air cargo market has suffered during the economic downturn.

The rival A380 has an order backlog of 159 aircraft. But it has yet to notch up any orders this year because of the global slowdown and the discovery of a wing cracking problem that is now being fixed.

Airbus needs A380 orders to hit its target of delivering 30 superjumbos to customers in 2015 – the year when this lossmaking aircraft programme is supposed to break even.

While the A380 and 747 may struggle to find many buyers, new levels of fuel efficiency are enabling Airbus and Boeing to amass a lot of orders for their new generation of wide-body twin engine aircraft – and even more contracts for their cheaper single aisle jets.

The two rivals have therefore raised production of many of their aircraft to record levels, but analysts are divided about whether this output can be maintained.

Jet manufacturing is a cyclical industry, usually following the ups and downs of the global economic cycle. Yet in spite of this, Airbus and Boeing have enjoyed a decade of almost uninterrupted strong growth.

Douglas Harned, analyst at Bernstein Research, says the current cycle is different, partly because the two manufacturers’ outstanding orders are for the first time dominated by fast-growing airlines in emerging markets. “We do not view this [as] a bubble,” he adds.

But Richard Aboulafia, analyst at Teal Group, another research firm, disagrees, saying Airbus and Boeing face at least a slowdown in coming years.

He estimates jet deliveries by Airbus and Boeing have increased in value by 12 per cent each year between 2008 and 2012, thanks to a combination of cheap financing and high oil prices.

“This unusual combination has created a huge market surge that could turn into a bubble,” he says. “If financing gets more expensive, or fuel gets cheaper, these production rates at Airbus and Boeing are not going to be sustainable.”


Source:   http://www.ft.com

Airbus and Boeing battle heats up

 June 16, 2013 9:38 pm

By Andrew Parker and Hugh Carnegy in Paris 

The Financial Times

The escalating battle between Airbus and Boeing in the lucrative long-haul passenger jet market will be laid bare at the Paris air show this week, with the two manufacturers set to unveil orders for their new generation of widebody aircraft.

Boeing is poised to launch the third and biggest version of its 787 Dreamliner aircraft at Le Bourget, in the latest sign of its determination to maintain a lead over Airbus in the widebody twin engine market.

Airbus, however, is planning to underline its effort to usurp Boeing in this market by announcing orders for the A350, its new passenger jet that last Friday completed its maiden test flight and will compete against the US group’s Dreamliner. The A350 might also do a fly past at Le Bourget.

Ray Conner, head of Boeing’s commercial aircraft division, expressed confidence on Sunday that the US group would stay ahead of Airbus in the widebody twin engine market because of its broader range of products, and played down suggestions of a price war.

“Price wars? We are going to compete, they are going to compete,” he said. “I would not necessarily call it a price war – it’s going to be good, healthy competition.”

Boeing is planning five next-generation widebody twin-engine aircraft – three models of the Dreamliner, plus two new versions of its popular 777 jet.

That compares to Airbus’s three versions of its A350 aircraft.

The Dreamliner and the A350 are brand-new twin-aisle aircraft mainly made from lightweight carbonfibre-reinforced plastic rather than traditional aluminium, so as to reduce fuel burn.

Boeing’s proposed upgrade of the 777 – dubbed the 777X project – will involve new engines and a carbon wing, although the fuselage is still due to be made of metal.

Tom Enders, chief executive of EADS, the Airbus parent company, said last week he expected the jet manufacturer to secure orders for a “a few hundred” aircraft in Paris. These could include an order from Air France-KLM for A350 aircraft.

Mr Conner declined to provide an orders tally for Boeing in Paris. However, Boeing is expected to launch the 787-10 – the biggest version of the Dreamliner, carrying about 320 passengers – with customers including Singapore Airlines, International Airlines Group, parent of British Airways, and United Air Lines of the US.

The Dreamliner suffered a significant setback in January when it was grounded by regulators because batteries burned on two 787s, but the flying ban ended in April after Boeing finalised significant modifications.

Although Airbus and Boeing sell fewer widebody jets than single-aisle aircraft, these long-haul models are more expensive and usually generate better profit margins than the short-haul equivalents.

Airbus and Boeing are due to announce some narrowbody orders in Paris. EasyJet of the UK could agree in principle to buy about 100 single aisle jets from Airbus, and have options for another 100 aircraft, although this deal has yet to be approved by the airline’s board.

Source:  http://www.ft.com

Beechcraft 58 Baron, Bonanza Flying Club, G-CIZZ: Accident occurred June 16, 2013 in Albenga, Italy

NTSB Identification: ERA13WA290  
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Sunday, June 16, 2013 in Albenga, Italy
Aircraft: BEECH 58, registration:
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On June 16, 2013, about 0950 coordinated universal time (UTC), a Beechcraft Model 58, United Kingdom registration G-CIZZ, operated by Bonanza Flying Club, impacted mountainous terrain near Albenga, Italy. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and flight plan information was unknown. The personal flight departed from Albenga Airport (LIMG), Albenga, Italy, and was destined for Troyes-Barberey Airport (LFQB), Troyes, France. The pilot was fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed due to impact forces.

According to Italian authorities, the airplane impacted terrain during the initial climb after takeoff, and that at the time of the accident, the mountains were obscured by clouds.

This accident investigation is under the jurisdiction of the Agenzia Nazionale per la Sicurezza del Volo (ANSV) of Italy. Any further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Agenzia Nazionale per la Sicurezza del Volo
Via A. Benigni, 53-00156
Telephone: +39 06 82 078 229
Fax: +39 06 8273672

This report is for informational purposes only, and contains only information released by or obtained from the Government of Italy.


http://www.caa.co.uk
 
A British pilot has died after his light aircraft crashed into a mountain in thick fog, Italian police have confirmed.

Flying club director Alan Tyson, 51, was killed instantly after his Beech 58 Baron flew into the blanketed peak an altitude of 1,880 metres.

Last night police and air accident officials were investigating the accident and looking at the possibility that the airplane’s altimeter was faulty.

Police said the alarm was raised by air traffic controllers at Albenga airport on the Italian Riviera near Savona after it disappeared from radar screens shortly after taking off on Sunday morning and at the same time by a walker who heard the low flying plane and seconds later the sound of a crash.

At the time of the accident visibility was said to be poor with the mountains in the area covered in fog and Mr Tyson is thought to have delayed his departure because of the poor weather and had then tried to make the flight after a ‘clear window’ was forecast.

However the plane crashed into the slopes of Mt Mindino, near Garessio, 30 miles north of Albenga and walkers further down the mountain reported hearing a loud explosion.

Fire fighters and alpine rescue teams were quickly on the scene and the wreckage was found close to a cross that marks the summit of the mountain and which is a popular destination with walkers and climbers.

Marshall Matteo Laurilio, of the paramilitary police in Garessio said: “The first call we got was from a member of the public, who had heard a low flying plane and then the sound of a crash. We then had a call from the airport to see it had disappeared from the radar screens.

“The weather at the time was foggy but there were occasional breaks in the cloud but the plane did not clear the top of the mountain - we are looking at the possibility of a fault with the altimeter as he should not have been that low but at this stage is it too early for certain to say that was the cause.

“The plane had taken off at around 9.30 but it didn’t crash until noon so it was flying around for more than two hours - there is also the possibility he may have got lost in the fog.

“Mr Tyson was killed instantly and no-one else was onboard. His body has been taken to a local hospital and the British Embassy in Rome has been informed of what happened. We think he was en route to France to pick up passengers but we are still investigating.”

Marshal Laurilio confirmed the plane’s registration as G-CIZZ. Officials at Albenga said the plane had been headed towards Levaldilgi airport near Cuneo but refused to give any further details. The plane was owned by Mr Tyson who lived in Wargrave near Reading, Berkshire.

He is the director of the Bonanza Flying Club which is based in Eaton Terrace, Belgravia and company records show him as being with the firm for 19 years, fellow director Nigel Meek could not be reached for comment.

A Foreign Office spokesman said: “We are aware of the incident and are providing consular assistance to the family.”


Source:  http://www.standard.co.uk

http://www.flickr.com/photos

 








 
The site of the Beech 58 Baron crash on Mt Mindinio near the Italian Riviera where British pilot Alan Tyson, 51, died 
 
Mr Tyler crashed his Beech 58 Baron into the mountain side in thick fog, and Italian police and air officials are investigating the possibility that the airplane's altimeter was faulty 


  • British man dead in plane crash near Italian Riviera 
  • Pilot Alan Tyson, 51, crashed into a mountain in thick fog
  • British Foreign Office said they are 'aware of the incident'

A British pilot has died after his light aircraft crashed into a mountain in thick fog, Italian police have confirmed.

Flying club director Alan Tyson, 51, was killed instantly after his five seater Beecht 58 Baron flew into Mt Mindino near the Italian Riviera at an altitude of 1,880 metres.

Last night police and air accident officials were investigating the accident and looking at the possibility that the airplane's altimeter was faulty.

Police said the alarm was raised by air traffic controllers at Albenga airport on the Italian Riviera near Savona after it disappeared from radar screens shortly after taking off on Sunday morning and at the same time by a walker who heard the low flying plane and seconds later the sound of a crash.

At the time of the accident visibility was said to be poor with the mountains in the area covered in fog and Mr Tyson is thought to have delayed his departure because of the poor weather and had then tried to make the flight after a 'clear window' was forecast.


However the plane crashed into the slopes of the mountain near Garessio, 30 miles north of Albenga and walkers further down the mountain reported hearing a loud explosion.

Fire fighters and alpine rescue teams were quickly on the scene and the wreckage was found close to a cross that marks the summit of the mountain and which is a popular destination with walkers and climbers.

Marshall Matteo Laurilio, of the paramilitary police in Garessio said: 'The first call we got was from a member of the public, who had heard a low flying plane and then the sound of a crash. We then had a call from the airport to see it had disappeared from the radar screens.

He added: 'The weather at the time was foggy but there were occasional breaks in the cloud but the plane did not clear the top of the mountain - we are looking at the possibility of a fault with the altimeter as he should not have been that low but at this stage is it too early for certain to say that was the cause.

''The plane had taken off at around 9.30 but it didn't crash until noon so it was flying around for more than two hours - there is also the possibility he may have got lost in the fog.

'Mr Tyson was killed instantly and no-one else was onboard. His body has been taken to a local hospital and the British Embassy in Rome has been informed of what happened. We think he was en route to France to pick up passengers but we are still investigating.''

Marshal Laurilio confirmed the plane's registration as G-CIZZ. Officials at Albenga said the plane had been headed towards Levaldilgi airport near Cuneo but refused to give any further details. The plane was owned by Mr Tyson who lived in Wargrave near Reading, Berkshire.

He is the director of the Bonanza Flying Club which is based in Eaton Terrace, Belgravia and company records show him as being with the firm for 19 years, fellow director Nigel Meek could not be reached for comment.

Tonight a Foreign Office spokesman said: ''We are aware of the incident and are providing consular assistance to the family.'


Source:  http://www.dailymail.co.uk

Diamond DA20-C1 Katana, N877CT: Accident occurred May 20, 2011 in Wurtsboro, New York

http://registry.faa.gov/N877CT

NTSB Identification: ERA11LA306
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 20, 2011 in Wurtsboro, NY
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/07/2012
Aircraft: DIAMOND AIRCRAFT IND INC DA 20-C1, registration: N877CT
Injuries: 2 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Witnesses observed the airplane takeoff and begin performing maneuvers similar to aerobatics at low altitude over the runway. The airplane descended in a forward slip until it was about 30 feet above the runway, accelerated, and pulled up to an estimated 70 degree nose-up attitude. The airplane leveled out and performed a “swoop down” maneuver, followed by a right turn toward an empty parking lot. It then entered a nose dive over the parking lot and impacted the ground. The pilot reported that the engine lost power, and he was making a forced landing in the parking lot. However, none of the witnesses reported hearing engine problems, and one witness specifically stated that he did not “hear any mechanical problems with the airplane.”

Examination of the wreckage did not reveal any abnormality that would have prevented normal operation of the airplane’s flight controls. Examination of the engine revealed evidence that, at some time, water had contaminated the fuel system. No other abnormalities were noted during examination of the engine. The pilot reported that he had drained some water from the airplane’s fuel system during the preflight inspection and that he had continued to drain fuel until no water was detected. Based on the pilot’s report that he had drained all water from the fuel system, the finding of no discrepancies (other than the evidence of water contamination) with the engine, and the lack of witness reports of engine problems, it is likely that the engine was operating throughout the aerobatic maneuvers.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s performance of aerobatic maneuvers at low altitude and his failure to maintain airspeed, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall.

On May 20, 2011, about 1745 eastern daylight time, a Diamond DA 20-C1, N877CT, crashed into an empty parking lot near Wurtsboro, New York. The pilot and pilot rated passenger received serious injuries, and the airplane incurred substantial damage. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight originated from the Wurtsboro-Sullivan County Airport (N82), Wurtsboro, New York, about 1730.

Witnesses stated to the responding New York State Police Officer that the airplane was observed immediately after takeoff maneuver in a, “quick”, sharp right turn at a low altitude. Soon after the airplane banked right and flew toward the north. Several minutes later the airplane was observed to “swoop” down toward the approach end of the runway and pulled up until it was going in the opposite direction from which it came. This maneuver was performed twice at an estimated altitude of 250 feet above the ground. The airplane was then seen performing a forward slip until it was about 30 feet above the runway, accelerate, and pulled up in an estimated 70 degrees nose above the horizon attitude. The airplane then leveled out and performed another “swoop down” maneuver, followed by a right turn, at a low altitude, toward an empty parking lot. The airplane was then observed in a nose dive just over the empty parking lot. After that, the airplane was not seen again and 911 calls were made by the witnesses. None of the witnesses reported hearing problems with the airplane’s engine. One witness stated that “During that entire time they were flying I did not hear any mechanical problems with the aircraft.”

Two months after the accident the pilot reported what he observed. He stated that he conducted a preflight inspection and did not note any discrepancies other than some water when the fuel system was sumped. He continued with the fuel sump process until no water was detected. An auxiliary power unit was needed to start the airplane; due to a weak battery from the length of time the airplane was inactive. After the engine start, the pilot confirmed the electrical charging system was operating. There were no discrepancies noted during the taxi and pre-takeoff engine run up. During the initial climb, the pilot made a 15-degrees right bank turn to avoid trees. He then made a left bank turn when he was about 400 feet above ground level (agl).

He then maneuvered the airplane so he could be first for landing in the pattern for runway 23. Once a beam from the end of the runway, he stabilized the airplane for landing by reducing engine power and lowering the flaps, while maneuvering the airplane for a left base followed by the final approach. His approach was high for the landing onto runway 23, so he performed a series of “45-degrees S-turns” maneuvers before electing to balk the landing. He leveled the wings when the airplane was about 20 feet above of the runway, added full power.

Upon reaching positive rate of climb, he raised the flaps. With the end of the runway coming up very quickly, he performed another 15-degrees bank to the right and pulled back “very quickly” on the flight control stick to clear trees situated at the end of the runway. He continued in this attitude when he noted a loss of engine power. He checked the engine rpm gauge, which indicated a loss of power. He then pushed the flight control stick “hard” forward to establish best glide speed and established a right bank turn toward the northwest. He experienced spatial disorientation and lost reference for the runway; however, he knew that a parking lot was nearby. When the airplane was about 200 feet agl, he spotted the empty parking lot located 90 degrees from him. He held the airplane in a nose down attitude to maintain speed and was committed to land in the parking lot; he tried to restart the engine but was unsuccessful. At that time he instructed the passenger to check his seat belt and shoulder harness, and to brace for impact. He does not recall what transpire between the time after the crash and being transported to the hospital.

The responding Federal Aviation Administrator (FAA) inspector stated the airplane impacted the asphalt parking lot, nose first, spun around, and slid backward for several yards until it impacted with a fence, before coming to a full stop. All flight control surfaces were present and flight control tubes were observed with impact damaged, bent, and intact. The flap control switch was observed in the takeoff position coinciding with the flap position. One of the propeller blades was observed broken from the propeller hub. Pieces of the wooden propeller blade were observed throughout the debris path.
The engine remained attached to the engine mount and airframe. The propeller spinner was damaged with a flat impact area on the lower left side where the airplane made initial ground contact. The underside of the airplane was crushed, displacing the instrument panel upwards, and damaging the cabin floor and firewall. The main landing gear were observed bent up, which damaged the left wing structure. The empennage section was broken and bent down. Breaching of the fuel and engine oil system was observed.

The Canadian designed, Diamond DA 20-C1, airplane was issued a Standard Airworthiness Certificate in the Utility Category in March of 1999 by the FAA. The two seat airplane is powered by a Teledyne Continental Motors, IO-240-B engine, rated at 125 horse power. The airplane is not certificated for aerobatic maneuvers. A review of the airplane’s maintenance records by the FAA inspector showed the last annual inspection was in September, 2010. The airplane had an estimated total time of 1,698 hours at that time.

The pilot, seated in the left, held a private pilot certificate with a single engine land and sea, and glider rating. He was issued a FAA first class medical certificate on July 27, 2009, with limitations. At that time, he reported a total of 840 civilian flight hours.

The pilot rated passenger held an airline transport pilot and flight instructor certificate. He was issued a FAA first class medical certificate on July 10, 2010, with no limitations. At that time, he reported a total of 4,500 civilian flight hours.

A post recovery wreckage examination was conducted by a representative of the airplanes manufacturer with FAA oversight. Flight control continuity was established; damage was consistent with impact. Fuel collected from the fuel strainer (gascolator) was observed with contaminants. Rust was found at the bottom at the fuel strainer filter sediment bowl. Fuel was found at the maintenance drains and at the outlet of the engine driven fuel pump. The spark plugs were observed with normal operating wear. The fuel flow divider component was disassembled; particle contamination and with watery white liquid was observed inside. The fuel tank drain sump valve was observed with rust; however, it was functioning when tested. The engine examination did not reveal any mechanical discrepancies.

The manager for M82 stated to the FAA inspector that to his knowledge, the aircraft had been in storage since December 2010. Aviation fuel is not available at N82, thus it must be purchased at another airport or transported by a container to fuel any aircraft based at N82.


First responders tend to the pilot and passenger of a Diamond DA20-C1 Katana which crashed just inside a fenced parking lot at the Kohl’s Warehouse in Wurtsboro, N.Y, Friday, May 20, 2011.  Witness’s stated the plane over shot the landing at the nearby Wurtboro Airport and lost control in an attempt to turn around. Both the pilot and passenger were airlifted to the nearest trauma center.




 
Rescue workers help the passenger and pilot of the Diamond DA20-C1 Katana that crashed May 20, 2011 in Wurtsboro. Their injuries were not life-threatening.












Plaintiffs:     RAFAL LUCZAK  and ANNA LUCZAK
 

Defendants:     DIAMOND AIRCRAFT INDUSTRIES, INC., DIAMOND  AIRCRAFT, TELEDYNE CENTRAL CONTINENTAL MOTOROS, INC.  , CONTINENTAL MOTORS, INC. , JOSEPH M. BENNIS, XYZ CORPORATIONS and JOHN DOES 1-10

Case Number:     
3:2013cv03701


Filed:     
June 14, 2013

Court:     
New Jersey District Court


Office:   
 Trenton Office


County:     
Somerset


Presiding Judge:     
Anne E. Thompson


Referring Judge:     
Lois H. Goodman
 
Nature of Suit:   
 Torts - Injury - Airplane Product Liability


Cause:
    28:1441 Petition for Removal- Personal Injury


Jurisdiction:     
Diversity        


Jury Demanded By:     
Plaintiff


Source:  http://dockets.justia.com/docket/new-jersey/njdce/3:2013cv03701/290825/

Owner had loaned plane involved in Wurtsboro crash

Taunton Municipal (KTAN), Massachusetts: Airport to be paid as ‘employee,’ not contractor

By Charles Winokoor,  Taunton  Gazette

Posted June 15, 2013,  11:06 PM


TAUNTON —

The commission representing Taunton Municipal Airport this week signed a new contract changing the way the airport is funded by the city.

The East Taunton airport, as does Taunton Nursing Home and John F. Parker Municipal Golf Course, operates as an enterprise system that generates its own revenue to cover the bulk of operational expenses and salaries.

The airport commission is allocated a modest, annual sum out of the city budget. The amount in the fiscal 2014 preliminary budget is just $10,000 to cover a part-time clerk and fuel attendants.

But for decades the city has provided a 1099 IRS form and paid the airport on the basis or it being an independent contractor and not an actual municipal employee.

With the signing of the new contract that has finally changed.

“We changed the structure,” City Solicitor Jason D. Buffington said.

Buffington said he insisted on the change because the prior arrangement did not fully comply with state and federal wage law.

“We noticed it when the contracts came up for renewal,” he said.

Buffington says the city is going to pay a limited liability company created by airport manager Daniel Raposa.

“The LLC is the employee,” Buffington said. “It’s now responsible for running the airport.”

Mayor Thomas Hoye Jr. said his law department did the right thing. The last thing he said he wants is a replay of a legal action brought against the city before he came into office.

“The city lost a significant lawsuit a few years back, and we do not want to go down that road again,” Hoye said, referring to the new approach as a “prudent decision.”

“We just can’t have 1099 employees — it’s a legal liability at the end of the day,” he added.

The mayor would not say how much the city was forced to pay when it lost that court case.

And he doesn’t blame former mayor Charles Crowley. The city, unfortunately, had through the years become complacent with its fiscal arrangement with the airport, Hoye said.

City employees, unlike independent contractors, are entitled to disability coverage, health insurance and unemployment benefits.

Attempts to reach airport manager Daniel Raposa were unsuccessful.

Taunton attorney William Manganiello, who in 2012 was appointed as an airport commissioner, said the previous arrangement did “not past muster” in terms of compliance with labor and IRS statute.

Manganiello says the issue of  whether or not the airport is an independent contractor or a municipal employee had become a distraction; he says meetings were held throughout May and into June.

“I’m pretty comfortable with the whole thing. Now we can get on with the real function of the airport,” he said.

Manganiello said the commission is working on a new master plan to increase revenue. The airport has been relying on revenues and fees from fuel sales, ground leases and tie-downs of planes, he said.

Manganiello said the airport would benefit by selling jet fuel so that state police and MedFlight helicopters don’t bypass Taunton in favor of New Bedford or Norwood to refuel.

He also points out that executives for Berkshire Hathaway-owned Jordan’s Furniture and other business leaders have likewise not found it convenient to land their private jets in Taunton.

Manganiello estimates the new contract will require an additional $15,000 and $20,000 to cover employee benefits. He said he’s not sure the city’s fiscal 2014 budget will provide that. If so, he said, the airport will have to find a way to raise extra revenue.

He acknowledges there was risk involved, fiscally speaking, by changing the pay structure with the city. But, he said, “It’s less risky then if we get sued.”

Manganiello praised Hoye for recently appointing four new commissioners, thereby expanding the body from five to seven members.

He also said every commissioner, himself included,  for the first time ever is a licensed pilot.

Raposa, whom Manganiello said through the years has done an overall “a good job” as manager, has never piloted a plane, he added. But for now, at least, he said that in itself will not become a bone of contention.

Source:  http://www.tauntongazette.com

George W. Bush’s jet makes emergency landing

 

by Jason Whitely 
Posted on June 16, 2013 at 11:06 AM

DALLAS — A private jet carrying former President George W. Bush from Philadelphia made an emergency landing in Kentucky Saturday night after the pilot reported the smell of smoke in the cockpit.

The Gulfstream IV landed safely at the Louisville airport at 8:46 p.m. It’s uncertain what caused the alarm or what happened once on the ground, but Bush’s office in Dallas told News 8 that the president continued his trip back to Texas aboard the same aircraft.

“President Bush's flight was briefly diverted to Louisville this evening, but he is already safely home in Dallas,” said Freddy Ford, a spokesman for the former president.

Bush is honorary chairman of The First Tee, which supports youth education programs through golf, and was returning from an event in Philadelphia.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.


Source:  http://www.kens5.com

Cessna 175, N9370B: Accident occurred June 15, 2013 in Needles, California

NTSB Identification: WPR13LA272 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 15, 2013 in Needles, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 175, registration: N9370B
Injuries: 2 Serious,2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 15, 2013, about 1800 Pacific daylight time, a single-engine Cessna 175 airplane, N9370B, experienced a loss of engine power during cruise flight and made a forced landing in a Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Wilderness Area, in Needles, California. The private pilot owned and operated the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, as a business flight. The pilot and one passenger received minor injuries; two additional passengers received serious injuries. The airplane sustained structural damage throughout the fuselage. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight that departed the Tehachapi Municipal Airport (TSP), Tehachapi, California, about 1530, and was destined for Ernest A. Love Field Airport (PRC), Prescott, Arizona. No flight plan had been filed.



http://flightaware.com/live/flight/N9370B


Three people were injured in a plane crash Saturday evening near Laughlin, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.  The single-engine plane with four people on board went down about 6 p.m. in a ravine, according to an FAA spokesman. Three people were injured and transported to a hospital. Their conditions are not known.

The plane was en route to Bullhead City, Arizona.  Where the flight originated was not known.   The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the incident.


Source:  http://www.reviewjournal.com

LAUGHLIN — A small private plane crashed in the hills just north and west of Needles early Saturday evening, sending first responders scurrying to try and locate the aircraft and evacuate the injured before darkness fell.

The first report of the crash was received just after 6 p.m., when the unidentified pilot reported that his plane had gone down. He advised emergency dispatch that he could see the Avi Resort & Casino in
Laughlin, Nevada from his location and attempted to send GPS coordinates from his cell phone.

Crews from the Fort Mojave Mesa Fire Department, Mohave Valley Fire Department, the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department and the San Bernardino County Fire Department established a command post at the intersection of Aha Macav Parkway and Needles Highway, on the California/Nevada border. A helicopter from CareFlight was called in to assist with the search and rescue.

An initial ground-based search and rescue attempt was unsuccessful, due to the rugged terrain. As crews prepared to regroup in a location south of the command post and attack from a different direction, CareFlight called in and reported that it had been able to evacuate two of the crash victims and that it would return to rescue the remaining passengers.

Preliminary reports are that four individuals were on the flight, two of whom were injured. The extend of their injuries was not known.

Unconfirmed sources reported that the aircraft ran out of fuel.


Source:  http://www.mohavedailynews.com

John Casper: Wittman Regional Airport (KOSH) has significant impact on economy -- Oshkosh, Wisconsin

June 14, 2013 5:34 PM  

Written by John Casper


 
Oshkosh has earned a world-renowned reputation as the undisputed Aviation Capital of the World. We see this every day and experience it in a big way once a year during the EAA AirVenture when people from all over the world journey to Oshkosh. But, how often have you heard someone say, “The airport’s a drain on the taxpayers and doesn’t pay its way”? The reality is that airports are assets of considerable economic value and Wittman Regional Airport is no exception. However, this fact is not widely understood. The airport contributes jobs, services and taxes.

Wittman Regional Airport represents an enormous economic asset and opportunity to Oshkosh and Winnebago County. It is the centerpiece of an area that can be developed into a major job-generator and tax-revenue producer.

The economic impact of an airport is a measure of the benefits it provides to the community. These benefits include the jobs, wages, and expenditures that take place at the airport. They also include the effects of these expenditures in moving from hand-to-hand through the community, enhancing economic activity far from the airport itself.

Economic impact as a whole comprises direct and indirect impacts. Direct impact is associated with businesses and providers of services at the airport. The value of direct impact is the sum of all payroll, non-payroll and capital expenditures, operating and maintenance costs, taxes, and fees incurred by every business and provider of services. A recent study, commissioned by Wittman Regional Airport and the Winnebago County Aviation Committee and conducted by the University of Wisconsin-Extension, indicated that there was over $28.5 million of direct economic impact at Wittman Regional Airport in 2012.

The analysis showed that the airport was responsible for 548 jobs, $23.6 million in payroll, $750,040 in tax revenue, and $1.48 million in lease payment. Strictly speaking, these direct impacts represent economic activities that would not occur in the absence of the airport.

There is also an indirect economic impact associated with airport businesses, operations and services.

These include both corporate and public users, government agencies, and aviation and non-aviation businesses. The value of this impact results from payrolls, taxes generated and other expenditures related to items such as food, lodging, and similar outlays that ripples through the local economy.

The study indicates that Wittman Regional Airport is indirectly responsible for 308 jobs, $12 million in payroll, and $2.88 million in non-direct tax revenue.

All of this results in a total economic impact of $40.7 million to Winnebago County and the surrounding areas and a total of 855 jobs. These numbers do not take into account the annual EAA AirVenture, estimated at over $110 million annual economic impact, including direct spending of $84.6 million in the Oshkosh area. The airport is an economic engine - like many business and industrial parks in Oshkosh.

Indeed, this economic activity is impressive, but what comes next?

This year, the Winnebago County Board and, specifically County Board Chairman David Albrecht, took the lead on an initiative to transform Wittman Regional Airport into a year-round global hub not only for sport and general aviation, but to leverage new aviation business development. Winnebago County, in partnership with the City of Oshkosh, purchased 50 acres of the land that abuts the south east portion of the existing airport property for the purpose of developing an Aviation Business Park.

The city established a TIF district to defray the costs of putting in the necessary utilities, roads and storm water management facilities.

Acquisition of this parcel assures development of land adjacent to the airport is consistent with airport and county objectives, and would drive economic growth.

We are well positioned to attract aviation-related business with the excellent facilities at the airport and the world headquarters of EAA, along with the skilled and hard-working labor force, and other existing aviation businesses and supply chain companies.

The UW-Extension estimates the aviation business park could create 1,619 jobs and generate $138 million in total income, $343 million in increased sales and $8.4 million in local government revenue.

While it may take some time to fill the park, the community has great experience with this type of development.

A little more than 20 years ago, the Southwest Industrial Park in Oshkosh was farmland, and today it is home to companies like Bemis, 4imprint, Miles Kimball and many others, employing 3,500 people and having an assessed value of more than $150 million. We have taken a quantum step forward to realizing this vision and further establishing our place as the leader in the aviation community.

Story and Comments/Reaction:  http://www.thenorthwestern.com

Half Century of Progress show returning to Rantoul Airport (KTIP), Rantoul, Illinois

 
Photo Courtesy and Credit:   Robin Scholz/The News-Gazette
 People and vehicles use a Rantoul airport runway to get around at the 2011 Half Century of Progress farm show. The show will return to the airport this year.



Sunday, June 16, 2013 - 7:00am | Dave Hinton 


People and vehicles use a Rantoul airport runway to get around at the 2011 Half Century of Progress farm show. The show will return to the airport this year.

Darius Harms said he was asked the question several times a day: Is there an agreement to hold this year's Half Century of Progress farm show?

Harms, chairman of the show held every other year by the I&I Antique Tractor and Gas Engine Club at the Rantoul airport, breathed a sigh of relief recently when he was informed the show had been approved by the Illinois Department of Transportation Division of Aeronautics.

"It's (been) kind of a tough situation," Harms said of the club being unsure whether the show would go on this year.

"It's hard to plan an event like that when you've got to wait till the last two or three months to get everything done. There's too much advertising, too much advance work, the planting of the seed.

"There's just a whole lot involved. It just makes you sweat for awhile when you can't plan ahead of time."

Because club members could not wait, they proceeded with fingers crossed as if the show would be approved.

At issue is holding the event at an aviation facility.

Just prior to the 2011 show, Airport Manager Bill Clayton said he was notified by the Division of Aeronautics that the airport had to be closed during the event due to safety concerns of planes flying into the airport while such a large event was being held. This year there was some doubt whether Half Century could be held there at all.

It wasn't as if the village of Rantoul waited until the last minute to try to secure approval for this year's show.

Clayton said former Mayor Neal Williams asked him to get the ball rolling early to get the government OK for this year's show. But despite submitting a proposal more than a year and a half prior to the show, the village of Rantoul only recently received notification that the show could be held.

Clayton said the application was made in January 2012.

Said Clayton, "The mayor said, 'Bill, we want to be proactive and get all we can for the village, and why don't we go ahead and request permission, to get the approval now?"

Clayton said the village received no response in 2012.

"We went through the whole year ... wondering why they didn't respond," the airport manager said.

He said part of the problem was understanding what was required of the village and determining whether Rantoul could do it.

So Clayton began trying to get information.

The Division of Aeronautics and Federal Aviation Administration required a contract between the village and the I&I club.

Division of Aeronautics officials met with village officials and let them know the conditions — conditions that ranged from there being no other venues existing in town that could accommodate such an event as the Half Century; an airspace study; and proof that the event would be a financial benefit to the airport and the community.

The I&I will pay the village $10,000 in compensation for the show being held at the airport.

Starting Aug. 16, the airport's north-south runway will be closed to accommodate site preparations. And then at 6 a.m. Aug. 22, the first day of the four-day show, the east-west runway will be closed.

After Aug. 26, only the east-west runway will be reopened, and the north-south runway will be closed until the airport has been cleaned up.

Mayor Chuck Smith said Clayton deserves a lot of credit.

"He's been negotiating the contract since January 2012," Smith said.

Smith said the size and scope of the event has a decided economic impact on Rantoul and the area.

"We're excited to have it back in town," Smith said.

He said village and I&I officials will also talk about the possibility of bus transportation to take show-goers to and from various locations in Rantoul.

"We're going to sit down and talk about that," Smith said.

Harms said the club has been preparing for the show, including "working on the ground, getting things mowed up, getting planting done and caring for the crops."

"We also need a little time out for prayer because the Good Lord has to help, too," Harms said.

The Half Century chairman said the show is a lot of work.

"We get calls everyday on camping and, 'Can we bring equipment?' and 'When can we bring it?' We get numerous calls daily.

"We have a lot to do and a short time to do it. We've got a lot of people behind us. That helps."

And it's not the only big show the club is holding this year.

The I&I will also hold its annual Historic Farm Days in Penfield this July.

Ideally, Clayton would like to keep the airport open during the Half Century show. It makes for easier access of pilots wanting to attend. And until the 2011 show, that was the case.

When the airport had to be closed at the last minute prior to that show, it caught some pilots unaware. Despite the closing being posted, Clayton estimated about a dozen pilots tried to fly in.


Story and Comments/Reaction:   http://www.news-gazette.com

Vans RV-7A, N954CH: Accident occurred June 15, 2013 in Altoona, Pennsylvania

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Final Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

National Transportation Safety Board  -   Docket And Docket Items:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

National Transportation Safety Board  -  Aviation Accident Data Summary:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA13LA288 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 15, 2013 in Altoona, PA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/30/2014
Aircraft: HAGERTY RV-7A, registration: N954CH
Injuries: 2 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that the airplane maintained 80 mph on final approach and slowed to 70 mph at touchdown. Upon touchdown on the main landing gear, the pilot reported that a wind gust occurred, and the airplane subsequently climbed and then landed hard on the nose landing gear, which bent under. The airplane then rolled off the runway onto grass and nosed over. The pilot reported no preimpact failure or malfunction that would have precluded normal operation. Both occupants reported having their lapbelts "snug" but not as tight as they could have been. Postaccident examination revealed that the nose landing gear was displaced and that a person's head with a similar sitting height as both occupants would have been about 1 inch below a crush line between the vertical stabilizer and the engine cowling. When the airplane inverted, both occupants struck their heads and sustained neck injuries that likely resulted from proximity of their heads to the canopy and might have been exacerbated by any slack in their restraints. Although postaccident measurements of the restraints confirm the occupants' statements that they were less than tight, anthropomorphic data for both occupants was not obtained, therefore; the amount of slack in either seat restraint was not conclusively determined.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's improper recovery from an encounter with a wind gust during landing, which resulted in a hard landing on, and displacement of, the nose landing gear and a subsequent runway excursion and noseover.

On June 15, 2013, about 1313 eastern daylight time, an amateur built Hagerty RV-7A, N954CH, registered to and operated by a private individual, nosed over during landing at Altoona-Blair County Airport (AOO), Altoona, Pennsylvania. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight from Falwell Airport (W24), Lynchburg, Virginia, to AOO. The airplane sustained substantial damage and the private pilot and one passenger sustained serious injuries. The flight originated from W24 about 1150.

The pilot stated that he announced his position on the common traffic advisory frequency when he was 10 miles from the destination airport and heard the pilot of an airplane announce the flight was departing runway 30. He asked the pilot of that airplane what runway the winds favored and continued his straight-in approach to runway 03. On final for the runway, with a mountain range on the right and the wind from the right, he encountered turbulence. As the flight descended closer he noticed the windsock and it showed a 7 to 10 knot wind and was extended ½ way out with some gusts.

He maintained 80 mph on final slowing to 70 mph at touchdown. On touchdown on the main landing gear a wind gust occurred and the airplane climbed, and then came down hard on the nose landing gear which bent under. The airplane rolled a good distance, riding on metal, and he thought about fire. The airplane started pulling to the left, and he reached over and pulled the mixture control and may have also turned off the electric thinking if he was off the runway and on grass there would be no sparks. The airplane went off the runway onto grass, and the nose landing gear dug in and the airplane nosed over. While hanging upside down he undid his 4-point restraint and an individual from the airport helped pull the canopy out of the way. He was able to crawl through a hole in the canopy and reached in and released his wife's 4-point restraint. She was able to get on her back, and he helped her out. By that time, the first responders arrived.

The pilot further stated that his restraint was "snug", but it could have been tighter meaning it was not as snug as it could have been, while the passenger (his wife) reported her restraint was not loose but not too tight. His sitting height is 34.5 inches and his wife's sitting height is 35 inches. He also stated there was no mechanical failure or malfunction that caused the accident.

A witness who is the pilot's brother reported the touchdown appeared smooth with no wobble or sway, but the airplane became airborne then, "came down very quickly" and veered to the left side of the runway. He reported seeing the nose-over and ran inside the terminal building where he called 911.

Inspection of the airplane following recovery by the FAA-IIC revealed the nose landing gear tire pressure was 37 psi, while the left and right main landing gear tire pressures were 47 psi each. The FAA-IIC also reported no apparent damage to the roll structure or seat restraints. The airplane was recovered for further examination.

Examination of the airplane following recovery was performed by several NTSB personnel. The inspection determined that a person with a sitting height ½ inch more than the pilot and the same as the passenger would have about 1 inch of clearance between the top of the subjects head and a line extending between the top of the vertical stabilizer to the engine cowling. The on-board GPS receiver was retained for read-out.

Read-out of the GPS receiver was performed by the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Division located in Washington, DC. The results of the read-out indicate that the entire accident flight was recorded. With respect to the final approach, at 1313:19, the airplane was about 474 feet past runway 03 threshold at 70 knots groundspeed. The successive GPS recorded data indicates that the while continuing over the runway the altitude increased slightly (agreed with pilot statement) while the groundspeed decreased to the lowest value (40 knots), then the altitude decreased and the groundspeed decreased to 11 knots with the location on the grass to the left side of the runway.

According to the current president of the designer of the airplane, the roll structure for airplanes with slider or tip-up type canopies is considered dual purpose in that it was designed to provide a support structure for the plexi-glass canopy and also to provide a degree of protection in the event of a nose-over. The president also reported that both structures were designed for the RV-6 and RV-6A airplanes in the '80's and have changed very little for the RV-7, RV-7A, RV-9 and RV-9A airplanes. The original designer did not recall doing any testing on either design, but both have proven to have very good track records in the field.

An aviation surface observation report taken at the accident airport at 1253, or approximately 20 minutes before the accident indicates in part that the wind was from 330 degrees at 8 knots; no gusts were reported.

http://registry.faa.gov/N954CH

NTSB Identification: ERA13LA288 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 15, 2013 in Altoona, PA
Aircraft: Hagerty RV-7A, registration: N954CH
Injuries: 2 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 15, 2013, about 1400 eastern daylight time, an amateur built Hagerty RV-7A, N954CH, registered to and operated by a private individual, nosed over during landing at Altoona-Blair County Airport (AOO), Altoona, Pennsylvania. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight from Lynchburg Regional Airport/Preston Glenn Field (LYH), to AOO. The airplane sustained substantial damage and the private pilot and one passenger sustained serious injuries. The time of departure from LYH was not determined.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration inspector-in-charge (FAA-IIC), after touchdown on runway 03, the airplane bounced, touched down, and then nosed-over coming to rest inverted on grass adjacent to the runway.




 
RV-7A, N954CH
Photo Courtesy and Credit:  Patrick Waksmunski, Altoona Mirror
~






 



MARTINSBURG - A pilot and his passenger were hurt Saturday when the pilot lost control of his experimental aircraft, which turned upside down upon landing at the Altoona-Blair County Airport.

The pilot, believed to be aircraft owner Charles J. Hagerty of Goode, Virginia, and his passenger were transported by ambulance to Nason Hospital, Roaring Spring, for treatment of minor injuries.

The Martinsburg Volunteer Fire Department and DeGol Aviation personnel assisted in the efforts to contain the aircraft's fuel and used ropes to pull the single-engine aircraft upright, then onto its wheels.


"We think the plane was landing when its front landing gear doubled back," Martinsburg Volunteer Fire Chief Randy Acker said Saturday. "It went off the macadam and dug into the grass." 


The crash occurred shortly after 1 p.m., and its cause will be investigated by the Federal Aviation Administration.

Airport personnel said they believed the couple were expected to land at the airport and that people had been waiting for them.

After the pilot and his passenger got out of the aircraft, Acker said firefighters set up a foam blanket around the wreckage to contain the vapors of leaking fuel.

"We had the airport close the north/south runway for a while," Acker said, "But planes could still land on the east/west runway."

Altoona-Blair County Airport Authority Chairman Lanny Ross, who was at the airport Saturday, said he heard "quite a few" approaching planes while the firefighters were working. As soon as the crashed aircraft was towed from the runway to the DeGol Aviation hangar, two planes landed.


Story, Photo, Video:  http://www.altoonamirror.com

 
A small airplane accident happened around 1:00pm Saturday afternoon.

The plane was upside down on the runway of the Altoona-Blair County Airport.

Dispatch says the two people in the plane at the time had minor injuries and were taken to the hospital.

It is unclear who the passengers were or how the plane crashed.

First responders lined the runway and surrounded the plane as it was upside down.

They were able to flip the plane back into position and then pulled it away to a near-by garage.

The plane’s frame was dented and the windows were shattered.

Crews looked for pieces of metal and glass left behind that could pose as a safety hazard for other planes.

Airport Authority member Gary Orner said a crash like this is rare.

"The accidents that you see so not happen very often, very rare in their nature," he said.

 Orner said first responders and airport officials are no strangers to crashes like this. They are trained to know how to respond.

"So if something like this does happen, we are prepared for it. Its not like it catches us by surprise,” he said

The FAA will contact the National Transportation Safety Board and depending on the severity of the situation, they will send an official out to observe the airplane.

Carson Airport (KCXP), Nevada: Open House Photos and Video




 


Submitted by editor on June 15, 2013 - 6:41pm 


Dozens of aircraft were on display Saturday at the annual Carson City Airport Open House. The annual aviation show featured teams of pilots and a variety of aircraft from around the West.

Attended by several thousand, the all-ages event brought vendors, families and scores of aviation fans to Carson City. Children enjoyed free airplane rides and the Kiwanis Club hosted a pancake breakfast.

In the video above, the Beech Boys Formation Flyers take a practice run with Carson Now and cameraman Steve Mitchell of eMedia Studios.

The Beech Boys are made up of pilots Colin Aro, Christian Goetze, John Tate, Bruce Wold, Wolfgang Polak and four others.

Read more, photo gallery, video:  http://carsonnow.org

Colomban Cri-Cri, N2SZ: Fatal accident occurred June 01, 2013 near Doylestown Airport (KDYL), Bucks County, Pennsylvania

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Docket And Docket Items / National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N2SZ 

NTSB Identification: ERA13LA263
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 01, 2013 in Doylestown, PA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/02/2014
Aircraft: WILSON WILLIAM M CRICKET MC12, registration: N2SZ
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Although the gross weight at takeoff could not be determined, the airplane was a minimum of 30 pounds above the design gross weight (375 pounds), but 15 pounds under the builder-designated gross weight. Because the airplane was an experimental amateur built airplane, the builder can waiver from the design criteria, including gross weight; however, decreased performance will likely occur.

After rotation, the airplane flew several feet above the runway until about 2,100 feet down the 3,004-foot-long runway. The airplane then began a shallow climb and proceeded about ½ nautical mile west-northwest from the departure end of the runway flying at a low altitude. Two witnesses reported hearing sounds consistent with an engine(s) malfunction, while another witness located less than 200 feet from the accident site did not hear sputtering sounds. As the airplane approached a road for a forced landing with traffic ahead, it pitched up, rolled to the left, and collided with power lines then the ground. While two explosions were noted, the first likely occurred when the airplane collided with the power lines and would not have likely caused any burn injury to the pilot, while the second occurred at ground contact and was likely the result of rupture of the fuel tank, which resulted in the pilot’s burn injuries. The drugs detected in the toxicology testing were consistent with those administered by medical personnel.

No evidence of preimpact failure or malfunction was noted to the flight controls, and examination of the heat-damaged engines revealed good compression in each cylinder. Both propeller blades of the right propeller were fractured, consistent with the engine developing power at impact, while both propeller blades of the left propeller were not fractured, which was consistent with the engine not developing power at impact. The reason for the lack of power from the left engine could not be determined during the postaccident examination of the engine.

Though it could not be determined whether the pilot intentionally remained close to the runway for more than 2/3’s of its length, this would have been different from his past practices. Further, a prudent pilot would have initiated a normal climb after rotation for safety purposes. Therefore, the lack of climb performance should have been a clear indicator to the pilot to abort the takeoff, which he could have safely performed within the remaining runway distance.

Accounting for environmental conditions but excluding any issue related to inefficiency of the accident airplane’s engines, propellers, or airframe, the single-engine and both-engine rate-of-climb at design gross weight would have been about 160- and 960 feet per minute, respectively. No determination could be made as to the actual values for the accident airplane. The operation of the airplane above the design gross weight would have further decreased the single-engine climb performance, although the exact decrease in performance could not be determined.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to abort the takeoff after detecting the airplane’s degraded performance. Contributing to the accident were the likely loss of power from the left engine for reasons that could not be determined during the postaccident examination of the engine, and the operation of the airplane above the design gross weight, which resulted in decreased single-engine performance.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On June 1, 2013, about 1144 eastern daylight time, a twin engine single seat experimental, amateur built Wilson Cricket MC12 airplane, N2SZ, registered to and operated by a private individual, collided with power lines then the ground shortly after takeoff from Doylestown Airport (DYL), Doylestown, Pennsylvania. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 local, personal flight. The airplane sustained substantial damage and the airline transport pilot was fatally injured. The flight originated about 1 minute earlier from DYL.

The manager of DYL who was familiar with the pilot and his airplane reported that the pilot trailered the airplane to DYL that day, arriving there before 1000. After arrival, the airplane was part of a static display of aircraft; the accident flight was the first flight of the day for the pilot from DYL. The manager did not witness the engine start but did witness the airplane being taxied to runway 23, and reported that the airplane rolled past midfield before becoming airborne. After becoming airborne he noticed it was in a shallow climb. Concerned that the airplane would not clear trees past the departure end of the runway he continued to watch the airplane and after it cleared trees, he diverted his attention. He also stated that the pilot usually flies off the ground quick, and confirmed the pilot did not make any distress call.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration inspector-in-charge (FAA-IIC), witnesses reported that shortly after becoming airborne, the wings were noted to be rocking back and forth.

A witness who was traveling southeast bound on Swamp Road (Route 313) reported seeing a small airplane flying very low swerving side to side flying in a northwesterly direction over Route 313. The witness who was located southeast of the accident site observed the airplane in the vehicle's rear view mirror flying lower and still swerving side to side but not as much as first. The individual reported thinking the airplane was going to impact at a nearby car dealership, and suddenly, observed the, "[airplane] veered sharply to the left and all I saw was a fireball." The witness also reported, "My son, who was with me heard the engine revving as if the pilot was trying to gain altitude."

Another witness who was driving southeast bound on Route 313 over the bypass reported the airplane was approaching his position flying in a westerly direction over Route 313. The witness reported to law enforcement seeing the wings rocking from side to side and descending. Another witness who was also driving southeast along Route 313 reported seeing the airplane flying at a low level. The witness thought the airplane would hit his vehicle as it "swooped down" towards him. The witness believed the airplane was low enough to pass under nearby traffic lights, and could not tell if the engines were operating but thought the propellers were spinning. The witness also believed the airplane may have been inverted when it passed his position.

Another individual reported to law enforcement seeing the airplane flying parallel to Route 313, and heard a sputtering sound. The witness continued to observe the airplane from his rear view mirror and noticed the airplane banked left. He then observed a fireball and proceeded to the scene in an effort to render assistance.

Yet another witness who was less than 200 feet southwest from the accident site reported to law enforcement hearing the airplane flying which he described as being very low. The witness reported the airplane flew in front of his position and as it passed him, it banked to the left and impacted the power lines. The witness also reported he did not hear any sputtering or see any smoke trailing the airplane.

One individual who was driving southeast bound on Route 313 reported that approaching the bridge over Route 611, he noted the accident airplane and made a comment to his daughter who was with him about the pilot doing stunts over the road. It then became apparent to him that the pilot was looking for a safe place to land. They approached the bridge and he noticed the airplane was descending while flying towards their vehicle. While on the bridge he parked his car as far to the right as possible and reported the airplane was flying towards them at a 45 degree angle and was floundering. During that time he heard full roar and then no sound from the engines, and reported the pilot was flying over Route 313 as if the pilot was attempting to perform an emergency landing. The individual noticed the nose pitch up straight in the air, followed by an immediate 90 degree roll to the left. He could see the bottom of the airplane and the wing barely missed their vehicle. The airplane then collided with the power lines causing sparks and an explosion. A portion of the airplane remained suspended, and the airplane then impacted the ground followed by a second explosion. The witness parked his vehicle, and went to the site to render assistance.

Bystanders, police and fire rescue personnel responded to the scene to render assistance.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 69, held an airline transport pilot (ATP) certificate with airplane multi-engine land and rotorcraft helicopter ratings. At the ATP level he was type rated in a Sikorsky SK-76 helicopter, Beech BE-300 and Fairchild Swearingen SA-227 airplanes. He held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane single engine land rating, and was issued a first class medical certificate with no limitations on May 13, 2013. On the application for the last medical certificate he listed a total time of 16,900 hours, and 100 hours in the last 6 months.

According to FAA Civil Aeromedical Division personnel, at the last medical examination the pilot was 71 inches tall and weighed 185 pounds.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The twin-engine, single seat, "T tail", tricycle gear airplane was built by a private individual from a kit in 1992 as model Cricket MC12 (Cri Cri), and according to FAA records was designated serial number 210013. It was certificated as an experimental amateur built airplane, and was powered by two 15 horsepower single cylinder 2-cycle PUL 212 engines and equipped with two wooden fixed pitch MC/AS 695200103 propellers. The airplane was also equipped with full span flaperons. The airplane's fuel tank is located in the cockpit forward of the seat, requiring placement of both legs directly over the fuel tank while seated.

Since the beginning of 1982 until about 1988, a company called Zenair sold kits for Cricket MC12. Personnel from Zenair reported they having no historical data concerning the Cricket MC12; therefore, no determination could be made whether the kit was provided by Zenair, or the original designer.

A document from Zenair (kit seller) indicates that the gross weight of the Cricket MC12 airplane with the PUL engines is 380 pounds (design weight is actually 170 kg or approximately 375 pounds). The document also indicates that the single engine rate of climb is 200 feet-per-minute (FPM), and at 420 pounds gross weight, the climb rate with the PUL engines is 1,000 FPM with both engines operating.

Documents submitted to the FAA by the builder indicated that the empty weight was 195 pounds, and using a pilot weight of 180 pounds, the airplane without fuel weighed 375 pounds, which corresponded to the maximum design gross weight. The builder stipulated the gross weight to be 420 pounds.

According to FAA records, the pilot purchased the airplane on December 6, 2002; no maintenance records were located.

A weight and balance document dated July 20, 2008, indicates the combined weights on each main and nose landing gears, plus subtractions and additions for equipment and 3.0 pounds of "nose weight." The airplane empty weight with the additions and subtractions was approximately 220 pounds.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

A surface observation weather report taken at DYL at 1154, or approximately 10 minutes after the accident indicates the wind was variable at 4 knots, the visibility was 10 statute miles, and the cloud condition was not reported. The temperature and dew point were 29 and 21 degrees Celsius, respectively, and the altimeter setting was 30.00 inches of Mercury.

Based on the altimeter setting of 30.00 inches of Mercury, the pressure altitude was approximately 314 feet.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The DYL Airport is a public-use airport located in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, owned by Bucks County Airport Authority. It is an uncontrolled field equipped with a single 3,004 foot long by 60 foot wide asphalt runway designated 5/23. The common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) is 122.975 MHz, and is not recorded.

On the date of the accident, the Bucks County Airport Authority, Doylestown Pilot Association, and Leading Edge Aviation sponsored an open house (Tenth Annual) at DYL showing antique, experimental and other airplane static displays. The event was open from 1000 to 1500 hours.

The DYL airport has a security camera that is mounted about 12 feet above ground level on the middle of the terminal building, and at the time was pointed to the southwest. The security camera recorded approximately 8 seconds of the accident flight at DYL; the video did not depict the point of rotation or the accident sequence. Review of the recorded video segment revealed the airplane first came into view while airborne several feet off the runway. The video depicted the airplane flying just above the runway about the same altitude as first viewed until reaching a taxiway located about 2,100 feet down the runway. At that point the video depicts the airplane beginning to climb with the wings rocking to the right and then back to wings level while continuing in a climb and then disappearing from view. No smoke is noted trailing the airplane.

Automotive fuel is not available for purchase at DYL; the airport only sells 100 low lead and Jet A type fuels. The pilot did not purchase fuel from DYL that day.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane crashed at the intersection of PA Route 611 Bypass (Easton Road) and Route 313 in Doylestown, PA. The wreckage was located on the southeast portion of the intersection in the foliage on the shoulder of Route 611. The approximate coordinates of the main wreckage were 40 degrees 19.85 minutes North latitude and 075 degrees 08.12 minutes West longitude. That location when plotted was located about 2,788 feet and 278 degrees straight line distance and direction from the departure end of runway 23.

Examination of the accident site by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector-in-charge revealed the "T-tail" was suspended among electrical wires above the resting position of the wreckage. The wings and pilot seat were on the ground in an upright position directly below the suspended "T-tail". The nose containing both engines with attached propellers was located on the ground inverted on a storm drain approximately 10 feet southwest of the wing section, and the fuel tank was separated and located on the ground in an upright position approximately 12 feet north of the wing section. The section of fuselage between the pilot's seat and the "T-tail" section suspended in the wires was not present and was consumed by the postcrash fire. The foliage on which the pieces landed had been burned but the tall reed grasses between the three aircraft pieces were intact with no evidence of burning. The left wing and leading edge of the vertical stabilizer had witness marks from striking electric wires, but the right wing had no damage. The rest of the wreckage had burned with evidence of fire on the tail hanging from the wire.

Further examination of the airplane following recovery revealed the separated fuel tank was ruptured and did not contain any fuel. Rudder and stabilator control cables and push rods were broken as a result of the separation of the "T-tail"; however, there was no evidence of preimpact failure or malfunction. Flaperon and flaps control authority was confirmed. Evidence of wire strikes were noted on the left wing and leading edge of the vertical stabilizer.

Examination of the cockpit revealed both throttle levers were in the retarded position; however control cable continuity from each throttle lever to the carburetor of each engine could not be determined due to melted control cables associated with the postcrash fire. The throttle mechanism at each carburetor was noted to operate satisfactory. Each engine master switch was in the off position.

Examination of both engines which remained attached to the engine pylons revealed fire damage to both, though rotation of each propeller by hand revealed both engine powertrains rotated freely with good compression noted in each cylinder. Fire damage to the spark plugs wires was noted. Both propellers exhibited heat damage; the left propeller was not fractured, while both blades of the right propeller were fractured.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The pilot was transported by ambulance from the accident site to the Doylestown Hospital for transport via helicopter to Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; however, the life flight helicopter was at the DYL Airport taking part in a static display. The pilot was redirected by ambulance to the DYL Airport where he was airlifted by helicopter to Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, for treatment of his injuries. The family withdrew care and placed him on do not resuscitate (DNR) status; he died while hospitalized on June 2, 2013.

The NTSB provided a subpoena to Temple University Hospital personnel to obtain admission blood and urine specimens. Those specimens were submitted as directed by the subpoena to the FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory (FAA CAMI), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma for testing. Additionally, specimens obtained during autopsy were also submitted to the FAA Bioaeronatical Sciences Research Laboratory for testing.

A postmortem examination of the pilot was performed by the City of Philadelphia Office of the Medical Examiner. The autopsy report indicated the cause of death was "Thermal Burns and Inhalation Injuries", with 2nd and 3rd degree burns to 90 percent of his body. The report also indicated that he sustained fractures of 4 right ribs, and comminuted fractures of the left humerus. No other fractures were reported.

Forensic toxicology testing was performed on admittance specimens from Temple University Hospital and also of specimens from the postmortem examination by the FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Forensic toxicology testing was also performed by the City of Philadelphia Office of the Medical Examiner.

The toxicology report by FAA CAMI indicated that cyanide testing was not performed, and the results were negative for carbon monoxide and volatiles. Unquantified amounts of etomidate, midazolam, and morphine were detected in the submitted blood specimens, while midazolam and morphine were detected in the submitted liver specimen.

The toxicology report by the City of Philadelphia Office of the Medical Examiner revealed the result was negative for cocaine, volatiles, and carbon monoxide, while unquantified amounts of lidocaine and midazolam were detected in the cardiac blood specimen. Additionally, 340 ug/L of morphine was detected in the cardiac blood.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Postaccident weight and balance calculations were performed using the empty weight of 220 pounds and the weight of the pilot at his last medical less than 3 weeks earlier (185 pounds). The zero fuel weight was calculated to be approximately 405 pounds, and because the fuel amount at takeoff could not be determined, no determination could be made as to the gross weight at engine start. At the calculated zero fuel weight, the airplane was 30 pounds over the design gross weight, but was 15 pounds under the builder designated gross weight.

The Koch Chart in the FAA safety publication FAA-P-8740-2, titled density altitude, provides increases in takeoff distance and decreases in rate of climb performance for airplanes that do not have an airplane flight manual or Pilot's Operating Handbook. Based on the temperature and pressure altitude about the time of the accident, 84 degrees and 314 feet respectively, the expected increase in takeoff distance would be approximately 25 percent, and the expected decrease in rate of climb performance would be 20 percent. Using data from the previous pilot's account of takeoff roll distance of 415 feet, and climb rate of 1,200 FPM, the takeoff roll distance would have increased approximately 104 feet, and the climb rate would have decreased 240 FPM. Using the same chart and reported single engine climb rate at gross weight as depicted by the kit builder revealed a decrease of 40 FPM. No determination could be made as to the amount of decrease in single engine climb rate for any weight above the maximum design gross weight.

ADDITIONAL DATA

Information Concerning Flight Evaluation of the Cricket

"Zenair Cricket News" newsletter No. 5, from fall of 1982, which contains an account from a pilot who had flown the Cricket, indicates that at 25 pounds less than the design gross weight, or 350 pounds, the PUL engine equipped Cricket was airborne in 415 feet and climbing at 1,200 FPM. The pilot also indicated that by remaining within the allowable gross weight, the airplane was, "…a remarkable performer on single engine. At 340 pounds, I have climbed the bird from 2,000 to 3,000 [feet] at 250 [feet-per-minute, and maintained 85 mph level at 3000 feet using full power on the good engine."

Previous NTSB Investigations Involving Cricket Airplanes

A review of NTSB's data base from 1982 revealed a total of 5 previous accidents involving Cricket airplanes dating back to 1982. Of the five accidents, four involve a MC12 and the last involves a MC15. A review of the accidents involving the MC12 airplanes revealed one (identified as NTSB investigation CHI83FA370), in which the pilot wrote an article reporting the circumstances of his accident. The pilot indicated in the article that after takeoff and the having achieved the climb angle, the left engine quit with a resulting yaw to the left. He lowered the nose, however the airspeed deteriorated to stall and the wing dropped. He retarded the right engine and applied forward control resulting in an immediate ground contact. He also relayed that, "…for ten seconds a vulnerability exists. If an engine fails, your options are very limited…."

Review of the three other accidents involving a MC12 identified by NTSB Case #'s (DEN84FTE01, FTW92LA140, and CHI06LA164) revealed one of the accidents (FTW92LA140) occurred during a forced landing following total loss of power from the left engine while on approach; the airplane had the same horsepower engines as the accident airplane. The report did not indicate the airplane weight at the time of the accident; therefore, no determination could be made whether the airplane was being operated above the design gross weight at the time of the accident.

One accident involving a MC15 (LAX95LA309) occurred during a forced landing because the pilot was unable to maintain single engine flight following total loss of power from the left engine. The MC-15 contains the same wing span, wing area, and wing aspect ratio as the MC12, and the MC15 had the same horsepower engines as the accident airplane. The report did not indicate the airplane weight at the time of the accident; therefore, no determination could be made whether the airplane was being operated above the design gross weight at the time of the accident.

NTSB Identification: ERA13LA263
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 01, 2013 in Doylestown, PA
Aircraft: WILSON WILLIAM M WILSON CRI CRI, registration: N2SZ
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 1, 2013, about 1215 eastern daylight time, a twin engine single seat experimental amateur built Wilson Cri Cri, N2SZ, registered to and operated by a private individual, collided with power lines after takeoff from Doylestown Airport (DYL), Doylestown, Pennsylvania. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 local, personal flight. The airplane sustained substantial damage and the airline transport pilot was fatally injured. The flight was originating about 1 minute earlier from DYL.

The airport manager who was familiar with the pilot and the airplane reported that the pilot trailered the airplane to DYL that day, arriving there before 1000. After arrival, the airplane was part of a static display of aircraft and the accident flight was the first flight of the day from DYL. The manager did not witness the engine start but did witness the airplane being taxied to runway 23. The manager reported that the airplane rolled about 2,000 feet before becoming airborne and after becoming airborne noticed it was in a shallow climb. Concerned that the airplane would not clear trees past the departure end of the runway he continued to watch the airplane and after it cleared trees, he diverted his attention. The manager went to the site and provided the location which was later determined to be located about 2,800 feet and 280 degrees from the departure end of runway 23.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector-in-charge, the airplane collided with power lines; a portion of the airplane remained suspended in the power lines and the main wreckage descended and impacted the ground


John Szabo 
 Buckingham resident Ed Wolfe said this photo, taken Saturday, June 1, 2013, shows John Szabo with his plane at the Doylestown Airport.


Today John Mariner Szabo croaked.

Truth be told, he actually passed on Sunday June 2, 2013, but if you knew him you see him now in this - his requested obituary opening line.


John Szabo passed at Temple University Hospital from injuries sustained in an accident that occurred June 1, while piloting his twin engine Wilson Cri Cri (Cricket) airplane out of Doylestown Airport. A tragic end to a life lived to the fullest; some comfort may be found in that he died doing what he loved.


Although 69 in years, the twinkle in his eye, the sharpness of his mind, and his enthusiasm for life were wonderfully and contagiously childlike.


Born in Rahway, N.J., in 1944, to Aline Rothen and John Szabo, he later moved to Florida where he graduated from Lake Worth High School, then he packed up his Corvette and traveled across the country in search of new adventures.


From 1966 to 1968, he served with distinction and valor as a member of the U.S. Army Aviation Branch. Serving two combat tours in Vietnam, he earned the coveted title of Aircraft Commander, piloting a UH1H/Huey helicopter. He was twice wounded in action, earning numerous awards and distinctions, including the Purple Heart.


John continued his passion for flight and became a career pilot, employed most recently for more than 20 years with Merck in New Jersey.


He built and flew his own aircraft, restored classic cars and found joy in nature. There was nothing he couldn't fix, and no question from his children or grandchildren that he couldn't answer. He was a jack of all trades and master of every one of them. John is survived by daughter Cristine Hahm, her husband Kyung, and their sons, Alex and Max of Seattle, Wash., his son, Robert Szabo of Allentown, Pa.; and his sisters, Aline Humphrey of Pueblo, Colo., Carol Szabo of El Granada, Calif. and Nancy Raynor of Montgomery, Ala. His longtime girlfriend, Heather Kimak, who died June 7, 2012, and her children held a special place in his heart, as did friends, Jim and Andrea Mehling, Tim Lelie, George Scholl, and Jack Gardner.


Relatives and friends are invited to attend his graveside service at 2:30 p.m., Monday, June 24, at Washington Crossing National Cemetery, 830 Highland Road, Newtown. The funeral procession will leave at 1:15 p.m. from Reed and Steinbach Funeral Home, 2335 Lower State Road, Doylestown. Please note the cemetery is in Pennsylvania and will not admit latecomers. A reception will follow in the main hanger at Princeton Airport.


Memorial contributions may be made to EAA Young Eagles, P.O. Box 3086, Oshkosh, WI 54903 or to the Space Foundation, Attention: Development, Space Foundation, 4425 Arrowswest Drive, Colorado Springs, CO 80907 or via the Web site www.spacefoundation.org/donate.

Thank you to all who touched his life. He misses us, is glad he was so loved, is delighted to once again have a full head of hair, and is happy he does not need to pay taxes.


Followed dreams, tinkered, adventured, learned, laughed, loved...