Wednesday, July 03, 2019

Reckless Flying: Estate administrator files lawsuit against Air Cargo Carrier, others

Short SD-330, N334AC, Air Cargo Carrier - ACC Integrated Services Inc: Fatal accident occurred May 05, 2017 at Yeager Airport (KCRW), Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia

Captain Jonathan Pablo Alvarado

Anh Kim Ho, First Officer

CHARLESTON – The estate administrator of a Cross Lanes man killed in an airplane crash is seeking damages from his cargo airline employer.

Virginia Chau, administratrix of the estate of Anh Kim Ho, filed a complaint in Kanawha Circuit Court against Air Cargo Carrier LLC, United Parcel Service Co., UPS Airlines Inc., Sheriff of Kanawha County, as the administrator of the estate of Jonathan Pablo Alvarado, alleging negligence and other counts.

The suit states Ho was employed by Air Cargo Carriers, a cargo airline that operates contract cargo services for UPS out of Charleston. The suit states on May 5, 2017, Ho and Alvarado were killed in a crash at a Charleston airport in a plane operated by Alvarado.

The plaintiff alleges Air Cargo failed to adequately train Alvarado and failed to investigate his known events of reckless flying.

The plaintiff is seeking all reasonable sums due and court costs. The plaintiff is represented by William M. Tiano of Tiano O'Dell PLLC in Charleston.

The case has been assigned to Judge Louis Bloom.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://wvrecord.com


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charleston 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

ACC Integrated Services Inc

http://registry.faa.gov/N334AC 



NTSB Identification: DCA17FA109 
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Friday, May 05, 2017 in Charleston, WV
Aircraft: SHORT BROS. & HARLAND SD3 30, registration: N334AC
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 5, 2017 at 6:51 a.m. eastern daylight time (EDT), Air Cargo Carriers flight 1260, a Shorts SD3-30, N334AC, crashed during landing on runway 5 at the Charleston Yeager International Airport (CRW), Charleston, West Virginia. The airplane was destroyed and the two pilots suffered fatal injuries. The flight was operating under the provisions of 14 CFR Part 135 as a cargo flight from Louisville International Airport (SDF), Louisville, Kentucky. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident.

Fuel Exhaustion: Cessna 177 Cardinal, N3225T, accident occurred July 05, 2017 near Fulton County Airport (KUSE), Wauseon, Ohio

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cleveland, Ohio

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms



Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 
    
http://registry.faa.gov/N3225T 



Location: Wauseon, OH
Accident Number: CEN17LA261
Date & Time: 07/05/2017, 1730 EDT
Registration: N3225T
Aircraft: CESSNA 177
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel exhaustion
Injuries: 1 Minor, 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The accident occurred during the third flight since the airplane had been filled with fuel. The student pilot and flight instructor stated that the engine lost power during the base leg to final approach to turn. The flight instructor took control of the airplane but had insufficient altitude to reach the runway, so he landed the airplane in a field just short of the runway where it contacted a ditch.

The airplane had been flown about 3 hours 45 minutes since it was last filled with fuel. The expected fuel consumption for the engine was 11.7 gallons per hour (gph) at 75% power and 10.14 gph at 65% power, which resulted in an endurance of about 3 hours 30 minutes or 4 hours 10 minutes, respectively. Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed 12 ounces of fuel remained in the fuel system, and there was no evidence of fuel leakage around the airplane. Given the fuel burn calculations and the evidence, it is likely that the flight instructor did not ensure that sufficient fuel was on board for the flight, which led to fuel exhaustion and the subsequent total loss of engine power.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The flight instructor's inadequate preflight fuel planning, which resulted in a total loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion.

Findings

Aircraft
Fuel - Fluid level (Cause)

Personnel issues
Fuel planning - Instructor/check pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Sloped/uneven terrain - Contributed to outcome

Factual Information

On July 5, 2017, at 1730 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 177, N3225T, collided with the terrain during a forced landing in Wauseon, Ohio. The certified flight instructor (CFI) and student pilot were not injured; the passenger received minor injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Visual flight rules conditions existed near the accident site at the time of the accident, and a flight plan had not been filed. The flight departed Bolton Field Airport (TZR), Columbus, Ohio, at 1615 en route to the Fulton County Airport (USE), Wauseon, Ohio.

The CFI reported they were landing at USE when the accident occurred. He stated they overflew the airport and entered a left downwind for runway 9. During the base leg to final approach turn, the engine lost power. The CFI took control of the airplane and with insufficient altitude to reach the runway, he landed the airplane in a corn field just short of the runway where it contacted a ditch.

The CFI reported to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Inspector the airplane was filled with fuel, 42 gallons, at the beginning of the day. They practiced touch and go landings for 1 hour 15 minutes in the morning. They then landed, picked up a passenger and flew to TZR where they had lunch prior to returning to USE. The round-trip flight between TZR and USE was about 2 hours 30 minutes resulting in a total flight time of about 3 hours 45 minutes.

The engine specifications show fuel consumption at 75% power is about 11.7 gallons per hour (gph) resulting in an endurance of about 3 hours 30 minutes. The fuel consumption at 65% power is 10.14 gph resulting in an endurance of about 4 hours 10 minutes. The airplane had been equipped with a 115-horsepower engine which was changed to a 180-horsepower engine about 30 flight hours prior to the accident. The pilot stated to the FAA Inspector that they departed TZR with about 15 gallons of fuel onboard and that he intentionally wanted a lower fuel level in the airplane because a mechanic needed to look at the fuel gauges.

A FAA inspector reported that he drained 12 ounces of fuel from the airplane after the accident. He stated there was no evidence of fuel leakage around the airplane. The inspector applied battery power to the airplane and the left fuel gauge indicated full and the right fuel gauge indicated empty. The fuel gascolator had a hole in the bottom of the bowl which was consistent with impact damage.

History of Flight

Approach-VFR pattern final
Fuel exhaustion (Defining event)
Loss of engine power (total)

Landing-flare/touchdown
Off-field or emergency landing
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)



Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 22, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/26/2013
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/14/2017
Flight Time:  389 hours (Total, all aircraft), 11.2 hours (Total, this make and model), 283 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 83.8 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 48.1 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4.1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 46, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/31/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N3225T
Model/Series: 177
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1967
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 17700525
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/01/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2350 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-360-A1A
Registered Owner: MARKEY ALLEN H
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: TOL, 683 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 17 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1752 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 82°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 20°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.09 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 12°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Columbus, OH (TZR)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Wauseon, OH (USE)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1615 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: Fulton County (USE)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 780 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: 09
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3862 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor, 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  41.612222, -84.138889 (est)

Loss of Control in Flight: Aviat A-1C-180 Husky, N272WY, accident occurred July 04, 2017 in Dillwyn, Buckingham County, Virginia


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.


Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Richmond, Virginia

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N272WY



Location: Dillwyn, VA
Accident Number: ERA17LA229
Date & Time: 07/04/2017, 1130 EDT
Registration: N272WY
Aircraft: AVIAT AIRCRAFT INC A-1C-180
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis

The private pilot was attempting to land at an unfamiliar grass airstrip. He made two low approaches, and on the third attempt, he elected to land the airplane with full flaps. After touchdown, he realized that he had insufficient runway remaining on which to stop, so he aborted the landing. Shortly after takeoff and after clearing the trees, the airplane abruptly stalled and impacted the ground. The grass airstrip was designed for radio-controlled model airplanes and was only 650 ft long. A large stand of trees formed the boundary of the northeast end of the runway. The pilot reported that he misidentified the grass airstrip and that there were no mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's selection of a grass airstrip that was of insufficient length for landing, and his exceedance of the airplane's critical angle of attack during the go-around, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall.



Findings

Aircraft
Airspeed - Not attained/maintained (Cause)
Angle of attack - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Understanding/comprehension - Pilot (Cause)

Factual Information 

On July 4, 2017, at 1130 eastern daylight time, an Aviat Aircraft Inc. A-1C-180, N272WY, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain in Dillwyn, Virginia. The private pilot was seriously injured, and one passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a local, personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and no flight plan was filed.

The pilot reported that he filled the airplane with fuel and departed his home airport for a private, paved airstrip about 12 miles to the northwest. He was encouraged to visit a neighbor who owned a grass airstrip located between the departure and destination airports, so he attempted to find the airstrip. He "falsely identified" the grass airstrip and attempted to land. He attempted two low approaches, the first with no flaps and the second with full flaps. On the third pass, he attempted to land the airplane with full flaps. After touching down, he realized that he did not have sufficient runway remaining to stop, and aborted the landing. Shortly after takeoff and after clearing the trees, the airplane "entered an abrupt stall" and impacted the ground.

The pilot believed that he was at full power when airplane control was lost. He also stated that there were no mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration reported that the airplane came to rest in a steep, nose-low position in a cornfield. There was no fire. Structural damage to both wings and the fuselage was confirmed. The inspector reported that the field where the pilot was attempting to land was a grass strip designed for radio-controlled model aircraft. The strip was oriented to the northeast/southwest, was about 650 ft in length, and was not intended for general aviation aircraft. A large stand of trees formed the boundary of the northeast end of the runway. 

History of Flight

Enroute
Miscellaneous/other

Approach-VFR go-around
Loss of control in flight (Defining event)

Uncontrolled descent
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT) 



Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 44, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/11/2013
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/08/2017
Flight Time:  600 hours (Total, all aircraft), 73 hours (Total, this make and model), 275 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 62 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 29 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: AVIAT AIRCRAFT INC
Registration: N272WY
Model/Series: A-1C-180 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2016
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 3272
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/05/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2200 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 38 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 40 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C126 installed, activated, aided in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-360-A1P
Registered Owner: Inspire Aviation LLC
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator:On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: FVX, 415 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 9 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1135 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 150°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 18°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Farmville, VA (FVX)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Farmville, VA (FVX)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1120 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Private R-C (NA)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 637 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 4
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 650 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Go Around; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 37.492222, -78.517500 (est)

Cessna TU206F Turbo Stationair, N150SC: Accident occurred July 03, 2019 in Waikoloa Village, Hawaii

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu, Hawaii

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

https://registry.faa.gov/N150SC

Location: Waikoloa Village, HI
Accident Number: WPR19LA185
Date & Time: 07/03/2019, 1035 HST
Registration: N150SC
Aircraft: Cessna TU206
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Aerial Observation

On July 3, 2019, at 1035 Hawaii-Aleutian standard time, a Cessna TU206F, N150SC, collided with a roadway sign following a loss of engine power and made a forced landing near Waikoloa Village, Hawaii. The commercial pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing. The airplane was registered to and operated by Aerial Imaging Inc. under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an aerial observation flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight and no flight plan had been filed. The cross-country flight originated from the Daniel K. Inouye International Airport (HNL), Honolulu, Hawaii, at 0640.

The pilot reported that they were destined for Kona, Hawaii, to conduct aerial survey work. As they arrived in the area, the pilot noticed a loss of oil pressure. He decided to head toward Kona International Airport (HKO), Kailua Kona, Hawaii. About half-way to the airport, the engine lost power. He was able to glide the airplane toward a stretch of highway that was mostly free of vehicles. While maneuvering to avoid a car, the right wing struck a road sign and the airplane came to rest in a ditch.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N150SC
Model/Series: TU206 F
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Aerial Imaging Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PHKO, 47 ft msl
Observation Time: 0953 HST
Distance from Accident Site: 17 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 21°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 4000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , Variable
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.96 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Honolulu, HI (HNL)
Destination: Waikoloa Village, HI

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None

Latitude, Longitude: 19.911111, -155.812500 (est)





WAIKOLOA, Hawaii Island (HawaiiNewsNow) - Officials are responding to a small plane that made an emergency landing on Waikoloa Road on Wednesday morning.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the pilot of a single-engine Cessna 206 reported engine failure and needed to land on a road. The pilot then landed on Waikoloa Road, about a mile south of Waikoloa Village, around 10:40 a.m.

There were two people on board, the Federal Aviation Administration said.

No injuries have been reported at this time.

Witness Justin Correia said he was driving in the area when he saw the plane.

“I was just coming up, seen like the wing, thought somebody drove off the road with a surfboard in the back of their truck,” he said. “When I pulled to the side, it was actually a plane.”

He then pulled over and saw two men emerge, appearing unscathed.

“I just asked if everybody was okay, if there was anybody else in the plane, and they said no, so I was like ‘perfect,’ and by the time I turned around, there was 50 people behind me and I just jumped in my truck and left," Correia said.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating.

Original article ➤ https://www.hawaiinewsnow.com

Norwegian Air / Hi Fly, Airbus A340-300, 9H-SUN: Incident occurred June 29, 2019 at Orlando International Airport (KMCO), Orange County, Florida


A Norwegian Air plane that aborted an international flight spewed a substantial amount of fuel on a large area of Orlando International Airport during its emergency landing, which an aviation expert described as a rare and potentially dangerous occurrence.

The incident happened late Saturday night, triggered initially by warnings of a failed hydraulic pump. Federal authorities have since begun an investigation while airport officials are assessing costs for cleaning up runway and taxiway surfaces.

The Norwegian flight, using a 19-year-old leased aircraft, was well out across the Atlantic Ocean when it reversed course and returned to Florida. Passengers were on board for nearly five hours, or more than half the time they would otherwise have spent on a flight to London’s Gatwick airport.

The returning flight was met by emergency vehicles, and passengers were held on the plane for an hour. Portions of the airport tarmac were closed temporarily so that crews could remove the spilled fuel.

Judy Watson Tracy was on that flight and from a window on the plane’s right side photographed a fountain of jet fuel coming from the rear edge of the wing to the runway.

Charles Westbrooks, aeronautical science professor at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and a former airline pilot, said most pilots never experience having to dump fuel. Far more rare is spilling fuel at an airport, he said.

“It would not be done intentionally,” Westbrooks said. “I can think of no reason why anyone would do that on purpose.”

Neither Norwegian nor the company providing the leased Airbus 340 for the London flight, Hi-Fly of Portugal, would explain why the wide-body aircraft dumped fuel on the airport’s runways and taxiways.

“As a standard safety practice, fuel was dumped prior to the safe landing of the aircraft at MCO, however there may have been some residual leakage from its wings,” Norwegian spokeswoman Min Kim said.

A HiFly spokeswoman said there was “no emergency situation” from a hydraulic pump’s “malfunction indication.”

“The aircraft was on the initial phase for a long haul flight to Europe so fuel had to be dumped to bring the aircraft into adequate landing weight,” InĂªs Pompeu dos Santos said.

The Federal Aviation Administration, confirming that it is investigating the aborted flight, said in a statement the “Norwegian Air 7058, Airbus A343, landed safely at Orlando International Airport at 9:53 p.m., June 29, after the pilot reported a loss of the aircraft’s primary hydraulic system.”

Westbrooks said a plane such as the HiFly Airbus would dump as much as 30,000 gallons of jet fuel in order to shed weight for a safe landing.

Pilots try to dump fuel over water if possible or over a rural area. With the plane traveling at several hundred miles per hour, dumped fuel quickly atomizes into a fine mist or vapor.

Dumping it on a runway is another matter, Westbrooks said, especially if it accumulates beneath the plane.

“You potentially have 200 or 250 people sitting on top of a flammable substance and the engines are running,” Westbrooks said. “I would not be comfortable with that at all.”

Orlando airport authorities said the amounts of fuel dumped on runways and taxiways of the airport’s west side “are still being determined but was of significant size.”

They said airport leaders are unaware of such an incident occurring previously.

Contractors were called in for a cleanup and costs have not yet been determined, airport officials said.

The website FlightAware shows the airplane reached an altitude of 35,000 feet and was east of North Carolina’s coast when it turned back to Orlando.

As the Airbus neared Florida’s coast at Daytona Beach, it completed four, large circles while still over water, and then flew to Orlando International Airport.

Not clear is whether the aircraft was dumping fuel over the Orlando metro area as it approached the airport.

Norwegian began to alert passengers earlier this year that it was relying on leased aircraft that are older than the airline’s newer Boeing 787 airplanes, which reportedly are in need of engine maintenance.

“We are contacting you to inform you that your flight will be operated by another Carrier,” Norwegian Air said in a statement. "We understand that these changes are not ideal, but it was necessary for us to lease an aircraft from another Carrier in order to avoid a disruption to your flight

Original article ➤ https://www.orlandosentinel.com

Beechcraft 58 Baron, N9403Q: Incident occurred July 03, 2019 at Centennial Airport (KAPA), Denver, Colorado

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

On landing roll, blew the right main tire. Right gear then collapsed and pulled off the runway and into the grass. Damage to landing gear and prop strike reported.

Blue Sky Baron LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N9403Q

Date: 03-JUL-19
Time: 17:44:00Z
Regis#: N9403Q
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: BE58
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: DENVER
State: COLORADO



ENGLEWOOD, Colorado (CBS4) – A twin-engine plane slid off the runway at Centennial Airport Wednesday. No one was hurt.

The call came in just before noon. The plane had one person on board, but no fuel leaked from the aircraft.

The runway was closed and the pilot worked with airport crews to right the plane and get it off the runway. It reopened shortly thereafter.

Story and video ➤ https://denver.cbslocal.com

Cessna 152, N6306P: Accident occurred April 19, 2020 near Corona Municipal Airport (KAJO), Riverside County, California -and- Accident occurred July 02, 2019 at Tracy Municipal Airport (KTCY), San Joaquin County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California

April 19, 2020: Aircraft lost engine and made an emergency landing on a road.

https://registry.faa.gov/N6306P

Date: 19-APR-20
Time: 17:52:00Z
Regis#: N6306P
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 152
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: CORONA
State: CALIFORNIA


A pilot and passenger were injured Sunday, April 19, when the single-engine plane they were in crashed and flipped over a short distance from Corona Municipal Airport, firefighters said.

There was no fire from the 10:48 a.m. crash on a service road southwest of the airport. The pilot had moderate injuries and the passenger, who was walking outside the aircraft after the crash, had minor injuries, said Corona Fire Department spokesman John DeYoe.

Pilot and passenger, whom DeYoe described as men in their upper 50s, were hospitalized. The airport remained in operation, DeYoe said.

The plane was engaged in a training exercise, DeYoe said. “They were doing two touchdowns (landing-and-takeoffs) and on the second touchdown they came around and they lost power and nosed into a service road … the plane then flipped over onto its top,” he said.

Because there was no fire, the first fire engine at the scene had trouble finding the downed aircraft, which was outside the airport property, DeYoe said.

A drone from the Corona Police Department was sent airborne, and its camera spotted the downed craft, DeYoe said. “There’s a lot of things you can utilize those things for,” he said.

The plane’s registration with the FAA said it is a Cessna 152 based in Corona, with the notation “sale reported” in place of an owner’s name.

DeYoe said the National Transportation and Safety Board was not sending an investigator to the site because of coronavirus contagion restrictions. Instead, the NTSB requested that police take specific photos of the wreckage, he said.

“From the sounds of it, they are not going to be out at all,” DeYoe said, due to the travel restrictions, and also because of the type of crash — the plane was still intact, and there were no serious injuries

DeYoe said he did not know Sunday afternoon whether it was an instructor-and-student flight or just two men aboard the plane with one practicing the touchdowns.

In January, four people died in a fiery single-engine plane crash during takeoff at Corona Municipal Airport.

https://www.pe.com

View of damaged left wing.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms



Location: Tracy, CA
Accident Number: GAA19CA390
Date & Time: 07/02/2019, 1000 PDT
Registration: N6306P
Aircraft: Cessna 152
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

The operator reported that during the solo student pilot's landing, the airplane immediately veered left, exited the runway and the left wing struck a paving vehicle on the adjacent taxiway.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing.

The operator reported that there was no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operations.

The operator and the student pilot did not submit the National Transportation Safety Board Pilot/Operator Aircraft Accident/Incident Report Form 6120.1.

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student 
Age: 40, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/12/2019
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 90 hours (Total, all aircraft), 38 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N6306P
Model/Series: 152 No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1981
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: 15284997
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/03/2019, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1669 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 7926.3 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: O-235 SERIES
Registered Owner: CC Aviation Inc
Rated Power:
Operator: CC Aviation Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Does Business As: Skyview Aviation
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSCK, 27 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 16 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1655 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 40°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  9 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Light and Variable /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.95 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 8°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Tracy, CA (TCY)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination:  Tracy, CA (TCY)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Tracy Muni (TCY)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 193 ft
Runway Surface Condition:Dry 
Runway Used: 30
IFR Approach:None 
Runway Length/Width: 4001 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Straight-in

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:N/A 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 37.688889, -121.441667 (est)

Fuel Exhaustion: North American T-28B, N28CU; accident occurred June 20, 2019 near Hollister Municipal Airport (KCVH), San Benito County, California

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Jose, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N28CU


Location: Hollister, CA
Accident Number: GAA19CA426
Date & Time: 06/20/2019, 1200 PDT
Registration: N28CU
Aircraft: North American T28
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel exhaustion
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

The pilot reported that, after takeoff, about 500 ft above the ground he retracted the landing gear and shortly thereafter, the engine sputtered and lost power. He adjusted the fuel mixture, but it did not have any effect. He attempted to return to the airport but noticed he would not make the runway and decided to land in a dirt field near the airport with the landing gear retracted. He recalled having refueled the airplane about a week prior.

The pilot further reported that as a safety recommendation to "Always top off fuel."

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.

The Federal Aviation Administration inspector who examined the airplane reported that, upon sumping the center tank and both wing tanks, he was only able to obtain about a cup or two of fuel out of the system. He further checked the fuel gauge; there was only one gauge for the fuel with a single switch which has left, right, and center positions. In the left position, it showed empty, in the center position, which showed total fuel, it read 900 lbs. and on the right position, it also showed 900 lbs.

He further added that the mechanic that assisted with the recovery, said there was no fuel leaks and there were no signs of fuel on the ground. He also stated that they did not remove any fuel from the aircraft.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 78, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/09/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/14/2018
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 1653 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1000 hours (Total, this make and model), 1610 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 9 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 7 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0.6 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: North American
Registration: N28CU
Model/Series: T28 B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1956
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 200302
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/10/2018, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 14000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 15673.9 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Wright
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: R-1820-86B
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 1425 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCVH, 237 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1900 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 321°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 1400 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 250°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.94 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / 14°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Hollister, CA (CVH)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Unknown
Destination: Hollister, CA (CVH)
Type of Clearance: Unknown
Departure Time: 1200 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Hollister Muni (CVH)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 230 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 31
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 6350 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 36.893333, -121.410278 (est)