Tuesday, October 20, 2015

Incident occurred October 20, 2015 at St. Petersburg-Clearwater International Airport (KPIE), Florida

St. Petersburg, Florida – A private plane with just the pilot aboard landed safely at St. Petersburg-Clearwater International Airport tonight after reporting a problem with the landing gear.

The plane did a fly-by so emergency crew on the ground to observe whether the landing gear had deployed.  It had.

The plane landed without further incident and taxied off the runway under its own power.

- Source:  http://www.wtsp.com

Boeing opens St. Louis tech site with 700 jobs

Boeing on Tuesday opened a new engineering research center in St. Louis, where more than 700 engineers, technicians and staff will develop advanced technologies for commercial airplanes and military systems.

“We’re building a deeply talented workforce here that will make important contributions to future products,” said site leader Nancy Pendleton in a statement.

New facilities at the Boeing Research and Technology site include labs focused on non-destructive testing of parts, human systems integration, polymer synthesis, and collaborative autonomous systems.

Boeing announced a major restructuring in 2013 to shift engineering work out of the Puget Sound area and southern California and to move it to new technology research centers established in St. Louis, Huntsville, Ala., and Charleston, S.C.

According to internal company documents reviewed by The Seattle Times last year, Boeing projected saving more than $100 million a year by transferring 1,100 research engineering jobs from here and an additional 200 from the greater Los Angeles area.

The documents cited a cost comparison of $212,000 per head annually in pay and benefits in this region, versus $152,000 at the newer engineering centers.

They also showed that only about 110 local engineers were to be offered relocation expenses and incentives to move to one of the new engineering centers.

The restructuring of the Research & Technology unit was just one piece of Boeing’s broader push since the spring of 2013 to shift engineering units away from the Puget Sound region. Altogether more than 6,000 local engineering jobs in the commercial and defense units were earmarked for transfer to other Boeing sites.

In an interview in May, Boeing Commercial Airplanes boss Ray Conner expressed regret over how the shift of the research unit work was handled, with engineers left hanging for many months not knowing if their jobs were going.

Conner said he tried to find other Boeing jobs within the commercial airplanes unit for as many of the displaced engineers as possible.

- Source:  http://www.seattletimes.com

Boeing touts operations, answers employment questions at Horry County public forum

CONWAY -- In a search for more skilled employers, Boeing officials spent Tuesday inspiring area students to join manufacturing programs.

The aerospace giant needs skilled workers for their booming Charleston County manufacturing plant, and Horry Georgetown Technical College hopes they can meet that demand. Boeing officials held a public forum Tuesday to discuss what Boeing S.C. produces and how future employees can meet their demands.

Officials from Coastal Carolina University, city and county government and members of the Horry County Board of Education gathered at the Burroughs and Chapin Auditorium on the Conway campus of HGTC. Members of the public – including high school and college students – were also in attendance to learn about what the aerospace manufacturer needs from future employees.

“We obviously have a very motivated workforce in this state, which is very appealing to a company the size of Boeing,” said Jessica Jackson, who works on community outreach for Boeing.

Eileen Patonay, Waccamaw Regional Education Center coordinator, said it’s important for area students to understand how big manufacturing companies work and what they expect from students. HGTC is developing a “manufacturing pipeline” to get students into machining, welding and technical programs.

Skilled workers are needed for aerospace jobs in the future, Patonay said.

“The opportunities our students saw today were inspiring,” she said. “Students need to know these jobs are out there for them.”

Peg Skalican, campus director of the Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics in Myrtle Beach, said Tuesday’s event exposed her students to the reality of a manufacturing job. Students need to experience the environment of a plant job in order to better understand how everything works, she said.

Students also need advice from future employers to make their current classes seem relevant.

“They need to hear it from the person who will eventually sign their paycheck to make their lessons relevant,” Patonay added.

Boeing officials met with HGTC representatives in August to discuss the college’s planned advanced manufacturing program.

Earlier this year, the HGTC board approved a $5.8 million budget for a training facility in Conway, which is slated to be finished by the fall of 2016. Four programs will be housed in the center: advanced welding technologies, machine tool, robotics and mechatronics. The school already offers the advanced welding and machine tool programs. The others will begin once the new building is finished. A $7.5 million training center is also planned for the school’s Georgetown campus.

Aimee Berberena, who graduated from HGTC and now attends PIA in Myrtle Beach, said she was excited to hear about the needs of Boeing S.C.

“I want to work for the company and I want to be able to contribute to the community,” Berberena said.

Learning about the company’s future expectations and what exactly the Charleston County plant creates – mostly the Boeing 787 plane – only gave her more excitement for a future manufacturing career.

“It’s something to look forward to,” Berberena said.

- Source: http://www.myrtlebeachonline.com

Man charged with pointing laser at police helicopter; jets also targeted • Planes, helicopters endangered by nationwide trend

Two United ExpressJets that had taken of from Bush Intercontinental Airport and were flying over the city in June were struck by a laser beam shot from 10,000 feet below.

Shortly thereafter, a Houston Police Department helicopter searching for the source of the laser beam, a pointer that sells for $10 or less, was itself struck by the device, leading officers on the ground to its source.

On Tuesday, Julio Cesar Valdez Salazar, 26, an unemployed Pasadena man who was arrested this week and charged with pointing the laser at the police helicopter, pleaded not guilty in federal court. He faces up to five years in prison if convicted.

Houston ranks among the top cities in the country for the number of laser beam strikes on aircraft, which nationwide has grown tenfold from 2006 to 2014.

So far this year, there have been 4,759 laser strikes in the United States, with Los Angeles, Phoenix and Houston leading the way, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

FAA spokesman Lynn Lunsford said a laser strike can be momentary but dangerous.

"When a laser light hits an aircraft, it can suddenly light up the cockpit, much like a camera flash going off in a darkened restaurant," he said. "Pilots say it destroys their night vision and often leaves them seeing spots for several minutes or even hours. It's dangerous at altitude, but even more if an aircraft is on final approach for landing."

No crashes have been attributed to laser strikes, but a number of pilots have reported being forced to turn over controls to the other pilot in the cockpit for landing because of low altitude laser strikes, and some sustained eye injuries, Lunsford said.

Pilots who have been hit by lasers are instructed by the FAA to fill out a five-page form. The document asks such questions as the color of the laser, whether it appeared to be tracking the aircraft's movement and if it caused the pilot to alter the flight's path.

The planes hit by a laser in June while over Houston were ExpressJet flights 4516 and 4515 operating on behalf of United Airlines.

"No flight operations were affected by these events," said Jarek Beem, a spokesman for ExpressJet. "However, the industry takes laser incidents seriously, and any observed in the flight deck are reported to local and federal authorities."

A federal law passed in 2012 made it a felony to point a laser beam at an aircraft, but only a handful of people have been prosecuted. Pointing a laser at an aircraft is a misdemeanor under Texas law.

Margarito Tristan III, of the South Texas city of Donna, was released from federal prison last year after an 18-month sentence for pointing a laser at a Customs and Border Protection helicopter.

Valdez's case is unique. The officers in the helicopter investigating reports from the United Airlines pilots about the laser were allegedly then hit themselves and able to call in officers on the ground.

Pasadena Police headed to an apartment, where they found Valdez, according to the FBI.

An agent testified during a hearing Tuesday after Valdez's arraignment that Valdez admitted to officers that he'd aimed the laser at the aircraft and handed over the device.

It was not clear why it took so long to take Valdez into custody.

Prosecutor Steven Schammel asked the judge to keep Valdez behind bars pending his trial, which is set for December.

"Our concern is an individual with a $9 device is endangering not only pilots and passengers, but the population at large," he said.

Public defender Jules Johnson questioned why authorities waited four months to indict Valdez if they thought he was either a threat to the community or at risk to run away.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Stephen Smith said from the bench that while the allegations in the case are serious and there could have been harm, Valdez should be released on bail.

Last year, a woman and her boyfriend were sentenced to prison in California after one of them was convicted by a jury and the other pleaded guilty in an incident in which an especially powerful hand-held laser repeatedly struck the cockpit of a police helicopter.

Officers in the air were investigating a report that an emergency transport helicopter used by a children's hospital had been hit by a laser.

The Department of Justice notes that law enforcement and emergency helicopters are particularly vulnerable to laser strikes, as they often fly at lower altitudes.

- Source:  http://www.houstonchronicle.com

Cessna 208B Supervan 900, N106BZ: Accident occurred March 24, 2015 in Verdigris, Rogers County, Oklahoma




http://registry.faa.govN106BZ

NTSB Identification: CEN15LA180 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, March 24, 2015 in Verdigris, OK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/19/2015
Aircraft: CESSNA 208B, registration: N106BZ
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, during the postmaintenance test flight, the turboprop engine lost power. The airplane was unable to maintain altitude, and the pilot conducted a forced landing, during which the airplane was substantially damaged.

The engine had about 9 total flight hours at the time of the accident. A teardown of the fuel pump revealed that the high-pressure drive gear teeth exhibited wear and that material was missing from them, whereas the driven gear exhibited little to no visible wear. A metallurgical examination of the gears revealed that the damaged drive gear was made of a material similar to 300-series stainless steel instead of the harder specified M50 steel, whereas the driven gear was made of a material similar to the specified M50 steel. Subsequent to these findings, the airplane manufacturer determined that the gear manufacturer allowed three set-up gears made from 300-series stainless steel to become part of the production inventory during the manufacturing process. One of those gears was installed in the fuel pump on the accident airplane, and the location of the two other gears could not be determined. Based on the evidence, it is likely that the nonconforming gear installed in the fuel pump failed because it was manufactured from a softer material than specified, which resulted in a loss of fuel flow to the engine and the subsequent loss of engine power.

The manufacturer subsequently inspected its stock of gears and issued notices to customers that had engines with fuel pumps installed with the same part number gear set as the one installed on the accident airplane. The manufacturer also issued a service information letter and service bulletins regarding the fuel pump gear set for engines used in civilian and military applications. As of the date of this report, the two remaining gears have not been located.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The fuel pump gear manufacturer’s allowance of set-up gears made from a nonconforming material to be put in the production inventory system, the installation of a nonconforming gear in the accident airplane’s production fuel pump, and the gear’s failure, which resulted in a loss of fuel flow to the engine and the subsequent loss of engine power.


According to Oklahoma Highway Patrol, two people were onboard at the time: pilot 39 year old Markus Bastuck, and passenger 36 year old Andrew Anklam. 


On March 24, 2015, about 1507 central daylight time, a Cessna 208B, N106BZ, collided with terrain and trees during an off airport forced landing in Verdigris, Oklahoma. The forced landing was a result of a loss of engine power during an en route climb. The airline transport rated pilot received minor injuries and the passenger/mechanic was not injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The aircraft was owned and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as post maintenance test flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the Tulsa International Airport (TUL), Tulsa, Oklahoma, at 1500.

The pilot stated they were on a post maintenance test flight when the accident occurred. He stated they first noticed the exhaust gas temperature (EGT) was 640 degrees and the engine torque was low, about 65%, but steady. As they continued to climb, the pilot noticed the EGT and engine torque began to decrease.

The pilot determined that he could not make it back to TUL so he decided to land at a nearby private airstrip. However he was unable to maintain sufficient altitude to reach the airstrip, so he chose a field for the forced landing. Shortly after touching down, the airplane impacted trees, completely severing the left wing from the fuselage and partially severing the right wing from the fuselage.

The airplane was equipped with a Honeywell TPE331-12JR engine, serial number P123178. Maintenance records show the new engine was installed on March 10, 2015, in accordance with STC SA10841SC. The engine had been flown about 9 hours since the engine installation.

The initial on-scene inspection of the airplane was conducted under the supervision of a Federal Aviation Administration Inspector. During this inspection, the fuel pressure line from the bottom of the fuel filter housing was removed. No fuel was visible in either the fuel line or the filter bowl. The main fuel line was disconnected from the engine driven low pressure pump. There was no fuel in the pump inlet and very little fuel drained from the line. The fuel line was removed at the firewall fuel filter and a little fuel was drained from the line, but not enough to have filled the line; however, there was a strong odor of fuel near the firewall. About 4 gallons of fuel were drained from the fuel reservoir tank when the airplane was recovered from the field. In addition, about 40 gallons of fuel were drained from the left wing fuel tank and 20 gallons of fuel were drained from the right wing fuel tank.

The aircraft was recovered and examined at the facilities of Air Salvage of Dallas. An examination of the airframe and flight controls did not reveal any failure or malfunction which would have resulted in the pilot's inability to control the airplane. The right wing, vertical stabilizer, rudder, elevator, and horizontal stabilizer had been removed from the airplane during the retrieval process. The flap jackscrew indicated the flaps were extended between 10 and 15 degrees. The Hobbs hour meter that was installed at the time of the engine installation indicated 9.6 hours.

The left and right wing fuel valves were in the ON position. Continuity of the fuel system was verified from the reservoir tank to the fuel line going to the engine. There were no pre-impact anomalies found with the aircraft fuel system which would have prevented fuel from the aircraft fuel tanks from getting to the engine. An external examination of the engine did not reveal any evidence of an uncontained failure or fire damage. The engine did show evidence of dirt and vegetation ingestion. The engine was then shipped to Honeywell for an operational check/teardown.

On May 12, 2015, the engine was examined at Honeywell Aerospace. An overall visual exanimation of the engine did not reveal any preimpact anomalies that would have prevented normal operation. The propeller shaft was rotated which resulted in corresponding rotation of the first-stage compressor impeller, third stage turbine rotor, and gearbox oil scavenge pump gerotor indicating continuity throughout the engine. A boroscope examination of the engine did not reveal any anomalies.

The air flow path of the engine was pressure washed and the engine was staged in a test cell. Without changing any of the original fuel and engine control components, all initial engine start attempts were unsuccessful. The fuel pump and fuel control unit (FCU) were changed out with surrogate engineering components. None of these changes resulted in a successful engine start. It was noted that the compressor discharge pressure was less than 2 psi while dry motoring the engine which is consistent with the amount of earthen debris found in the engine core, at the entrance to the second-stage compressor impeller, at the exit from the second-stage compressor vanes, and at the entrance to the combustor.

The fuel pump, part number 897390-8, series 3, serial number P1604, was disassembled. There was wear and material missing from the gear teeth of the high pressure drive gear. The driven gear exhibited little to no visible wear. A metallurgical examination of the gears revealed the damaged drive gear was made of a material similar to 300 series stainless steel instead of the specified M50 steel which is a harder material. The driven gear was made of a material similar to the specified M50 steel. The gear housing exhibited wear consistent with the interface of material from the worn drive gear against the walls of the housing during operation of the pump.

As a result of the metallurgical findings, Honeywell initiated an internal investigation with their supply vendor, Shimadzu, who manufactured the gear sets for the fuel pump. It was determined that the manufacturer used three set-up gears made from 300 series stainless steel during the manufacturing process. One of those gears was installed in the fuel pump on the accident airplane and the two remaining gears were not accounted for. Honeywell inspected their stock of gears and issued Notices of Escape to their customers who had engines that had fuel pumps installed with the same part number gear sets as the accident airplane. Honeywell also issued a Service Information Letter and Service Bulletins TPE331-72-A2255, TPE331-72-A2256 (military use), and TPE331-72-A2254 (military use) regarding the fuel pump gear set.

As of the date of this report, the two remaining gears have not been located.

The FCU, part number 897801-3 (Honeywell) 8070-471 (Woodward), serial number 19357690, was examined at Woodward on June 9, 2015. The stub shaft (drive spline) could not be turned by hand. The shaft was loosened with a wrench and was subsequently able to be turned. No external damage was noted on the shaft. A new inlet screen was placed in the FCU as the original one was removed at Honeywell and was found to contain metal contamination. The FCU was placed on a test bench with a clean membrane filter installed. The FCU was tested and most of the test points were out of limits on the Accel and Power Lever schedules. The filter was removed from the discharge flow line and it contained a significant amount of metallic debris. The debris was not magnetic. The FCU was then disassembled. Both the overspeed and underspeed governor assemblies were rough when rotated and small metal particles were found on the ballheads, valve plungers, and valve sleeves. The bypass valve was disassembled and metal debris was found on the bypass plunger. Scoring was observed on the overspeed governor pilot valve. Metal shavings found throughout the FCU in particular on the fly weight bearings and on the bypass valve are consistent with metal from the fuel pump drive gear.

http://www.ntsb.gov



2016 air show dates announced • Richard B. Russell Regional Airport (KRMG), Rome, Georgia

The Wings Over North Georgia Air Show is set to return to the Richard B. Russell Regional Airport in 2016.

John Cowman with JLC Airshow Management shared the news during Tuesday’s Airport Commission meeting.

“We’ve got our show dates for next year.  They are October 29 and 30,” he said. “One December 7, at some point that afternoon, we will send out a press release announcing what our plans are for next year. I’m excited about it already.”

The 2015 show was marred by heavy rains, which grounded the planes on that Saturday.

“Everybody leaned forward on Sunday and we got the full show in, and that was a challenge,” Cowman added. “The one shining penny for the weekend was the barbecue classic. We got nothing but super rave reviews about it.”

Cowman said it was a difficult decision cancelling one day of the show but, in the end, safety won out.

Airport Manager Mike Matthews said he is still working on the final financial numbers regarding fuel sales from this year’s air show.

- Source:  http://wrgarome.com

City Council discusses development and use of aviation in Hastings, Nebraska

Members of the Hastings City Council agreed Monday that there was merit to reviving the city’s airport advisory board and to actively look at increasing traffic at the Hastings Municipal Airport.

Council members met at the airport terminal for their October work session Monday and heard a presentation from Hastings Airport Association members Aaron Schardt and Matt Kuhr about the current state of the airport and solutions to increase general aviation use there.

Local pilots and aviation enthusiasts formed the Hastings Airport Association earlier this year to advocate for the future of the airport. Several Hastings Airport Association members attended Monday’s meeting.

“If airports don’t have an advocate, they fall by the wayside,” Schardt said.

In crafting a report for Monday’s meeting, the Hastings Airport Association members included several statistics showing usage of how the Hastings airport lags behind comparable airports across Nebraska.

With nearly 11,000 feet of available runways and available fuel, the Hastings airport is a top-10 facility in the state, Hastings Airport Association representatives said.

Since the city of Hastings took over the airport from the Hastings Airport Authority when the Airport Authority disbanded in 2002, the airport has received more than $2 million in federal funding.  

They included a list of 26 businesses and organizations that use the airport.

During the meeting, Justin Osborne read a letter from Dave Rippe, executive director of the Hastings Economic Development Corporation, which stated the value of the airport, including how it serves as a front door to Hastings for many visitors to the community.

Rippe wrote that the airport was the entry to Hastings for executives from large corporations evaluating whether to potentially open a new location in the community or keep an existing location open.

There are 81 airports in Nebraska that allow general aviation — non-commercial aviation, which makes up the majority of all flights.

Of the 25 largest communities in Nebraska, 15 airports are owned by Airport Authorities and 10, such as Hastings, are owned directly by their respective communities.

Of the 10 that are owned by the community, Hastings is the only airport without a fixed base operator — a business contracted to provide airport services.

Last year, Hastings sold 46,800 gallons of fuel. By comparison, the Norfolk airport sold 213,000 gallons of fuel and Fremont sold 103,000 gallons.

Schardt said out-of-state pilots look for airports with the best services when selecting where to stop to refuel during cross-country flights.

“You’ve got to look at the reverse side of things as much as the expenses,” Schardt said. “That’s important.”

The airport operated on a $24,532 deficit in 2014.

“We spent a lot more than $24,000 on a lot less,” Schardt said.

He reminded the council that with the right services in place, the airport has the opportunity to generate enough revenue to offset expenses.

Council members Michael Krings and Chuck Niemeyer both expressed interest in re-establishing an airport advisory board, which would include at least one pilot, one non-pilot and one council member. The council members also thanked city staff for the diligent effort put forth to run the airport since 2002.

Hastings Airport Association members also offered the recommendation of re-establishing the Airport Authority, which would take over control of the airport from the city, be a political subdivision and operate on a levy-funded budget.

“You’ve got to walk before you can run and that’s running,” city administrator Joe Patterson said.

- Source:  http://www.hastingstribune.com

Jamaica: Improvement in aviation industry will lead to economic development, say experts

Minister without portfolio in the Ministry of Transport, Works and Housing Dr Morais Guy (right) in conversation with (from left) Dr Olumuyiwa Benard Aliu, president of the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO); Director general of the Jamaica Civil Aviation Authority Nari Williams-Singh; and ICAO Secretary General Dr Fang Liu. 



Continued strides being made by the Government in modernizing the aviation sector will serve to boost tourism and promote economic development.

This is the view of top experts in the industry who met last week at Iberostar Hotel in Lilliput, St James, for the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) council meeting.

During the two-day meeting, which ran from October 12 to 13, Jamaica was repeatedly praised for its commitment to the development of the air transport sector, and was described as a leading player in the region.

President of the ICAO, Dr Olumuyiwa Benard Aliu, in his address, said a lot can be learnt from Jamaica's approach to aviation, noting that the country is showing the kind of vision that will inevitably lead to huge economic rewards.

"Jamaica...has been leading by example," Dr Aliu said.

He noted that by enhancing the safety and efficiency of its air transport system, Jamaica is well positioned to exploit its proximity to countries such as the United States (US), Canada and Mexico for tourism and trade.

Deputy Administrator at the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Michael Whitaker agreed.

He noted that nearly 75 percent of all flights go through countries in the Western Hemisphere, Jamaica included, and the country is in a position to take advantage of this high volume of air traffic.

Chief executive officer of MBJ, the operator of the Sangster International Airport, Dr Rafael Echevarne, said the kind of traffic that has been passing through the airport is proof that the country's investment in aviation is reaping dividends.

"Worldwide, less than 20 per cent of the world's airports are certified, and we are in a very incredible situation, whereby Montego Bay airport is fully certified. This is something that is truly amazing and which we should be proud of," he said.

The Montego Bay-located airport has been named the best airport in the Caribbean four years in a row by the World Travel Awards and is among the 20 per cent of airports worldwide that are ICAO-certified.

Tourism and Entertainment Minister Dr Wykeham McNeill, in his presentation at the Jamaica Product Exchange (JAPEX) trade show in Montego Bay last month, said Sangster International "was literally bursting at the seams" during the last winter tourist season.

He said he expects even more stopover arrivals for the 2015/16 winter season, which starts in December.

- Source:  http://www.jamaicaobserver.com

Paulding airport commercialization takes another step forward

Paulding County officials’ efforts to make their airfield into the second commercial airport in Atlanta have taken a step forward, with the completion of a draft environmental assessment for the project and plans for a public hearing.

The draft environmental assessment marks a milestone in a process that has taken nearly two years so far.


Paulding officials announced in 2013 their plans to commercialize their airport, but that was followed by vociferous opposition from Delta Air Lines, the city of Atlanta and some residents in Paulding, who filed lawsuits challenging the commercialization.


One of those legal challenges led to a settlement in December 2013 that called for an environmental assessment before Paulding Northwest Atlanta Airport could be commercialized — imposing a significant delay in the county’s plans.


The lengthy documents released Tuesday examine potential impacts of commercializing the airport on noise, traffic and the environment, including wetlands and streams — as well as potential economic benefits.


The environmental assessment examines proposed service by Allegiant Air to offer service from small airports like Paulding County where there is little or no scheduled air service. The commercialization of Paulding’s airport would serve “the existing and future needs of the flying public in Northwest Georgia,” according to the document.


An attorney representing residents who oppose the airport commercialization had asked the Federal Aviation Administration to fully review a complaint filed by the city of Atlanta in August against the Paulding County Airport Authority and address questions about the county’s authority to file the application to commercialize the airport, before moving forward with the draft environmental assessment.


However, the request was ignored and the draft released.


While Paulding airport officials, Paulding county chairman David Austin and other county officials have pushed for the airport commercialization, three of the five county commissioners are opposed to it.


Peter Steenland, an attorney representing residents in opposition to the airport commercialization, said the FAA “should not be wasting taxpayer dollars” on the controversial project, saying the environmental review should be halted until larger issues are resolved.


The process is not yet complete, however.


The public can comment on the draft environmental assessment through Dec. 11, online at the Paulding airport or county websites or in person at the Paulding airport or library.


A public hearing on the airport draft environmental assessment is scheduled for Dec. 1 at 6 p.m. at the Paulding airport.


-Source: http://airport.blog.ajc.com

Piper PA-46-310P Malibu, N4BP, DLM Holding Group LLC: Accident occurred July 22, 2015 at Wittman Regional Airport (KOSH), Oshkosh, Wisconsin

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA311
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, July 22, 2015 in Oshkosh, WI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/09/2016
Aircraft: PIPER PA-46-310P, registration: N4BP
Injuries: 3 Serious, 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot was landing at a large fly-in/airshow and following the airshow arrival procedures that were in use. While descending on the downwind leg for runway 27, the pilot was cleared by a controller to turn right onto the base leg abeam the runway numbers and to land on the green dot (located about 2,500 ft from the runway's displaced threshold). About the time the pilot turned onto the base leg, he observed an airplane taxi onto the runway and start its takeoff roll. The controller instructed the pilot to continue the approach and land on the orange dot (located about 1,000 ft from the runway's displaced threshold) instead of the green dot. The pilot reported that he considered performing a go-around but decided to continue the approach. As the pilot reduced power, the airplane entered a stall and impacted the runway in a right-wing-low, nose-down attitude. Witnesses estimated that the bank angle before impact was greater than 60 degrees. A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

Analysis of a video recording of the accident showed that the airplane was about 180 ft above ground level (agl) when the turn onto the base leg began, and it descended to about 140 ft agl during the turn. The airplane's total inertial speed (the calculated vector sums of the airplane's ground speeds and vertical speeds) decreased from 98 knots (kts) to 80 kts during the turn. During the last 8 seconds of flight, the speed decreased below 70 kts, and the airplane descended from about 130 ft agl to ground impact. The wings-level stall speed of the airplane at maximum gross weight with landing gear and flaps down was 59 kts. In the same configuration at 60 degrees of bank, the stall speed was 86 kts and would have been higher at a bank angle greater than 60 degrees. 

Reduced runway separation standards for airplanes were in effect due to the airshow. When the accident airplane reached the runway threshold, the minimum distance required by the standards between the arriving accident airplane and the departing airplane was 1,500 ft. The video analysis indicated that it was likely that a minimum of 1,500 ft of separation was maintained during the accident sequence.

Although the pilot was familiar with the procedures for flying into the airshow, the departing airplane and the modified landing clearance during a period of typically high workload likely interfered with the pilot's ability to adequately monitor his airspeed and altitude. As a result, the airplane entered an accelerated stall when the pilot turned the airplane at a steep bank angle and a low airspeed in an attempt to make the landing spot, which resulted in the airplane exceeding its critical angle of attack. At such a low altitude, recovery from the stall was not possible. Although the airshow arrival procedures stated that pilots have the option to go around if necessary, and the pilot considered going around, he instead continued the unstable landing approach and lost control of the airplane.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to perform a go-around after receiving a modified landing clearance and his failure to maintain adequate airspeed while maneuvering to land, which resulted in the airplane exceeding its critical angle of attack in a steep bank and entering an accelerated stall at a low altitude. 


HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 22, 2015, about 0744 central daylight time, a Piper Malibu PA-46-310P single-engine airplane, N4BP, sustained substantial damage when it impacted runway 27 (6,179 ft by 150 ft, concrete) while landing at the Wittman Regional Airport (OSH), Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The pilot and two passengers sustained serious injuries and two passengers sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to DLM Holding Group LLC and operated by the pilot under the provisions of the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed the Southwest Michigan Regional Airport (BEH), Benton Harbor, Michigan, about 0730 eastern daylight time. 

The pilot reported that he departed BEH and overflew Kenosha, Burlington, Hartford, Ripon, and Fisk, Wisconsin. He then proceeded to fly the Fisk arrival procedures for runway 27 which were in use per the notice to airmen (NOTAM) for the EAA AirVenture 2015 air show at OSH. The pilot reported that he entered the right downwind leg for runway 27 at 1,800 ft and started to descend while maintaining 90 kts airspeed. He reported that he was instructed by air traffic control (ATC) to turn onto the base leg abeam the runway numbers and to land on the green dot (located about 2,500 ft from the runway 27 displaced threshold). After he started the base turn, he observed a twin-engine airplane taxi onto runway 27 and start its takeoff roll. (A passenger in the Malibu identified the airplane on the runway as a Cessna "high-wing 4-seater") The pilot was concerned about the airplane on the runway and was worried about a collision. The pilot reported that ATC instructed him to continue the approach and land on the orange dot (located about 1,000 ft from the runway 27 displaced threshold) instead of the green dot. The pilot considered doing a go-around, but decided to continue the approach. He reported that about 250 to 300 ft above ground level, he pulled back on the power which resulted in the airplane entering a stall. He attempted to recover by adding full power, but the airplane impacted the runway in a right wing low, nose down attitude. The right wing hit the runway which resulted in an explosion with fire and black smoke rising above the accident site. The right wing separated from the airplane and landed in the grass on the south side of the runway. The airplane skidded on its belly and came to rest on the left side of the runway about 278 ft from the initial impact point. The left wing was partially separated from the fuselage and there was a fire under the left wing.

The two passengers who were sitting in the middle, rear-facing seats, and the passenger sitting in the rear seat exited the airplane with assistance from the pilot and people who arrived at the site soon after the accident. The Crash Fire Rescue (CFR) personnel arrived at the scene and used foam to put out the fire. The passenger sitting in the copilot's seat was extracted from the wreckage by the CFR. All five survivors were taken to local hospitals for treatment. 

Numerous witnesses reported that they saw the airplane on the base leg as it entered a steep right bank and impact the terrain in a steep nose down, right wing low attitude. One witness reported that he was located on the terminal ramp to the north of the approach end of runway 27. He heard an aircraft approaching from over the terminal building and observed that the airplane was very low – less than 200 ft above ground level (agl). The witness said that there was no indication that the airplane was in distress, such as a sputtering engine. He further reported that the airplane entered a steep right turn, with an estimated angle of bank of over 60 degrees and then impacted on its side with the right wing contacting the ground first. 

AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL COMMUNICATIONS

Special procedures and staffing for ATC were in effect during the Experimental Aircraft Association's AirVenture event. The North Local Control (NLC) team was located in the control tower. The team consisted of five controllers: two spotters, one communicator, a team leader, and a front-line manager (FLM) overseeing the operation. At the time of the accident, the NLC team was responsible for issuing landing clearances on runway 27. The Itinerant Mobile (IM) team, who had overall responsibility for ATC departure operations on runway 27, was working from a Mobile Operations Communications Workstation (MOOCOW) located at the intersection of runway 27 and taxiway A. The IM team was responsible for clearing aircraft for takeoff on runway 27 and consisted of four controllers: an aircraft communicator (AC), one spotter/coordinator, and two "crossers" who work directly with aircraft holding for departure on the taxiway. Communication between the IM and NLC teams was conducted via portable FM (frequency modulation) radios used by the MOOCOW AC and the NLC FLM, although coordination was kept to a minimum. The IM team was responsible for ensuring separation between arrivals and departures by monitoring the inbound pattern traffic and releasing departures when there was sufficient time to do so before the next aircraft landed.

Instructions for the Fisk arrival contained in the AirVenture NOTAM direct pilots to minimize radio transmissions and not respond to ATC communications. Review of recorded transmissions from the NLC team and the IM team showed that at 0742:24, the NLC communicator instructed a Malibu on downwind for runway 27 to begin descent. At 0742:44, the Malibu pilot was told to, "…turn abeam the numbers, runway 27 green dot cleared to land."

Before and during the period the Malibu was operating in the traffic pattern, the IM team was clearing departures for takeoff from runway 27. Between 0730 and 0743 there were about 22 departures. The last departure before the accident was "Cessna 44Q", cleared for takeoff at 0743:03. The IM communicator then continued, "44Q roll it around the corner – scoot!"

At 0743:11, the NLC communicator transmitted, "Malibu I've got somebody on the runway – keep it coming around keep it coming around cleared to land runway 27 orange dot, land as soon as you can."

At 0743:23, the IM communicator transmitted, "Don't turn your back – don't turn your back!"

There were no further transmissions on the IM frequency.

The tower controllers notified airport firefighters to respond, extinguish the post-crash fire, and assist the aircraft's occupants.

The IM communicator reported that the Malibu looked "normal" on downwind over the gravel pit, but the next time he saw it, the aircraft looked unusually low for a runway 27 arrival. The Malibu was west of the terminal building and had not yet started to turn right base. The next departure was holding short between 125 and 250 feet from the runway. Traffic was very light, and there were no other aircraft waiting to depart. The communicator cleared the Cessna for takeoff. The communicator then observed that the Malibu was lower and "tighter" on base than he expected, so he went on frequency and told the Cessna pilot to hurry up. The Cessna pilot never stopped, and made a rolling takeoff as requested. The Malibu was over the terminal building and then turning toward the runway. The communicator reported that by then, the departing Cessna was rolling and approaching or beyond the green dot on the runway. 

The communicator reported that the Malibu was on downwind west of the terminal building, and had not turned base yet when the Cessna was cleared for takeoff. He stated that controllers try to use minimum spacing during AirVenture, and to expedite traffic to avoid go-arounds. Because arriving aircraft were on the NLC frequency, the IM communicator could not directly instruct a pilot to go around. Should a go-around appear necessary, the IM team would contact the tower FLM via FM radio and the FLM would either override the tower frequency and send the aircraft around or ask the tower communicator to do so. The communicator stated that he had no reluctance to call for a go-around if he perceived an unsafe situation.

The communicator reported that while the Malibu was turning from downwind to base, it looked like it was making a continuous turn to final. Partway down the curving "base" leg, it briefly rolled wings level and was heading straight southbound. The Malibu was "very low" at that point. The communicator reported that the airplane overshot the final approach course and rolled into a very steep bank to try to line up with the runway. The wings looked almost perpendicular to the ground. He made the "don't turn your back" radio transmission, which was directed at one of the spotters, because the Malibu was in an unusual maneuver and the spotter needed to watch out for it. 

Runway Separation

Under normal circumstances, controllers would be required to maintain at least 3,000 ft of separation between a departing Cessna and an arriving Malibu using the same runway. According to the reduced runway separation standards authorized during AirVenture, the minimum required distance between the arriving Malibu and the departing Cessna was 1,500 ft when the Malibu reached the runway threshold. 

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The 46-year-old pilot held a private pilot certificate with a single-engine land rating and an airplane instrument rating. He reported that he had 934 total hours of flight time with 130 hours in make and model. He held a third class medical certificate that was issued on December 3, 2014, with no limitations.

The pilot reported that he had flown to OSH during the EAA AirVenture Airshow numerous times and was familiar with the procedures for flying to OSH during the week of the airshow. He reported that on the morning of the accident, the airplane traffic was light and there was no other airplane on downwind when he was landing. He reported that he was surprised that the controllers cleared the "twin-engine" to taxi onto the runway and depart when he had already turned onto the base leg of the approach. He reported that he initially thought about doing a go-around, but decided to land when he was instructed to land on the orange dot. 

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was a single-engine Piper Malibu PA-46-310P, serial number 46-8408065, manufactured in 1984. It had a maximum gross weight of 4,100 lbs and it seated six. It was equipped with a Continental 300-horsepower TSIO 550-C (1) engine, serial number 802599. The last annual maintenance inspection was conducted on November 12, 2014, with a total airframe time of 5,792 hours. The engine had 1,439 hours since the last overhaul. 

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 0740, the surface weather observation at OSH was: wind 250 degrees at 3 kts; visibility 10 miles; sky clear; temperature 19 degrees C; dew point 14 degrees C; altimeter 29.97 inches of mercury. 

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane's initial impact point was just right of centerline in the threshold area of runway, 55 ft from the start of runway 27. The scraping on the runway and the burn path that was on a 238-degree heading led to the right wing which was190 ft from the initial contact point. Five parallel slash marks were found in the runway's concrete surface, which were consistent with propeller strikes. Three composite propeller blades were found in the debris field. All three blades were separated at the blade root and all exhibited extensive impact damage. 

The right wing was separated from the fuselage at the wing root. The wing was intact but it exhibited fire and impact damage, and the outboard span of the wing was bent upward and twisted. The right landing gear was found in the down position. The flap bellcrank was broken at the outboard rod end. The flap actuator was inspected and it indicated that the flaps were in the down position. The aileron remained attached to the wing. Both aileron cables were separated at the wing root.

The fuselage was located 278 ft from the initial impact point on a 242-degree heading. The left wing was still attached to the fuselage, but it was partially separated at the wing root. The flap and aileron remained attached to the left wing. The flap bellcrank was broken at the outboard rod end. Both aileron cables were separated at the wing root. The empennage remained attached to the fuselage and exhibited little impact damage. The elevator, rudder, and trim cables were connected to their control surfaces to the flight controls and control surface movement was confirmed. The hour meter indicated 1,452 hours. The JPI EDM-930 engine monitor was sent to the National Transportation Safety Board's (NTSB) Vehicle Recorder Laboratory for examination. 

The engine examination revealed that all the cylinders remained in place and attached to the crankcase. Cylinders Nos. 3 and 5 were impact damaged. The engine was manually rotated and there was thumb compression on all six cylinders, although the compression on Nos. 3 and 5 was weak due to the impact damage. Drive train continuity was confirmed when the engine was rotated and the accessory gears on the rear of the engine turned respectively. The top spark plugs were inspected and exhibited normal wear and color. The left and right magnetos produced spark and the impulse couplings were heard to operate when rotated. The fuel system remained intact. The fuel throttle body and metering unit were intact and undamaged. The fuel manifold diaphragm was intact and the fuel screen was uncontaminated. Aviation fuel was found in the fuel lines leading from the fuel manifold to the individual fuel injectors. The propeller hub remained attached to the crankshaft propeller flange. 

TESTS AND RESEARCH

JPI EDM-930 Engine Monitor

The NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory examined the JPI EDM-930 engine monitor's non-volatile memory (NVM) and it was determined that the accident flight was recorded. The recorded time was correlated to central daylight time. 

The recording began around 06:20. Values for exhaust gas temperature and cylinder head temperature began to rise. Around 06:30, manifold pressure and engine RPM rapidly increased consistent with the aircraft beginning a takeoff roll. Most recorded parameters remained stable from approximately 06:35 until approximately 07:25. 

At 07:25, manifold pressure was reduced. Fuel flow, oil pressure, oil temperature, EGT and CHT all began slightly negative trends. Near the end of the recording, around 07:43, manifold pressure sharply decreased in value along with engine RPM. In the last recorded values, engine RPM, manifold pressure, fuel flow and values for CHT and EGT began to sharply rise. The recording ended abruptly at 07:44.The engine parameters were generally increasing in value just prior to the recording abruptly ending at 07:44. The NTSB Engine Data Monitor (EDM) report has been entered in the docket. 

NTSB Video Study

The NTSB Office of Research and Engineering produced a video study based on a video recording of the accident flight. The Malibu was captured in a video for approximately eighteen seconds before it impacted the ground on runway 27. The video was recorded by a Kodak SP360 camera mounted inside the cockpit of a parked airplane that was not involved in the accident. The camera had a 360-degree panoramic field of view. The location of the parked airplane was on the north ramp near the airport terminal. 

The video study estimated that the altitude of the Malibu as it initiated its turn to base leg was about 180 ft agl, and it descended to about 150 to 130 feet agl on the base leg. During the last 8 seconds of flight, the Malibu descended from about 130 ft agl to ground impact. The total inertial speed (the vector sums of the ground speeds and vertical speeds) was calculated and it showed that the Malibu was traveling at 98 kts decreasing to 80 kts during the turn to the base leg. The speed continued to decrease and during the last 8 seconds of flight, the speed was below 70 kts. 

The video study also analyzed the location of the second airplane (Cessna) that taxied onto runway 27 and departed as the Malibu turned onto the base leg. The video was analyzed to determine how much distance was between the two airplanes during the accident sequence. At time 5:06 in the video, an object is seen moving east to west and is assumed to be the departing Cessna on runway 27. It is only seen for a fraction of a second because the camera view was obstructed. Because the Cessna was on the ground and far from the camera, its image in the video is only a barely visible moving dot. The straight line distance between the Cessna, when it was seen on the video, and the Malibu, which was on its base leg, was about 1,570 ft. The analysis indicated that to keep a 1,500 ft distance between the two airplanes, if the Malibu had completed its turn to final which would take 9.4 seconds, the Cessna would have to move to the west at an average speed of 45.7 kts. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Angle of Bank vs Airspeed

The Piper Malibu PA-46-310P Pilot's Operating Handbook (POH) figure 5-3 lists stall speeds corrected for aircraft bank angle. The stall speed for a Piper PA-46-310P at 4,100 lbs with gear and flaps down at 0 degrees angle of bank is 59 kts. With the same configuration, it shows the stall speed is 86 kts at 60 degrees of bank, and would have been higher at an angle of bank greater than 60 degrees. 

The "Airplane Flying Handbook FAA-H-8083-3A" provided the following information about accelerated stalls: 

"Though the stalls just discussed normally occur at a specific airspeed, the pilot must thoroughly understand that all stalls result solely from attempts to fly at excessively high angles of attack. During flight, the angle of attack of an airplane wing is determined by a number of factors, the most important of which are airspeed, the gross weight of the airplane, and the load factors imposed by maneuvering." 

"At the same gross weight, airplane configuration, and power setting, a given airplane will consistently stall at the same indicated airspeed if no acceleration is involved. The airplane will, however, stall at a higher indicated airspeed when excessive maneuvering loads are imposed by steep turns, pull-ups, or other abrupt changes in the flight path. Stalls entered from such flight situations are called 'accelerated maneuver stalls,' a term, which has no reference to the airspeeds involved." 

EAA AirVenture 2015 NOTAM

The EAA AirVenture 2015 NOTAM stated the following concerning landing approach at Oshkosh:

"A waiver has been issued reducing arrival and departure separation standards for category 1 and 2 aircraft (primarily single-engine and light twin-engine aircraft). 

Pilots should be prepared for a combination of maneuvers that may include a short approach with descending turns, followed by a touchdown at a point specified by ATC which may be almost halfway down the runway. Use extra caution to maintain a safe airspeed throughout the approach to landing." 

The NOTAM stated: "If a go-around is needed, notify ATC immediately for resequencing instructions." It also stated, "Maintain a safe airspeed and avoid low turns on landing approach." 

Ben West flies with his son Christaan. West was one of the first to respond to a plane crash.



Sun Prairie resident Ben West is no stranger to stressful situations. 

He’s a fulltime member of the National Guard and a commercial pilot with over 20 years of experience in the military and fifteen as a pilot. So when a plane crashed at an Experimental Aircraft Association’s AirVenture show in Oshkosh July 22, West didn’t think twice about jumping to action.

West was at Wittman Regional Airport coordinating pyrotechnics for the “Tora Tora Tora” airshow, which commemorates the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor. His cousin, Don Dragoo, and he were getting supplies ready -- West was “waist-deep in the dynamite bunker.” Then, they heard a crash and saw smoke coming from close by.

As others ran to the scene, West jumped into his truck and Dragoo got in the passenger seat. They were the first to arrive. A small plane had hit the runway and skidded into the grass.

The right wing had torn off and the left wing on fire.

One passenger slumped out of the plane’s open door.

Dragoo pulled the man, the pilot’s father, out of the plane.

The pilot was able to leave on his own, and with a push from West so did the other passengers, except for the unconscious passenger sitting in the copilot's seat out. It was a precarious situation.

“The left wing is draining fuel and it’s burning, but it’s still attached,” West said. “So I thought to myself, ‘I can’t let him get burned.”

West climbed into the passenger’s seat, wary of the flames. When he tried to drag the passenger sitting in the copilot's seat out of the plane, West found he was pinned in place by his feet. He told the man to push.

Dragoo watched from the side.

“He was pinned inside the seat and not very responsive,” Dragoo said. “My cousin was trying to get him to respond, trying to pull him free of the seat.”

And while this happened, the plane was filling up with smoke. West said he knew the odds of the fire spreading to the whole plane were fairly high, and he thought about his wife and three sons, worried that he would never see them again.

Though he was nervous, West said he felt “surprisingly at peace.”

Eventually, realizing he would not be able to pull the passenger sitting in the copilot's seat out, West reluctantly left the plane. He grabbed a fire extinguisher right as the emergency responders showed up.

Dragoo said the firefighters sprayed foam, which initially didn’t diminish the flames. Soon, though, they were able to extinguish the wing.

“It seemed like forever, but I’m sure it was only a couple minutes,” Dragoo said.

Paramedics cut open the side of the plane to access the passenger and transported the accident victims to the hospital via ambulance, with one transported by air.

West said he owes part of his fast response to his military training.

“You’re not a static observer,” he said. “You’re actively involved in protecting people.”

He also said his reaction also came from his own values.

“On a personal side as a Christian, I feel a duty to protect people too,” he said. “My natural instinct is to get involved and to help.”

He also gives credit to others on the scene, including Dragoo and his military friend Mike Bracki, who rushed to the accident and immediately started treating the passengers for shock. West said he is “fortunate to be around doers.”

Dick Knapinski, spokesperson for the EAA in Oshkosh, said passengers were all released from the hospital within days.

The victims were pilot Kenneth S. Kaminski, 46, from Benton Harbor, Mich.; his father Gerald T. Kaminski, 71, of Palos Hills, Ill.; Margaret C. Laing, 30, of Michigan; Nathan Gargano, 26, of Michigan; and Neil Dill, 56, from Indianhead Park, Ill., according to Knapinski.

Dill was in critical condition when he was admitted.

Knapinski said air show crashes do not happen often. “It’s a pretty rare occurrence,” he said.

According to Knapinski, the National Transportation Safety Board is still investigating the cause of the crash.

- Source: http://www.hngnews.com


Ben West with his wife Cortney and sons Christiaan, 5, Caleb, 9 and Aiden, 4. West said he thought about his family as he entered a burning plane.



DLM HOLDING GROUP LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N4BP

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA311
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, July 22, 2015 in Oshkosh, WI
Aircraft: PIPER PA-46-310P, registration: N4BP
Injuries: 3 Serious, 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 22, 2015, about 0744 central daylight time, a Piper PA-46-310P single-engine airplane, N4BP, sustained substantial damage when it impacted runway 27 (6,179 ft by 150 ft, concrete) while landing at the Wittman Regional Airport (OSH), Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The pilot and two passengers sustained serious injuries and two passengers sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to DLM Holding Group LLC and operated by the pilot under the provisions of the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed the Southwest Michigan Regional Airport (BEH), Benton Harbor, Michigan, about 0730 eastern daylight time. 

The pilot reported that he departed BEH and overflew Kenosha, Burlington, Hartford, Ripon, and Fisk, Wisconsin. He then proceeded to fly the Fisk arrival procedures for runway 27 which were in use per the notice to airmen (NOTAM) for the EAA AirVenture 2015 air show at OSH. The pilot reported that he entered the right downwind leg for runway 27 at 1,800 ft and started to descend while maintaining 90 kts airspeed. He reported that he was instructed by air traffic control (ATC) to turn onto the base leg abeam the runway numbers and to land on the green dot (located about 2,500 ft from the runway 27 displaced threshold). After he started the base turn, he observed a twin-engine airplane taxi onto runway 27 and start its takeoff roll. The pilot reported that ATC instructed him to continue the approach and land on the orange dot (located about 1,000 ft from the runway 27 displaced threshold) instead of the green dot. The pilot continued the approach and about 250 to 300 ft above ground level, he pulled back on the power which resulted in the airplane entering a stall. The pilot attempted to recover by adding full power, but the airplane impacted the runway in a right wing, nose down attitude. 

Witnesses reported seeing the airplane during the downwind to base turn and enter a steep angle of bank with the right wing down. The right wing hit the runway which resulted in an explosion and fire with black smoke rising above the accident site. The right wing separated from the airplane and landed in the grass on the south side of the runway. The airplane skidded on its belly and came to rest on the left side of the runway about 250 ft from the initial impact point. The left wing was partially separated from the fuselage. A postimpact fire ensued on the separated right wing and under the partially separated left wing.

The pilot, the two passengers who were sitting in the middle seats, and the passenger sitting in the rear seat exited the airplane with some assistance from people who were near the accident site. The Crash Fire Rescue (CFR) personnel arrived at the scene and used foam to put out the fire. The passenger sitting in the copilot's seat was extracted from the wreckage by the CFR. All five survivors were taken to local hospitals for treatment. 

At 0740, the surface weather observation at OSH was: wind 250 degrees at 3 kts; visibility 10 miles; sky clear; temperature 19 degrees C; dew point 14 degrees C; altimeter 29.97 inches of mercury.

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Milwaukee FSDO-13



Photos of a Piper PA-46-310P Malibu that crashed at the Experimental Aircraft Association's AirVenture show the extent of damage to the aircraft.