Wednesday, June 6, 2012

Hot Trailer: Robert Zemeckis-Directed ‘Flight’

 

"The way you landed that plane is nothing short of a miracle." 

It's been over a decade since we've seen a live-action film from Robert Zemeckis (after Beowulf, The Polar Express and A Christmas Carol became the director's focus), and ironically enough, that film was Cast Away, which followed Tom Hanks trying to survive on a desert island after a plane crash. Now the director is back to live-action filmmaking with a film that has a plane crash being prevented as the catalyst for a powerful drama starring Denzel Washington. The first trailer is here and it is quite something, quite a lot to take in, yet looks fascinating and quite good.

Skymark Airlines to put instructors on jets

Skymark Airlines Inc. has promised to place instructors on some flights from mid-June to supervise pilot performance following a series of safety lapses. 

The airline made the pledge in a remedial plan presented Tuesday to the Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism Ministry, which had issued an admonition over six incidents between February and May and ordered the airline to take corrective measures.

In April, a Skymark airplane landed on an unauthorized runway at Ibaraki Airport, while a flight in February landed at Miyako Airport in Okinawa Prefecture after making an approach below the designated minimum altitude.

Meanwhile, the consumer affairs center in Tokyo lodged a protest Tuesday with the airline over its notice that passengers should file complaints with its customer center or public consumer affairs centers as it would no longer accept them aboard flights.

Source:  http://www.japantimes.co.jp

Cirrus SR20: Jakub Tabędzki and Adrian Napieralski first solo flights at Poznań-Ławica Henryk Wieniawski Airport, Poland

 
 It was long awaited moment at Aero Poznan. For the first time PPL(A) pilot students have soloed at Poznan Lawica airport flying Cirrus SR20. Their name’s are Jakub Tabędzki and Adrian Napieralski. Congratulations to Jakub (and his instructor Piotr Buchowski) and Adrian (and his instructor Włodzimierz Chrenowicz) !

   

Hang Glider In Shock Trauma - Ridgely Airpark (KRJD), Caroline County, Maryland

PHOTO BY Abby Andrews

 
PHOTO BY Abby Andrews


A hang glider is in Shock Trauma in serious condition after making a hard landing in a field in Caroline County. 

 It happened Wednesday during a special event at the Ridgely Airport, according to a spokesman at the state police barrack in Easton.

The pilot went down in a tall wheat field after his equipment didn't flare properly.

He was part of the East Coast Hang Glider Championship, a national hang gliding competition, according to a co-owner of Highland Aerosports in Ridgely. The company puts on the annual event.

Adam Elchin tells WBAL Radio News that the pilot suffered a brain injury.

There were more than 20 gliders taking part in the competition. Other gliders landed in the area, according to Elchin. The injured pilot was the only one to have a bad landing.

He adds that in eight years of the company hosting the championship, this is the first time a pilot has needed medical attention.

Sources:

http://www.wbal.com
 

Beech 35-A33 Debonair, KCN Aero Club Inc., N334Z: Accident occurred June 06, 2012 in Gardner, Kansas

http://registry.faa.gov/N334Z

NTSB Identification: CEN12LA373  
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 06, 2012 in Gardner, KS
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/06/2013
Aircraft: BEECH 35-A33, registration: N334Z
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

After an uneventful local flight, the pilot landed and refueled the airplane. The pilot planned to demonstrate a soft field takeoff, departing to the south on the 3,237-foot-long grass runway. The pilot stated that when the airplane lifted off, he leveled it to accelerate in ground effect; however, the airplane did not accelerate as he expected. As the airplane continued along the runway, the pilot realized that the airplane was not going to make it over a fence near the departure end of the runway. The airplane collided with the fence and came to rest in a pasture, resulting in substantial damage to wings. Examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal any evidence of mechanical malfunction or failure that could explain the pilot's report of diminished performance during takeoff. Additionally, the pilot reported that the airplane was operating normally during the earlier flight and during preflight engine run-up just before takeoff. The pilot reported that the wind was variable out of the east at 8-10 knots. An automated weather observation recorded 3 miles from the accident site, reported the wind from 120 degrees at 6 knots at the time of the accident. The airport manager reported that the wind had been out of the south just before the accident, but after he was notified of the accident he checked the windsock again and it showed wind from the north-northeast.

Based on the available wind information and the pilot's report of diminished performance during takeoff, it is likely that the airplane encountered a wind shift to a tailwind during the takeoff roll. The pilot stated that he should have aborted the takeoff earlier.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The pilot's delay in aborting the takeoff when the airplane was not accelerating as expected. Contributing to the accident was a wind shift during takeoff.

On June 6, 2012, approximately 1300 central daylight time, a Beech 35-A33, N334Z, registered to KCN Aero Club INC., of Kansas City Missouri, was substantially damaged when it impacted a fence after takeoff from runway 17 at the Gardner Municipal Airport (K34), Gardner, Kansas. The airline transport rated pilot and the airline transport rated passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the vicinity and a flight plan was not filed. The flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The flight was intended to train and familiarize an aero club member in the club-owned Beech 35-A33. After about 1.2 hours of uneventful local flying, the airplane was landed and refueled. After a successful runup with no anomalies noted, the pilot set up to demonstrate a soft field takeoff from the 3,237 foot long grass runway. As the airplane lifted into ground effect, the pilot thought that the acceleration was not as he expected. As the airplane continued, the pilot knew that the airplane was not going to make it over a fence near the departure end of the runway. The airplane collided with the fence and came to rest in a pasture resulting in substantial damage to wings.

Examination of the airframe and engine after the accident did not show any evidence of mechanical malfunction or abnormalities that could explain the pilot's report of diminished performance during takeoff. Additionally, the pilot reported that the airplane was operating normally during the earlier flight and during preflight runup just prior to takeoff.

The takeoff was to the south, heading 170 degrees. The pilot reported that the wind was variable from 090-110 degrees at 8-10 knots. The automated weather report from New Century Airport (IXD), located 3 miles from the accident site, reported the wind from 120 degrees at 6 knots.

The airport manager of K34 reported that he did not see the accident in person. He was sitting in his office when he received a phone call from the tower chief at New Century (IXD) asking if he knew anything about an airplane off the runway. Just before he got the phone call he heard that another aircraft had taken off from runway 8 at Johnson County Executive Airport (OJC). OJC was located 11 miles to the east of K34. He thought that was odd because the wind had been out of the south. He then checked the windsock K34 and it was showing wind from the North Northeast. He estimated that he saw the windsock about 5 or 10 minutes before getting the call from the tower chief from New Century.

On the submitted NTSB Form 6120, Recommendation Section, the pilot stated that if the airplane was not performing as expected, for any reason, the takeoff should be aborted as soon as there was an indication of abnormal performance.

 
 
A Beechcraft 35 Bonanza went down shortly after takeoff this afternoon near the Gardner Municipal Airport in southern Johnson County.

 Photo Courtesy: Johnson County Sheriff's Office

GARDNER, KS (KCTV) -  A plane went down with two people on board near the Gardner Municipal Airport, an official with the Johnson County Sheriff's Department said Wednesday.

The plane went down just before 1 p.m. near 183rd Street and U.S. 56 Highway.

When sheriff's deputies arrived on scene, they found a airplane that ended up about 200 yards south of the airport's runway in a field.

Two people were on board the single-engine Beechcraft airplane. One person had minor injuries, but neither was taken to the hospital.

The Johnson County Sheriff's Office said investigators from the Federal Aviation Administration are looking into the cause of the crash.

"We really don't know a lot," said Tom Erickson, spokesman for the sheriff's office. "We know it went through the fence in this field 200 yards from the airport. The FAA is here to take over the investigation to find out why it crashed."

The plane wound up about 150 yards from Debbie Gardner's home.

"I was just sitting in there watching TV," said Debbie Gardner, whose last name is the same as the airport she lives near. "My aunt called and said, 'That makes another plane in our yard.'"

A glider hit the fence behind her residence last year.

"It's something different besides the cows," Debbie Gardner said.

Her husband, Mike Gardner, said he is glad that no one was seriously injured in either crash.

"We've lived here 14 years and the planes come in and out a lot," he said. "They have been as low as the tire touching the trees. You can count the rivets on the planes sometimes."

Master Deputy Tom Erickson PIO
Johnson County Sheriff

Gardner, Kan. – Just before 1:00 p.m. today, June 6, 2012 deputies responded to the area of 183rd Street and U.S. 56 Highway to investigate a reported airplane crash. Deputies discovered an airplane which had come to rest in a field about 200 yards south of the Gardner Municipal Airport runway.

There were two people on board the single engine Beechcraft. One person received minor injuries. Neither person was transported to the hospital.

Investigators from the Federal Aviation Administration responded and are looking into the cause of the crash.

Gulfstream G650, Gulfstream Aerospace, N652GD: Accident occurred April 02, 2011 in Roswell, New Mexico

NTSB Identification: DCA11MA076
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 02, 2011 in Roswell, NM
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/24/2013
Aircraft: GULFSTREAM GVI, registration: N652GD
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

NTSB investigators traveled in support of this investigation and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The Safety Board’s full report is available at http://www.ntsb.gov/investigations/reports_aviation.html. The Aircraft Accident Report number is NTSB/AAR-12-02.

On April 2, 2011, about 0934 mountain daylight time, an experimental Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation GVI (G650), N652GD, crashed during takeoff from runway 21 at Roswell International Air Center Airport, Roswell, New Mexico. The two pilots and the two flight test engineers were fatally injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged by impact forces and a postcrash fire. The airplane was registered to and operated by Gulfstream as part of its G650 flight test program. The flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
an aerodynamic stall and subsequent uncommanded roll during a one engine-inoperative takeoff flight test, which were the result of (1) Gulfstream’s failure to properly develop and validate takeoff speeds for the flight tests and recognize and correct the takeoff safety speed (V2) error during previous G650 flight tests, (2) the G650 flight test team’s persistent and increasingly aggressive attempts to achieve V2 speeds that were erroneously low, and (3) Gulfstream’s inadequate investigation of previous G650 uncommanded roll events, which indicated that the company’s estimated stall angle of attack while the airplane was in ground effect was too high. Contributing to the accident was Gulfstream’s failure to effectively manage the G650 flight test program by pursuing an aggressive program schedule without ensuring that the roles and responsibilities of team members had been appropriately defined and implemented, engineering processes had received sufficient technical planning and oversight, potential hazards had been fully identified, and appropriate risk controls had been implemented and were functioning as intended.

The Safety Board’s full report is available at http://www.ntsb.gov/investigations/reports_aviation.html. The Aircraft Accident Report number is NTSB/AAR-12-02.

On April 2, 2011, about 0934 mountain daylight time, an experimental Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation GVI (G650), N652GD, crashed during takeoff from runway 21 at Roswell International Air Center Airport, Roswell, New Mexico. The two pilots and the two flight test engineers were fatally injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged by impact forces and a postcrash fire. The airplane was registered to and operated by Gulfstream as part of its G650 flight test program. The flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident.

NTSB Identification: DCA11MA076 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 02, 2011 in Roswell, NM
Aircraft: GULFSTREAM GVI, registration: N652GD
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators traveled in support of this investigation and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 2, 2011, about 0934 mountain daylight time, a Gulfstream GVI (G650) airplane, N652GD, was substantially damaged after impact with terrain during takeoff at Roswell International Air Center Airport (ROW), Roswell, New Mexico. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a company flight plan was filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 flight. The two flight crewmembers and the two technical crewmembers were fatally injured. The flight had originated from ROW about 0700 for a local area flight.

The airplane was operating under a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Experimental Certificate of Airworthiness and was performing a take off with a simulated engine failure to determine take-off distance requirements at minimum flap setting.

Wingtip scrape marks beginning on the runway approximately 5,300 feet from the end of the runway lead toward the final resting spot about 3,800 feet from the first marks on the runway. Witnesses close to the scene saw the airplane sliding on the ground with sparks and smoke coming from the bottom of the wing, and described the airplane being fully involved in fire while still moving across the ground. The airplane struck several obstructions and came to rest upright about 200 feet from the base of the airport control tower. Several airport rescue and fire fighting (ARFF) units responded quickly and fought the fire.


SAVANNAH, Ga. — Gulfstream Aerospace released a report of their findings on the crash of a Gulfstream G650 test flight in April of 2011.

Four Gulfstream employees lost their lives when the plane went down over New Mexico.

The report includes a probable cause of the crash and safety recommendations to prevent future accidents.

An excerpt from the report states that, “Gulfstream accepts full responsibility for the accident.”

The report was submitted to the National Transportation Safety Board. The NTSB is still investigating the crash and their final report isn’t expected until this fall.

Gulfstream released a report on the crash of a Gulfstream G650 test flight in April of last year

Piper PA-22-135 Tri-Pacer, N3431A: Accident occurred June 06, 2012 in Bangor, Michigan

NTSB Identification: CEN12LA348
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 06, 2012 in Bangor, MI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/05/2013
Aircraft: PIPER PA-22-135, registration: N3431A
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On the day before the accident, the owner/pilot made a forced landing to a field due to a loss of engine power. No damage was incurred during that event. Examination of the airplane after the off-airport landing revealed that the gascolator screen was almost completely plugged by a flaky, shellac-type material. The airplane had a history of automotive fuel use, and the inspector who examined the airplane told the pilot that he should have a local mechanic do a thorough fuel system evaluation and flushing before further flight. He reminded the pilot that there were screens in the fuel tanks, carburetor, and in the belly sump that should be checked and cleaned. On the day of the accident flight, the pilot and a local mechanic added fuel to the right fuel tank and performed fuel flow tests. The pilot then attempted to take off, and the engine stopped producing power. The airplane impacted the ground in a left turn and nosed over. Examination of the airplane after the accident revealed that the carburetor and gascolator screens were 50 percent obstructed. Neither the pilot nor the mechanic indicated in their postaccident statements that the gascolator, carburetor, or fuel tank screens were checked or that the fuel system was flushed to remove the residual fuel system contaminants. Based on the available evidence, it is likely that the engine power loss was due to the obstruction of the fuel system screens, which prevented adequate fuel flow to the engine.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to properly service the fuel system, and subsequent decision to conduct the flight with known fuel system deficiencies, which led to the total loss of engine power.

On June 6, 2012, about 1015 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-22-135, N3431A received substantial damage when it impacted the ground and nosed over after it was unable to climb after takeoff from an unimproved field near Bangor, Michigan. The private pilot received serious injuries. The aircraft was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight was originating at the time of the accident and was destined for the South Haven Area Regional Airport (LWA), South Haven, Michigan.

On the day prior to the accident, June 5, 2012, the pilot was flying the airplane to LWA when he experienced a loss of engine power and executed a forced landing into a field. The airplane was not damaged during the off-airport landing. On the day of the accident, the pilot was attempting to take off from the same field in order to continue to LWA. The pilot reported that after takeoff, the engine stopped producing power and he was attempting to return to the field. The airplane was in a left turn when it struck the ground. The pilot reported that he had added fuel to the right fuel tank and accomplished fuel flow tests on the ground prior to the accident. He stated that the fuel flow from the left tank was not adequate, but flow from the right tank was. He stated that he ran the engine for about 20 minutes on the right tank at high power settings before the attempted flight.

A local mechanic who was a witness to the accident reported that the owner enlisted his help to rectify a fuel flow issue. He stated that on the morning of the accident, they added 10 gallons of fuel to the right fuel tank. They then removed the gascolator bowl and timed the fuel flow. The left tank took 7 minutes to flow one gallon of fuel and the right tank took 6 minutes to flow one gallon of fuel. They then performed a run-up to full power on both fuel tanks. He stated that the pilot then attempted to take-off. He said the airplane was slow to clear the ground and gain altitude. It then turned left and descended at which point the witnesses view was obstructed by terrain.

A postaccident examination of the airplane after the landing in the field on June 5, 2012, confirmed that the airplane was not damaged. The gascolator screen was found to be almost completely plugged by a flaky shellac type material. The owner reported to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector that the airplane had a long history of auto fuel use and that he had been getting the shellac type material from the fuel sumps on the airplane. The inspector and the owner discussed that the owner would get a local mechanic and do a thorough fuel system evaluation and flushing before further flight. The inspector reminded the pilot that there were screens in the fuel tanks, carburetor, and in the belly sump that should be checked and cleaned. 

A second examination of the airplane after the accident on June 6, 2012 revealed that the gascolator and the carburetor inlet screens were about 50 percent restricted. 

Neither the pilot nor the mechanics report made mention of having performed a flushing of the fuel system or checking/cleaning of the fuel tank screens in the fuel tanks, carburetor, or gascolator.



Photo from Van Buren Co. Sheriff


Pilot William Lawson force landed this plane in Van Buren County, fixed it, then crashed it the next day. He was hospitalized for injuries.
 (June 6, 2012)


BANGOR TOWNSHIP, Mich. - The same plane and pilot that force landed on Tuesday crashed on take-off Wednesday, injuring the 72-year-old pilot.

William Lawson of Decatur made an emergency landing in a Van Buren County corn field Tuesday afternoon, then went home to get tools to fix the aircraft before authorities arrived on the scene.

Lawson, who has had a license for 50 years, told them he was flying from Decatur to an airport in South Haven when the single-engine plane developed mechanical problems and started sputtering. The department said Lawson could see his destination several miles away, but landed in the filed because he didn't think the plane would make it.

He repaired the plane and on Wednesday tried to fly it out of the field. But deputies said the plane began sputtering and then stalled. He was only about 25 feet off the ground, and when he touched down, the small plane flipped onto its top.

Lawson was taken by ambulance to an area hospital for treatment of a possible fracture and facial cuts.

The FAA will investigate the incidents.

http://www.woodtv.com



http://registry.faa.gov/3431A

IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 3431A        Make/Model: PA22      Description: PA-22 Tri-Pacer
  Date: 06/05/2012     Time: 1700

  Event Type: Incident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: VAN BUREN TWP               State: MI   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A CORNFIELD,  VAN BUREN COUNTY, MI

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: DETROIT, MI  (GL23)                   Entry date: 06/06/2012 


Several calls about a “plane down” came to Van Buren County’s 911 just before noon Tuesday, but when police arrived at the scene … a newly planted corn field … on the southwest corner of 68th Street and C.R. 378, no pilot was to be found.

Police found him at his home, where he’d gone to pick up tools to repair the plane.

William Lawson, 72, told police he was flying a single engine 1953 Piper Tri-Pacer from a private airstrip in Decatur en route to South Haven Airport.

A mechanical problem occurred and the plane started sputtering. Lawson could see South Haven Airport about 5 miles away, but decided he couldn’t make it that far and chose the corn field for emergency landing. He circled the field twice to make sure he would be able to land without damage to the plane or himself.

FAA officials were contacted.

Lawson told police he’d been a licensed pilot for about 50 years.