Monday, May 16, 2016

Cessna 180, C-GBLK; accident occurred May 15, 2016 at St. George Regional Airport (KSGU), Washington County, Utah and accident occurred October 20, 2012 at Chilliwack Airport, British Columbia -Kathryn's Report

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Salt Lake City FSDO-07

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA233
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, May 15, 2016 in St. George, UT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/14/2016
Aircraft: Cessna 180, registration: C-GBLK
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of a tailwheel-equipped airplane reported about 4 seconds into the landing roll the airplane veered to the left despite full rudder deflection applied to the right. The pilot further reported that he added power to correct for the deviation, but the airplane continued to the left, departed the runway, and ground looped. During the ground loop, the right main landing gear collapsed and the right wing was substantially damaged.

The pilot did not report any mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll, which resulted in a runway excursion, ground loop, right main landing gear collapse, and substantial damage to the right wing.

Cessna 180, C-GBLK: Accident occurred October 20, 2012 at Chilliwack Airport, British Columbia 

People check out a plane that crashed while landing at the Chilliwack Airport on October 20, 2012.


A Cessna 180 plane slid off the runway and into a ditch at Chilliwack Airport on October 20, 2012.

Terry Wilkins, assistant airport manager at Chilliwack Airport, said the Cessna was swept off the runway by a strong crosswind, went across a field, and into a ditch

Chris Gatsin witnessed the incident, and told Global BC he saw the plane flip a few times.

However, Wilkins said the plane did not flip.

Four people were on board, including the pilot, and all climbed out of the aircraft on their own.

Wilkins said they were checked at the scene by an ambulance, and were then released.

A crane was brought out to lift the aircraft out of the ditch, and it was then taken to a local maintenance shop.

 


 

CHILLIWACK (NEWS1130) - A small plane has crashed while landing at Chilliwack Municipal Airport.

Chris was driving eastbound on Highway 1 and called our newsroom just before 1:30 p.m. on October 20, 2012

"I was just driving along the freeway and I saw the plane approaching from the east and all of a sudden it went sideways -- there's quite a heavy crosswind here -- and it cartwheeled into the drainage ditch. I saw the two wings break off," he explains.

"[It] looked pretty horrific... to see the water spay and the wings break off," he adds. "The first thing I did was pull over and call 9-1-1 and report it. Shortly after, maybe a minute, I saw two people climb out over the bank onto the drainage canal, and a few minutes later two more got out."

BC Ambulance Service and Chilliwack RCMP both attended the scene.

No official word on any injuries. 

Beech A36 Bonanza 36, N84BF: Incident occurred April 08, 2016 in Gainesville, Cooke County, Texas

http://registry.faa.gov/N84BF

Date: 08-APR-16
Time: 00:00:00Z
Regis#: N84BF
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 36
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: Unknown
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Fort Worth AFW FSDO-19
City: GAINESVILLE
State: Texas

AIRCRAFT LANDING GEAR COLLAPSED UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES, GAINESVILLE, TEXAS.

Piper PA-28-151, Orange Coast College, N32251: Accident occurred May 15, 2016 at John Wayne-Orange County Airport (KSNA), Santa Ana, Orange County, California

ORANGE COAST COLLEGE: http://registry.faa.gov/N32251

Date: 15-MAY-16
Time: 19:00:00Z
Regis#: N32251
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Substantial
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: STANDING (STD)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Long Beach FSDO-05
City: SANTA ANA
State: California

AIRCRAFT WHILE HOLDING ON RUNWAY, WAS STRUCK BY JET BLAST OF PASSING B737, AND IMPACTED THE RUNWAY, JOHN WAYNE-ORANGE COUNTY AIRPORT, SANTA ANA, CALIFORNIA.

Ultralight: Incident occurred May 15, 2016 in Brooksville, Hernando County, Florida

Date: 15-MAY-16
Time: 12:50:00Z
Regis#: UNREGISTERED
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19
City: BROOKSVILLE
State: Florida

UNREGISTERED ULTRALIGHT ON LANDING SUSTAINED UNKNOWN DAMAGE, BROOKSVILLE, FLORIDA.

Cessna 172RG Cutlass, Black Ridge Partners LLC, N6281V: Accident occurred May 13, 2016 in North Las Vegas, Clark County, Nevada

BLACK RIDGE PARTNERS LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N6281V

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Las Vegas FSDO-19


NTSB Identification: WPR16LA109
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 13, 2016 in Las Vegas, NV
Aircraft: CESSNA 172RG, registration: N6281V
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 13, 2016, about 1415 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 172RG airplane, N6281V, sustained substantial damage following a loss of control and runway excursion at the North Las Vegas Airport, Las Vegas, Nevada. The commercial pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to Black Ridge Partners, LLC and was operated by the pilot as a personal flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no Federal Aviation Administration flight plan had been filed for the flight.

The pilot reported that following a normal touch down, the airplane veered slightly to the left, and she corrected with right rudder. Then the airplane veered to the left again, and did not react to brake or rudder control inputs. Subsequently, the airplane exited the left side of the runway and struck a runway distance remaining sign, resulting in substantial damage to the left wing and left horizontal stabilizer.

A detailed examination of the airframe is pending.

















AIRCRAFT:   1980 Cessna 172 RGII Cutlass RG, N6281V Serial No. 172RG00607

ENGINE – Lycoming O-360-F1A6, Serial No. L-28665-36A

PROPELLER – Destroyed

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks or other information):

ENGINE:   1265.3 SMOH
.
PROPELLER:    Damaged

AIRFRAME:        4135.1              

OTHER EQUIPMENT:      Basic Instruments, RT385A, KMA24, KLN88, KX155
                       
DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  Veered off runway and struck a sign. This caused the gear to collapse.  

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES:    The damages are to the propeller, cowling, gear and wing. 

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:    Elite Aviation at North Las Vegas, NV 


Read more here:  http://www.avclaims.com/N6281V.htm

Cessna T337G Super Skymaster, N2QD: Incident occurred May 14, 2016 in Riverside County, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N2QD

Date: 14-MAY-16
Time: 21:40:00Z
Regis#: N2QD
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 337
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Riverside FSDO-21
City: RIVERSIDE
State: California

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, RIVERSIDE, CALIFORNIA.

Cameron Balloons US Z-150, N6952D: Accident occurred May 13,2016 in Edmond, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma

http://registry.faa.gov/N6952D

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Oklahoma City FSDO-15

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA183
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 13, 2016 in Edmond, OK
Aircraft: CAMERON BALLOONS US Z-150, registration: N6952D
Injuries: 1 Serious, 5 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 13, 2016, about 0750 central daylight time, a Cameron Balloon US Z-150, N6952D, collided with trees and the terrain during a landing in Edmond, Oklahoma. The pilot and four passengers received minor injuries. One passenger was seriously injured. The balloon received substantial damage to the envelope. The balloon was registered to a private individual and was operated by OKC Balloons Aloft as a sightseeing flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The local flight originated about 0700.

Spirit Airlines, Airbus A320, N638NK: Incident occurred May 13, 2016 at Los Angeles International Airport (KLAX), Los Angeles County, California

SPIRIT AIRLINES INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N638NK

Date: 13-MAY-16
Time: 17:30:00Z
Regis#: N638NK
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A320
Event Type: Incident
Damage: Minor
Activity: Commercial
Flight Phase: STANDING (STD)
Aircraft Operator: NKS-Spirit Airlines
Flight Number: NKS217
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA El Segundo (Los Angeles) FSDO-23
City: LOS ANGELES
State: California


SPIRIT AIRLINES FLIGHT NKS217 AIRBUS A320 AIRCRAFT WHILE PARKED AT THE GATE DEPLANING PASSENGERS, THE JETBRIGE STRUCK THE AIRCRAFT DOOR, NO INJURIES, DAMAGE IS MINOR, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA.

Mooney M20F Executive, Barefoot Aviation LLC, N6371Q: Accident occurred May 13, 2016 in North Little Rock, Pulaski County, Arkansas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Final Report   -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board:
https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA200
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 13, 2016 in Little Rock, AR
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: MOONEY M20, registration: N6371Q
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private-rated pilot was taking off in the airplane when the airplane's engine began to sputter and lose power. He elected to reduce engine power and land on the remaining runway; however, he had already retracted the landing gear. The pilot lowered the landing gear handle, but was not able to lock the gear into place before the airplane impacted the runway and the nose gear collapsed. Postaccident examination of the airplane found water in the left and right wing fuel tanks, as well as the engine’s carburetor.  It is likely that the loss of engine power was a result of the water contamination of the fuel system. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A loss of engine power due to water contamination of the fuel.

On May 13, 2016, about 0930 central daylight time, a Mooney M20F airplane, N6371Q, conducted a forced landing while departing the North Little Rock Municipal airport (KORK), near Little Rock, Arkansas. The private rated pilot and passenger were not injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged during the accident. The airplane was registered to and operated by Barefoot Aviation LLC, Little Rock, Arkansas, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. 

The pilot reported to the responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, that after takeoff, about the time he retracted the landing gear, the engine started to "sputter". The pilot lowered the landing gear and tried to land and stop on the remaining runway. However, the airplane landed hard on the nose gear and the nose gear collapsed. The airplane came to rest just off the end of the runway.

The airplane sustained damage to the nose of airplane, including substantial damage to the firewall.

The airplane was moved back to the owner's hangar, and remained there, until the insurance company sold the wreckage. The new owner recovered the airplane and had the airplane transferred to a maintenance facility. Personnel at the maintenance facility reported that during recovery of the airplane, water was found in the left and right fuel tanks. Additionally, water was found in the engine's carburetor.

Barefoot Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N6371Q

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Little Rock FSDO-11

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA200
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, May 05, 2016 in Little Rock, AR
Aircraft: MOONEY M20, registration: N6371Q
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 13, 2016, about 1030 central daylight time, a Mooney M20F airplane, N6371Q, conducted a forced landing after departing the North Little Rock Municipal airport, near Little Rock, Arkansas. The private rated pilot and passenger were not injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged during the accident. The airplane was registered to and operated by Barefoot Aviation LLC, Little Rock, Arkansas, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. 

The pilot reported to the responding FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) inspector, that during takeoff, about the time he retracted the landing gear, the engine started to "sputter". The pilot lowered the landing gear and tried to stop on the remaining runway. However, the airplane landed hard on the nose gear, the nose gear collapsed, and the airplane came to stop just off the end of the runway.

The airplane sustained damage to the nose of airplane, including substantial damage to the firewall.

Mooney M-20G Statesman, N9381V: Incident occurred May 16, 2016 at Cottonwood Airport (P52), Yavapai County, Arizona

http://registry.faa.gov/N9381V

Date: 16-MAY-16
Time: 16:30:00Z
Regis#: N9381V
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20G
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07
City: COTTONWOOD
State: Arizona

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP AND STRUCK THE PROPELLER, COTTONWOOD, ARIZONA.


A Cottonwood pilot escaped injury after he forgot to lower the landing gear on his Mooney M20G aircraft Monday morning. 

Cottonwood police and fire were called to the Cottonwood Airport on a report of an airplane crash at 9:58 a.m. Monday, according to a news release from the City of Cottonwood.

On arrival, units found the aircraft sitting on runway 32, the news release stated. 

The pilot, James Gray of Cottonwood, was out of the plane and said that he was unhurt. 

According to the city's news release, Mr. Gray said that as he was landing on runway 32, he forgot to lower his landing gear. 

The aircraft landed and skidded about 585 feet before coming to a stop. 

The plane sustained damage to the undercarriage and to the prop. The plane was lifted up by a crane and the gear was lowered. 

The plane was then towed off the runway. 

The investigation will be handled by the National Transportation Safety Board. 

The airport runway was closed for about one hour before reopening.

Original article can be found here:  http://verdenews.com



An airplane crashed at Cottonwood Airport on Monday morning after a pilot forgot to lower the landing gear as he came in for a landing, Cottonwood city officials said.

Cottonwood police and fire officials responded to a report of a Mooney M20G airplane crash about 10 a.m. Monday and found pilot James Gray, of Cottownwood, unhurt, according to a city press release.

Gray's plane skidded about 585 feet before it came to a stop, sustaining damage to the undercarriage and prop, officials said.

The plane was towed away, and the runway was closed for about an hour before reopening, officials said.

The crash investigation will be handled by the National Transportation Safety Board.

Original article can be found here: http://www.azcentral.com

Cessna P210N Pressurized Centurion, Cessna P210 LLC, N5493W: Incident occurred May 14, 2016 at Deer Valley Airport (KDVT), Phoenix, Maricopa County, Arizona

CESSNA P210 LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N5493W

Date: 14-MAY-16
Time: 17:23:00Z
Regis#: N5493W
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 210
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07
City: PHOENIX
State: Arizona

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING WENT OFF THE RUNWAY, STRUCK A SIGN AND LIGHTS, DEER VALLEY AIRPORT, PHOENIX, ARIZONA.

Cessna 172F Skyhawk, East Carolina Aviation LLC, N8566U: Accident occurred May 14, 2016 in Currituck County, North Carolina

East Carolina Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N8566U

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Greensboro FSDO-39

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 14, 2016 in Currituck, NC
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N8566U

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Date: 14-MAY-16
Time: 20:26:00Z
Regis#: N8566U
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: CURRITUCK
State: North Carolina

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A MARSH, CURRITUCK COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA.

Piper PA28R, Panjab Aviation Inc., N54414: Incident occurred May 15, 2016 Marysville, Yuba County, California

PANJAB AVIATION INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N54414

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Sacramento FSDO-25

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, MARYSVILLE, CALIFORNIA.

Date: 15-MAY-16
Time: 20:00:00Z
Regis#: N54414
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28R
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MARYSVILLE
State: California

Cessna 182P Skylane, N58625: Accident occurred May 14, 2016 in Williamsburg, Virginia

Aviation Accident Final Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary  -  National Transportation Safety Board:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N58625

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA235
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 14, 2016 in Williamsburg, VA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/12/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 182P, registration: N58625
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the pilot, shortly after he climbed above the tree tops during the takeoff initial climb, he determined that he was uncomfortable flying in the gusting wind conditions. He reported that he completed one traffic pattern and made an approach to runway 31. He recalled that during the landing flare, the airplane encountered a wind gust and was blown to the right, and off of the runway. The pilot reported that the airplane touched down in the safety area on the right side of the runway and the airplane impacted a drainage culvert where it came to rest. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the firewall and the right wing spar.

The pilot reported that there were not any pre-accident mechanical failures or anomalies with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation prior to the accident. 

The meteorological aerodrome report at the accident airport reported: KJGG 141915Z AUTO 28013G18KT 220V300 10SM CLR 28/12 A2972 RMK AO1

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing in variable direction and gusting wind conditions, resulting in a landing off the side of the runway and impact with a drainage culvert.

Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee, N7051R, Icaros Flying Club Inc: Accident occurred May 16, 2016 at Homestead General Aviation Airport (X51), Homestead, Miami-Dade County, Florida

http://registry.faa.gov/N7031R

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19


NTSB Identification: ERA16FA186
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 16, 2016 in Homestead, FL
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N7031R
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 16, 2016 about 1646 eastern daylight time, a Piper, PA-28-140, N7031R was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain during landing at Homestead General Aviation Airport (X51), Homestead, Florida. The private pilot was seriously injured and the passenger received minor injuries. The airplane departed from Miami Executive Airport (TMB), Miami, Florida. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the planned flight to X51. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual as a personal flight conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The passenger stated that the pilot was a personal friend and this was their first flight together. The passenger also stated he was a student pilot, but never obtained his pilot certificate and he currently did not have a medical certificate. He added that soon after departing TMB, the pilot transferred control to the passenger and let him fly around, making a couple turns and then the passenger gave controls back to the pilot. The passenger stated they flew to X51 and the pilot made one touch-and-go landing and during departure, the pilot transferred control over to the passenger and stated "you make the next landing and I will watch you." The pilot then asked the passenger if he wanted "one notch" of flaps which equated to 10 degrees of flap extension, in which the passenger stated he did want "one notch" of flaps. The passenger was trying to fly the airplane straight to the runway, but kept getting blown to the left side. The passenger tried to correct the flight path, but could not get the airplane back on the centerline of the approach to runway 36. The passenger further stated he was having difficulty controlling the airplane and did not remember if the pilot tried to help or not. The passenger did not know how they got so far off the centerline of the runway and heading 90 degrees from the centerline of the runway. He remembered the ground coming up on them quickly and he braced for impact.

Examination of the airplane at the accident site revealed that the wreckage was located to the left side of runway 36, approximately 340 feet away and midfield. The direction of flight was 295 degrees magnetic and the airplane came to rest oriented about 200 degrees magnetic. There were ground scars between the runway and a canal that corresponded with damage to the left wing tip. Orange paint chips were located in the grass and ground scars. The airplane had proceeded across the water and impacted the bank on the edge of the water. The propeller contacted the bank first, which bent one blade aft and stopped the engine from rotating further. During the impact, the nose gear bent aft and both main landing gear were sheared off. The airplane then slid approximately 40 feet to its final resting spot.

The left wing tank was full of fuel and the right wing tank was half full of fuel. The fuel was clean and no water was present. The nose section of the airplane was crushed and the engine was tilted up about 30 degrees. The left wing main spar was fractured at the fuselage and the rear attachment point bolt separated and was missing. The left wing pulled away from the fuselage approximately 6 inches, but still remained attached to the flap torque tube assembly. The flaps were in the neutral position, but the flap handle was in the first detent, which equated to 10 degrees of flap extension. The ailerons, fuselage and right wing were intact. The fuel selector was selected to the left tank. Both control yolks were bent to the right side and downward. The pilot's shoulder harness was torn in half at the mid-point of the belt. The pilot's seat was separated from the seat rails, consistent with impact forces. The passenger's shoulder harness was intact and his seat was attached at all four corners of the seat rails.    
 


SOUTHWEST MIAMI-DADE, Fla. (WSVN) -- A man is being airlifted to the hospital after a small plane made a rough landing on the edge of the Florida Everglades, Monday afternoon.

According to Miami-Dade Fire Rescue, the single-engine Piper went down near Southwest 287th Street and 187th Avenue in Southwest Miami-Dade.

Witnesses said the plane was attempting to land at Homestead General Aviation Airport when it was carried away by strong winds. The aircraft then went past the runway and over a canal before landing on its belly.

According to officials, two people were on board, and rushed to the hospital. 

One person was transported via air rescue, while the other was transported via ground rescue.

7Skyforce HD captured the victim being put in a helicopter by paramedics. He is being taken to an area hospital as a trauma alert.

The plane sustained serious damage to the nose.

Story and video:  http://www.wsvn.com



Two people were injured when a small plane made a rough landing near a Homestead airport Monday.

The incident was reported in the 28700 block of Southwest 217th Avenue.

Officials said two people, a pilot and passenger, were on board the single-engine Piper plane when the pilot lost control during landing.

Footage showed the small plane in a grassy area next to a canal near Miami-Homestead General Aviation Airport.

One person was airlifted to Jackson South while the other person was taken by ground, Miami-Dade Fire Rescue officials said.

Story and video:  http://www.nbcmiami.com

A small plane landed hard, bouncing along Runway 36 at Homestead General Aviation Airport Monday afternoon, before stopping near a canal, federal officials said.

A separated tire could be spotted about six feet from the plane, which also was split in the front.

A Miami-Dade Fire spokeswoman confirmed that two people on board were taken to the hospital — one of whom was airlifted as a trauma alert. The plane went down at about 4:45 p.m. at 28700 SW 217th Ave., at the Homestead airport.

The Federal Aviation Administration said Monday the Piper PA/28 had only two people on board.

Greg Chin, a spokesman for Miami-Dade Aviation Department, said the plane was coming from Miami Executive Airport.

Investigators were there into the night collecting evidence on what may have caused the fixed single-engine plane to go down.

According to FAA records, the plane, which was built in 1966, was registered to Sandy and Santiago Gonzalez.

Original article can be found here: http://www.miamiherald.com

Piper PA-28-181, Archer Aero LLC, N991A: Accident occurred May 13, 2016 in Cedar Key, Levy County, Florida

ARCHER AERO LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N991A

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA243
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 13, 2016 in Crystal River, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/25/2016
Aircraft: PIPER PA-28, registration: N991A
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot reported that shortly after the airplane rotated during the takeoff, he noticed that the flaps were extended. He further reported that about 20 feet above the ground he retracted the flaps from 25 degrees to zero degrees, and simultaneously encountered wind that pushed the airplane towards the ground and left of centerline. Once the airplane settled on the ground, he attempted to correct back to the center of the runway, but reported that the airplane veered off the runway to the left and impacted a ditch. 

A postaccident examination revealed substantial damage to the engine mount. 

According to the student pilot there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation. 

A review of recorded data from the automated weather observation station located on the airport, revealed that, about 5 minutes after the accident the wind was 280 degrees true at 6 knots, wind gust 14 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, and sky clear. The airplane landed on runway 27.

The Federal Aviation Administration has published the Airplane Flying Handbook FAA-H-8083-3A (2004). This handbook discusses retraction of the flaps and states in part: Depending on the airplane's altitude and airspeed, it may be wise to retract the flaps intermittently in small increments to allow time for the airplane to accelerate progressively as they are being raised. A sudden and complete retraction of the flaps could cause a loss of lift resulting in the airplane settling into the ground.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The student pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the takeoff, which resulted in runway excursion and collision with a ditch. Contributing to the accident was the improper flap retraction procedure employed by the pilot during takeoff.

Cessna 180H Skywagon, N2423F: Accident occurred May 14, 2016 in Wasilla, Alaska

http://registry.faa.gov/N2423F

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Anchorage FSDO-03


NTSB Identification: ANC16CA027
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 14, 2016 in Wasilla, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/31/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 180, registration: N2423F
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot stated that he was landing his tailwheel-equipped airplane on a gravel surfaced runway that had recently been graded on both sides, with excess dirt and gravel being deposited in the center of the runway. Upon touchdown the airplane veered sharply to the left, and the right wing impacted the runway's surface. The airplane continued to the left, exited the runway, and the right main tire gripped the paved surface of the adjacent runway causing the airplane to snap back to the right. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing and right aileron. The pilot stated that there were no preaccident mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during landing, which resulted in a collision with terrain. Contributing to the accident was the loose dirt and gravel deposited in the center of the runway.

Schleicher ASW 19, N19V0T; accident occurred May 15, 2016 in Frankton, Madison County, Indiana -Kathryn's Report

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N19VT

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Indianapolis FSDO-11


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA244
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 16, 2016 in Frankton, IN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/14/2016
Aircraft: SCHLEICHER ASW 19, registration: N19VT
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the glider reported that due to the lack of thermals, he decided to land on an off-airport field. The pilot further reported about 20 feet above the ground on final approach he encountered turbulence behind obstacles. Subsequently, the glider entered an aerodynamic stall and impacted terrain in a nose low attitude.

The right wing, fuselage, and canopy were substantially damaged. 

The pilot did not report any mechanical malfunctions or failures with the glider that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's exceedance of the critical angle of attack on final approach in turbulent conditions, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall and collision with terrain.





MADISON CO., Ind. -- The FAA will be in Madison County on Monday to investigate the crash of a glider.

Deputies were called to the 7200 block of W 700 N shortly before 5pm Sunday.

They found the pilot of the glider,  Richard Smith, 65, Greentown, Ind., lying on the ground.

Smith told deputies that he caught a downdraft and was trying to recover from it but could not.

He said the sailplane hit the ground, nose first, then the right wing caught the ground and knocked him back about 30 feet.  The glider came to rest on its belly.

Smith told deputies he was able to unbuckle himself and get out he glider after it went down.

He was taken to Community Hospital to be treated for a stiff back and minor aches.

JetBlue, Airbus A320-200, N789JB: Incident occurred May 15, 2016 at Salt Lake City International Airport (KSLC), Salt Lake County, Utah

JETBLUE AIRWAYS CORP: http://registry.faa.gov/N789JB

Date: 15-MAY-16
Time: 04:52:00Z
Regis#: JBU802
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A320
Event Type: Incident
Damage: Minor
Activity: Commercial
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Aircraft Operator: JBU-JetBlue Airways
Flight Number: JBU802
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Salt Lake City FSDO-07
City: SALT LAKE CITY
State: Utah

JETBLUE AIRWAYS FLIGHT JBU802 AIRBUS 320 AIRCRAFT, REGISTRATION NOT REPORTED, ON DEPARTURE A BIRD STRUCK THE WINDSCREEN, MINOR DAMAGE, NO INJURIES, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH.

Beech A36TC Bonanza, N60RW: Fatal accident occurred May 16, 2016 near Tupelo Regional Airport (KTUP), Lee County, Mississippi

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Preliminary Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Henry L. Jackson: http://registry.faa.gov/N60RW

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Jackson FSDO-31

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA185
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 16, 2016 in Tupelo, MS
Aircraft: BEECH A36TC, registration: N60RW
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 16, 2016, about 0835 central daylight time, a Beech A36TC, N60RW, was destroyed when it impacted terrain in Tupelo, Mississippi. The airline transport pilot and three passengers sustained fatal injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight that originated at Tupelo Regional Airport (TUP), Tupelo, Mississippi, about 0830, destined for Williamsburg-Whitley County Airport (BYL), Williamsburg, Kentucky. An instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to air traffic control recordings, shortly after departing runway 36, the pilot advised the tower controller that there was smoke in the cockpit and that they needed to return to the airport. According to witnesses, the airplane made a left, westbound turn, at an altitude of about 500-1,000 feet. Witnesses reported seeing the airplane turning back towards the approach end of runway 18. Witnesses also reported seeing the airplane in a descent with smoke and flames coming from the airplane before it impacted terrain. 

The on-scene investigation revealed that the wreckage, which was mostly consumed by fire, was located on flat terrain with trees in the vicinity at 34 degrees, 17.464 minutes north latitude, 088 degrees, 45.922 minutes west longitude. Tree cuts, commencing about 50 feet above the terrain, descended at an approximately 30-degree angle for about 165 feet along a heading of 110 degrees magnetic. 

All flight controls surfaces were accounted for at the accident site, and flight control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit to their respective control inputs. The outboard portion of the right wing was found about 80 feet past the initial tree strike; it was separated from the airframe and heavily burned. The right aileron remained attached, but the right flap was separated. The left wing remained attached at the forward spar, but sustained extensive fire damage. 

One of the propeller blades exhibited S-bending and leading edge gouging, the other blades exhibited tip curling and aft bending.

Examination of the engine revealed that the exhaust pipe was missing from the exhaust side of the turbocharger. A subsequent examination of the engine at a recovery facility did not reveal any other preexisting mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. Thumb compression was obtained on all cylinders, and continuity was confirmed throughout the drive train.

The exhaust pipe was recovered by airport personnel from the runway, along with a fractured V-band retaining clamp used to secure it to the turbocharger, and small fragments of fabric insulation. The recovered items were forwarded to the NTSB Materials Laboratory where a preliminary examination of the V-band clamp revealed that the outer band was fractured at a spot weld, and that oxidation and deposits found on the fracture surface were consistent with the presence of a preexisting crack. 

The six seat, low wing, retractable tricycle-gear airplane, was manufactured in 1980. It was powered by a Continental TSIO-520, 300 horsepower engine, equipped with a McCauley three-blade, constant-speed propeller. 

The pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate, with ratings for airplane single-engine land, multi-engine land, and instrument airplane; as well as flight instructor single-engine land, multi-engine land, and instrument airplane. He was issued a third-class medical certificate on October 24, 2014, and he reported 5,675 total hours of flight experience on that date.

Weather TUP, about 2 miles south of the accident site, reported at the time of the accident included; sky conditions 5,000 feet overcast, 10 statute miles of visibility and winds from 130 degrees at 9 knots.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Motorists pass by a makeshift memorial that was placed at the entrance of the access road that leads to the scene of Monday’s plane crash.


Lt. Col. Henry “Jack” L. Jackson, pilot, his wife Lt. Col. Gwynn A. Groggel
~

Dr. Charles Torti and his wife, Carrie Torti
~


TUPELO – A single-engine private plane made two distress calls and was trying to return to the Tupelo Regional Airport when it crashed Monday morning.

All four people onboard were killed when the Beechcraft Bonanza went down in a wooded area about a half-mile north of the runway.

Tuesday morning, Lee County Coroner Carolyn Green released the names of the victims: pilot Henry Jackson, 75; his wife Gwynn Groggel, 70; Charles Torti, 69; and Carrie Torti, 59. The two couples were all from Kerrville, Texas.

According to Millicent Hoidal, investigator in charge for the National Transportation Safety Board, witnesses on the ground saw pieces of the plane fall off as it took off around 8:30 a.m. and the pilot reported smoke in the cockpit.

“The pilot made two radio calls to return to the airport. They were cleared by the control tower to return to the airport,” Hoidal said. “It’s hard to generalize. Smoke in the cockpit could come from a variety of reasons. It could come from the panel or it could come from the engine.

“We swept the runway and portions of the exhaust system were found. The post-impact fire destroyed a significant amount of information, but there is still a lot of information. The plane did not have a black box, but often there are instruments in the panel, like a Garmin, that could record flight data and be useful in our investigation.”

The NTSB arrived at the scene late Monday and released the bodies to the coroner. They have been sent to the state crime lab in Jackson to have dental records confirm their identities.

“By going with dental identification, I’m hoping to have biological confirmation within a couple of days,” Green said. “That means they can be released to the families quicker.”

Hoidal and her team spent most of Tuesday documenting the scene and searching for evidence. What is left of the plane was loaded on a flatbed trailer and hauled to a secure location out of state.

“Within 5 to 10 days, we will release a preliminary report, usually just a one-page report,” Hoidal said. “Within 12 to 18 months, we will release the full factual report on our website.”

The plane took off from Kerrville Municipal Airport Sunday and landed in Tupelo. The couples over-nighted in Tupelo and took off around 8:30 a.m. Monday morning. Their flight plan showed they were headed to Charlottesville, Virginia.

“I communicated with both families,” Green said. “These two couples loved to travel together and their families are in disbelief.”

Tupelo Mayor Jason Shelton said this was not a safety issue for the airport and stressed the aircraft was not connected with Tupelo’s commercial air service.

This is the second time in less than five years that a plane crashed shortly after takeoff, resulting in a fatality. In August 2011, David Duncan’s twin-engine Cessna veered to the left and crashed into trees in front of a house on North Coley Road.

The NTSB investigation ruled a fuel line was improperly installed, causing one engine to cut out at 400 feet.

Original article can be found here:  http://djournal.com

A recovery team from Dawson Aircraft leaves the scene with a trailer carrying the Beech A36TC Bonanza that crashed shortly after takeoff on Monday near Tupelo Regional Airport. Two couples from Texas were killed in the crash.


Dawson Aircraft, recovery team

MEMPHIS, TN (WMC) -  A private plane crashed near the Tupelo airport just before 9 a.m. Monday, killing four people on board.

According to Tupelo Police Chief Bart Aguirre, a pilot and three passengers are dead. 

The plane is a Beech Bonanza, a single-engine, six-seat aircraft registered to a company in Texas. The police chief said a mechanical issue could have caused the crash. 

According to the NBC affiliate in San Antonio, long-time pilot Harry Cook in Texas received a call Monday morning from a Tupelo Police Department detective asking if he could help identify who was on board the plane. Cook said the plane was registered to Henry L. Jackson, known as Jack Jackson to family and friends. He said Jackson, his wife Gwynn Groggel, and another couple were on the plane.

According to fire officials, the plane crashed in a wooded area and no other structures were damaged in the crash. 

A Federal Aviation Administration official said the pilot reported smoke in the cockpit before the plane crashed.

Shelton said the plane was fully loaded with fuel when it took off, bound for Virginia, and the nature of the crash caused it to burst into flames.

Tupelo officials said they have secured the scene and are waiting on federal officials to arrive and investigate the crash. 

"Anytime there is an incident that involves an aircraft, that immediately falls under federal jurisdiction," Tupelo Mayor Jason Shelton said. 

Shelton also agrees with the police chief and is speculating the cause of the crash is mechanical failure.

"This is just speculation on my part; this is not any type of official source. You're typically talking about some type of mechanical issue," Shelton said.

Shelton said the identities of the victims in the crash could not be released at this time, but it is believed they are from out of state.

"The information right now is difficult," Shelton said. "The names and identities cannot be released at this time."

Officials said they are still waiting on the FAA to arrive on the scene and investigate so the scene can be released and the bodies can be sent for autopsies and DNA tests.

"It is our understanding and belief that it was an out of state plane and that the occupants of the plane were out of state," Shelton said.

The plane crashed on a small access road less than half a mile from the Tupelo airport. The road leads to a sewage treatment plant.

Witnesses said they rushed to the crash site, but could not get close enough to provide any help because a chain link fence surrounding the sewage treatment plant kept them out.

"It went straight up about 3,000 feet and came right back down," Carl Fleming said.

Fleming was one of the witnesses that saw what happened to the plane.

"It was pretty loud," Fleming said. "Loud enough to shake the ground." It also shook the walls of nearby homes.

The police chief said because the plane crashed in the sewage plant, it was impossible for witnesses to get to the scene.

Firefighters arrived and used bolt cutters to get through the fence. Shelton acknowledged the fast response of the first responders, pointing it only took four minutes for the first crews to arrive on scene.

The accident was reported at 8:34 a.m., with the first responder crews arriving on scene at 8:38 a.m.

"It was a tremendous response by our first responders," Shelton said.

Witnesses said the plane hit several trees on its way down, then exploded twice.

"You could hear the trees popping," Fleming said. "The smoke was coming out of those trees and going back that way."

Shelton said he wanted to emphasize the crash does not reflect a safety concern with the Tupelo airport.

"This is a very, very uncommon occurrence at Tupelo airport, or any airport for that matter," Shelton said.

He said in spite of some reported incidents at the airport, it does not show a reason for concern due to the amount of traffic the airport conducts.

"We serve all three areas of aircraft here," Shelton said. "Tupelo is small enough where it's a place for pilots to do student training. It's a place for recreational pilots to go out and use their own place. It's also a cargo hub for commercial travel."

He said because of the amount of traffic the airport sees, it is not unusual for some reported incidents to show up occasionally. 

"I don't think it's out of the norm," Shelton said. "What you would look at is if there is some sort of safety issues or safety concerns with the airport and there are none."

This is not the first plane to crash in Tupelo. A pilot was killed in a crash in 2011. 


Story and video:   http://www.kfvs12.com






ALBEMARLE COUNTY, Va (WVIR) -  A plane bound for Charlottesville Albemarle Airport crashed in Mississippi Monday morning. Now investigators are combing the crash scene in Tupelo, where authorities say the pilot and three passengers were killed.

The FAA says the plane had just taken off from an overnight layover in Tupelo when the pilot reported seeing smoke in the cockpit. The private plane crashed shortly after take-off near the Tupelo Regional Airport. 

The Tupelo fire chief and mayor say first responders raced to the scene, but there wasn't much they could do. 

"The plane was fully loaded with fuel, taking off to go to Virginia and the nature of the crash caused a fire. For those who saw the plume of smoke, you had a plane fully loaded with fuel departing for a relatively long trip,” said Tupelo Mayor Jason Shelton. 

Shelton says he believes the accident may have been caused by a mechanical issue. At this point, authorities are not confirming the identities of anyone on board.

The Beech Bonanza was registered in Kerrville, Texas. Airport officials there say pilot Henry "Jack" Jackson, his wife Gwynn, and another couple left Sunday for Tupelo. Officials say Henry Jackson was an experienced pilot. He was vice commander of the Texas Wing Civil Air Patrol, a civilian group that helps the U.S. Air Force with search and rescue activities.

The Tupelo Police Department is still working on officially identifying the remains of the passengers. The bodies have been sent for autopsy.

FAA spokeswoman Arlene Salac says the FAA will investigate and the National Transportation Safety Board will determine the crash's cause.

Story and video:  http://www.nbc29.com


Four people were killed this morning when their private plane crashed in a field in Tupelo, Mississippi, shortly after takeoff, authorities say.

In a statement, the Federal Aviation Administration said that the  Beech A36TC Bonanza crashed a half-mile from Tupelo Regional Airport at around 8:30 a.m. local time. Tupelo Police Chief Bart Aguirre said today that the plane was "briefly" in the air before it crashed.

The FAA said the plane was carrying three passengers and a pilot.

The  Beech A36TC Bonanza was heading to Charlottesville, Virginia, according to FlightAware. The plane had taken off from Kerrville, Texas, and landed in Tupelo Sunday.

The names of the deceased had not yet been released.

The FAA said the pilot reported smoke in the cockpit before the crash. "We got smoke in our cockpit. We need to come back around," the pilot could be heard saying on air-traffic control audio.

"From what I can tell you right now there's quite a bit of debris," Aguirre said today during a news conference. "The wreckage is very broken up."

The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are both investigating the crash.

Story and video:  http://abcnews.go.com




TUPELO, Miss. (WTVA) – WTVA News is on the scene of a plane crash near the Tupelo airport.

Tupelo officials confirm it is on Colonial Estate Road. It happened at about 8:34 a.m Monday.

Tupelo Chief Bart Aguirre says it was a private plane heading to Virginia. He says there were four on board: three passengers and one pilot. There are no survivors.

The plane is a Beech Bonanza, single-engine, six-seat aircraft registered to a company in Texas.

According to the Daily Times in Kerrville, Texas, the plane is registered to a Kerrville resident.

Joe Kennedy of Kerrville Aviation says the plane left Kerrville with four on board at 8:15 a.m. on Sunday morning.

According to a statement from the FAA, the pilot reported smoke in the cockpit.

The bodies will be sent for autopsies.

As of now, the names of those involved are not being released until family members have been notified.

Story and video:   http://www.wtva.com




Four people died Monday morning when a small plane crashed after taking off from Tupelo Regional Airport.

Tupelo Police Chief Bart Aguirre said the three passengers and a pilot died in the crash near Colonial Estates Road, about a half a mile north of the airport in a field adjoining the Tupelo Buffalo Park & Zoo.

According to the Federal Aviation Agency, the Beech BE36 crashed at 8:32 a.m. The pilot reported smoke in the cockpit before the crash.

Lee County Coroner Carolyn Green called the site "a severe crash area."

Leesha Faulkner, communications director for the city of Tupelo, said the plane burned on impact, and that there were no survivors. Tupelo police located the burning aircraft around 8:38 a.m. Tupelo fire and Northeast Mississippi Medical Center responded to the scene as well.

An aircraft matching that description, a  Beechcraft Bonanza, registered from Kerrville, Texas, arrived at the Tupelo airport Sunday morning. The six-seater, single-engine plane, registered to Henry L. Jackson, had departed Kerrville Municipal Airport in Kerrville, Texas, on Sunday at 8:16 a.m. It landed at the Tupelo Regional Airport at 11:38 a.m., according to FlightAware.com.

It was scheduled to take off from Tupelo Monday at 8:30 a.m. with an arrival time of 12:41 p.m. at the Charlottesville-Albemarle Airport in Charlottesville, Virginia. The weather was overcast with a light wind at the time of take-off.

The Kerrvile Daily Times reported Monday that four people from Kerrville were killed in the crash. They did not identify the victims.

Green told reporters that even when she had some idea of who the victims were, she would be hesitant to notify family until she has DNA identification.

Tupelo Mayor Jason Shelton called the crash a "worst-case scenario."

"Tupelo Fire Department, airport emergency responders, and Tupelo police responded immediately and secured the scene and now will be in a secondary role to the FAA as they continued to conduct the investigation," Shelton said.

The Associated Press reported that Laurie Carwile, who works in the gift shop at the Tupelo Buffalo Park & Zoo, said she heard the crash and later saw smoke.

“We actually thought it was thunder,” Carwile said. “I was in the gift shop and this man came beating on the door telling me to open the door. I thought we were being robbed. He was actually trying to tell me the plane had come down and to call 911.”  

The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are working to determine the crash’s cause.

Original article can be found here: http://www.clarionledger.com



Four people from Kerrville were killed early Monday morning after a small plane crashed outside Tupelo, Mississippi.

The plane, a  Beech A36TC Bonanza, is registered to a Kerrville resident, according to Joe Kennedy of Kerrville Aviation, the fixed-base operator at the Kerrville/Kerr County Airport at Louis Schreiner Field.


Kennedy said the plane took off from Kerrville with four people on board at about 8:15 a.m. Sunday morning. The plane was taking off from Tupelo this morning.


Names have not being released yet pending notifications.


Original article can be found here:  http://dailytimes.com





























TUPELO – Four people were killed Monday morning when a small, private plane crashed shortly after takeoff from Tupelo Regional Airport, according to police.

“The log at the airport said there were three people on onboard, in addition to the pilot,” said Tupelo Police Chief Bart Aguirre. “We did not see any survivors.”

The Beech A36TC Bonanza is registered to Henry Jackson of Kerrville, Texas, about 50 miles northwest of San Antonio. The single engine plane, with a top speed of 200 knots and a range of 1,000 miles, arrived in Tupelo Sunday from Kerrville Municipal Airport. The flight plan filed at the airport showed the plane set to take off at 8:30 a.m. Monday from Tupelo with a destination of Charlottesville, Virginia.

The plane crashed about a half-mile from the north end of the runaway, approximately 150 yards west of Colonial Estates Road. The aircraft was on fire when Tupelo Police officers located it at 8:38 a.m.

“There is quite a bit of debris. The plane was broken up,” Aguirre said. “We found some bodies on the scene.”

A Federal Aviation Administration official said the pilot reported smoke in the cockpit after taking off.

“All that will be determined by the (Federal Aviation Administration),” Aguirre said. “We are holding the scene for them. Once they release the scene, the coroner will be allowed to go in and do what she has to do.”

During a Monday afternoon press conference, Aguirre said he expected FAA’s investigative team to arrive soon from Jackson.

Aguirre said once the FAA has “released” the scene, the bodies of the victims will be sent to the state crime lab in Jackson for autopsies, and DNA will be used to identify them. He does not expect identification to be made very soon.

“There’s no information available as to the identities,” he said. “It us our understanding and belief that it was an out-of-state plane and the occupants of the plane were out-of-state residents.”

Both the north and sound ends of Colonial Estates are blocked and will be for most of the day. Onlookers will not be allowed into the area.

“If you live in that area, we will let you go back home, but we are protecting the scene,” Aguirre said Monday morning.

Aguirre said no other lives were endangered by the crash and no structures were damaged, as the plane landed in a wooded area.

Tupelo Mayor Jason Shelton described Monday’s crash as a “worst-case scenario.”

“We send out heartfelt condolences for the pilot and passengers on the plane,” Shelton said. “No information has been released, but no survivors have been located. It appears to be a worst case scenario. Our thoughts and prayers are with the families.”

Shelton said he was not yet aware if the plane was being used for business or leisure travel, but did clarify the aircraft was not connected with Tupelo’s commercial air service.

Saltillo Mayor Rex Smith was at the airport this morning prior to the crash, but he did not witness the incident.

Smith was at the airport to see off his wife, Alice, who was scheduled to take a Contour Airlines flight to Nashville this morning.

As passengers for the Contour flight began to queue up, however, the security screening was halted, Smith said.

“They just told us there was an incident,” he said. “They didn’t say what it was at first.”

From his location in the airport, Smith said he did not see anything related to the crash.

The Contour flight did eventually take off, about 40 minutes behind schedule, according to Smith.

Putting his wife on an airplane was a little unsettling after news of a crash, the mayor admitted.

“It was kind of scary,” Smith said.

Monday morning’s crash is not the first at or near the Tupelo airport in recent years:

• In August 2011, David Duncan died virtually instantly when the Cessna twin-engine airplane he had just piloted from Tupelo Regional Airport suddenly banked to the left about 400 feet above the ground and crashed into a tree near a home off North Coley Road.

Reports to and by the National Transportation Safety Board, which investigated the incident, indicated the crash’s probable cause came from the airport mechanic’s failure to follow normal procedures to install a fuel line to the plane’s engine, which caused the engine to quit and the plane to crash.

Duncan’s daughters settled a lawsuit with the Tupelo Airport Authority’s insurance carrier in December 2013.

• In July 2013, a Beechcraft A36 owned by Fred Newman Jr. of Columbus crash-landed at Tupelo Regional after it lost power while approaching the runway.

The plane touched down in the pasture of the Tupelo Buffalo Park, bounced into the air and crossed a street before coming to a stop on airport property just short of the runway. Newman suffered minor injuries.

• In June 2014, a Beechcraft Baron twin-engine aircraft made a belly landing at the airport. No injuries were reported from that incident.

• In February 2015, a Cessna 182 crash landed at the airport. A Saltillo man was taking his plane on a shakedown flight before going on a trip that weekend when the back landing gear of the aircraft came down but the front wheel did not. The plane skidded on its nose for about 30 yards and stopped in the middle of the runway. The pilot was not injured in the crash.

“I do want to stress this is not a safety concern or a safety issue with the Tupelo airport,” Shelton said.

Story and video:  http://djournal.com