Monday, April 16, 2018

Cirrus SR22T, N999VX: Incident occurred November 07, 2015 at Paso Robles Municipal Airport (KPRB), San Luis Obispo County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this incident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Jose, California
Cirrus Aircraft; Duluth, Minnesota

Aviation Incident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N999VX

Aviation Incident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Paso Robles, CA
Incident Number: WPR16IA025
Date & Time: 11/07/2015, 1234 PST
Registration: N999VX
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22T
Aircraft Damage: Minor
Defining Event: Landing gear collapse
Injuries: 5 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional

Analysis

The student pilot was landing the airplane when, during the landing roll, the nose landing gear collapsed. Examination revealed that the nose landing gear had separated, and metallurgical testing showed that the failure was the result of high stress fatigue cracking due to sideways bending from one side. The crack was through the strut tube located at the forward edges (toes) of the gusset tube where it welds to the main strut tube. No other anomalies were identified with the landing gear. Further testing revealed that shimmy events or nonstandard towing procedures could result in the cracks and eventual separation of the nose gear. Similar incidents have occurred involving the same nosewheel design. As a result, the airplane manufacturer released a service bulletin to inspect for cracking and a service advisory related to appropriate towing procedures. Additionally, the manufacturer updated the design of the nose landing gear to increase the strength of the strut tube. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this incident to be:
The failure of the nose landing gear due to unanticipated fatigue loads.

Findings

Aircraft
Nose/tail landing gear - Fatigue/wear/corrosion (Cause)
Nose/tail landing gear - Design
Nose/tail landing gear - Capability exceeded (Cause)

Factual Information 

***This report was modified on January 29, 2018. Please see the docket for this accident to view the original report.***

On November 7, 2015, at 1234 Pacific standard time, a Cirrus SR22T, N999VX, sustained minor damage during the landing roll at Paso Robles Airport, Paso Robles, California. The airplane was registered to PHD Ventures Inc., and operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight instructor, student pilot, and three passengers were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed.

According to the flight instructor, the student pilot was flying the airplane and the airplane touched down normally on the main gear. The student pilot then lowered the nose of the airplane and the nose landing gear collapsed.

Post incident examination revealed that the nose landing gear had separated. The nose landing gear consists of a main strut tube and two gusset tubes near the top portion of the main strut tube. The separation involved a crack beginning at the edge of the side gusset tubes weld to the main strut tube. Prior to the incident, a similar event had occurred, NTSB Incident WPR15IA252, and following this event, additional incidents occurred, including one in Japan.

The NTSB Materials Laboratory examined the nose landing gear strut and determined that the failure of the landing gear was the result of high stress fatigue cracking due to sideways bending from one side. No mechanical or metallurgical anomalies were noted with the landing gear.

On March 7, 2016, Cirrus Design Corporation issued Service Advisory Letter SA 16-03, which denoted the following:

Cracks have been discovered on the nose landing gear strut assembly at the welds between the strut tube and the LH and RH gusset tubes.
A visual inspection of the welds between the strut tube and the LH and RH gusset tubes for cracks must be performed every time the engine cowling is removed.
If cracks are found, the aircraft is prohibited from flight until the nose landing gear strut assembly is replaced. (Refer to AMM-32-20).
Additionally, Cirrus Design Corporation performed structural testing of the nose landing gear.

Based on the data provided by the NTSB metallurgy lab, and a video of the Japan incident airplane experiencing nose landing gear shimmy 6 months before the nose gear collapsed, Cirrus explored two different methods of producing side loads in the nose landing gear. The first was through taxi and towing, the second through shimmy. Flight testing showed that significant side loads on the nose landing gear would develop during a shimmy event.

As a result of the testing, Cirrus did the following:

On April 12, 2016, Service Bulletin SB2X-32-22, "NOSE GEAR – Nose Landing Gear Strut Assembly Inspection," was released to inspect all the nose landing gear in the field for cracks in the welds between the strut tube and the LH and RH gusset tubes. In addition to the one-time inspection required by Service Bulletin SB2X-32-22, Cirrus added a post-shimmy inspection to Chapter 5-50 Unscheduled Maintenance Checks of the Aircraft Maintenance Manual (AMM). Similar to the hard/overweight landing inspection, this post-shimmy inspection would look specifically for cracks at the gusset welds exactly as noted in the Service Bulletin.

On April 12, 2016, based on the potential for damage to the nose landing gear due to loading from non-standard and abusive tug operation, Service Advisory SA16-05, "Aircraft Towing Guidance," was released offering aircraft towing guidance. This guidance includes the following;

When towing aircraft, do not stop/start abruptly, especially when the tow bar is at an angle greater than 45° either side of center.

When positioning the aircraft with a towing vehicle, the angle of the tow bar must be less than 45° either side of center for both pulling and pushing. Hand towing must be used if angles greater than 45° either side of center are needed for positioning.

Do not tow aircraft at speeds higher than 15 mph.

On July 14, 2017, Cirrus Design Corporation Service Bulletin SB2X-32-22R1 was issued. The bulletin, which is considered mandatory, was revised to update Compliance, Effectivity, Purpose, Manpower Requirements, and Accomplishment instructions. The bulletin specifically states, "Operators who have successfully complied with the original release of this service bulletin, dated April 12, 2016, must complete Revision 1 of this Service Bulletin in its entirety, and must continue to perform this Service Bulletin every 50 hours thereafter until termination action occurs.

On January 5, 2018, Cirrus Design Corporation Service Bulletin SB2X-32-22R2 was issued. The bulletin, which is considered mandatory, was revised to update Compliance and Effectivity. The bulletin specifically states, "Operators who have successfully complied with the original release of this service bulletin, dated April 12, 2016, must complete Revision 2 of this Service Bulletin in its entirety, and must continue to perform this Service Bulletin every 50 hours thereafter until termination action occurs.

On July 14, 2017, Cirrus Design Corporation Service Bulletin SB2X-32-23, which Cirrus considered to be mandatory, entitled "NOSE GEAR – Nose Wheel Shimmy Reduction," was issued. The bulletin noted that on affected airplanes, nose wheel shimmy may exist on aircraft equipped with Beringer wheels. The bulletin states that a nose tire vibration due to imbalance or tire damage can be mistaken for NLG shimmy. However, it is advisable that both conditions be examined closely and considered tandem during aircraft inspection. The bulletin contains instructions for the adjustment of the nose tire pressure and force required to rotate the nose wheel fork.

On January 5, 2018, Cirrus Design Corporation issued revised Service Bulletin SB2X-32-23R1. The bulletin, which is considered mandatory, was revised to update Effectivity, Purpose, and Accomplishment Instructions. The bulletin states that operators who have successfully complied with the original release of this Service Bulletin, dated July 14, 2017, must complete Revision 1 of this Service Bulletin in its entirety. The Service Bulletin contains instructions for the adjustment of the nose tire pressure and the verification of the force required to rotate the nose wheel fork.

On July 14, 2017, Cirrus Design Corporation issued Cirrus Service Advisory (SA) SA17-08, entitled "Possible Cracking at Nose Land Gear Fillet Welds." The SA revealed that cracks had been discovered on some nose landing gear (NLG) strut assemblies at the fillet welds between the strut tube and the LH and RH gusset tubes. These cracks had led to the collapse of the NLG assemblies. The SA further revealed that each of the aircraft involved had a history of excessive nose wheel shimmy following touchdown of the nose landing gear. The SA defined "nose wheel shimmy" as "a lateral oscillation or wobble of the NLG resulting in a shaking feeling throughout the cabin of the aircraft that can vary in intensity." This is normally encountered during the landing roll-out and will subside as speed is reduced. Cirrus noted in the "Actions" section of the SA that nose wheel shimmy can be reduced or eliminated by lowering the tire pressure. Prior to the next flight, adjust the tire pressure on the nose landing gear to 40 – 50 psi (276 – 344 kPa).

On January 5, 2018, Cirrus Design Corporation issued revised Service Advisory SA17-08R1 (revision 1). The Advisory was issued to update Effectivity and the NLG tire pressure as outlined in SA17-08, dated July 14, 2017. Cirrus noted in the "Actions" section of the SA that nose wheel shimmy can be reduced or eliminated by lowering the tire pressure. Prior to the next flight, adjust the tire pressure on the nose landing gear to 30 – 35 psi (207 – 241 kPa).

Cirrus Aircraft also incorporated specific emphasis and recommendations on how to further discourage shimmying on landing and actions to be taken if the situation occurs on landing in their pilot training program. These incorporations are included in the Landing Standardization Course. Maintenance guidance is also available to mechanics following a shimmy event.

To increase the strength of the weld in the critical area on the nose landing gear, the thickness of the main strut tube was analyzed with an increased wall thickness from 0.125-inch to the full thickness of 0.156-inch. The result of the analysis was an increase (3-5%) in the local stress levels in the static analysis. This design change has been made for all new and replacement gear. 

History of Flight

Landing-landing roll
Landing gear collapse (Defining event) 

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: None
Age: 48, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification:
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 140 hours (Total, all aircraft), 140 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 24, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s):
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/30/2013
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/01/2015
Flight Time:  1000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 390 hours (Total, this make and model), 900 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 94 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 17 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP
Registration: N999VX
Model/Series: SR22T NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2014
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 0871
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 5
Date/Type of Last Inspection:
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3600 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Continental Motors
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: TSIO-550-K
Registered Owner: PHD VENTURES INC
Rated Power: 315 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PRB, 839 ft msl
Observation Time: 1253 PST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 70°C / 37°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots, 240°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Santa Monica, CA (SMO)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Paso Robles, CA (PRB)
Type of Clearance: VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 1145 PST
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: PASO ROBLES MUNI (PRB)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 838 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 31
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4701 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Minor
Passenger Injuries: 3 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 5 None
Latitude, Longitude:  35.672778, -120.626944

NTSB Identification: WPR16IA025
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Incident occurred Saturday, November 07, 2015 in Paso Robles, CA
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22T, registration: N999VX
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators used data provided by various sources and may not have traveled in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft incident report.

On November 7, 2015, at 1234 Pacific standard time, a Cirrus SR22T, N999VX, sustained minor damage during the landing roll at Paso Robles Airport, Paso Robles, California. The flight was being operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight instructor, student pilot, and two passengers were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed.

According to the flight instructor, the student pilot was flying the airplane and the airplane touched down normally on the main gear. The student pilot then lowered the nose of the airplane and the nose landing gear collapsed.

Mooney M20R Ovation, N6868: Incident occurred April 16, 2018 near Twin-Oaks Airport (T94), San Antonio, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio

Aircraft went off the end of the runway on landing, through a fence and came to rest in roadway.

http://registry.faa.gov/N6868

Date: 16-APR-18
Time: 19:20:00Z
Regis#: N6868
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20R
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: SAN ANTONIO
State:TEXAS









A small aircraft landed on a North Side street Monday afternoon after the pilot apparently missed a nearby runway.

San Antonio Fire Capt. Kevin Koch said a couple in their 70s were trying to land the plane at Twin Oaks Airport around 3 p.m. when a wind gust lifted the plane past the runway. It ended  up in the 600 block of Heimer Road.

The plane had to make an emergency landing in the 600 block of Heimer Road Monday April 16, 2018.

The couple was not seriously injured but the woman was hospitalized after complaining of back pain. No one on the ground reported injuries.

The plane was partially on the sidewalk and caused damage to some fences. Though the damage to the plane was not extensive, Koch said the wing was bent and fuel was leaking from the aircraft.

A crane was brought in to remove the plane and it was placed back onto the runway, clearing the street, around 5 p.m.

FAA officials are investigating the incident.

This is the second incident involving a small plane in San Antonio in two days. On Sunday, the pilot of an experimental small-engine aircraft died after the plane crashed.

Original article can be found here ➤  https://www.mysanantonio.com











SAN ANTONIO - Police said two people luckily survived after their plane overshot the runway and landed in the middle of a North side road.

It happened in the 600 block of Heimer Road at about 2:50 p.m. 

Officers said the couple was trying to land the plane at a privately owned airport, but overshot runway and was unable to stop in time. 

The plane went over the runway fence, slightly tipped over and finally stopped in the middle of the street.

Police said a man and woman in their 80s were inside and luckily did not suffer any major injuries.

The woman was transported to the hospital for minor back pain.

This is the second local plane accident in the last two days. 

On Sunday, a man died after crashing his plane in Medina County. 

Original article can be found here ➤ http://news4sanantonio.com

Pittsfield Municipal Airport (KPSF), Berkshire County, Massachusetts: Finance Committee to consider new revenues, costs

PITTSFIELD — Just as the Pittsfield Municipal Airport looks to finalize a new revenue stream for the city, the facility's runway redo lands at a higher price.

The City Council Finance Committee will consider the measures next week. They include agreements with Oak Leaf Energy Partners to create a solar facility at the Barker Road airport, as well as a borrowing authorization that increases pending runway construction costs by about $1 million.

If the City Council approves the 20-year lease and associated tax agreement, the city could see about $400,000 in annual revenue from the solar project, said Airport Manager Gloria Bouillon. The lease for the solar power installation includes about 26 of the airport's roughly 600 acres.

As for the runway project increases, Bouillon said the Federal Aviation Administration called for grading changes that ultimately necessitated the inclusion of both runways in the project's scope. Because the FAA is heavily funding the $7 million project and the city will see additional support from the Massachusetts Department of Transportation, Pittsfield's share of the cost falls at $349,736, Finance Director Matt Kerwood said.

The airport will shut down for 85 days beginning April 30 in order to break ground on the project.

The Finance Committee will review these matters during its meeting at 7 p.m. April 23.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.berkshireeagle.com

Incident occurred April 16, 2018 near San Jose International Airport (KSJC), California

SAN JOSE (CBS SF) — A ClipperJet landed at Mineta San Jose International Airport after being hit by lightning this morning, an airport spokeswoman confirmed.

The pilot of the Falcon 2000 first reported a possible lightning strike at 9:30 a.m. when the plane was 5 miles west of the airport en route to San Jose. 

After landing, the pilot confirmed that the plane had been struck.

There were eight passengers on board and no injuries were reported, according to airport spokeswoman Rosemary Barnes.

Barnes said emergency responders were not called to the scene and the jet taxied to a private parking facility on the west side of the airport.

She said the incident occurred in Federal Aviation Administration airspace and airport operations were not affected.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com

SAN JOSE — A private jet descending to San Jose was hit by a lightning strike on a stormy Monday morning but landed safely afterward, officials said.

The pilot of a Dassault Falcon 2000 reported around 9:30 a.m. that the aircraft “may have been struck by lightning” about five miles west of Mineta San Jose International Airport, said airport spokeswoman Rosemary Barnes.

Barnes said the pilot did not call for an emergency landing, and the plane landed safely a few minutes later. There were no reported injuries among the crew or eight passengers on board.

A post-flight inspection confirmed that the plane was hit by lightning, Barnes said. The extent of any damage was not immediately clear.

Lightning strikes are fairly common with commercial aircraft, with some authoritative estimates indicating that every commercial plane in the United States experiences at least one lightning strike each year. But virtually none of those strikes cause any serious damage or flight risk because modern aircraft fuselages are designed to conduct and redirect any electrical energy absorbed.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.mercurynews.com

Beech G33 Bonanza, N9345Q: Fatal accident occurred April 16, 2018 in Blissfield, Coshocton County, Ohio

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Indianapolis

Aircraft crashed under unknown circumstances in a field.

http://registry.faa.gov/N9345Q

Date: 16-APR-18
Time: 10:32:00Z
Regis#: N9345Q
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: G33
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: DESTROYED
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: BLISSFIELD
State: OHIO

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov






WALHONDING - Two people are believed dead after a Beech G33 Bonanza crash Monday morning in the Walhonding area, according to authorities.

Lt. Matt Boyd, of the Ohio State Highway Patrol, said the number of bodies and the identities of the deceased are yet to be determined. Names will be released once families are notified, he said, and he wasn’t sure when that would be.

The Coshocton County Sheriff’s Office reported receiving a call around 7:25 a.m. from the flight service center in Panama City, Florida, that a Beech G33 Bonanza making its way from Elyria had dropped off of radar in the Coshocton County area. The Sheriff’s Office confirmed the plane did not land at the Coshocton County or Holmes County airports before starting a search.

At about 9:50 a.m. Monday, a farmer reported finding the wreckage in a heavily wooded area on a hill off of County Road 401 between Tiverton and Spring Mountain, Boyd said. Debris was centralized to a small area on the hill. Looking at broken branches and trees, one could see the path the plane took to the crash site.

The cause of the crash is yet to be determined. Boyd said the patrol has the lead in the local investigation. Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration were expected later Monday, Boyd said.

Assisting on scene were Coshocton County EMS, Walhonding Valley Fire Department and Coshocton County Coroner Robert Gwinn. Emergency crews cleared the scene around noon. Cleaning of debris has yet to start, pending further investigation of the site.

Original article ➤ https://www.coshoctontribune.com





The Ohio State Highway Patrol identified the two people killed in a Beech G33 Bonanza crash in Coshocton County Monday.

According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Edward Zezlina, 67, and Linda O'Brien, 71, were in the Beech G33 Bonanza when it crashed.  

Edward Zezlina was flying the Beech G33 Bonanza. 

The couple lives in Grafton, Ohio, in Lorain County.

The crash happened in a remote area only accessible by foot or ATV.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the flight left Elyria, Ohio and was headed to DeLand, Florida. 

The call came in at about 10 a.m. and the crash is located in the 30700 block of County Road 401.

At about 7:25 a.m., the Coshocton County Sheriff received a call that the Beech G33 Bonanza dropped off the radar. 

The Sheriff's office and highway patrol confirmed the Beech G33 Bonanza did not land at any surrounding airports and began a search. 

At about 9:50 a.m., a resident reported finding the wreckage.

The National Transportation Safety Board will determine the cause of the crash after further investigation.

The cause of the crash remains under investigation by authorities including the Federal Aviation Administration and local law enforcement.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.10tv.com

Piper PA-28R-201 Cherokee Arrow III, N811MS: Incident occurred April 15, 2018 at Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport (KBJC), Broomfield, Colorado

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Aircraft experienced gear collapse, skidded off the runway.

G & M Aircraft Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N811MS

Date: 15-APR-18
Time: 18:32:00Z
Regis#: N811MS
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 28R 201
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: DENVER
State: COLORADO

Cessna 172R Skyhawk, N301CF: Incident occurred April 13, 2018 at Gainesville Regional Airport (KGNV), Alachua County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aircraft while taxiing went into the grass and damaged a taxiway light.

Sunrise Aviation Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N301CF

Date: 13-APR-18
Time: 18:32:00Z
Regis#: N301CF
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172R
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: GAINESVILLE
State: FLORIDA

Incident occurred April 13, 2018 in Tavares, Lake County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida 

Aircraft overturned while landing at seaport. 


Date: 14-APR-18
Time: 00:25:00Z
Regis#: N64137
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172M
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No

Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 135
City: TAVARES
State: FLORIDA


A flipped seaplane in Lake Dora in Tavares, "America's Seaplane City," April 13, 2018
~


TAVARES — On a windy evening in Tavares, Angela Allen decided to try out a new lens for her Nikon camera to photograph the city’s seaplanes.

But when she started snapping pictures of an aircraft circling above and then landing on Lake Dora in “America’s Seaplane City,” it became evident that it had more trouble in the water than in the air.

“The water was super choppy, he was kind of wobbling back and forth and … I guess he just lost control,” said Allen, 33, of Leesburg. The plane’s nose tipped into the lake, she said, and the rest of the plane tumbled forward during its descent Friday.

“By the end, the only thing you could see was landing gear, basically,” she said of the overturned boat about 100 yards from Wooton Park’s shoreline.

The pilot of the seaplane, which belonged to Jones Brothers Air and Seaplane Adventures in Tavares, could not be reached for comment, but walked — or swam — away without injury. His seaplane is one of three that have flipped in Lake Dora in the last six months, according to the Tavares Fire Department.

Steve McCaughey, executive director of the Seaplane Pilot Association in Lakeland, said two of those incidents were “totally preventable.”

On March 21, John Cossette's plane flipped in Lake Dora as he was making a U-turn on the lake. He was not injured.

“They were not traveling at speed, no one was in danger — they were taxiing,” McCaughey said. “Quite honestly, it was just improper pilot technique.”

On average, there are total of six fatalities per year related to seaplanes in the country. In Florida alone, there were 67 boating fatalities in 2016.

McCaughey added that Tavares is one of the top five busiest seaplane ports in the country.

In September, Hurricane Irma tore through Central Florida — destroying all of the Tavares’ seaplane docks. The city is inking a contract with a design-build firm now, but completion of the docks are more than a year away with an estimated cost of $8 million to $10 million, most of which could get covered by city insurance.

“We’re antsy; we want it done, but it’s a process,” Tavares economic development director Bob Tweedie said Monday.

McCaughey said the city has been a model seaplane base throughout the U.S.

He said flips like the one Friday often are the result of a chain reaction set off when one of floats becomes and stays submerged.

“It’s pretty technical stuff … he was probably making a turn,” McCaughey said. “It’s kind of a slow-motion type of event.”

For Allen, that much was true.

She snapped photographs as the pilot was safely picked up by boaters and the seaplane slowly tilted forward.

“Thank God somebody was already on the lake to help this guy,” she said.

Original article ➤  http://www.orlandosentinel.com

Piper PA-24-250 Comanche, N7353P: Incident occurred April 13, 2018 at Cambridge-Dorchester Regional Airport (KCGE), Maryland

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore, Maryland

Aircraft landed gear up.

http://registry.faa.gov/N7353P

Date: 13-APR-18
Time: 16:02:00Z
Regis#: N7353P
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 24 250
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: CAMBRIDGE
State: MARYLAND

Beechcraft 58 Baron, N67WM: Incident occurred April 13, 2018 at Easton Airport (KESN), Talbot County, Maryland

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore, Maryland

Aircraft porpoised while landing.

http://registry.faa.gov/N67WM

Date: 13-APR-18
Time: 18:30:00Z
Regis#: N67WM
Aircraft Make: BEECHCRAFT
Aircraft Model: BARON G58
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: EASTON
State: MARYLAND

Eurocopter EC-120B, N120EC: Incident occurred April 14, 2018 at Hanscom Field (KBED), Bedford, Middlesex County, Massachusetts

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boston, Massachusetts

Rotorcraft made a hard landing in the grass, towed to ramp.

Rotorscape LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N120EC

Date: 14-APR-18
Time: 14:26:00Z
Regis#: N120EC
Aircraft Make: EUROCOPTER
Aircraft Model: EC120B
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 133
City: BEDFORD
State: MASSACHUSETTS

Cessna U206G Stationair, N67JA: Incident occurred April 13, 2018 at JAARS-Townsend Airport (N52), Waxhaw, Union County, North Carolina

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charlotte, North Carolina

On landing aircraft encountered a wind gust resulting in a tail strike.

JAARS Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N67JA

Date: 13-APR-18
Time: 14:15:00Z
Regis#: N67JA
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: U206G
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: WAXHAW
State: NORTH CAROLINA

Quad City Challenger II, N635DT: Fatal accident occurred April 15, 2018 in Friona, Parmer County, Texas

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lubbock, Texas

Aircraft crashed in a field under unknown circumstances.

http://registry.faa.gov/N635DT

Date: 16-APR-18
Time: 01:00:00Z
Regis#: N635DT
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: CHALLENGER II SPEC
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: FRIONA
State: TEXAS






PARMER COUNTY, TX (KFDA) -  Two men are dead after the Quad City Challenger II they were flying in crashed in to a field in Parmer County.

The Quad City Challenger II took off from a grass airstrip on a private piece of property roughly 5 miles east of Friona.

Parmer County Sheriff Randy Geries says reports indicate the Quad City Challenger II may not have been in the air too long before it crashed.

"We believe they hadn't been flying long," said Sheriff Geries. "It was just a little bit before dusk [when they took off.] We were told they hadn't been gone that long, but then they became overdue, and after it got dark they began to worry about them.

The plane came to rest in the middle of a wheat field.

The FAA was out investigating in the early morning, tearing through every piece of this wreckage trying to piece together exactly what happened.

The top of the plane had to be weighed down by an engine and a big tire due to the heavy winds.

Reports say the plane was last spotted around 8:30 p.m.

Two hours later, a 911 call was placed, reporting the aircraft and its two passengers had gone missing.

Multiple agencies aided in the search including: the Bovina Fire Dept., the Friona Fire Dept., Friona Police Dept., Parmer County Sheriffs Office and Department of Public Safety.

"We had local fire departments, from both Bovina and Friona come in [to] assist us with the ground search," said Sheriff Geries. "We involved the Department of Public Safety, they sent officers and we also had their aircraft out of Amarillo come and help us."

Sheriff Geries credits advanced technology on a DPS helicopter for helping to locate the downed plane around 1:00 a.m.

The FAA and NTSB are still investigating what caused the crash, but both men were reportedly experienced pilots.

Sheriff Geries called the incident a tragedy.

"We have a lot of people that have small aircraft around in the area," said Geries. "We don't have this happen, its a tragedy when it does happen. We don't know what happened, but we have a couple young men that lost their lives. Our hearts go out to the family. Now it's just trying to figure out what happened so we can educate ourselves and move forward for the family." 

The two passengers onboard the plane have been identified as 25 year-old Clayton Sides from Dimmitt, and 25 year-old Thomas Hefner from Bovina.

A family friend said both men were outstanding citizens and will be missed dearly.



Original article can be found here ➤  http://www.newschannel10.com





PARMER COUNTY, TX (KFDA) - Two people have died after a plane crashed in Parmer County Sunday evening.

Department of Public Safety officials say an aircraft failed to return after taking off from the owner's home. 

The plane was last seen around 8:30 p.m. in flight west of Friona.

Around 10:43 p.m., 911 was called to report the plane missing. 

A ground search was conducted, and a Department of Public Safety aircraft located the plane around eight miles west of Friona.

Both occupants of the aircraft were found dead.

They have been identified as 25-year-old Clayton Sides of Dimmitt and 25-year-old Thomas Jacob Hefner of Bovina.

At this time, Department of Public Safety troopers are securing the scene until Federal Aviation Administration arrive.  The investigation into the crash is ongoing.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.kcbd.com




PARMER COUNTY, TX - Two people are dead following a plane crash in Parmer County Sunday evening. 

According to the Federal Aviation Administration and the Texas Department of Public Safety, the plane crashed in a cornfield approximately 8 miles west of Friona. 

The Federal Aviation Administration said the Quad City Challenger II took off from a private airstrip around 8:00 p.m.

The Department of Public Safety said the plane was reported missing around 10:30 p.m.

Authorities located the downed aircraft around 1:00 a.m. Monday.

The Department of Public Safety identified the victims as Clayton Sides, 25, of Dimmitt and Thomas Jacob Hefner, 25 of Bovina.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the victims were reported to be a flight instructor and a student. 

Federal Aviation Administration investigators are on their way to the crash site and the National Transportation Safety Board has been notified. 

The National Transportation Safety Board will be in charge of the investigation.

Original article ➤ http://www.everythinglubbock.com