Thursday, August 4, 2011

Family rents banner plane to find suspect.



ST. PETERSBURG - Teresa Clovis says most of the people who met her Uncle Michael were left with the same impression.

"Amazing man, amazing man. Much younger than his years," said Clovis.

That, she says, makes this week so much harder to deal with. 74-year-old Michael Cerone died Wednesday from injuries sustained in a Monday morning accident in St. Petersburg.

Police say Lorenzo Lynch ran a red light and struck Cerone's car. Lynch, who is currently on probation, apparently ran away from the scene.

Investigators think he was injured in the crash, but ran anyway because he didn't want to go to jail.

Much to the dismay of Cerone's family, he's still on the run.

The family has been doing TV and radio interviews, pretty much talking to anyone they can to help police get the word out to catch the suspect.

Thursday they decided the "airways" weren't quite enough -- so they took their message to the air.

For four hours, a banner plane circled St. Petersburg reading: "Lorenzo Lynch fugitive on the run. Call police with info."

"It's just something that we can do as a family to help support that to help bring justice and get the word out," said Clovis.

But finding Lynch may be easier said than done.

FOX 13 went to his last known address only to find the house number on the street does not exist.

Even though Clovis says her family is very angry, they don't want Lynch harmed.

"Accept responsibility, turn yourself in, get the medical attention you need and put closure to this," said Clovis.

All this grieving family wants is justice for their favorite uncle. And it appears they'll think outside of the box and up in the air to get it.

"We want to do everything we can to bring justice," said Clovis. 

Source:  http://www.myfoxtampabay.com

Dodge City votes to continue flights to Denver

DODGE CITY — Dodge City officials will ask the federal government to continue subsidizing flights from Dodge to Denver.

The Dodge City Commission voted 3-2 Thursday to seek support for commercial air service to Denver under the Essential Air Service program. Commissioners Michael Weece, Monte Broeckelman and Jim Sherer voted in favor of the proposal, and Commissioners Rick Sowers and Kent Smoll voted against it.

The commission's recommendation will go to the U.S. Department of Transportation, which will make the final decision.

Keeping flights

Southwest Kansas could lose commercial air service if the federal government cuts funding for the Essential Air Service program, which supports commercial flights in small, rural communities.

As a possible solution, Garden City officials have asked Dodge to support a bid from American Eagle, which has offered to provide flights from Garden to Dallas. But American Eagle's bid would cost about $900,000 more than bids from other airlines, prompting Garden City officials to seek financial assistance from Dodge.

Garden City suggested that Dodge City could forgo about $1 million in federal funding to help establish a regional airport in Garden. Under this scenario, Dodge City Regional Airport would have remained open but discontinued commercial fights.

But Dodge City Manager Ken Strobel gave the commission two different options to consider Tuesday:

• Continue the city's current arrangement with Great Lakes, in which the airline provides four daily round-trip flights to Denver.

• Ask Great Lakes to provide two daily flights from Dodge to Denver, and ask American Eagle to offer two flights from Garden City to Dallas.

If the commission had chosen the second option, the city would have applied to participate in the federal Alternative Air Service Pilot Program. Under that scenario, the city would have given up its right to subsidized air service and used part of the subsidy to support American Eagle's service.

The city would then use its remaining subsidy to finance related services, such as a shuttle from Dodge to the Garden City airport.

Strobel said the second option would essentially help the Dodge airport regain its dual-hub status, which was lost when Great Lakes stopped offering flights from Dodge to Kansas City.

"I can't give you guarantees on this, but I think at this point, it is well worth taking a very, very serious look at the alternative program," he said. "I think it serves the people of Dodge City better. I think it provides an opportunity for us that we certainly haven't had up to this point. And it's, frankly, my recommendation to go that direction."

Sherer wondered if Great Lakes could offer three daily flights to Denver.
"How much would that cost?" he said.

Strobel said he could not give a definite answer, but he estimated that adding an extra flight would cost about $800,000.
 

Transport Canada finds no fault in Nanaimo air show crash. Steen Skybolt Biplane, C-FIPS. British Columbia, Canada.

NANAIMO -- Air show organizers followed the rules June 4 when a plane crashed into the Nanaimo airfield, injuring a stunt pilot, a Transport Canada review found.

Bill Phipps, an experienced pilot from Campbell River, was performing acrobatic manoeuvres in the Wings and Wheels air show put on by the Nanaimo Flying Club, when spectators saw his plane hit the ground.

Some observers were critical of how emergency responders were prevented from crossing the field to rescue the injured pilot, but Transport Canada’s review found organizers went by the book that day.

“Our review is complete and all the information available to date indicates the air show was in compliance with Canadian aviation regulations and there is no further action required at this time,” said Sara Hof, Transport Canada spokeswoman.

A Transport Canada observer was present to witness the entire show, meaning the crash was under direct observation by the agency when it occurred. That is a requirements of air shows under the Aeronautics Act.

“We had somebody on the scene,” Hof said.

Still unknown is what caused 71-year-old Phipps to crash. He remains in a Victoria hospital where he is said to be improving.

Spectators were shocked when he smacked his hand-built biplane into the grassy airfield at 2:05 p.m. The crash brought the festive event to an abrupt end.

Sigmund Sort, an air show spectator, said he was angry with the “tentative response” of Cranberry Fire Department members, who were staged near the airport tower almost directly across the runway from the crash scene.

Sort said members stood by for about a minute before heading to the crash site, but the lead emergency responder said his crew was following orders.

REINBOLDT RICHARD A CHALLENGER II, N340BR: Accident occurred August 04, 2011 in Reedsburg, Wisconsin.

NTSB Identification: CEN11LA546 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 04, 2011 in Reedsburg, WI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/26/2012
Aircraft: REINBOLDT RICHARD A CHALLENGER II, registration: N340BR
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot and passenger departed the airport’s south runway for a local flight. Several witnesses reported that the airplane reached an altitude of about 300 feet, the left wing dropped, and the airplane descended and impacted the ground in a near vertical attitude. The airplane’s ballistic parachute system was partially deployed, but the airplane was too low at deployment for the parachute to fully deploy. An examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal any preimpact abnormalities that would have precluded normal operation. A handheld global positioning system (GPS) unit was located in the wreckage and downloaded. A plot from the GPS indicated that the airplane departed from runway 18 and tracked westward in a large circle before it returned to the airport. The track then showed that the airplane descended as it approached the airport from the southwest and was aligned with the runway at an altitude that corresponded with the runway’s altitude. The airplane then climbed to an altitude of 1,027 mean sea level (msl) (about 122 feet above ground level [agl]) and started a left turn. The final GPS point showed the airplane at an altitude of 1,035 msl (about 130 feet agl) and at an airspeed of 47 mph. Based on the events, it is likely that the pilot did not maintain adequate airspeed and the airplane entered a power-on stall during takeoff.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The pilot did not maintain adequate airspeed during takeoff, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall.


On August 4, 2011, at 1115 central daylight time, a Challenger II, kit-built airplane, N340BR, impacted terrain near Reedsburg, Wisconsin. The two occupants received fatal injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged during the accident. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated without a flight plan. The flight originated from Reedsburg Municipal Airport (C35), Reedsburg, Wisconsin, at 1025.

The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspectors stated that several witnesses reported that the airplane reached an altitude of about 100 to 300 feet, the left wing dropped, and the airplane spun down; impacting the ground near vertically. It was also reported that the airplane’s ballistic parachute system, was activated, but too low to the ground to fully deploy.

The airplane came to rest next to a building, in an industrial area located adjacent the airport. The airplane remained in the vertical position, with the bottom of the fuselage against the side of the building. The airplane’s front cabin and fuselage area was crushed aft into the cockpit, both wings and the remaining fuselage sustained substantial damage. The inspectors also noted that fuel was present in the airplane’s fuel tank.

After documentation of the accident site, the wreckage was recovered and a follow-up exam was conducted at local hangar. The three-bladed propeller remained intact; the leading edge of the blades contained small nicks. The parachute system’s cord was partially wrapped around the propeller. The airplane’s fabric had been torn by impact, but otherwise appeared in good shape. Control continuity was established to the flight controls. The engine’s electric starter would not rotate the motor; however, it appeared that the starter sustained impact damage in the accident. The engine was separated from the airframe and shipped to a facility for further examination. A handheld GPS (global position system) unit was located in the wreckage and downloaded.

At the test facility, the engine was placed on a test stand. An adjustment was made to one of the carburetor’s slide mechanism to correct impact damage. Both ignition systems checked operational and the engine was rotated by the electric starter. The engine started and was able to produce power, without hesitation or problems.

The examination of the engine and airframe did not reveal any pre-impact mechanical anomalies.

The data obtained from the GPS unit contained a number of tracklogs dated from September 19, 2009, to August 4, 2011. Downloaded tracklog data included the following parameters for each recorded data point: index, GPS date/time, GPS altitude, distance from previous update [leg length], time since last update [leg time], average groundspeed during the interval [leg speed], average course during the interval [leg course], and latitude/longitude position at the time of the update.

Tracklog data recovered for August 4, 2011 was stored in the tracklog designated Session 35. Data related to this tracklog began at 1019:34 CST with a latitude/longitude position fix corresponding to the Reedsburg’s airport (C35). A review of the airplane's track showed the airplane departing the airport on runway 18. The airplane tracked westward, in a large circle, before heading back to C35, about 45 minutes later. The airplane then descended as it approached the airport from the southwest, aligning with runway 7 at C35. The airplane’s path tracked along runway 7, at an altitude that corresponded to the runway’s altitude. The airplane then climbed to an altitude of 1,027 msl (mean sea level), and started a left turn. The final GPS position location at 11:15:00, the airplane’s (ground) speed was 47 mph, at an altitude of 1,035 msl (approximately 130 feet above ground level).

The automated weather station, located 9 miles east of C35, reported at 1115, wind at from 220 degrees at 6 knots, temperature 82 degrees Fahrenheit, dew point 62 degrees Fahrenheit, visibility 10 miles, scattered clouds at 3,200 and 4,200 feet, and an altimeter pressure setting of 30.02 inches of Mercury.


 NTSB Identification: CEN11LA546
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 04, 2011 in Reedsburg, WI
Aircraft: REINBOLDT RICHARD A CHALLENGER II, registration: N340BR
Injuries: 2 Fatal.
 

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On August 4, 2011, about 1115 central daylight time, a Challenger II, kit-built airplane, N340BR, impacted terrain shortly after departing the Reedsburg Municipal Airport (C35), Reedsburg, Wisconsin. The two occupants received fatal injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged during the accident. The aircraft was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated without a flight plan. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

In an initial report from the responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspectors, several witnesses reported that the airplane reached an altitude of about 300 feet, the left wing dropped, and the airplane spun down; impacting the ground near vertically. It was also reported that the airplane's ballistic parachute system, was activated, but too low to the ground to fully deploy.

The airplane was recovered for further examination.

Two people died when a small plane crashed near the Reedsburg Municipal Airport Thursday morning. The plane nosedived into the ground against a metal barn shortly after leaving the Reedsburg Municipal Airport.
(Brady Ambrose, Reedsburg Times Press / August 4, 2011)

REEDSBURG - Two people died when a small plane crashed near the Reedsburg Municipal Airport on Thursday morning.

Reedsburg Police declined to release the identities of the pilot or passenger, though the aircraft is registered to a Wisconsin Dells resident. It was not clear if the plane's owner was aboard at the time of the crash.

The plane, a Challenger II single-engine ultralight, nosedived into the ground next to a metal barn behind Skinner Transfer and O'Reilly Auto Parts shortly after leaving the Reedsburg Municipal Airport at about 11:15 a.m. Eyewitnesses said the plane was trying to gain altitude when it began to wobble.

"It looked like it was trying to get up and it was wobbling like it wasn't sure of itself and then we heard the bang," said Brittani Pitt, who was heading into O'Reilly Auto Parts with her boyfriend when they saw the plane.

Britt Solverson - co-owner of Solverson Aviation, which operates out of the Reedsburg airport - said based on the accounts he heard from employees who saw the crash, a stall and spin may have caused the crash.

He said plane weight, wind and air density all could factor into such an accident.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the Reedsburg Police Department are conducting an investigation to determine the cause of the accident. The National Transportation Safety Board also will conduct an investigation.

Solverson said he knows three things for sure at this point, but also was still learning details about the crash.

"The flight originated from the (Reedsburg) airport, it was an ultralight aircraft and the pilot was someone from the area," he said.

Moments after she heard the loud crash, Pitt said employees from Skinner Transfer started shouting that a plane went down and that someone should call 911. Pitt said she, her boyfriend and employees began running toward the site of the crash, which wasn't easy to find because there wasn't any smoke.

Bill Hamburg, Pitt's boyfriend, was one of the first people on scene. He said it appeared that the pilot had sustained a major head injury and neither he nor the passenger was conscious.

"It's pretty bad," Hamburg said at the scene.

He said he heard the sound of "tin hitting tin" after watching the plane wobble and guessed that it may have glanced off the top of the shed and heading straight down from there.

"It folded them up," Hamburg said.

The wings of the plane were nearly touching the ground and the cockpit of the ultralight plane was located at a nearly identical depth with the wings. There was no fire or explosion, but a strong smell of gas cropped up almost immediately after the crash, Hamburg said.

Rex Hinze, an employee of Skinner Transfer, didn't see the plane crash, but he heard it. He said it sounded like the plane still was at full throttle when it hit the ground right before the loud bang.


Source: http://www.wiscnews.com

A pilot and a passenger were killed this morning when their ultralight aircraft crashed shortly after takeoff from a municipal airport near Wisconsin Dells, authorities said.

The craft, a single-engine Quad Cities Challenger II, took off from the Reedsburg Municipal Airport at 11:16 a.m., according to a statement from Reedsburg police.

The cause of the crash wasn’t immediately known, and police and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating. The National Transportation Safety Board also will conduct its own investigation.

The craft was registered to an owner in Wisconsin Dells. Reedsburg is about 15 miles from the Dells.

Witnesses told the Baraboo News Republic that the craft appeared to wobble as it tried to gain altitude after takeoff. It then nosedived into the ground and collided with a barn. The pilot had suffered a serious head injury, those witnesses said. Neither he nor the passenger was conscious when employees of nearby businesses arrived at the scene.

Source:  http://www.chicagotribune.com

Two people died when an ultralight plane crashed near the Reedsburg Municipal Airport Thursday morning.

The plane, a Challenger II single-engine, nosedived into the ground next to a metal barn shortly after leaving the Reedsburg Municipal Airport at about 11:15 a.m. Eyewitnesses said the plane was trying to gain altitude when it began to wobble.

The crash killed the pilot and passenger. As of late Thursday afternoon, Reedsburg police hadn't released their identities.

"It looked like it was trying to get up and it was wobbling like it wasn't sure of itself and then we heard the bang," said Brittani Pitt, who was heading into nearby O'Reilly Auto Parts with her boyfriend when they saw the plane.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the Reedsburg Police Department are investigating the crash. The National Transportation Safety Board will also conduct an investigation.

FAA spokeswoman Elizabeth Isham Cory said the pilot didn't file a flight plan because he was operating under visual flight rules, which require only that a pilot be able to see and avoid obstacles.

Bill Hamburg, Pitt's boyfriend, was one of the first people on scene. He said he heard the sound of "tin hitting tin" after watching the plane wobble and guessed that it may have glanced off the top of the shed before plunging to the ground.

Authorities said more details would be released Friday.

Blown Out Tire Sends 3 Planes To Biggs Army Airfield, Texas.

EL PASO, Texas -- Three flights at the El Paso International Airport were diverted to Biggs Army Airfield on Thursday.

Two Southwest Airlines planes and one American Airlines plane were diverted after a Cessna Citation's tire blew on the runway, said an El Paso International Airport official said.

The incident happened around 1:35 p.m. before the plane took off. airport officials said the pilot decided to abort the takeoff.

Federal Aviation Administration officials at the Air Traffic Control Tower made the decision to suspend flight operations so that debris from the blown tire could be removed properly.

Normal operations resumed at 2:08 p.m., airport officials said.

Source:  http://www.kfoxtv.com

Flights Land At Biggs Airfield To Avoid Debris On Airport Runway. Biggs Army Airfield (Fort Bliss) KBIF Fort Bliss (El Paso), Texas.

EL PASO, Texas -- Three flights were diverted to Biggs Army Airfield Thursday afternoon after they were unable to land at the El Paso International Airport.

A private jet blew a tire on the airport's main runway, 4-22, causing the pilot to abort the takeoff, airport officials said.

That prevented other aircraft from landing from 1:35 p.m to 2:08 p.m.

Confused passengers onboard two Southwest Airlines and one American Airlines flight found themselves re-routed to Biggs Army Airfield on Fort Bliss.

One even called the ABC-7 newsroom to find out what the problem was.

A viewer who said her mother was on one of the Southwest flights told ABC-7 her mom reported "people are being patient but children are getting restless."

According to the woman, a flight plan had to be created to get the planes from Biggs to the airport and that kept the planes on Fort Bliss property for a couple of hours.

Passengers were told to close all window shades due to the extreme heat and minimal airflow in the cabin, the woman said.

Airport officials were not able to confirm this information.

Flights resumed once airport employees removed debris from the blown tire and inspected the runway. 

Source:   http://www.kvia.com

Why 2 Blue Angels Didn't Fly On Thursday


SEATTLE -- There was some confusion on Thursday over why two Blue Angels didn't fly during their first practice for this year's Seafair Air Show.

Four Blue Angels took to the skies over Lake Washington to practice their air show, but two never left the ground.

KIRO 7 Eyewitness News reporter Chris Legeros was told at first that there were some maintenance issues. By the time he got to Boeing Field, security had asked a KIRO 7 live truck to leave the Angels parking lot, and news crews weren't allowed inside.

Then, Angel jet No. 5 was firing up, and there was a loud pop.

"There was a large backfire and then flames came out the back," said Jann Berry, a Angels fan.

But a Blue Angels public affairs officer said there was no need for alarm. The fuel mixture was wrong in No. 5, causing a backfire. The mis-mixture isn't uncommon, a Blue Angels official said.

Lt. Katie Kelly said the decision to fly only four jets was not linked to any mechanical problem. Apparently four of the pilots had their practice time cut short when air traffic delayed their departure.

Captain Greg McWhirter decided to give four jets more time to get their bearings over the city.

"So, this allowed them to make sure they had the lay of the land and had all their visual checkpoints in line, and because of this, two of the aircraft didn't fly. And this allowed the maintenance team to perform some maintenance that will actually put them ahead of the weekend," said Lt. Katie Kelly.

The Navy said the reason pilots stayed on the ground was not because of a mechanical problem but rather because they were familiar with their checkpoints for the performance.

Some Angels fans who showed up the Lake this afternoon, admitted they were a little disappointed that the full formation didn't fly.

The Navy says the full formation of six jets will practice Friday afternoon.

During the Blue Angels practice, an officer told KIRO 7 Eyewitness News that another plane had violated Blue Angels airspace.

Then, 20 minutes later, the officer said there was misinformation and that no one had violated the airspace.


Tukwila residents can expect to continue to hear more aircraft noise this week with the Blue Angels of the U.S. Navy in Seattle for Seafair.

The Blue Angels are headquartered at the Museum of Flight in Tukwila, using King County International Airport to take off and land.

The flight schedule for the remainder of the Blue Angels stay follows:

Thursday, Aug. 4

Air show practice flights:

10 a.m.- noon and 1:20-2:30 p.m.

Friday, Aug. 5

Air show practice flights:

1:30-3 p.m.

Saturday, Aug. 6

Air show performance:

1:30-3 p.m.

Suday, Aug. 7

Air show performance:

1:30-3 p.m.

Tuesday, Aug. 9

Mid-morning, Blue Angels will depart

NOTE: Seafair’s military air show involves a variety of aircraft and  operational times; and not all aircraft originate from King County International Airport.

Flag carrier Garuda Indonesia announces new plans for Citilink ahead of spin-off.

Flag carrier Garuda Indonesia has announced new business plans for its low-cost carrier (LCC) brand Citilink ahead of a plan to spin-off Citilink as a separate business entity in the first quarter of 2012.

The newly appointed advisor to Garuda’s board of directors for Citilink development, Con Korfiatis, told a press conference on Wednesday afternoon that the plans would include a “very thorough overall brand refresh” for Citilink, including a new livery design, new website, a new cabin interior design, new advertising and marketing strategies and new cabin crew uniforms.

“The whole process will take approximately four to six months to roll out,” Korfiatis said at the launch of Citilink’s new livery in Garuda City Center at Soekarno-Hatta International Airport in Cengkareng, Banten.

Garuda finance director Elisa Lumbantoruan said the spin-off process would make it easier for Citilink to expand its business, as the LCC could make decisions without consent from Garuda.

“This way, Citilink will become much more independent,” he said.

Elisa said the planned business expansion included the acquisition of five new Airbus A320 narrowbody airplanes to strengthen the Citilink fleet of five Boeing 737-300s and one 737-400.

“The five A320s will be acquired through leasings from Airbus with a security deposit of US$750,000 per month per plane,” he said, adding that the planes would arrive in Jakarta in several phases.

“The first airplane is expected to come either this month or in September, while each of the rest will follow next October, November, December, and February,” he said, adding that as the new Airbus A320 arrived, Citilink would phase out its Boeing 737 airplanes.

In the long run, Citilink also expects the arrival of 25 new Airbus A320s, recently ordered by Garuda from Airbus at the Paris Air Show in June, starting from 2014, he said.

All Citilink pilots would undergo retraining to qualify them to fly the Airbus airplanes, he said.

“The retraining will hopefully begin in the fourth quarter.”

Meanwhile, maintenance of the Airbus jetliners would be undertaken at the Garuda Maintenance Facility (GMF) Aero Asia at the airport area, just the same as other airplanes operated by Garuda and Citilink.

“A320 is nothing new to GMF as it has undertaken the maintenance service of numerous A320s operated by many other airlines,” Elisa said.

He said the LCC airline also planned to significantly expand its route growth in the upcoming years.

Citilink currently serves 10 domestic routes connecting Jakarta to Surabaya, Denpasar, Medan, Banjarmasin, Balikpapan and Batam. The LCC also serves the route linking Surabaya with Balikpapan, Banjarmasin and Makassar.

Citilink plans to serve destinations in the eastern part of Indonesia and regional routes by flying to Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, Singapore and Australia, Elisa said.

He said the LCC was forecast to carry 2 million passengers this year and aimed to reach 8.3 million passengers by 2013.

Source:  http://www.thejakartapost.com

Peanuts for kin of India Air Force pilots killed in crashes.

NEW DELHI: Life in India comes cheap, especially if it's in service to the nation. First, young rookie pilots are made to fly aging fighters like MiG-21s, which do not have modern flying aids. Or, soldiers are forced to battle heavily-armed terrorists without proper bullet-proof jackets or helmets.

And then, if they are killed, the government gives their families just Rs 10 lakh to Rs 15 lakh as ex gratia. Take the case of Flying Officer Suraj Pillai, 24, who was killed on Tuesday afternoon after his MiG-21 went down while on a training mission at the Nal airbase near Bikaner in Rajasthan.

Pillai's family will get only Rs 11 lakh as ex gratia from the Union government. Yes, of course, they will also get Rs 53.5 lakh under the IAF's group insurance scheme, apart from some family pension. "Military aviation is an inherently risky business, and when coupled with old aircraft and poor maintenance, it becomes deadly," said a senior officer.

"There is certainly a case for increasing the ex gratia given by the Union government. Premiums for the group insurance, after all, are deducted from the salary of the officer concerned," he added.

The overall compensation package in the Army, incidentally, is even worse. If an officer dies in an accident during the "course of duty" or in "violence by terrorists", his family is entitled to an ex gratia of Rs 10 lakh. The Army Group Insurance, in addition, pays Rs 30 lakh. The ex gratia goes up to Rs 15 lakh if the officer is killed in actual counterinsurgency operations or border skirmishes. It becomes Rs 20 lakh during "enemy action in war or war-like engagements, which are specifically notified".

For "battle casualties", there is also "liberalized family pension", 75% air and rail concessions, and allotment of "oil product agencies" under 8% defence quota, among other benefits.

1,000 aircraft lost by Indian Air Force in crashes since 70s

Wreckage of a MiG-21 fighter aircraft crash, soon after taking off from Naal airfield in Bikaner district.
PTI Photo

NEW DELHI (PTI): In the last 40 years, the Indian Air Force has lost 1000 aircraft in accidents of which 39 per cent were caused by pilot error.

A Parliamentary Committee report on Wednesday said that, the IAF has lost 999 aircraft since the 1970s and human error and technical defects were the main cause behind these crashes.

One MiG 27 had crashed in Biakaner yesterday in which the pilot was killed.

"In 39.5 per cent of the cases, technical defect is the cause and in 39 per cent of the cases, human error was found to be responsible," the report said.

The Committee was informed by the IAF that of these 999 accidents, 12 cases were being investigated by the service.

Servicing error caused 1.6 per cent of the accidents wheras nine per cent of the crashes were caused by bird hit and the remaining were because of the errors by the Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL).

Most of the accidents have involved the MiG series aircraft which are on their way out of service and are planned to be phased out in next four to five years.

Source:  http://www.brahmand.com

Chopper taxi service awaits government nod. Jodhpur, India.

JODHPUR: The state may soon have helicopter taxis provided the government gives its nod on a proposal to start chartered air services.

Affluent trusts have submitted a proposal for the air taxi service to the government through the Jodhpur divisional commissioner recently.

Once launched, the service will have a fleet of dedicated helicopters which can not only be availed by tourists for travel across the state but also by business magnates and corporate houses.

Initially, the proposal has been floated considering the religious areas of interest in the state and most of the trusts behind the proposal are basically the religious trusts. However, the service is likely to be extended to anyone willing to avail it as the state is grappling with an abject lack of qualitative and quick means of transport specially in view of long and exhausting distances.

Jodhpur divisional commissioner R K Jain said the state has been cut off in terms of air connectivity, particularly when it comes to chartered flights and has been a hurdle on prospects concerning both tourism and industry. "Though considerable improvement in surface transport has taken place in the past few years but hardly any initiation has been taken with regard to air connectivity. The growth rate of the state can be further expedited with faster mode of transport," he said highlighting that 18 prosperous religious trusts of the state have offered to fund a fleet of helicopters and run it on "no loss no profit" basis.

Suggesting a broad action plan for the proposal, Jain said, "I have proposed to the government that if the proposal is approved, these trusts are ready to run this service through a properly managed mechanism."

He said in western Rajasthan, Barmer and Jaislamer are emerging as energy hubs and global corporates are setting up their operations in oil and gas. Further, Jodhpur is becoming an educational hub with a full-fledged handicraft industry, apart from the emerging tourism industry in the state. "Considering these factors, there is an urgent necessity of strengthening the air infrastructure here. Even the industries also approved the idea that an immediate beginning can be made by introducing helicopter services, which practically has no gestation period and will propel the prospects of the state," Jain added.

Welcoming the idea, Govind Singh Rathore, a tourism entrepreneur, said there are many global tourists who skip some important destinations due to absence of proper air connectivity or due to absence of some quick means of transport keeping the long distances in mind. "This service will result in not only further exposure of the state as a tourist destination but also result in spurt in the flow of tourists," Singh asserted.

Pilot surprised by F-16s • Two F-16 fighters intercept 75 year old woman's plane. NORAD Fighters Respond to Aircraft Near Chicago.

http://www.norad.mil/News/2011/080311.html
 
A 75-year-old South Barrington pilot got the surprise of her life when her small plane was intercepted by two F-16 fighter jets Wednesday night after it entered restricted airspace temporarily put in place for President Barack Obama’s visit to Chicago.

The jets were scrambled from Toledo by the North American Aerospace Defense Command at 5:34 p.m. after the Kitfox Model 2 flew into temporarily restricted airspace, said NORAD spokesman Lt. Michael Humphreys.

NORAD officials said the plane did not have a radio, forcing the command to scramble the jets in order to identify it. The jets intercepted the plane, forcing it to turn around and return to its home airport of Mill Rose Farm, Humphreys said.

The airport is basically a grass landing strip in the middle of a residential area owned by the Rose family of South Barrington. The FAA has record of several aircraft registered to the family’s patriarch, William R. Rose, who died in April 2010 at age 83.

The pilot, Myrtle Rose — wife of William R. Rose, who was among the founders of the village of South Barrington — was flying the plane by herself, South Barrington Deputy Police Chief Ray Cordell said.

“She was unaware that she had entered restricted air space,” Cordell said, adding that Rose didn’t seem shaken. “Surprised was probably the right term.”

An employee at Rose Packing Company Inc., which owns Mill Rose Farm airport, declined to comment. Rose herself could not be reached for comment.

For the quiet bedroom community of South Barrington, it’s the most excitement the village of roughly 4,500 people has seen in years.

“We do not have fighter jets flying over the village very often,” Cordell said.

South Barrington police got involved after receiving a call from Illinois State Police notifying them that the Federal Aviation Administration was looking for the pilot.

Cordell said Rose gave a statement to the FAA and that the agency “didn’t believe that there was any threat.” FAA spokeswoman Elizabeth Isham Cory said the agency’s investigation could take several weeks.

“With these types of Temporary Flight Restriction violations, there are no lines drawn in the air; it’s sometimes a little hard to tell where you’re at,” said NORAD spokeswoman Stacey Knott. “Typically, it’s just a mistake.”


SOUTH BARRINGTON, Ill. (AP) Two F-16 fighter jets intercepted a plane flown by a 75-year-old woman when it entered restricted airspace during President Barack Obama's Chicago visit.

The North American Aerospace Defense Command confirms to The Daily Herald that the jets were summoned from Toledo, Ohio, on Wednesday afternoon. NORAD spokesman Lt.

Michael Humphreys says the jets intercepted Myrtle Rose's Kitfox Model 2 and she turned around.

Police say the South Barrington woman was flying the plane by herself and wasn't aware she was in restricted airspace. They say she didn't seem shaken, but was surprised.

South Barrington is a northwestern Chicago suburb with about 4,500 residents. Obama was in Chicago for a birthday fundraiser.

Information from: Daily Herald, http://www.dailyherald.com

Lynden, Washington man sentenced for spotlight on Border Patrol helicopter.

Credit: KING

Federal prosecutors say a Lynden, Wash. man used this light to 'blind' the pilots of a Border Patrol helicopter.

by KING 5 News

NWCN.com

SEATTLE – A Lynden man has been sentenced for shining a spotlight on a U.S. Border Patrol helicopter.

Wayne Groen, 42, will spend 60 days in federal custody, and 90 days under home electronic monitoring. In addition, he receives 120 hours of community service, and must pay a $5,000 fine.

Last September, Groen said he stepped outside his home to investigate a loud noise, shining a spotlight at a Blackhawk helicopter.

Prosecutors said said the spotlight was on the helicopter for five minutes, and it temporarily blinded the pilot, who was wearing night-vision goggles.

The helicopter was about 600 feet off the ground at the time of the incident. 


A Lynden man who shined a spotlight on a U.S. Customs and Border Protection helicopter patrolling over his home in September was sentenced to two months in prison in U.S. District Court in Seattle Thursday, Aug. 4.

U.S. District Judge Thomas S. Zilly also sentenced Wayne Groen to 90 days of home detention, 120 hours of community service, three years of probation and a $5,000 fine.

According to records filed in the case and testimony in the trial:

At about 9:35 p.m. Sept. 22, the Customs Air and Marine division helicopter was patrolling the U.S.-Canada border near Lynden. The pilot was wearing night-vision goggles and was blinded by a spotlight coming from the ground. The co-pilot had to help the pilot to fly out of the area.

The helicopter returned soon after to find the source of the spotlight, and pilots and investigators on the ground determined the light was coming from the vicinity of Groen's home. When an agent on the ground drove up Groen's street, Groen shined the spotlight at him and got out of his car with the spotlight in his hand.

In April, a jury found Groen guilty of incapacitating an individual during the authorized operation of an aircraft but acquitted him of interference with the authorized operation of an aircraft.

The statutory maximum for Groen's charge is 20 years in prison, with the prosecution recommending a sentence of 10 months. The defense argued for no prison time, requesting instead that Groen get one year of probation, pay a $5,000 fine and do 120 hours of community service.

12 Missing World War II Army Airmen Buried at Arlington National Cemetery





ARLINGTON, Va. - All their lives, Charles Durgin and his brother Jack heard stories of a man they never met named "Uncle Fred."

"He was the guy who was always living a little care free, wanting to be on the edge a little bit," said Charles Durgin.

His name was Staff Sgt. Frederick Harris and in World War II, he served as a tail gunner of a B-24 bomber nicknamed "Shack Rat."

The Durgin family never knew what happened to Fred.

"I'd heard rumors and stuff about how he went missing and maybe it was a volunteer mission and no one really knew the details," said Jack Durgin.

What is known is that in October 1943, Harris and 11 crewmates took off from this airbase on New Guinea for a reconnaissance mission and disappeared.

The fate of the "Shack Rat" and her crew stayed a mystery until August 2003, when a crew member's ID card was found in New Guinea. But the site was so remote, forensic crews couldn't reach the location until 2007.

The Durgins and the families of the “Shack Rat's” 11 other crew members soon received a call from the Pentagon, asking the families to provide DNA to help in identifying remains that were found at the site. Charles said, "Nobody expected it, no one hoped for it, actually we didn't even know anyone was looking for anyone and they told us there are teams of military personnel looking all the time."

After a long process, the 12 members of the "Shack Rat" were finally identified, and given full honors in a joint burial at Arlington National Cemetery. The ceremony marked the end of a six-decade mystery, but the beginning of a generation's new appreciation of life, and death.

For Jack Durgin, it is a lesson he can now share with future generations of his family.

"Arlington is a lot more than headstones, and to make that connection, we've got to realize every headstone, every family has a story,” said Jack.

And after 68 years, the crew of the “Shack Rat's” story has an end.

The crew of the “Shack Rat” was laid to rest in section 60 of Arlington National Cemetery. It is the area that contains most of the present day casualties from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Their names are listed below:

1st Lt. Jack E. Volz
2nd Lt. Regis E. Dietz
2nd Lt. Edward J. Lake
2nd Lt. Martin P. Murray
2nd Lt. William J. Shryock
Tech. Sgt. Robert S. Wren
Tech. Sgt. Hollis R. Smith
Staff Sgt. Berthold A. Chastain
Staff Sgt. Clyde L. Green
Staff Sgt. Frederick E. Harris
Staff Sgt. Claude A. Ray
Staff Sgt. Claude G. Tyler

Boeing Pilots Draw "747" in the Sky as They Zig-Zag Across the U.S.


Testing planes can be pretty mundane. You fly a new tube of metal around for hours and hope nothing goes wrong. So it's pretty cool that the folks at Boeing are having such a fun time testing their snazzy new 747.

Yesterday, Boeing pilots flew a new 747-8 freighter up, down, and across the country, drawing "747" with their flight path.

It's the second time Boeing's gotten press for doing something strange but totally fun, as they prepare to ship the new plane out to customers starting next month.

Read more:  http://blogs.seattleweekly.com

Plane makes emergency landing at Space Coast Regional Airport (KTIX), Titusville, Florida

A small plane made an emergency landing at Space Coast Regional Airport in Titusville after smoke was reported in the cockpit, fire officials reported.

Two people were seen running away from the unidentified aircraft about 12:50 p.m. today, after the plane landed at the airport, located at 355 Golden Knight Blvd., fire officials reported.

“They diverted the airplane from wherever they were going and they made an emergency landing,” said Scott Gaenicke, spokesman for the Titusville Fire Department.

“There were two people onboard but no one was injured.”

Titusville Fire Department crews responded to runway 9/27 where the aircraft was sitting. No flames were seen. An investigation is underway.

Two emergency landings reported at Indianapolis airport Thursday

An airport official says a fire was spotted in a military aircraft's landing gear, after landing at the airport around 9:30 am. Officials say the fire was reported while taxiing.

Indianapolis— Airport officials say an aircraft leaving Indianapolis to Boston experienced a brake problem around 1:30 Thursday. The plane turned around and landed back in Indianapolis.

There were 52 people aboard the aircraft.

The incident was the second reported emergency landing at the Indianapolis International Airport Thursday.

An airport official says a fire was spotted in a military aircraft’s landing gear, after landing at the airport around 9:30 am. Officials say the fire was reported while taxiing.

The King Air 200 Turboprop was not en route as planned. The plane was reported to have taken off and landed in Indiana.

Two people were aboard the flight. No injuries are reported.

Officials say the fire was small and involved the left main gear. It was quickly extinguished. Emergency responders remained on the scene to monitor the temperature of the gear area to ensure it was cooling properly. 

Source:  http://www.fox59.com

Germany: Radar system could makes runways safer

WACHTBERG, Germany, Aug. 4 (UPI) -- German researchers say a new sensing system to spot debris on a runway could prevent disasters like the 2000 crash of the Concorde in France that killed 113.

Parts often become detached from aircraft during the stresses of take-offs and landings, putting subsequent runway users at risk as was the case with the Concorde, which ran over a piece of metal, bursting a tire that sent debris into a fuel tank, causing it to catch fire.

Currently, airport workers must periodically drive up and down runways looking for such debris, a time-consuming an error-prone process.

Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institutes in Germany say the new system can monitor runways continuously for debris and warn of any dangers.

"Our technology would have prevented the Concorde tragedy from happening," Fraunhofer researcher Helmut Essen said.

"Devices installed all along the runway continuously scan the surface," he said. "They can detect even the smallest of items, such as screws, but the system will only issue a warning if an object remains on the runway for a longer period of time. A windblown plastic bag or a bird resting briefly will not set off the alarm."

The system consists of infrared cameras, optical 2-D and 3-D cameras, and networked radar sensors.

Initial testing will begin at Cologne-Bonn airport this fall, researchers said.

Fuselage of Caribbean Airlines plane was in good condition. Boeing 737-800, 9Y-PBM, Performing Flight BW-523. Georgetown, Guyana.

Preliminary investigations into the crash of a Caribbean Airlines plane in Guyana indicate that the aircraft split in almost separate pieces after its front landing gear broke off on impact.

Evidence gathered at the crash site on the outskirts of the Cheddi Jagan International Airport in Guyana suggests that the fuselage of the Boeing 737-800 aircraft was in good condition before Flight BW523 landed in rainy weather at 1.32 a.m. on Saturday with 163 passengers and crew on board, aviation sources close to the ongoing investigation into the accident told the Express yesterday.

The Boeing aircraft travelled along the runway, broke through a perimeter fence and stopped in a ditch not far from a 200-foot ravine, more than a mile from the terminal building of the airport.

There were no fatalities during the crash, but 35 people were treated for injuries at two medical facilities in Guyana.

Local, Guyanese and United States investigators were at the site yesterday, continuing the probe into the crash.

Director general of Trinidad and Tobago's Civil Aviation Authority Ramesh Lutchmedial is part of several teams conducting onsite enquires into the accident.

Probers have found that the aircraft broke apart at one of its seams, near the front of the aircraft. Seats in the aircraft were not damaged.

The plane, which is said to have cost about US$48 million, was leased by Caribbean Airlines in 2009 from a company called CIT Aerospace, which has offices in Ft Lauderdale, Florida, USA. Final results of the investigation could take about a year, officials have said.

Caribbean Airlines is paying US$500 to passengers on the flight, amounting to more than US$78,000.

The airline has offered counselling to affected passengers as well as pilot Fareed Dean, first officer Jason Naipaul and cabin attendants working the service, which originated in New York, USA, then flew to Trinidad, with its final destination being Guyana.

Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) in the United States were also at the site again yesterday.

The aircraft's flight recorder was retrieved intact from the aircraft and sent to the NTSB's Washington, DC, labs earlier this week.

Analysis of the flight data from the recorder, commonly called a "black box", was expected to have started immediately.

Caribbean Airlines held an interfaith service for staff members at its Piarco headquarters yesterday.

Sources close to the airline said it has not had cancellations by passengers since the incident.

Cardiac arrest? Here's a sandwich. Ryanair Charges for Sandwich Used to Treat Passenger for Cardiac Arrest.

Who needs CPR when you can have a soda?

Although European flight attendants are mandated to know first aid, one family says that when a relative went into cardiac arrest during a flight, the baffled flight crew didn’t deliver life-saving CPR, but instead delivered a sandwich and soda…and charged for it.

"We want Ryainair to apologize," Billie Appleton said, according to the Aftonbladet newspaper.

Appleton says her stepfather, Per-Erik Jonsson, 63, went into cardiac arrest during a flight from England to his home in Sweden. When he lost consciousness, his wife alerted the staff but they were unprepared to render treatment, Appleton told the paper.

“They said he had low blood pressure and gave him a sandwich and a soda,” she told the paper. “And they made sure he paid for it.”

Appleton is a nurse and apparently put her medical skills to use. She slapped her stepfather on the chest, which got him breathing again, she told the paper.

Once the Swedish man appeared to stabilize, the flight crew presented the family the bill for the soda and sandwich, she said, according to the paper.

A Ryanair spokesman told The Local that the flight crew handled the situation correctly.

“In line with procedures for such cases a Ryanair cabin crew suggested a diversion to the nearest airport or to have an ambulance on stand-by on arrival at Skavsta, so that the passenger could receive medical treatment," he said, according to The Local.

Jonsson’s family contradicts Ryanair’s memory of the events and says there was no ambulance awaiting their arrival.

FOX 29 Investigates: Pilot Fighting For What He Believes Is Owed - Jason Flood - Bellanca 8GCBC Scout, Heads Up Advertising, N87020: Accident occurred August 02, 2011 in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey

FOX 29

 Philadelphia News, Weather and Sports from WTXF FOX 29  


FRANKLINVILLE, N.J. -   A FOX 29 investigation: a young New Jersey pilot survives a devastating crash only to learn that his employer does not hold the important insurance policy that is vital in getting him back on his feet.

Jeff Cole and FOX 29 Investigates have the story tonight of Jason Flood and his fight for what he believes he's owed.

A warning, some of the images in this report are hard to look at.

"...This is what it's made to do. Doing the aerobatics--flips, rolls, spins..." said Flood.

Jason Flood is happy when he's around his aerobatic plane. He feels pure joy when he's strapped in its seat, control in hand---defying gravity.

"Free. I'm at home. It's a place of enjoyment. It's freedom. It's what I love..." said Flood.

Flood is a 23-year-old pilot who flies out of a small airfield near his Franklinville, New Jersey home. However, every time he soars, he remembers the day that he came tumbling to earth.

"...August 2nd. was a very devastating, life changing event for me..." he said. "I can't talk. I am in a strange room trying to figure out where I am. I can't get up to go to the bathroom. My life changed that day."

August 2nd., 2011, He's is flying low trying to hook-on an advertising banner to pull above beach goers along the Jersey Shore. Suddenly, the engine quits and Flood spirals down.

Federal Investigators found that the 20-year-old pilot made an error.

Flood says he had just moments to lift the nose of the aircraft before it slapped the earth.

"On the scene you could hear in the police recordings they said this doesn't look good," Flood said.

Jason Flood was knocked-out. Rescue workers found him bent-over and bloodied in the cockpit. Pictures show his crumpled body in the yellow tee-shirt. Flood had suffered massive injuries including broken bones, organ damage and internal bleeding.

Flood was eventually rushed to Camden's Cooper Hospital where, after 3 weeks in a coma and multiple surgeries, he emerged with rods and pins holding his broken body together.

"...How did you survive?" asked FOX 29's Jeff Cole.

"By the grace of God..." he replied.

Jason Flood's rehab was painful and long. Furthermore, he says it was made more difficult when he learned the family friend who'd hired him to fly banner planes failed to carry state-required insurance that would have gone a long way to help him get back on his feet."

That man is Herbert Degan of Woodbine, New Jersey. He can be seen behind the wheel of the Lexis recording FOX 29's Jeff Cole and his crew with his cell phone.

You can see Degan in happier times with Jason Flood in a photo posted on a web site which documents aerobatic air shows. They're also side by side in a video of a fund raiser held for Flood.

According to a State of New Jersey Workers Compensation Order, Degan's banner business Heads Up Advertising, LLC, which is under his and his wife's names, was uninsured. It did not carry state-mandated workers' compensation insurance.

While the Degan's did pay Flood his weekly wages of about 200 bucks for half a year in 2012, Flood's won a 190,000 dollar workers' compensation judgment against Heads Up Advertising and the Degan's, but he has not collected.

And there's something else you should know about Herbert Degan. He's an air traffic controller at the Atlantic City Airport. He's directed aircraft to depart and land safely for 22 years. In fact, he's listed as the "safety rep." at the Atlantic City air traffic control Tower for the National Air Traffic Controllers Union.

Jeff Cole tried to talk to Herbert Degan, but as he approached his SUV, he noticed his young son in the back seat, so he asked Degan to take his card so they could talk later.

Degan would not talk. His bankruptcy attorney, in an e-mailed statement to FOX 29, accused Jason Flood and his parents of spreading "venomous lies" about the Degan's.

He wrote that the Degan's would like "nothing more than to respond" but are unable to because the "Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Case is still pending."

Herbert Degan and his wife filed the Chapter 7 bankruptcy in November of 2013 claiming that they owe between One-million and 10-million dollars.

Listed as creditors: Jason Flood for his 190,000 dollar workers' comp. judgment and the State of New Jersey for almost 1.2-milion dollars, most of it for Flood's medical bills. Those bills have now been cut to $400,000 and paid by a special state fund.

In a recording of the December bankruptcy hearing, Herbert Degan admits his banner business had no workers' compensation insurance at the time of Flood's devastating crash, but claimed it was an accountant's fault.

"He failed to obtain workers compensation insurance for us without us knowing," Degan said.

In the meantime, Jason Flood is back fighting gravity and battling for what he believes he's owed.

"I'm left in the dust, left at the bottom, trampled on again--even after the plane crash," said Flood.

FOX 29 called New Jersey accountant Michael Shumski who's listed on the Degans' bankruptcy filing. He said he did work for Degan's Heads Up Advertising but does not recall Degan asking him to arrange workers' comp insurance. He says he forwards such requests to insurance brokers. The Degan's Attorney calls the crash a "tragic event" which has forever altered the lives of the Floods and the Degans.

Degan's attorney says they will also not respond at this time due to an "open criminal charge" against Jason Flood's father. Flood's father was charged with harassment after he accused the Degan's of lying on their bankruptcy filing after that December hearing. Flood says he'll fight the charge.

Story, video, photo gallery:  http://www.myfoxphilly.com


 FOX 29
 




Bellanca 8GCBC Scout, Heads Up Advertising, N87020: Accident occurred August 02, 2011 in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey

NTSB Identification: ERA11LA437 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 02, 2011 in Egg Harbor Township, NJ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/26/2012
Aircraft: BELLANCA 8GCBC, registration: N87020
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

After the airplane’s fourth unsuccessful attempt to pick up a banner, a witness reported that the airplane was flying about 100 feet above ground level and the wings were "wobbling." The airplane then descended, and spun before it impacted the ground. The pilot stated that he did not have any recollection of the accident or the events prior to the accident. No preimpact anomalies were noted with the airframe or engine during a postaccident examination.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot’s failure to maintain adequate airspeed while maneuvering near the ground, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall.

On August 2, 2011, at 1500, eastern daylight time, a Bellanca 8GCBC, N87020, registered to an individual and operated by Heads Up Advertising, incurred substantial damage when it impacted terrain in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey. The pilot was seriously injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a company flight plan was filed for the Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, banner towing flight. The flight originated from Woodbine Municipal Airport (OBI), Woodbine, New Jersey, about 1450.

The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector stated that the pilot fueled the airplane prior to flying towards the banner pick up area. The pilot attempted 3 banner pickups prior to the accident. He maneuvered the airplane for the fourth attempt but failed to pick up the banner. The banner ground handler looked away and started to prepare the banner for another attempt, when moments later he heard a loud impact noise and observed the airplane had crashed into the ground about half mile away from the pickup area, on the crosswind for the banner tow pattern.

According to a witness, the airplane was observed flying approximately 100 feet above ground level. She noted that the wings were "wobbling" and the airplane was not climbing although it was in a nose up attitude. Next, she saw the airplane begin to "nosedive" and start spinning but was unable to see the airplane impact the ground.

The pilot stated that he did not have any recollection of the accident or the events prior to the accident.

The airplane was manufactured in 1974 and was equipped with a Lycoming O-360 series, 180-horsepower engine. The airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on February 3, 2011. At the time of the inspection, the reported aircraft time was 6698.0 total hours and the recorded tachometer was 2090.15 hours. The tachometer located in the wreckage 2236.91 hours.

The pilot, age 20, held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) second-class medical certificate was issued in May 2011. He reported 600 total hours of flight experience, of which, 65 hours were in the accident airplane make and model.

A post accident examination of the wreckage by the FAA revealed that control continuity was verified to all flight control surfaces. Fuel samples were taken from each wing with no water or contaminants noted. Examination of the engine was performed and the top and bottom sparkplugs were removed and no issues were noted. The crankshaft was rotated by the propeller flange and compression was observed on all cylinders. In addition, spark was obtained from the spark plug leads during the rotation.



 


Published on Mar 17, 2013
PLEASE READ THE DESCRIPTION
WARNING: Graphic material. Viewer discretion is advised.

This is a video montage of photos that were acquired by Jason Flood, an aerobatic pilot based in Southern New Jersey. On August 2, 2011, Jason was flying a Bellanca 8GCBC Scout on a routine banner tow flight when, in the process of picking up a banner, the engine seized on the airplane and he and the aircraft crashed in Egg Harbor Township.

As a result of the accident, Jason sustained the following injuries: crushed left calcaneus heel, right ankle explosion, broken right tibia and right femur, an assortment of broken ribs, lumbar spine explosion, the total loss of his left kidney and spleen, and lastly a ruptured aorta. Jason underwent numerous surgeries to fix his heel, ankle, and tibia with rods and screws as well as the insertion of plates and screws in his body, including rods and screws in his back.

Amazingly, Jason made a full recovery. He took his first airplane flight a mere two months after the accident and flew the family's Piper Cub shortly afterwards. Ten months after the accident, in late June 2012, Jason competed in the Widlwood Acroblast competition in Cape May County, NJ, placing second in the intermediate category out of nine competitors. Not even two months after that Jason flew his first airshow performance since the accident - the airshow taking place at the New Garden Flying Field in Toughkenamon, PA.

Jason would like to thank the Egg Harbor Township Police Department, the Scullville Fire Company, the Cardiff Fire Department, and their respective EMS personnel for assisting in his rescue as well as the EMTs and pilots for the New Jersey State Police's SouthStar Medevac unit, along with staff at AtlantiCare Regional Medicare Center and Cooper University Medical Center in Camden for going above and beyond to ensure Jason got the best medical care possible. He would also like to thank his family and friends for always being by his side during that time, and of course throughout the entire recovery phase and beyond.

You can visit Jason's website at http://www.jasonfloodairshows.com 


Video of Jason's performances at the 2012 New Garden Airshow can be found at http://www.zingeraviation.com .


 
NTSB Identification: ERA11LA437 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 02, 2011 in Egg Harbor Township, NJ
Aircraft: BELLANCA 8GCBC, registration: N87020
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On August 2, 2011, at 1500, eastern daylight time, a Bellanca 8GCBC, N87020, registered to an individual and operated by Heads Up Advertising, incurred substantial damage when it impacted terrain in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey. The pilot was seriously injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a company flight plan was filed for the Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, banner towing flight. The flight originated from Woodbine Municipal Airport (OBI), Woodbine, New Jersey, about 1450.

The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector stated that the pilot fueled the airplane prior to flying towards the banner pick up area. The pilot attempted 3 banner pickups prior to the accident. He maneuvered the airplane for the fourth attempt but failed to pick up the banner. The banner ground handler looked away and started to prepare the banner for another attempt, when moments later he heard a loud impact noise and observed the airplane had crashed into the ground about half mile away from the pickup area, on the crosswind for the banner tow pattern.

According to a witness, the airplane was observed flying approximately 100 feet above ground level. She noted that the wings were "wobbling" and the airplane was not climbing although it was in a nose up attitude. Next, she saw the airplane begin to "nosedive" and start spinning but was unable to see the airplane impact the ground.

The pilot stated that he did not have any recollection of the accident or the events prior to the accident.

The airplane was manufactured in 1974 and was equipped with a Lycoming O-360 series, 180-horsepower engine. The airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on February 3, 2011. At the time of the inspection, the reported aircraft time was 6698.0 total hours and the recorded tachometer was 2090.15 hours. The tachometer located in the wreckage 2236.91 hours.

The pilot, age 20, held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) second-class medical certificate was issued in May 2011. He reported 600 total hours of flight experience, of which, 65 hours were in the accident airplane make and model.

A post accident examination of the wreckage by the FAA revealed that control continuity was verified to all flight control surfaces. Fuel samples were taken from each wing with no water or contaminants noted. Examination of the engine was performed and the top and bottom sparkplugs were removed and no issues were noted. The crankshaft was rotated by the propeller flange and compression was observed on all cylinders. In addition, spark was obtained from the spark plug leads during the rotation.





Jason Flood was supposed to take part in a big aerobatic competition this weekend at Hammonton Municipal Airport. Instead, his fellow pilots are hoping he’ll pull through after being critically injured in a plane crash this week.

“We miss him. We’re all praying for him and hoping everything will be alright," said Dennis Thompson.

Jason, 20, was at the controls Tuesday when a banner plane he was flying went down at a grass field in Egg Harbor Township, Atlantic County, New Jersey.

"It went straight down and it was spinning, straight down into the ground," said a 911 caller.

Firefighters had to cut Jason out of the wreckage.

“It had to be catastrophic to happen, for him not to be able to get out of a situation,” said David Crescenzo who knows Jason. "He's very gifted. Very talented. Very conscientious pilot. He's not a risk-taker."

Jason first flew with his dad when he was 12 and has been flying solo since he was 16. He has a love for aerobatics and flies his own plane when he competes in airshows. On Tuesday, he was flying another plane, trying to pick up or hook an advertising banner, when police say he either lost control or the plane had a mechanical problem. Fellow pilots say they'd be surprised if human error caused the plane to go down.

“He’s a safe pilot. He’s a good pilot, even though he’s young, he’s got more experience than most of these guys you’ll see fly today," Thompson said.

Jason is in critical condition at Cooper University Hospital. It could take federal investigators a year or more to issue their findings on what caused the crash.