Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Incident occurred June 13, 2017 at Memphis International Airport (KMEM), Tennessee



MEMPHIS, Tenn. - A FedEx plane made a scary landing at Memphis International Airport Tuesday afternoon. 

FOX13 learned two of the plane's tires caught fire and all four tires blew on impact.

The fire was put out when the plane landed.

Two people were on board, but nobody was injured.

Three rescue vehicles were on site when FOX13 arrived. 

We learned there will be no impact on departures or arrivals. 

Original article can be found here: http://www.fox13memphis.com

China: Online streaming site to crack down on sales of unregistered aircraft

China's live broadcast app Kuaishou says it will investigate accounts whose owners are involved in the trade of unregistered small planes.

The products that can fly and remain in the sky for extended periods are made in workshops that lack any sort of certification for production or navigation, the Beijing News reported. In addition, buyers have to assemble the aircraft by themselves.

Xie Baogang, with the online username "Feitian Shaojiang," has 250,000 fans on Kuaishou. His personal page displays 327 videos, most of which are about rotary-wing aircraft. Xie's rotary-wing aircraft production factory is located in Dezhou, Shandong province. His products are priced at 130,000 RMB and 350,000 RMB, for single-seat and double-seat aircraft respectively. Other than the engines, which are imported, all other parts of the aircraft are reportedly made by Xie himself.

Xie has been selling rotary-wing aircraft for seven years to hobbyists all across the country.

"The aircraft are very safe and won't fall apart while they are flying," he promised, while at the same time admitting that no buyers will apply for navigation certificates.

"Buyers usually fly the aircraft in the countryside, where supervision is lax. It's even okay to fly in urban areas as long as the aircraft don't take off and land [there]," Xie added.

Zhang Qizhun, director of the aviation law committee of the Beijing Bar Association, emphasized that such activity is illegal. According to China's Civil Aviation Law and Regulations for the Administration of the Airworthiness of Civil Aircraft, aircraft producers have to obtain type and production certificates before they are allowed to design and produce civil aircraft.

Original article can be found here: http://en.people.cn

Quincy Regional Airport (KUIN) manager plans future improvements

Cracks found in the runway at the Quincy Regional Airport.



QUINCY, Ill. (WGEM) -  Quincy City Council approved money Monday for airport improvements.

Aldermen approved paying the bill for a runway re-striping project. Officials say the striping keeps the airport in compliance with the FAA., but work is still needed in other areas at the airport. 

Airport Manager Terrance Ward says the next plan is dealing with bumps that have appeared on the runway. 

"When you're about to take off, you don't need to hit a bump," Ward said. "That's not acceptable. So we mill those off, but you get to a point where that runway starts to degrade and we've gotten to a point where it needs attention."

Ward has put in a request to finish the project in two phases each costing $3 million. He says it's now up to the federal and state governments on how quickly that could be approved.

Story and video:  http://www.week.com

Federal Aviation Administration issues final finding of no significant environmental impact for proposed South Central Regional Airport

Local farmer and landowner John DeRooi 


OSKALOOSA — The Federal Aviation Administration has approved a finding of no significant impact for the proposed South Central Regional airport environmental assessment, meaning that officials can move into the land acquisition phase of the project.

Jim Hansen, chairman of the South Central Regional Airport Agency Board, verified the FAA finding in a telephone interview Tuesday, June 13. He said that copies of the finalized and approved environmental assessment are available at the Mahaska County Courthouse, the Pella and Oskaloosa city halls and from the FAA office in Kansas City.

"We're pleased to have moved the project to this point and we're looking forward to moving ahead with the project," Hansen said. "We intend to keep going [with the project] and hope to work with people."

The proposed regional airport project is planned to be constructed on roughly 582 acres of prime agricultural land north of Highway 163 between the cities of Pella and Oskaloosa. The idea was developed in 2010, and is controlled jointly by the cities of Pella and Oskaloosa, the FAA and Mahaska County via a 28E Agreement signed in 2012.

The proposed airport would not be open to commercial air travelers, and would be utilized by regional corporate airplanes and jets as well as other pilots such as crop dusters. The plan includes constructing three runways, a terminal building and hangar space for as many as 52 aircraft. Once completed and open, the existing airports in Pella and Oskaloosa would be closed permanently. 

Hansen said details of the next steps in the project will be discussed by members of the SCRAA Board during their next meeting, which is scheduled for 6 p.m., Tuesday June 27, at the Oskaloosa City Council Chambers on South Market Street.




"Things are progressing. I think at the next [SCRAA] board meeting, we hope to put out requests for proposals for consultants for the next stage of land acquisition and legal counsel as well," Hansen said.

The project has faced fierce opposition from both local politicians as well as area farmers. Many see the project as catering to the corporate interests of Pella Corp., Vermeer and Musco Lighting in Oskaloosa.

Local farmer and land owner John DeRooi said he was unaware of the FAA finding of no significant impact, and he said he is disappointed to learn of it and also saddened by the project moving forward.

"We've been here 130 years...it hurts," DeRooi said of the possibility of losing any of his family's land. "I just don't understand it. I feel bad about it."

DeRooi said if the project goes forward as planned, he estimates he would lose a portion of the land his family owns and farms, as well as land he rents to another farmer.

"They would take half of the best 50 acres we own, and they would go through the middle of 100 acres of land I rent out," DeRooi said. "It is top land."

DeRooi and his family are one of about at least six different land owners who would be affected by the proposed airport. Calls to the attorney representing several of the landowners—Gary Dickey of Des Moines—were not returned as of 5:40 p.m. Tuesday. 

Hansen said the next phase of the project is to develop a land acquisition plan, hire consultants for that task, hire property appraisers and also develop a funding plan for the project. The estimated $25 million cost of the project is reportedly being split by the cities of Pella and Oskaloosa—at 10 percent each—with a majority 80 percent contribution from the FAA.

"The FAA has asked us for a funding plan, from the cities of Pella and Oskaloosa, for land acquisition. We'll have to decide if we need some funding," Hansen said. "Generally what you do is buy a piece of property or a couple of pieces of property and ask the FAA for carrying costs—like interest."

Hansen explained that if a piece of land was purchased for $100,000, the initial cost would have to be paid by the cities of Pella and Oskaloosa, which would then request from the FAA a reimbursement for the cost.

Members of the SCRAA executive board, including Hansen and Oskaloosa City Manager Michael Schrock and Pella City Manager Mike Nardini, met with FAA officials last week in Kansas City to discuss the project.

Hansen said rumors of a reduction in FAA funding in the proposed federal budget put forth by President Donald J. Trump have not affected planning for the project.

"I don't expect there to be any impact from [Trump's budget]," Hansen said. "We met with the FAA last week—they're just [doing] business as usual."

Mahaska County Supervisor Mark Doland, who has been against the project since its inception, said he was aware of the FAA decision on the environmental assessment.

"I've got a copy of it, but I haven't been able to read it," Doland said of the final report. "It isn't a surprise to me. This is the second and final approval, so it wasn't a surprise."

Doland said due to the Board of Supervisors voting 2-1 earlier this year to leave the 28E Agreement with Pella and Oskaloosa, he does not consider Mahaska County a party to the project anymore.

"I think the stance of the Board of Supervisors is we voted to exit the agreement," Doland added. "As far as we are concerned, we are out of the agreement. My position is we're out."

Doland said the Board of Supervisors are mainly concerned with the possible closure of 220th Street, a prime farm to market road used by local farmers. There have been discussions about making a circular road around the airport to replace 220th Street, but nothing has been finalized, Doland added.

The project now moves forward into the land acquisition phase, Hansen said, which means the properties needed for the project will be examined by consultants and then appraised for value by at least two different independent property appraisers.

Landowners will asked to sell their land and be offered a price for their property first. If those efforts are unsuccessful, eminent domain proceedings would possibly be considered, he added.

"We'll be looking at  probably September [time frame] before we try to acquire the properties," Hansen said.

DeRooi said he doesn't want to sell his family's land, and he feels that the situation may be a potential example of eminent domain abuse. He also said his family intends to hold out as long as possible.

"I'll be of of the last ones left," he said.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.oskaloosa.com

Incident occurred June 13, 2017 at Tallahassee International Airport (KTLH), Leon County, Florida

A United Airlines plane made an emergency landing at Tallahassee International Airport Tuesday afternoon after an odor was reported coming from its cockpit.

Initial reports stated there was smoke, but United Airlines spokeswoman Erin Benson said Flight 1239 made an emergency landing after an odor was reported in the cockpit.  The plane landed safely and taxied at TLH about 5:30 p.m. No one was hurt, Benson said.

The United Airlines 737, which was headed from Miami to Chicago O'Hare, had 155 passengers and crew on board, said Chris Curry, director of aviation at TLH. 

United Airlines is bringing in another plane to take passengers to O'Hare. 

Original article can be found here: http://www.tallahassee.com

Beverly Regional Airport (KBVY) prepares for busy time ahead, future

North Atlantic Air president John Messenger 



BEVERLY — Business is up at the Beverly Regional Airport, after several years of dropping numbers for takeoffs and landings. And it's about to get even busier.

Last year the airport logged 51,105 operations (takeoffs or landings), up from 44,206 in 2014. Over the last seven years, the airport posted its highest numbers in 2010, with 61,000 operations. After dropping for a few years, it has been on a steady increase.

"The traffic count is definitely up and the designation from municipal to regional has had a big effect on our perception in the aviation world," said August Faulstich, vice chairman of the Airport Commission.

Now, airport officials are preparing for an influx of people flying in for the U.S Senior Open at the Salem Country Club June 26 through July 2.

"We (may) even have planes parking on the taxiway because we anticipate running out of room," said airport manager Bob Snuck.

They expect a number of golfers to be coming in on corporate jets, which make up a lot of the airport's traffic even without the tournament.

The airport pumps just over $32.5 million each year into the economy, according to numbers released by the state Department of Transportation in 2014. Airport visitors may spend money dining out at local restaurants or staying in local hotels, Snuck explained.

Beverly happens to be the third-busiest small airport in the state; that doesn't include large airports like Logan in Boston.

In addition to visiting aircraft, the airport has more than 100 planes based there, Snuck said.




Sprucing things up

The airport has also undergone some upgrades recently. Last year it opened a new, $4.2 million administration building. Most of that was funded by the state.

On the Danvers side, North Atlantic Air, Inc. is under new ownership. The company serves as the airport's fixed-base operator, which means it helps with reservations, coordinates when planes are coming in, and can coordinate fueling for aircraft and catering. The company also does maintenance and can also do customs and immigration, as well as international waste removal, according to John Messenger, one of its owners.

Since taking ownership last November, Messenger and Nicholas Burlingham, his business partner, have upgraded their facilities with a new kitchenette and comfortable pilot's lounge with armchairs and a big-screen television.

More plans are in the works. Over the next four years, they plan to demolish the current office and some of the hangars and have them rebuilt to meet the needs of current planes and crew.

He said the service level at the airport has "increased dramatically."

"We're putting our best foot forward," Messenger said.




No bids for restaurant

What the airport still lacks is a restaurant. A second bidding period on the city-owned space within Building 45 yielded no results when it closed last week, Faulstich said. Officials are now advertising the space nationally, hoping to be noticed by a larger chain.

"We need to have a restaurant site at the airport," Faulstich said.

Pilots have to complete three landings and takeoffs every 90 days, Snuck said. For some, this means flying to a nearby airport, getting lunch, and flying back. Some airports even schedule a "fly in" event to attract pilots to a scheduled breakfast.

That can't be done in Beverly.

The nearby industrial park may also draw patrons, Snuck noted, whether it's for lunch or for dinner after work.

Even without the restaurant, both noted that the airport is doing well, and there's "no danger" of it not being around in the foreseeable future.

Story and photo gallery:  http://www.salemnews.com

Randall Airport (06N) owner pushing aviation community proposal

TOWN OF WALLKILL - Wearing an all-white shirt, suspenders, shoes, pants, hat and round, black sunglasses, Charles Brodie finished mowing the lawn at Randall Airport late Monday morning, hopped off his tractor and climbed through a window of his home to meet his guests.

His modest home on the airport grounds, originally a shed and trailer once used by a balloon company, is crammed neatly with tools, cans of oil and model planes besides furniture. And on the walls, in the drawers, on the tables and in the filing cabinets are the plans for Brodie’s longtime dream for his airport - an aviation community.

The idea began before he even bought Randall Airport in 1984 for $285,000.

“If this were a marathon,” Brodie said, “this would be the 26th mile.”

Stan Tso is Brodie’s longtime friend and attorney. He said the time for the aviation community at the airport has finally come. Middletown and the Town of Wallkill are on the upswing, he said, with the opening of nearby Orange Regional Medical Center and Touro College in Middletown.

Sometimes called “airparks” (which Brodie doesn’t like) or “fly-in communities,” the idea is a place where homes and airplanes coexist. Where pilots park their planes in their garages instead of a car.

Brodie, 74, has said that 68 percent of the airport property is “absolutely forever-and-ever non-revenue producing.” That part of the airport cannot be built on because it’s strictly for airport use. But Brodie has 153 adjacent acres that could be developed. The airport has a 2,810-foot runway and is 77.25 acres.

Current plans call for 30 estate homes with access to taxiways that lead to the Randall Airport runway. There’s also 76 proposed homes that could either be one- or two-family homes, apartments or townhouses. Then there’s a 120-room hotel, up to 21 airport hangars and a medical building near East Main Street.

The airport now serves mostly as a parking lot for light aircraft and hang gliders.

This is something Brodie has wanted to change for years. Back in 1990, when Brodie first moved to the airport, his idea was for the project to be completed by 2003.

But his plans got stalled, Brodie said at the time, because of the climate of the aviation industry after Sept. 11. He couldn’t get funding, he said.

By 2006, Brodie’s idea for the aviation community was 55 estate homes and 102 duplexes, triplexes or quadplexes. There was a hotel, conference center and office building. There were plans to include an airplane service station and dealership, which is where he wanted Cirrus Design Corp. to come in. The company competed with Cessna making single-engine, four-seater planes.

“Flying, aviation is my life. It’s what I love most,” Brodie said.

Now, once again, Randall Plains is back in front of the Town of Wallkill Planning Board. It was reintroduced last month as a three-phase plan. Brodie said the plan was given preliminary sketch approval by the Planning Board. Now, developers are beginning the state environmental reviews and working on securing financing. Plans call for the project to break ground in August 2018.

Brodie said he’s received plenty of offers worth millions of dollars over the years to buy the land. But he’s turned it all down. He believes his idea is still the best use for the property.

“I just tell them no, it’s not for sale. It doesn’t interest me,” Brodie said. “The development has to be what the vision says it has to be.”

Read more here:  http://www.recordonline.com

Iowa State Cirrus SR22 (N176CF) sold Monday for $450,000

Iowa State University, Cirrus SR22, N176CF: http://registry.faa.gov/N176CF 

Iowa State University has sold its Cirrus SR22 aircraft for $450,000 to Midwest Aviation Equipment, LLC. The 2011 plane was purchased in 2014 for $470,000 plus the trade-in value of an older plane owned by the university of $28,000.

The plane was appraised in February at $667,712 by a NAAA Senior Certified Aircraft Appraiser, according to documents.

ISU considered using a broker and a bid process to sell the plane. However, after evaluating broker responses to the request for proposal, bid responses and other market factors, ISU decided to sell the plane directly, the Flight Service website says (item 27).

The university had owned a Beechcraft King Air 350 (twin engine), which was purchased in February 2014; and a Cirrus SR22 (single engine) purchased in July 2014 and sold June 12, 2017.

The Cirrus was the plane former President Leath was certified to fly and was damaged while he was piloting. Damage in the appraisal report said the Cirrus struck a runway light at the Bloomington-Normal Airport (KBMI) Illinois in September of 2015.

Common questions about Iowa State's flight program following the reveal of damage done to the plane by former President Leath are addressed on http://www.ur.iastate.edu/flightservice/

University Flight Service has three full-time pilots, according to the fact page. These pilots are ISU employees who are certified to fly both the King Air and the Cirrus aircraft. 

The fact page also said it was well-known, especially when Leath was hired, that he was a pilot. It was reported that President Leath’s ability to fly was considered an asset because it allowed for more flexibility and efficiency in his schedule, according to the fact page.

Before that the university had two planes, a 1977 Beechcraft King Air and a 1978 four-seater Piper PA 28-161. The newer planes were purchased as replacements.

Original article can be found here: http://www.iowastatedaily.com




Iowa State University has sold its Cirrus SR22 aircraft, the school announced Tuesday. Former university president Steven Leath, who left ISU in May, was criticized during his final months in office for how he used the plane.

Midwest Aviation Equipment of Cedar Rapids bought the plane for $450,000, according to documents posted on ISU's website Tuesday. Iowa State had paid $498,000, minus the value of a trade-in, in 2014 for the Cirrus.

"ISU considered using a broker and a bid process to sell the plane," a statement on the website said. "However, after evaluating broker responses to the RFP, bid responses and other market factors, ISU decided to sell the plane directly."

The final purchase price was $24,000 more than the highest bid, according to documents released Tuesday by the university.

Leath left Iowa State in May for the presidency of Auburn University.

Leath, who has a pilot’s license, experienced a hard landing in 2015 while piloting the plane. ISU officials confirmed a year later that the plane sustained more than $15,000 in damage during the incident.

Leath announced in September 2016 that he would no longer pilot any state-owned aircraft, but he would continue to make use of the university’s larger King Air. 

Both pre-owned aircraft had been purchased during Leath's tenure at ISU, replacing older planes. The Cirrus was purchased using unrestricted ISU Foundation funds that were under Leath's discretion. 

An audit by the regents released in December found that some of the flights in which Leath had mixed personal and professional business entered a gray area in terms of compliance with university and regent policies. 

The university has been reviewing its ownership of planes as part of a broad review of the ISU Flight Service. ISU officials said last month that an internal operations review led to “no major changes” in the service’s operation manual and procedure guide.

A draft financial analysis ISU officials provided to the regents in February projected that it would cost the university nearly $33,000 more during the next academic year to contract charter flights rather than use ISU Flight Service. 

The two “summary considerations” that offered at the end of the draft report include:

Keep Flight Service operational “at least for the time being” and open new discussions with the Ames Municipal Airport's new fixed-based-operator, Central Iowa Air Service, to see what further savings are possible.

Allow the ISU Department of Athletics — which makes the most use of the service — to assume administrative oversight and financial responsibility for the service.

Bob Donley, the board's executive director, gave ISU officials in February additional time to gather and analyze the additional information about the operator for the airport. Since then, neither the regents nor the university has released a final draft of the report.

Donley announced last week that he would resign as executive director July 15. The regents will conduct a search for his replacement.

ISU is the only one of Iowa's three public universities that owns aircraft for general use.

The University of Iowa owns three airplanes and one helicopter, according to information provided in September. All four aircraft are used solely for sponsored/funded research at the Operator Performance Laboratory within the College of Engineering, and all of the pilots are part of the research staff.

Original article can be found here: http://www.desmoinesregister.com

Lockheed P2V-5F Neptune, N9855F, Neptune Aviation Services Inc: Incident occurred June 11, 2017 at Ernest A Love Field Airport (KPRC), Prescott, Yavapai County, Arizona

Neptune Aviation Services Inc:   http://registry.faa.gov/N9855F






Shortly after 2pm Sunday, Prescott Fire Department responded to a report of an inbound slurry tanker returning on only one engine. 

The P2 Neptune was returning to the Ernest A. Love airport from the 1,000 acre Tee Fire near Black Canyon City when it's right main prop engine failed.  

Prescott Fire responded two engines and its aircraft rescue truck to the runway to stage until the aircraft arrived.  

The three person crew was able to land the aircraft safely and without injury.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.prescottenews.com

Head Balloons AX7 77B, N30721: Accident occurred June 08, 2017 in Chatsworth, Livingston County, Illinois

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Springfield, Illinois

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N30721

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA223
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, June 08, 2017 in Chatsworth, IL
Aircraft: HEAD BALLOONS INC AX7 77B, registration: N30721
Injuries: 1 Serious, 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On June 8, 2017, about 1630 central daylight time, a Head Balloons AX 77B balloon, N30721, encountered a wind gust while preparing for takeoff that threw the balloon occupants to the floor of the basket. The pilot and one passenger received minor injuries and one passenger received serious injuries. The balloon received minor damage to the basket. The balloon was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The flight was originating from Chatsworth, Illinois when the accident occurred.

Cessna T303 Crusader, N420FC, Darby Pursuits LLC: Incident occurred June 10, 2017 at Morehead-Rowan County Clyde A. Thomas Regional Airport (KSYM), Kentucky

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Louisville

Darby Pursuits LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N420FC

Aircraft on landing, struck the propellers and flaps.

Date: 10-JUN-17
Time: 07:25:00Z
Regis#: N420FC
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: T303
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MOREHEAD
State: KENTUCKY

Cessna 152, N95821, Kent State University: Accident occurred June 12, 2017 at Kent State University Airport (1G3), Portage County, Ohio

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA335 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, June 12, 2017 in Stow, OH
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/03/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 152, registration: N95821
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot reported that, during the landing roll of a solo flight, the airplane landed to the left of the runway centerline. He added that he applied right rudder but overcorrected and that the airplane veered to the right. The student pilot reported that he “panicked” and his leg “got stuck on the right rudder.” The airplane veered off the runway to the right and impacted a ditch.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the firewall.

The student pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilot’s rudder overcorrection during the landing roll, which resulted in a loss of directional control.

Additional participating entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cleveland, Ohio

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Kent State University: http://registry.faa.gov/N95821


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA335
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, June 12, 2017 in Stow, OH
Aircraft: CESSNA 152, registration: N95821
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot reported that, during the landing roll of a solo flight, the airplane landed to the left of the runway centerline. He added that he applied right rudder, but overcorrected and the airplane veered to the right. The student pilot reported that he "panicked" and his leg "got stuck on the right rudder". The airplane veered off the runway to the right and impacted a ditch.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the firewall.

The student pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Tecnam P-2006T, N260JL, Clover Park Technical College: Incident occurred January 12, 2017 at Astoria Regional Airport (KAST), Clatsop County, Oregon

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Seattle

Clover Park Technical College: http://registry.faa.gov/N260JL

Aircraft on landing, nose gear retracted.

Date: 12-JUN-17
Time: 18:15:00Z
Regis#: N260JL
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 206
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ASTORIA
State: OREGON

Piper PA-28-181 Archer, N915PA, TransPac Aviation Academy: Incident occurred August 14, 2017 -and- Incident occurred June 12, 2017 at Chandler Municipal Airport (KCHD), Maricopa County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale

Bird Acquisition LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N915PA

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA487
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, August 14, 2017 in Chandler, AZ
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N915PA

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft on landing, went off the runway and struck a barricade.

Date: 14-AUG-17
Time: 14:44:00Z
Regis#: N915PA
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: CHANDLER
State: ARIZONA

Aircraft on landing, struck the propeller.

Date: 12-JUN-17
Time: 20:35:00Z
Regis#: N915PA
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: CHANDLER
State: ARIZONA

Pakistan International Airlines pilot issued notice for violating rules

KARACHI: The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) has issued a notice to the Pakistan International Airlines’ flight operations chief for operating an aircraft without taking the mandatory rest, compromising air safety, putting passengers’ lives in danger and violating safety laws, it is learnt.

According to sources, the CAA’s acting Flight Standards Director Arif Majeed issued the notice to chief flight operations Uzair Khan for operating the flight without taking the prescribed rest from Toronto to Lahore last month.

The notice, issued on June 2, says: “You, Mohammad Uzair Muhib Khan (ATPL 949) did not avail minimum rest before operating flight on May 26, 2017 in violation of Rule 220 (2) and 240 of the Civil Aviation Rules 1994 and ANO 91.0012 issue 5 of April 7, 2011, relating to flight time, flight duty period, and rest period, for fatigue management.”

When contacted by Dawn, Uzair Khan conceded that he had not taken the mandatory rest owing to domestic issues. Regarding taking the money not due to him also, he said that he would get it adjusted in his salary next month. 

Original article can be found here:  https://www.dawn.com

Sandra Feliciano: Hagerstown, Maryland, pilot helps get air race off the ground



Sandra Feliciano of Hagerstown was a teenager when, as a Civil Air Patrol cadet, she fell in love with flying.

It would be many years later — after marriage, children, divorce, a move and meeting her current husband — that Feliciano would get her pilot's license in 2007 and became a flight instructor in 2010.

When pilots from across the nation arrive for the 41st Air Race Classic on Wednesday at Frederick Municipal Airport, Feliciano will have had a hand in planning the logistics and activities for the female-only competition.

Feliciano, 47, is a member of the Sugarloaf Chapter of the Ninety-Nines Women Pilots in Frederick.

The Ninety-Nines were founded in 1929 by Amelia Earhart and 98 other female pilots to support and encourage women pilots. It now has about 5,000 licensed pilots from 35 countries.

"This air race is not only a fun race and fun thing to do, but it also gets the word out that, hey, women pilots have a place in our aviation framework, structure that we can contribute to, and we're just as good as any of the guys are," Feliciano said.

The three-day, cross-country air race is an annual event, with different starting and ending points. In 2010, Frederick was the end of the race, but this year, it will be the starting point.

It is the oldest airplane race of its kind in the United States, according to a news release.

More than 50 airplanes, with more than 100 female pilots, will arrive at Frederick Municipal Airport on Wednesday. There are pre-race inspections, flights to determine each plane's handicap, classes to take, and activities planned for the pilots, family members who travel with them and the public.

The race begins at 8 a.m. on Tuesday, June 20, with airplanes taking off 30 seconds apart. The public can watch the departures from the airport parking lot.

The racers will have four days to fly the 2,648-mile course from Frederick to Santa Fe, N.M., stopping in between at Coshocton, Ohio; Indianapolis, Ind.; Decorah, Iowa; Bemidji, Minn.; Spencer, Iowa; Abilene, Kan.; Ardmore, Okla., and Plainview, Texas.

Prizes are awarded at the finish on June 23 in Santa Fe for each leg and for the overall race, with times based on each plane's handicap.

"There's a lot of logistics involved in it. We've been actually working on this for about three years now," Feliciano said.

She has been working on hotel arrangements and will help out the main organizer, Lin Caywood, who is racing.

Only 1 to 2 percent of Americans are pilots. Of that number, only about 6 percent are women.

For that reason, the Ninety-Nines provide much-needed support, encouragement and camaraderie for female pilots.

"I just love flying. ... I think more women should get up and fly and get their pilot certificate," said Feliciano, a nurse consultant who does contract monitoring for prison health care in the western half of Maryland.

Tickets to many of the events are still available. For more information, go to www.sugarloaf99s.org.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.heraldmailmedia.com

Corporate Eagle to build new HQ at Oakland County International Airport (KPTK)




Corporate Eagle is planning to build a new facility at the Oakland County International Airport after being selected for a 5.7-acre parcel of land there.

The Waterford Township-based provider of fractional jet ownership and jet management services competed against several other organizations for the highly-sought property on which it will build new headquarters and hangar from the ground up, company CEO Rick Nini said.

The company has outgrown its current 58,000-square-foot facility at the airport, which can house 15 aircraft, Nini said. It is broken up into two hangar bays combined with an office building and a separate hangar bay.

"We're so chopped up, and we're cleaning all that up with this (new project)," Nini said. "It's going to be much more efficient."

The new facility will be between 70,000 and 75,000 square feet and hold up to 20 aircraft. There will be attached office space and a VIP area for members.

"Corporate Eagle has experienced tremendous growth over the last few years …" Nini said. "In the past five years, Corporate Eagle has doubled its member base and significantly increased our staff."

Corporate Eagle employs 57 people, including 32 pilots, and has 14 aircraft, according to a company news release. It has 41 members from Southeast Michigan. Nini said he hopes to soon grow to 90 employees and 55-60 members.

The company's aircraft include the Dassault Falcon 2000, Raytheon Hawker 800XP and Beechcraft Super King Air B200. The company also manages several private aircraft for families and businesses. Nini said the company is planning to announce acquisition of a new larger and longer-range aircraft.

Nini did not disclose how much will be invested in the new project. He said he hopes to break ground by the end of summer or start of fall, and to complete the project within a year after.

Architecture is being handled by Howell-based Squires Architectural Group and Bloomfield Township-based Young & Young Architects. The general contractor is still being finalized, Nini said.

Corporate Eagle took a hit in the recession, with revenue falling from $13 million in 2007 to $8.5 million in 2009, Nini told Crain's in 2015. The industry was hurt in 2008 when the CEOs of General Motors Co., Chrysler Corp. and Ford Motor Co. flew on corporate-owned jets to go before Congress seeking a publicly financed bailout to save their companies from collapse.

The company has bounced back, posting a record year in 2016, during which it "flew more than 2,000 trips with over 9,000 passengers — landing in 27 different countries," Nini said.

A company spokeswoman said there are not yet plans for the current facility after Corporate Eagle changes headquarters.

Original article can be found here: http://www.crainsdetroit.com

Float-equipped Aviat Aircraft A-1B, N71JA: Accident occurred May 26, 2017 in Lake Tomahawk, Oneida County, Wisconsin

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N71JA

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA204
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 26, 2017 in Lake Tomahawk, WI
Aircraft: AVIAT AIRCRAFT INC A-1B, registration: N71JA
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 26, 2017, about 1025 central daylight time, an Aviat Aircraft A-1B, a float-equipped single-engine airplane, N71JA, sustained substantial damage when it nosed-over upon landing on Tomahawk Lake located near Lake Tomahawk, Wisconsin. The commercial pilot sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight that departed Rhinelander-Oneida County Airport (RHI), Rhinelander, Wisconsin, about 1000.

Eagles Nest Airport (31E) Development Slated for Public Hearing: Eagleswood Project Using 111 More Acres



“The airport is not being expanded, nor have I purchased additional land,” Eagles Nest airport owner Peter Weidhorn assured one of his neighbors in writing last week, adding he would be pleased to discuss the matter further, with her or with any concerned citizen in the airport’s vicinity.

A public hearing is scheduled for Wednesday, June 28, at 7 p.m. in the municipal meeting room in West Creek. Its purpose, Weidhorn explained, is for New Jersey Department of Transportation, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, New Jersey State Planning Commission, Eagles Nest Airport and Eagleswood Township to satisfy the requirements of the Coastal Area Facility Review Act – and to receive public testimony on a map amendment, according to the notice issued by the Office for Planning Advocacy, which oversees the State Planning Commission. The map amendment would allow for the creation of a new transportation “node” on 111 acres, 107 of which are already disturbed.

The report is available electronically for public inspection on the Office for Planning Advocacy’s website at nj.gov/state/planning. Select “Map Amendments” from the menu under Regional Coordination in the Office of Planning Advocacy section.

In it, the new designation of “Heavy Industry Transportation Utility Node” is described as an enhancement that would promote “beneficial economic growth, development and renewal for all residents of New Jersey.”

“While the airport is small,” according to the report, “it is a public airport that is used for emergency purposes and training purposes by various government entities. The airport has also received significant government funding over the years to make necessary improvements and currently employs 70 people. A resolution was adopted by Eagleswood Township in 2016 supporting this petition for a node at the Eagles Nest airport.”

The public may comment orally, and in written form, at the hearing and may submit written comments to the Director of the Office for Planning Advocacy until July 28. Written comments can be emailed to Osg_ed@sos.nj.gov, or mailed to the New Jersey Department of State, Office for Planning Advocacy, 33 West State St., 4th Floor, P.O. Box 820, Trenton, N.J. 08625-0820. 

Original article can be found here:   http://thesandpaper.villagesoup.com

Cessna P206A Super Skylane, N206TF, Skydive East Coast: Accident occurred June 12, 2017 at Eagles Nest Airport (31E), West Creek, Eagleswood Township, Ocean County, New Jersey

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

SeaSky27 Productions LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N206TF

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA205
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, June 12, 2017 in West Creek, NJ
Aircraft: CESSNA P206, registration: N206TF
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 12, 2017, about 2255 eastern daylight time, a Cessna P206A, N206TF, was substantially damaged during a forced landing while on approach to Eagles Nest Airport (31E), West Creek, New Jersey. The commercial pilot sustained minor injuries. The airplane was owned and operated by Seasky27 Productions LLC, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a maintenance test flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and a visual flight rules flight plan was filed but not activated for the flight that originated about 1 hour earlier from Danbury Municipal Airport (DXR), Danbury, Connecticut.

The airplane had recently undergone engine maintenance, which included the installation of new cylinders. Earlier that day, the pilot flew the airplane on an uneventful 1 hour maintenance test flight from 31E to DXR. The entire flight was performed with the fuel selector on the right tank, and the mixture control in the full rich position. No engine discrepancies were noted during the flight.

Prior to departing DXR for the return flight to 31E, the pilot performed a "quick preflight inspection." The airplane departed with an estimated 65 gallons of fuel, the fuel selector on the left tank, the mixture control in the full rich position, and climbed at full power to 7,500 ft mean sea level (msl). The pilot maintained 24 inches manifold pressure and 2,400 rpm (same engine settings as the first leg), and flew to 31E while periodically scanning the engine gauges. While on final approach to runway 14, he realized the "sight picture" was not correct, and performed a go-around. He climbed to between 1,000 and 1,200 ft msl, then turned onto the crosswind and downwind legs of the traffic pattern. While on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern between 1,200 and 1,500 ft msl, before midfield, with the auxiliary fuel pump on, the engine sputtered and quit, and the propeller stopped. The pilot attempted to restart it which consisted of moving the fuel selector to the right tank position, verifying the mixture control was full rich, and advancing the throttle, but the engine did not restart. He turned onto the base leg of the traffic pattern, and flew towards the runway while maintaining a best glide speed of 80 knots; however, the airplane impacted trees then the ground about 1/4 nautical mile before the runway, and came to rest inverted.

The airplane was recovered and will be examined at a later date.





A small plane, a single-engine Cessna 206 Stationair belonging to Skydive East Coast, crashed at Eagles Nest Airport in West Creek Monday around 11 p.m., the second crash in one month’s time. On Tuesday, May 16, a Stinson 108 went down between two residential properties in the airport’s immediate vicinity.

This time, again, the pilot was “unhurt completely” and “pretty amazed” to have “walked away without a scratch,” according to the plane’s owner, George Voishnis. No passengers were on board, and nothing on the ground was damaged except some trees.

“So he did a really good job of landing it the way he did,” Voishnis said.

Airport owner Peter Weidhorn described the coincidence of crashes as “a freaky set of occurrences.” Weidhorn got the call at 11:15 Monday night from Eagleswood Township Mayor Michael Pasternak and was flabbergasted.

Voishnis is co-owner of the Skydive East Coast tandem jump operation. The plane “will be a complete loss,” he said. He explained one of his pilots had been flying the plane after some routine maintenance that required several break-in hours. As the pilot was attempting to land, he didn’t have his approach quite right – Weidhorn speculated he may have been misaligned or at the wrong altitude – so he went back up and “did a go-around” to try again. For reasons yet unknown, the engine stopped, and he glided into the trees between the airport property and the adjacent sand mining operation. There was no fire, Weidhorn added, although “it’s not excusable.” Weidhorn said the plane is totaled, its propeller driven half in the ground.

Tuesday the State Police and Federal Aviation Administration were on the scene investigating; Weidhorn said he and representatives from the National Transportation Safety Board would be there on Wednesday.

A public hearing is scheduled for Wednesday, June 28, at the municipal building to provide comments to the N.J. Planning Commission on a zoning change for a transportation node at the airport.

Original article can be found here: http://thesandpaper.villagesoup.com

EAGLESWOOD - Just four weeks after a single-engine plane went down in the West Creek section of town, another small plane has crashed, this one just shy of Eagles Nest Airport, state police confirmed. 

The small plane crashed around 11 p.m. Monday in a wooded area near a runway, Trooper Alejandro Goez said. The pilot, the only person in the plane, suffered minor injuries.

The plane appeared as though it was about to land, but the precise cause for the crash was not yet known Goez said. The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating.

In May a Stinson single-engine plane crashed in the 100 block of Laurel Hill Lane, a crash that also left a lone pilot with minor injuries, state police confirmed at the time.

The May crash came just two days after a Learjet en route to Teterboro Airport crashed in Carlstadt, killing the pilot and copilot. Nobody else was aboard the small jet and nobody on the ground was hurt.

There were no signs of the most recent crash from outside the locked gate at the airport early Tuesday morning.

Read more here: http://www.app.com

EAGLESWOOD, New Jersey -- A pilot suffered minor injuries when a small plane skidded off a runway in New Jersey. 

It happened at 11 p.m. Monday at Eagles Nest Airport in Eagleswood, Ocean County.

The plane ended up in the woods.

There was no immediate word what caused the pilot to lose control of the aircraft.

Original article can be found here: http://6abc.com

EAGLESWOOD, NEW JERSEY -- A small plane crashed in a wooded area near a runway at Eagle's Nest airport Monday night, State Police said. 

The aircraft went down around 11 p.m.

The pilot suffered only minor injuries and no one else was aboard, police said. 

No structures on the ground appear to have been damaged, police also said.

The Federal Aviation Administration was also contacted. 

Original article can be found here: http://www.nj.com