Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Accident occurred July 12, 2017 near Lake St. John Regional Airport, Orillia, Ontario, Canada

A Ramara firefighter is among two men taken to hospital with serious injuries after a plane crash in Lake St. John.

The plane crashed Wednesday at around 3:30 p.m., near the Orillia Lake St. John Airport. According to the initial investigation by the OPP, the small float-type plane was attempting to land at the airport when for some unknown reason it flipped over.

Fire officials say the pair was thrown from the plane and were rescued from the water. They were wearing life-jackets at the time.

The two men suffered what Rama paramedics are calling serious injuries. The pair was transferred to Orillia’s Soldiers’ Memorial Hospital for treatment.

Ornge Air Ambulance was contacted, but stormy weather prevented them from responding.

The men were rescued by Dylan McKee. He jumped in his boat when he saw the plane going down and rushed to the crash site.

“When I got on scene there, the two occupants of the plane were sitting on the wings of it upside down and just holding on to it. Very frantic. Things happened so fast didn’t know what was going on,” he said.

Emergency crews attempted to pull the plane out of the water, but it started to take on water and sunk. Divers will need to be brought in to remove it.

The Transportation Safety Board has been notified and the investigation into the crash is ongoing.

http://barrie.ctvnews.ca

On July 12 at approximately 3:30 p.m., officers from the Orillia Detachment of the OPP, Rama Police Service, Rama Fire Rescue Service and the Ramara Fire and Rescue Service, along with the County of Simcoe Paramedic Services responded to a report of a downed aircraft on Lake St. John.

From the initial investigation that followed, police have determined that the aircraft was attempting to land on the water near the Lake St. John Regional Airport when from reasons unknown at this time, it flipped over. 

Nearby homeowners who witnessed the crash immediately responded in their own boats and rescued two males who were on board the aircraft and took them to shore where emergency services personnel had gathered. 

The males have since been transported to a local hospital and are being treated for injuries which are described as serious, but non-life threatening.

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada has been notified and will also be assisting with the ongoing investigation, however the plane has since sunk and arrangements are now underway to have the plane raised to the surface.

Further details including the exact make and model of plane that was involved will be provided as the investigation continues and once the water recovery is made.

Emergency Services personnel who attended this incident wish to recognize the quick thinking and speedy response of nearby property owners and cottagers who rushed to the scene and no doubt prevented this from potentially ending in a tragedy. 

http://www.orilliapacket.com

Progressive Aerodyne Searey, N108SR, Blue Skies & Calm Waters LLC: Accident occurred July 12, 2017 in Lago Vista, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

Blue Skies & Calm Waters LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N108SR


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA409
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, July 12, 2017 in Lago Vista, TX
Aircraft: PROGRESSIVE AERODYNE INC SEAREY LSA, registration: N108SR

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft landed nose down on the water.

Date: 13-JUL-17

Time: 01:05:00Z
Regis#: N108SR
Aircraft Make: PROGRESSIVE AERODYNE
Aircraft Model: SEAREY
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: AUSTIN
State: TEXAS




AUSTIN (KXAN) — As the Federal Aviation Administration continues to investigate what went wrong when a small sea plane crashed into Lake Travis Wednesday night, the man who towed the plane to shore says he may have found a clue.

Removing the plane from the water and disassembling it so it could be towed away was a long tedious process. It took Chris Riley and his team more than 10 hours.

Riley, the owner of Flagship Towing, said, “We have to make sure we don’t get in the cockpit, around the cockpit, damage any of the glass in the cockpit, or any of the crucial components of the plane.”

Riley mainly works with boats, but he does tow planes like this one from time to time. It’s an amphibious plane, meaning it can land on either ground or water.

“Only problem with this particular landing was the running gear was left down,” he said, referring to the plane wheels.

Riley says when this kind of plane hits a runway, they should be down for the landing, but when it hits the water the wheels shouldn’t be out.

“So pretty much it was a sudden stop to the plane just because the drag of the wheels caused the tip of the plane just to dip down in the water,” he continued.

It’s important to note that’s not an official answer as to why the plane flipped into the water. The FAA will have the final word once its investigation is finished.

The agency is also investigating after two people were killed in a plane crash in in Tyler, Texas Thursday morning. Investigators say the private twin-engine plane crashed in a field. It had just taken off from Tyler’s Pounds Regional Airport. Both people on board were killed in the crash.

http://kxan.com




8:35 p.m. update: The plane crash at Lake Travis near Pace Bend appears to have involved a single-engine aircraft with one male occupant, first responders said Wednesday evening. 

A Pedernales Fire Department boat has rescued the pilot, a man in his 40s who was the only occupant in the aircraft and reported no medical complaints, EMS said.

The plane, a small amphibious aircraft, appeared to be three-fourths of the way underwater when first responders arrived, EMS said. It seems to have flipped over while landing on the lake, said Lynn Lunsford, a spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration.

The aircraft is being towed to shore for investigation, Lunsford said.

This is the second plane crash in Lake Travis this year.

Earlier: Austin-Travis County EMS are responding to Lake Travis near Pace Bend for a plane that reportedly crashed into the lake, EMS tweeted Wednesday.

Emergency responders received a call of an aircraft down at 8:06 p.m. from the 2000 block of North Pace Bend Road, near mile marker 32, officials said.

First responders have spotted the aircraft but have not made contact with any patients yet. A boat is approaching the plane, EMS said.

A STAR Flight helicopter is on the way to assist. Civilians in the area are also assisting, EMS said. 

http://www.statesman.com

LAKE TRAVIS, Texas (KXAN) — A single-engine plane has crashed into Lake Travis Wednesday evening, according to Austin-Travis County EMS.

A pilot, described as a man in his 40s by EMS, is not reporting any injuries. He was the only person on board the plane.

Firefighters were called to 2011 N. Pace Bend Rd. at around 8 p.m. Lynn Lunsford, an FAA spokesperson, says the small amphibious plane flipped over while landing in the lake.

The pilot got out safely and the aircraft is being towed to shore.

On May 28, a small plane crashed in Lakeway. Like Wednesday’s crash, the pilot was the only one on board and he was not injured.

A little more than a year ago, a biplane crashing into Lake Travis was caught on camera. One passenger suffered minor injuries, but did not need to be taken to the hospital.

http://kxan.com

Aeronca 11AC Chief, N85893: Fatal accident occurred July 18, 2016 - private airstrip in Ishpeming, Marquette County, Michigan

Ishpeming residents Dean Honkala, 49 and William Brewer, 48, were killed in the crash.



The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Grand Rapids, Michigan

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N85893



NTSB Identification: CEN16FA269 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, July 18, 2016 in Ishpeming, MI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: AERONCA 11AC, registration: N85893
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

During a personal local flight, the private pilot made a low pass in the airplane over the runway and turned left to enter the traffic pattern for landing. A witness stated that the airplane "looked mushy" when it made its left crosswind turn. Another witness reported that the airplane appeared to enter a "close-in" traffic pattern at an estimated altitude of 100 to 150 ft above ground level. He further stated that the airplane's airspeed seemed slower than normal. He stopped watching the airplane until he heard a change in its engine noise. When he looked back, the airplane was in a left bank turning from the base leg to final approach, and the engine stopped producing power. The airplane immediately went into a left spiral and turned about 360° before impacting the ground. The accident site was located about 1,200 ft from the approach end of the runway near the runway centerline. A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal any evidence of a mechanical malfunction or failure that would have precluded normal operation. 

Although the airplane's calculated weight at the time of the accident was about 6 pounds over its maximum gross weight, this likely was not a factor in the accident as it would not have significantly increased the airplane's stall speed. A carburetor icing probability chart indicated a probability of serious icing at glide power at the temperature and dew point reported at the time of the accident. Given that no mechanical reason for the loss of engine power was identified, it is likely that the loss of engine power was due to carburetor icing. Following the loss of engine power, the pilot likely failed to maintain adequate airspeed, resulting in the airplane's wing exceeding its critical angle-of-attack and a subsequent aerodynamic stall.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain airspeed following a loss of engine power due to carburetor icing while turning from base to final at a low altitude, which resulted in the airplane's wing exceeding its critical angle of attack and a subsequent aerodynamic stall. 




HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 18, 2016, about 2007 eastern daylight time, an Aeronca 11AC, N85893, sustained substantial damage during impact with terrain after a loss of engine power while in the traffic pattern of a private grass airstrip near Ishpeming, Michigan. The pilot and the pilot rated passenger received fatal injuries. The airplane was owned and operated by private individuals under the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The local flight departed the Edward F. Johnson Airport (M61), Ishpeming, Michigan, located 4 nm south of the accident site, about 1945. 

A witness reported that he observed the airplane make a low pass over the grass airstrip. He stated that when the airplane made its left crosswind turn, it "looked mushy." He said that the airplane looked like it was "plowing through the turn." He did not see the accident occur, but he heard the impact. When he arrived at the accident site, the airplane's tail was in the air. The tail lowered when they tried to gain access to the cabin. 

A witness located about 800 ft west of the approach end of the grass runway reported that he saw the airplane approaching the airstrip from the southeast. The airplane's flight path and engine sound were normal as the airplane made a low pass over the northeast runway. The airplane turned a left crosswind and appeared to enter a "close-in" traffic pattern on a left downwind at an estimated altitude of 100 to 150 ft above ground level. He stated that the airplane's airspeed seemed slower than normal and he stopped watching the airplane until he heard a change in the engine noise. He stated that the airplane was in a left bank when the engine quit. The airplane immediately went into a left spiral and turned about 360 degrees before impacting the ground.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The 49-year-old pilot held a private pilot certificate with a single-engine land rating, and he was a certified flight instructor with a sport endorsement for single-engine land airplanes. He held a third class airman medical certificate dated April 4, 2016, with the limitation that he shall possess glasses for near and intermediate vision. During his medical examination, the pilot reported that his total flight time was 750 hours. 

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was a single-engine Aeronca 11AC, serial number 11C-277, manufactured in 1946, and equipped with a 65-horsepower Continental Motors A-65-8F engine, serial number 5767568. It seated two and had a maximum gross weight of 1,250 lbs. The empty weight was 782 lbs with a useful load of 468 lbs. The combined weight of the pilot and passenger was 462 lbs. There was 2 gallons (12 lbs) of fuel found in the auxiliary fuel tank and the main fuel tank was breached. The calculated weight and balance indicated that the aircraft was at least 6 lbs over gross weight at the time of the accident.

The carburetor icing probability chart from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB): CE-09-35 Carburetor Icing Prevention, June 30, 2009, indicated a probability of serious icing at glide power at the temperature and dew point reported at the time of the accident.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1955, the surface weather observation at the Sawyer International Airport (SAW), Marquette, Michigan, located 13 miles to the northeast of the accident site, was: wind 050 degrees at 8 kts, 10 miles visibility, sky clear, temperature 17 degrees C, dew point 10 degrees C, altimeter 30.17 inches of mercury.



WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION 

The accident site was located about 1,200 feet from the approach end of the runway aligned with an extended runway centerline. The accident site area was uneven terrain covered by tall grass, shrubs, and trees. The airplane was initially found by rescue personnel nose down with the tail in a nearly vertical position. Pieces of the broken wooden propeller were found at the initial point of impact, which was about 21 ft to the northwest of the main wreckage. The nose and engine compartment of the airplane exhibited crushing and buckling which was consistent with about a 45-degree nose down impact. One of the Sensenich wooden propeller blades was broken off near the hub and the other blade was splintered along its entire span. The propeller exhibited damage consistent with aft crushing with few rotational signatures. The entire span of the left wing's leading edge was crushed aft. The outboard section of the left wing was broken outboard of the wing strut, crushed, and buckled aft. The right wing was broken at the front spar attach point to the fuselage and was almost twisted off and facing aft. The leading edge of the outboard section of the right wing was crushed and buckled aft. The rear fuselage and empennage remained largely intact. The flight control cables had continuity from the flight control surfaces to the cockpit flight controls. Breaks in the cockpit flight controls were consistent with overload fractures. 

The instrument panel and cockpit exhibited extensive impact damage. The throttle was found full forward. The carburetor heat was full forward. The ignition switch was on BOTH. The engine fuel primer was in the closed and locked position. The mixture control knob was broken off. The throttle, mixture and carburetor heat cables were found attached to the carburetor and carburetor air box. The carburetor was a Stromberg Model MAS3B. Fuel was found in the carburetor. The throttle lever was found full forward. The airbox was crushed by impact forces. The carburetor heat cable was still attached but did not move due to impact damage. 

The 8-gallon auxiliary fuel tank aft of the cabin had about 2 gallons of fuel. The fuel selector was on the main tank. The main 8-gallon fuel tank was forward of the instrument panel. It was completely broken open and no fuel was found in the tank. The cork float was moist. The inside walls of the fuel tank had a film of dirt contamination sticking to it. The vegetation between the point of impact and the main wreckage exhibited fuel blight. 

The examination of the engine revealed that the cylinder Nos.1 and 3 upper spark plugs were finger tight. The engine crankshaft was rotated by hand. Suction and compression was produced on cylinders Nos. 1, 2, and 3. Cylinder No. 4 did not exhibit "thumb" compression due to impact damage, but the piston and valves continuity was established. Oil was found in the No.4 cylinder. Drive train continuity was established. The upper spark plugs were in good condition with normal color and round electrodes. The examination of the bottom spark plugs revealed that the No.1 plug was normal. The No. 2 bottom spark plug lead cable was connected, but loose. The No. 3 spark plug gap was measured at 0.009 of inch gap, which typically has a 0.018 – 0.022 inch gap.

The left Slick 4333 magneto was still attached to the engine. The impulse coupling operated and spark was observed on all 4 towers. The right Slick 4333 magneto was separated from the engine. The magneto was rotated, and the impulse coupling operated and spark was observed on all 4 towers.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The autopsy of the pilot was performed at the Duke LifePoint Hospital, Marquette, Michigan, on July 19, 2016. The cause of death was from multiple traumatic injuries sustained during an airplane crash. A Forensic Toxicology Fatal Accident Report was prepared by the FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute. The results were negative for all substances tested.



NTSB Identification: CEN16FA269
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, July 18, 2016 in Ishpeming, MI
Aircraft: AERONCA 11AC, registration: N85893
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 18, 2016, about 2007 eastern daylight time, an Aeronca 11AC, N85893, sustained substantial damage during impact with terrain after it had a loss of power in the traffic pattern of a private grass airstrip near Ishpeming, Michigan. The pilot and the pilot rated passenger received fatal injuries. The airplane was owned and operated by private individuals under the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The local flight departed the Edward F. Johnson Airport (M61), Ishpeming, Michigan, located 4 nm south of the accident site, about 1945. 

A witness located about 800 ft west of the approach end of the grass runway reported that he saw the airplane approaching the airstrip from the southeast. The airplane's flight path and engine sound were normal as the airplane made a low pass over the northeast runway. The airplane turned a left crosswind and appeared to enter a "close-in" traffic pattern on a left downwind at an estimated altitude of 100 to 150 ft above ground level. He stated that the airplane's airspeed seemed slower than normal and he stopped watching the airplane until he heard a change in the engine noise. He stated that the airplane was in a left bank when the engine quit. The airplane immediately went into a left spiral and turned about 360 degrees before impacting the ground. 

The accident site was located about 1,200 ft from the approach end of the runway and near the runway centerline. The accident site area was uneven terrain covered by tall grass, shrubs, and trees. The airplane was initially found by rescue personnel nose down with the tail in a nearly vertical position. Pieces of the broken wooden propeller were found at the initial point of impact, which was about 21 ft to the northwest of the main wreckage. The vegetation near the initial impact point to the main wreckage exhibited fuel blight. The nose and engine compartment of the airplane exhibited crushing and buckling which was consistent with about a 45-degree nose down impact. One of the wooden propeller blades was broken off near the hub and the other blade was splintered along its entire span. The propeller exhibited damage consistent with aft crushing with few rotational signatures. The entire span of the left wing's leading edge was crushed aft. The outboard section of the left wing was broken outboard of the wing strut, crushed, and buckled aft. The right wing was broken at the front spar attach point to the fuselage and was almost twisted off and facing aft. The leading edge of the outboard section of the right wing was crushed and buckled aft. The instrument panel and cockpit exhibited extensive impact damage. The rear fuselage and empennage remained largely intact. 

At 1955, the surface weather observation at the Sawyer International Airport (SAW), Marquette, Michigan, located 13 miles to the northeast of the accident site, was wind 050 degrees at 8 kts, 10 miles visibility, sky clear, temperature 17 degrees C, dew point 10 degrees C, altimeter 30.17 inches of mercury.

Walter J. Koladza Airport (KGBR) storm draws attention to lead in aviation fuel

Joseph Solan, son of Walter J. Koladza Airport owner Richard Solan, fuels up a plane for a guest. Leaded aviation gas is now the center of a controversy at the airport as its owners seek permits for three new hangars and possible future expansion.



GREAT BARRINGTON — If you didn't know what was going on here, it's a happy, romantic scene under a bright summer sky. A couple has pulled their airplane up to the self-serve fuel tank at Walter J. Koladza Airport, and loading it with bags from their car.

"We're going to Nantucket then to Newport," the husband is saying, as the airport owner's bright-eyed 18-year-old son comes over and fuels up the couple's Piper Cherokee.

But just then, the airport manager starts talking about water samples and environmental testing, and what Koladza's neighbors are saying might be lead contamination after water tests in two nearby homes revealed high concentrations of lead.

So as the airport continues on a new approach to a stormy town permitting process that will allow it to build three hangars, lead in aviation fuel is still a target for stopping the project.

While it is a real problem everywhere, it's one on its way to being solved in the next few years. Lead is not used in cars anymore, or in most commercial airplanes. The last place you will find lead in transportation fuel is in small private aircraft, and the Federal Aviation Administration is trying to get it out by 2018.

"Avgas [aviation gas] emissions have become the largest contributor to the relatively low levels of lead emissions produced in this country," says the FAA's website.

And the FAA's program to find a high octane unleaded avgas suitable for piston-engine powered aircraft is on track, according to FAA spokeswoman Allison Duquette. And one fuel producer in the program says a new product should be available by 2020.

FAA spokesman Les Dorr said whenever it does happen, it will coincide with a ban on leaded avgas, something the FAA and US Environmental Protection Agency are coordinating. This will involve the EPA making an official "endangerment finding" about the health effects of leaded fuels, he added.

About one-third of all piston-engine aircraft - around $65,000 airplanes - need the high octane leaded fuel to prevent damage that can cause sudden engine failure.

But the EPA says for humans, there is no safe level lead - it can stick to soil particles after traveling long distances from an airplane, or other source of emission. And depending on the type of lead and soil, it can leach into groundwater.

This is something neighbors of Walter J. Koladza Airport are worried has already happened over the years, harming the aquifer the town relies on for drinking water. The state has acknowledged that the airport - along with other nearby threats - is a risk to the aquifer. Two neighbors found lead concentrations well above the level the EPA says requires remediation. But water and soil test results from the airport show low concentrations. And so does the town's water as of 2015.

Right now the airport sells 100LL, a high octane avgas that contains lead. While the self-serve fueling station has an underground tank, it has a computerized monitoring system to check for leaks. And that tank will be replaced with an above-ground tank this summer because state environmental regulations require it.

But now some neighbors are saying the airport, as a condition of being allowed to expand, should also carry an unleaded avgas that's already on the market until FAA program unveils the new, unleaded fuel that all piston-engine planes can handle.

Swift to the market

The FAA is working with the EPA, industry, and avgas producers, Shell and Swift Fuels to come up with the unleaded replacement.

Since the agency's Piston Aviation Fuels Initiative isn't expected to bear fruit for several more years, Swift - a small, Indiana-based company - came up with an unleaded alternative for use in those 123,000 private airplanes in the country that can use it, according to Swift CEO Christopher D'Acosta.

The company is now selling UL94 at 18 airports around the country - including Falmouth Airpark - as well as at 23 private airfields and one university.

And not only because lead can be toxic.

"Pilots are asking for it," D'Acosta said. "They don't like lead-fouling, which forces the pilot to operate on certain maintenance schedules because lead messes up the engine. Certain types of airplanes are susceptible."

But there are still about 65,000 small aircraft for which there is still no other alternative but high octane leaded avgas, said D'Acosta, noting that airports that sell UL94 will also have to keep selling leaded avgas until the FAA program unveils the replacement fuel.

"We're three years into a 5-year schedule to make that happen," D'Acosta said of the FAA initiative.

PRICING

D'Acosta said pricing for UL94 is "commercially competitive" with leaded fuel, but that the ultimate price would depend on the supply chain and the economic considerations of the airport like property taxes.

"The airport is free to charge whatever they want," he said.

But so far, UL94, is "pretty cheap," as Koladza manager Kenneth Krentsa put it, after having looked into it.

But he also noted that only about two to three percent of airplanes at Koladza will be able to use it.

At Koladza, the leaded 100LL is selling for $4.68, according to AirNav.com, a price that competes with UL94 pricing.

At Falmouth Airpark UL94 is selling at $4.55 per gallon, and around the country, it's a similar story. At San Carlos Airport in California, Dan Demeo of Rabbit Aviation Services said UL94 is $4.60 per gallon, and about 55 percent of planes at the airport can use it.

Demeo said the push to get UL94 was environmentally-minded.

"Our county board of supervisors really supported it - we're in the Bay area, so I think people are a little more sensitive," he said. "We worked with the airport manager and the San Mateo public works and we all got on board."

Other costs

Krentsa said there is a catch, should Koladza carry UL94. It's called a Supplemental Type Certificate, something a pilot needs from the FAA to use a different product or part.

Krentsa said the cost of such a certificate is about $3,000.

"You can't just put something in your airplane and say, `hey this is going to work,'" he said. "It could be a light bulb, the use of auto fuel - someone has done all the research, and you have to pay them ... it's like having a patent, and royalties for them to do the legwork."

"Who's going to pay the $3,000 just to be able to use that fuel?" he wondered.

The FAA is trying to tackle this, too, given what will be a complicated transition to unleaded avgas at the end of its testing program.

The FAA's Dorr said while some aircraft require the certificate to use UL94, the agency is trying to find a way to get an aircraft or engine type certified by the manufacturer, or by giving a certificate to a third-party like the fuel producer.

The FAA is also working with Congress on adding new language to a bill that would let the agency automatically allow the use of new unleaded fuels without a certificate, he said.

But light sport aircraft don't need the certificate to use the fuel, said Randy Simon, Falmouth Airpark's manager. He said the airport started selling UL94 for those models, which need less maintenance with UL94. He also said airplanes built in the 1940s were designed to run on unleaded fuel.

"People aren't educated yet," Simon said, noting that Swift gave the airport a lot of brochures and signs to put near the fueling area to help spread the word. Roughly 20 percent of planes at the Airpark are using UL94, he added.

While Krentsa understands all this, he said there is another cost to Koladza if it were to also sell UL94 - a second tank, or a split tank, which can be more expensive.

Krentsa, who is now shopping for the new tank, said the cost can run anywhere from $40,000 to $100,000.

Krentsa has previously said he would be happy to sell UL94, but that right now, it appears to be too challenging and expensive.

D'Acosta, who said he is eager to sell UL94, also said it isn't just about making money. He talked about how the phase-out of lead in auto fuel that began in 1973, and how what's left are mostly these small private aircraft.

"That's exactly why we're doing all this," he said. "Everybody in the country knows that lead is a bad thing. There have been efforts to [get lead out] for decades and this is just the tail end of those efforts."

http://www.berkshireeagle.com

Stinson 108-2 Voyager, N343C, Eagles Nest Motel and Car Rental: Accident occurred July 18, 2016 at Haines Airport (PAHN), Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Eagles Nest Motel and Car Rental: http://registry.faa.gov/N343C

NTSB Identification: ANC16LA048
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, July 18, 2016 in Haines, AK
Aircraft: STINSON 108 2, registration: N343C
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 18, 2016, about 1230 Alaska daylight time, a tailwheel-equipped Stinson 108 airplane, N343C, sustained substantial damage following a structural failure of the left main landing gear during the landing rollout at Haines Airport, Haines, Alaska. The certificated private pilot, and three passengers were not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot, as a visual flight rules (VFR) personal flight, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed. The flight had departed Skagway, Alaska about 1200, destined for Haines.

During an interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) on July 18, 2016, the pilot stated that he was flying three of his family members home to Haines from Skagway. Wind at the Haines Airport was reported to be a left quartering tailwind of less than 4 knots. The pilot performed a normal landing on runway 26 with the intent of exiting the runway via a right turn onto taxiway "B". About 100 feet prior to the taxiway, while at an estimated speed of 20 mph, the airplane turned unexpectedly to the right and made a rapid 180 degree turn. The pilot applied left brake pressure but the right turn continued. About halfway through the turn, the pilot felt two lurching events in succession and then felt the left main landing gear fold up under the aircraft. The left wing and propeller struck the runway surface and the airplane collapsed onto the left side of fuselage. The pilot stated that there were no environmental or performance issues that should have precipitated a ground loop. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing, left lift strut and lower fuselage. 

A postaccident examination by the pilot revealed that the left landing gear leg separated in two places with the first near the axle and the second near the upper shock strut attachment points. The left wheel separated from the assembly and both the wheel assembly and axle were located about 10 feet in front of the propeller. Photographic evidence revealed extensive corrosion on the inner sleeve of the fractured axle. 

A subsequent inspection of runway 26 revealed 2 lines of black tire marks that were consistent with a right turn during braking action. An estimated 25-foot-long ground scar was consistent with bare metal scraping that trailed from about 110 degrees magnetic, prior to the final airplane resting location.

The axle and hub assembly have been retained and a detailed examination is pending. 

The closest weather reporting facility is Haines Airport, Haines, Alaska. At 1154, an aviation routine weather report (METAR) from the Haines Airport was reporting in part: wind from 150 degrees at 3 knots; sky condition, clear; visibility, 10 statute miles; temperature 70 degrees F; dew point 57 degrees F; barometric pressure 29.90inHG.
======

HAINES, Alaska (KTUU) A non-injury plane crash caused the Haines Airfield to close for about an hour and a half Monday, according to Alaska State Troopers.

Troopers observed the small, apparently damaged plane 12:25 p.m. and contacted the pilot and passengers, according to a dispatch posted online. While no one was hurt, pilot Shane Horton told troopers that the landing gear had buckled during landing. The wing and prop struck the ground.


The FAA, National Transportation Safety Board and state Transportation Department were notified, and the plane was photographed before removal from the runway, troopers wrote. The plane is a Stinson 108-2, according to FAA records.


http://www.ktuu.com

Feds in San Antonio work to seize Learjet in Mexico corruption probe

The federal government is trying to seize a private jet owned by a Mexican businessman with San Antonio ties who is caught up in a cross-border bribery and money laundering probe.

In a lawsuit filed last month in San Antonio federal court, prosecutors asked a judge to forfeit a 2000 Learjet registered in Mexico, alleging it was involved in a money laundering scheme. Information about the airplane’s owner and the alleged money laundering was kept sealed. In a court filing Wednesday, prosecutors said they notified Luis Rayet, a businessman from the Mexican state of Coahuila, that they’re trying to take the plane.

The plane is owned by Rayet’s company, Rajet Aero Servicios S.A. de C.V., which provides air charter services between Mexico and the U.S. It was seized in San Antonio.

Prosecutors included boilerplate language in the initial suit claiming the plane is “property involved in a transaction or an attempted transaction” using money gained through “foreign offenses involving ‘extortion,’ foreign offenses involving ‘the misappropriation, theft, or embezzlement of public funds by or for the benefit of a public official,’ foreign offenses involving bribery of a public official; (and) wire fraud.”

Rayet’s name has shown up before in court proceedings related to an investigation into the laundering in Texas of tens of millions of dollars stolen from the Coahuila government, but he has not been charged with a crime. This is the first time U.S. prosecutors have tried to seize his property.

“Mr. Rayet denies that his company’s 2000 Learjet was derived from or involved in a money laundering scheme or any other illegal activity,” Houston lawyer Andy Parker said Wednesday. “He looks forward to refuting the government’s claims in open court.”

A massive public works program in Coahuila left the state billions of dollars in debt, and since 2013 federal prosecutors in San Antonio and Corpus Christ have leveled allegations that former officials stole millions of dollars from the state and laundered a portion of it in Texas. They’ve charged the state’s former interim governor, its former treasurer and several businessmen. Former Gov. Humberto Moreira, once the leader of Mexico’s ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, is under investigation but has not been charged and has denied wrongdoing.

Rayet’s name most recently came up during the plea hearing of Luis Carlos Castillo Cervantes, a Rio Grande Valley businessman who admitted to laundering money in Texas that he received from state contracts secured by bribing government officials.

Castillo said he got state paving contracts in exchange for paying bribes to former interim Gov. Jorge Juan Torres Lopez, now a fugitive from criminal charges in Corpus Christi, and former state treasurer Hector Javier Villarreal, who has admitted to financial crimes in San Antonio and is free on bond pending his sentencing.

Castillo also admitted to paying nearly $600,000 in 2009 to a title company that was used to purchase a house in the Greystone Country Estates subdivision for Moreira’s mother-in-law. During his plea hearing, Castillo said he owed the money to one of Rayet’s companies and was told to wire money to the title company to settle that debt.

Castillo also admitted to paying nearly $600,000 in 2009 to a title company that was used to purchase a house in the Greystone Country Estates subdivision for Moreira’s mother-in-law. During his plea hearing, Castillo said he owed the money to one of Rayet’s companies and was told to wire money to the title company to settle that debt.

Rayet in the past invested in Texas properties, including a home near Houston that had been owned by Torres, the former interim governor, and three pieces of property in San Antonio that one of his companies purchased in 2011 and sold in 2014.

http://www.expressnews.com

Erco 415-C Ercoupe, N99307: Accident occurred July 16, 2016 at Ogle County Airport (C55), Mount Morris Township, Illinois

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Plaines, Illinois

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N99307

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA299 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 16, 2016 in Mt Morris, IL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: ENGINEERING & RESEARCH 415 C, registration: N99307
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot was conducting a local personal flight, which was the airplane's first flight following its annual inspection. The pilot reported that, while on the downwind leg, he reduced power for landing and that the engine then lost power. During the subsequent forced landing, the airplane encountered a crosswind gust and then bounced twice, which caused substantial firewall damage. 

An examination of the carburetor revealed no anomalies. The weather conditions at the time of the accident were conducive to the accumulation of serious carburetor icing at descent power settings. It is likely that the engine power lost power due to carburetor icing.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's loss of airplane control during a forced landing in gusting crosswind conditions and the airplane’s subsequent bounce on the runway following a loss of engine power. Contributing to the accident was the loss of engine power due to carburetor icing.

On July 16, 2016, about 1645 central daylight time, an Engineering & Research 415 C airplane, N99307, impacted terrain during a forced landing on runway 9 at the Ogle County Airport (C55), near Mount Morris, Illinois, following an inflight loss of engine power. The pilot was uninjured. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight originated from C55 about 1640.

According to the pilot, this was the airplane's first flight following its annual inspection. The airplane departed from runway 27. On downwind the pilot reduced power for landing and the engine lost power. The pilot stated that he turned to land on runway 9. During the forced landing, the airplane encountered a crosswind gust and the airplane sustained the substantial firewall damage when it bounced twice on the runway.

At 1554, the recorded weather at the Chicago/Rockford International Airport (RFD), near Rockford, Illinois, was: wind 140 at 8 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition scattered clouds at 5,000, broken clouds at 25,000 feet; temperature 26 degrees C; dew point 13 degrees C; altimeter 30.11 inches of mercury.

The pilot indicated in his accident report that that there was a carburetor mechanical malfunction. A Federal Aviation Administration inspector had the carburetor examined by a mechanic. No carburetor anomalies were detected. However, the inspector plotted RFD's temperature and dew point at the time of the accident on a carburetor icing probability chart. The plot showed a probability of serious icing at descent power settings.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA299
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 16, 2016 in Mt Morris, IL
Aircraft: ENGINEERING & RESEARCH 415 C, registration: N99307
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 16, 2016, about 1545 central daylight time, an Engineering & Research 415 C airplane, N99307, impacted terrain during a forced landing on runway 9 at the Ogle County Airport (C55), near Mount Morris, Illinois, following an inflight loss of engine power. The pilot was uninjured. The airplane sustained substantial fuselage, firewall, and engine mount damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight originated from C55 at time unknown.

According to preliminary information given to the Federal Aviation Administration, the pilot stated that this was the first flight following the airplane's annual inspection. The airplane departed from runway 27. On downwind the pilot reduced power for landing and the engine lost power. The pilot stated that he turned to land on runway 9. During the forced landing, the aircraft caught a wind gust and it sustained the substantial damage when it porpoised twice.

Hobby drones can threaten firefighting aircraft



Through California and the west, where wildfires often burn at an alarming rate, the problem of unmanned hobby drones interfering with firefighting aircraft has become increasingly serious, officials say.

Twice this year in San Diego County and at least two other times elsewhere in the state, air tankers or helicopters have been grounded during fire fights after drones were spotted flying over the blazes — posing a grave risk to aircraft and personnel in the area.

Nationwide, the number of so-called “drone intrusions” this year was 17 as of Friday, according to the National Interagency Fire Center, part of the US Bureau of Land Management.

Such incidents could have tragic consequences, authorities say.

Cal Fire Battlaion Chief Burke Kremensky, who heads the Ramona Air Attack base, said tankers and helicopters can help slow the advance of a fire, which is crucial when people are trying to evacuate.

“If there’s a drone flying and we have to cease operations, that’s putting a life at risk,” he said.

A collision between a drone and an aircraft could also be disastrous.

“If that drone strikes a propeller or strikes one of the rotors on a helicopter it could cause … that aircraft to crash,” Kremensky added. “The props are very lightweight and not designed to take an impact from a five pound object floating in the air.”

He said as tankers and helicopters fly low near a fire front preparing to dump water or fire retardant to slow the advance of flames, they can be traveling at about 100 miles an hour.

“It could actually break through the windscreen or windshield and come into the cockpit,” he said. “All four of our aircraft (based in Ramona) are piloted by one pilot. If that thing came in and hurt the pilot then it will crash into the mobile home park or the houses they are trying to protect.”

The latest incident of drone interference took place June 28 after two air tankers had made a retardant dump at the head of a fire near Fallbrook that was burning toward a mobile home park. Moments later two drones were spotted hovering about 200 feet above the area where the pink retardant had just been dropped, Kremensky said.

The tankers usually dump their loads from a height of 100 to 150 feet above the flames. “I don’t know how they missed (the drones),” he said.

Kremensky said he had to ground the tankers and copters for about an hour until the drones had left. Their operators were never identified. Luckily, the fire did not destroy any property before being extinguished days later after having burned nearly 800 acres.

Another incident was reported June 13 by Oceanside police near a brush fire that charred 50 acres on Camp Pendleton near the Marine Memorial Golf Course .

Police said a drone was seen in the air while a helicopter was making water drops on the blaze. The aircraft had to clear the area until the drone was gone, police Lt. Matt Cole said at the time. The drone operator was never seen.

Numerous state and federal laws restricting drones in fire areas are now in place. One California statute makes flying a drone over a fire and interfering with emergency personnel a misdemeanor. Another limits first responder’s liability for damaging a drone that is interfering with operations. In other words, a drone can be shot down by first responders although that has yet to happen.

Last week a 54-year-old Arizona man pleaded not guilty to two felony counts of endangering firefighting crews by flying a drone over an active fire in a designated “no fly” zone.

Several incidents allegedly linked to the man caused 14 aircraft to return to bases for more than an hour during the Goodwin fire, which began two weeks ago in the Prescott National Forest southwest of Flagstaff.

Complicating things further is that drones are almost impossible to see from the air. All reports of drone activity have come from observers on the ground who have seen them in them flying or who have spotted operators guiding a drone remotely.

Why are drones flying near fires? Often to take photographs and video to post on social media or sell to news organizations.

“They can cause a lot of destruction and possibly a lot of death … just to get a good picture,” Kremensky said.

Media agencies, many of which own and use drones for news gathering, know the laws well.

“Drone flight rules are in place for some very sound reasons,” said the San Diego Union-Tribune Photography and Video Editor John McCutchen. “Irresponsible use is only going to cause problems for firefighters and the media.”

http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com

Evolution Trikes REVO, N9912S: Fatal accident occurred July 09, 2016 at Cushing Field (0C8), Newark, Illinois and accident occurred May 24, 2014 near Williamsburg-Jamestown Airport (KJGG), Williamsburg, Virginia

Randy E. Atkinson 


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; DuPage, Illinois

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N9912S


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA263 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 09, 2016 in Newark, IL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/01/2017
Aircraft: EVOLUTION TRIKES REVO, registration: N9912S
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot was conducting his fourth solo flight in the weight-shift aircraft and was landing on a private turf runway in light wind conditions. A witness stated that the aircraft initially appeared to track straight down the runway after landing; however, shortly thereafter, it started to oscillate to the left and right. The oscillations increased until the aircraft rolled over and came to rest on its side. An examination of the aircraft did not reveal any preimpact malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. Although the pilot only had a total of 16.75 flight hours and less than 2 hours solo, it could not be determined why he lost control of the aircraft after landing.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilot's failure to maintain directional control on landing. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's lack of flight experience.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 9, 2016, about 0915 central daylight time, an Evolution Trikes Revo, weight-shift aircraft, N9912S, impacted terrain at the Cushing Field Ltd Airport (0C8), Newark, Illinois. The student rated pilot, sole occupant, was fatally injured and the aircraft was substantially damaged. The aircraft was registered to and operated by a private individual, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time.

A witness who was in an airplane positioned in the traffic pattern observed the accident. The witness stated that the accident aircraft landed on runway 36. Initially, the aircraft appeared to track straight down the runway, when the aircraft started to oscillate left and right. The oscillations then increased until the aircraft rolled over. The pilot was taken to a local hospital and was initially listed in critical condition before he succumbed to his injuries.

The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector reported that the aircraft came to rest on its side. The aircraft sustained substantial damage to the wing and fuselage; the examination of the aircraft did not reveal any pre-impact malfunctions.

PILOT INFORMATION

The pilot held a student pilot certificate and was operating under the sport pilot medical rules. A review of the pilot's logbook revealed he had accumulated 16.75 total flight hours, with 1.75 solo, in the accident aircraft. The logbook revealed three solo flights before the accident flight.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident aircraft was an Evolution Trikes Revo. The aircraft has a strut-braced hang glider-style high-wing, weight-shift controls, two-seats-in-tandem, tricycle landing gear, and a single-engine in the pusher configuration. The aircraft was powered by a reciprocating Rotax four cylinder 912ULS engine and a fixed pitch propeller. A review of the aircraft's maintenance records revealed the last condition inspection was completed on February 8, 2016 with an aircraft total time of 93.5 hours. A review of FAA records revealed the aircraft received its Special Airworthiness Certificate in the Special Light Sport – Weight Shift Control Aircraft category on February 7, 2011. The student pilot purchased the aircraft in March 2016; however, at the time of the accident, the aircraft registration had not been updated in the FAA's database.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 0915, the automated weather observation facility located at the Morris Municipal Airport – James R. Washburn Field (C09), about 10 miles southeast of the accident site recorded; wind calm, 10 mile visibility, broken clouds at 1,900 ft, temperature 71 degrees Fahrenheit (F), dew point 62 degrees F, and a barometric pressure of 30.02 inches of mercury.

AIRPORT INFORMATION
The Cushing Field Ltd Airport (0C8), is a privately owned airport, open to the public, located 2 miles southwest of Newark, Illinois. Pilots are to use the CTAF (Common Traffic Advisory Frequency) for communications. The airport has a single turf runway 18/36; 2,831 ft by 180 ft. The airport is at an elevation of 640 ft mean sea level.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The wreckage came to rest on its right side, on the grass runway. Substantial damage was noted to the aircraft fiberglass fuselage/fairing. Several tubing members for the wing were either bent or broken during the collision with the ground. The fabric wing was also torn.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Office of the Coroner, DuPage County, Illinois conducted an autopsy on the pilot. The cause of death was determined to be "cervical spinal injuries".

The FAA Bio Aeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, conducted toxicological testing on the pilot. The specimens were not tested for cyanide. The test was negative for carbon monoxide and ethanol. The test was positive for Fentanyl in lung and blood.

Fentanyl is an opioid medication. Fentanyl is used as part of anesthesia to help prevent pain after surgery or other medical procedure. A review of medical records revealed that the fentanyl was administered during medical treatment, after the accident.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA263
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 09, 2016 in Newark, IL
Aircraft: EVOLUTION TRIKES REVO, registration: N9912S
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 9, 2016, about 1940 central daylight time, an Evolution Trikes Revo, weight-shift aircraft, N9912S, experienced a hard landing at the Cushing Field LTD Airport (0C8), Newark, Illinois. The student rated pilot, sole occupant, was seriously injured and the aircraft was substantially damaged. The aircraft was registered to and operated by a private individual, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time.

An initial report from the responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector stated that student rated pilot had little flight experience, but was endorsed for solo flight. The aircraft landed hard and flipped over, coming to rest upside down.   The aircraft was retained for further examination.








NTSB Identification: ERA14CA262 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 24, 2014 in Williamsburg, VA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/30/2014
Aircraft: EVOLUTION TRIKES REVO, registration: N9912S
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot stated that he was flying the weight-shift control aircraft over a river while the passenger took photos. As he slowed and descended the aircraft near a bird's nest in order for the passenger to capture a photo, the aircraft entered an aerodynamic stall. The pilot applied full engine power to recover, but the aircraft continued to sink before impacting the river, resulting in substantial damage. The pilot and passenger subsequently egressed and swam to the shore. The pilot stated that there were no mechanical malfunctions or anomalies of the aircraft or engine that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's failure to maintain airspeed while maneuvering at low altitude, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall and impact with water.