Thursday, July 20, 2017

Small airports expecting record traffic for eclipse

PORTLAND, Ore. -- Hundreds of pilots plan to make the most of the solar eclipse in Oregon.

Madras Airport in Central Oregon has already taken reservations for 300 planes. As of Thursday it had room for 50 more, but the planes must arrive Aug. 18, 19 or 20.

The day of the eclipse, Aug. 21, is sold out for landings.

Manager Rob Berg says most pilots will camp out on the field near their planes. The airfield will have a beer and wine garden, sky diving, music and a World War II museum. Learn more

The Federal Aviation Administration reports that Bend and Madras airports are bringing in private companies to run air traffic control around the eclipse.

In Salem, also in the path of totality, Ron Peters is expecting a very busy day on the eclipse.

“Seeing a lot of business,” said Peters, the manager of Salem Aviation Fueling. It’s where pilots who want to land and stay will park their planes.

“We're the first major airport in the line of totality,” he said.

And there is no room left. Every parking space is booked.

“We actually are getting requests from people down in California, Idaho, Washington, people flying in to go see the eclipse here,” said Peters.

The field has official parking spots for 125 small planes but Peters plans to squeeze 250 into the parking areas.

It will likely be the busiest morning in the airport's history.

“So they're flying in to see the event, the event happens then, boom they're gone,” said Peters. “So you've got 200 plus aircraft that are coming in, everyone wants to be here at the same time, everybody wants to leave at the same time,” he said.

Closer to Portland, Aurora Airport is already busy with summer travelers.

Even north of the path of totality things are sure to get much more active on eclipse day.

“It will be busy,” said Bruce Bennett, owner and Chief Pilot at Aurora Aviation.

He said nearly all the company's rental planes are booked for the big event. He thinks most pilots taking off from aurora will have reservations at fields in Madras, John Day, even Stanley, Idaho as they fly east looking for the best eclipse viewing weather.

He thinks most pilots will land and watch the eclipse from the ground.

Brian Keil is not one of them. He will be in the air.

“I will. I think it will be a great experience to be able to see it from above and hopefully it will be a good event for us,” he said.

He’ll carry passengers in a rented plane. He's not sure where he'll end up - somewhere in the path of totality.

“It all depends on the best view I can get. You know, cameras and what not. I expect the people I’m taking up to have cameras and we should get a very good view from the top side,” Keil said.

Rental cars are a premium as well. One aviation company worker in Bend who was booking a car for out of town travelers said she was quoted $707 for three days around the eclipse.

http://www.kgw.com

Erlanger Health System announces arrival of LIFE FORCE 6 Helicopter



CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. — Erlanger Health System has announced the arrival of a new LIFE FORCE 6 helicopter that will serve patients in western North Carolina.

Erlanger says the aircraft arrived at Erlanger Baroness Hospital Wednesday afternoon in order to be equipped for its inaugural medical flight set for August 15. The LIFE FORCE 6 helicopter will be based at Western Carolina Regional Airport in Andrews, North Carolina.

The new aircraft is a H135 with Instrument Flight Rules (IFR). Meaning that in mountainous regions, like where LIFE FORCE 6 will be based, aircraft not equipped with IFR can frequently get fogged in and are unable to answer patient transport requests.

With the addition of this aircraft, Erlanger says patients in the Murphy region will have quicker access to a higher level of care with increased safety. Erlanger says the addition of the new LIFE FORCE helicopter brings the LIFE FORCE fleet to six total helicopters – four dual engine aircraft equipped with IFR and two single-engine aircraft that use visual flight rules, or VFR.

Erlanger says LIFE FORCE provides a clinical team for medical operations and Med Trans Corporation provides pilots and mechanics for the aeromedical service, along with the aircraft. Med Trans equips the LIFE FORCE fleet with Airbus H135 helicopters and Bell 407 helicopters.

Erlanger says LIFE FORCE has provided air medical transport to the Chattanooga region for more than 27 years and operates five bases in Tennessee and Georgia that cover 50,000 square miles. They are accredited by the commission for accreditation of medical transport systems and is nationally ranked as one of the highest performing air medical services in the country. On average, the company flies approximately 2,500 patients each year and is the only air ambulance program in the region that carries ultrasound, blood and plasma and is credentialed by physicians at Erlanger to perform emergency surgical procedures. All flight nurses and paramedics are board certified in critical care transport and LIFE FORCE is one of only 5% of the programs in the country that has achieved this standard.

NewsChannel 9's Alyssa Spirato rode along with a Life Force pilot. To see that story and learn more, you can click here.

http://newschannel9.com

Cessna 175A Skylark, N8051T, Skylark Aircraft LLC: Incident occurred July 20, 2017 near Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport (KBZN), Gallatin County, Montana

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Helena, Montana

Skylark Aircraft LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N8051T

Aircraft force landed in a field and went into a ditch.

Date: 20-JUL-17
Time: 16:39:00Z
Regis#: N8051T
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C175
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: BOZEMAN
State: MONTANA

The third leg of their cross country air trip was going well. Cody Barnett had the controls of the Cessna 175, Thomas Seros was sitting next to him. They left Couer d’Alene early Thursday morning and coasted over mountain ranges with ease. By mid-morning, they started their descent into Bozeman.

They were second in line to land at the Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport and about seven miles away when the engine started sputtering.

“We both look at each other, we’re like, ‘This can’t be good,’” Barnett said.

Barnett is 22, Seros is 19. Both are licensed pilots. They played with the air and gas mixture going into the engine, a quick fix for problems that arise when a plane is descending.

It didn’t work. Seros restarted the engine three times, and that didn’t work. They were losing engine power, and they didn’t know how to fix it. Seros took the controls and Barnett started trying to fix the problem. A few miles later, the propeller quit.

They didn’t talk, didn’t freak out. They stayed focused, even though they knew the plane wasn’t going to make the runway. Another landing spot would have to do.

A green field with a pivot pointing east stood out among the houses.

“I called it and I said, ‘We’re going down in the field,’” Seros said. “’We’re not going to make it, we’re going down in this field.”

The Cessna’s wheels hit the ground and the plane rolled until it hit an irrigation ditch. Barnett and Seros popped open the doors and jumped out. Police cars, fire engines and an ambulance drove up Spooner Road to find them. Airport personnel showed up, too.

Neither man was injured. There’s nothing but a few dents on the plane. Nothing caught fire.

“It was so lucky,” Seros said a few hours later, sitting in a coffee shop in Bozeman.

The action happened in a matter of three or four minutes, from sputtering engine to emergency landing. Mechanics from Arlin’s Aircraft Services came to look at the plane and eventually towed it away. The two men spent the rest of the day giving their story to the Federal Aviation Administration and letting their families know they were OK.

Brian Sprenger, the director of the Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport, said emergency landings like this are unusual, though the airport has tried to ensure there’s enough open space for emergency landings in its immediate area. Sprenger thinks the two men made the right choice.

“He found a suitable field that he felt comfortable landing at,” he said. “I think he made the right choice.”

The two men live in Phoenix. Barnett is a student at Arizona State University and works at a drone company. Seros studies at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University and works at a local airport.

Barnett has been a licensed pilot since 2012, Seros since February. Both own planes. Seros bought the one they flew here about a month before their trip.

“This is my first really long flight with it,” he said.

They’d planned a three-stop tour of Montana and northern Idaho. They were in Polson on Sunday, Couer d’Alene on Tuesday. Bozeman is the last stop before they head back to Phoenix.

They were scheduled to fly back to Phoenix on Saturday, but that may change. Mechanics are still working on diagnosing the problem with the plane.

Barnett suspects it might be fuel blockage. They left Couer d’Alene with more than enough gas, and there was still gas in one of the tanks after they landed. But they can’t be sure.

“Until the mechanic tears it apart, no clue,” Barnett said.

Whatever it was, the two men are glad the engine trouble didn’t happen earlier in the day, like when they were flying over mountain ranges. Pilots are trained to deal with emergencies like this, and though each has been flying for less than a decade, they’re pretty sure they did it right.

“We literally ran through everything that we’ve done, and we did it correctly,” Barnett said.


http://www.bozemandailychronicle.com


BOZEMAN -  

UPDATE: 7/20/17, 2:50 p.m. 

According to airport director Brian Sprenger, the Cessna 175 was carrying two people, who were uninjured in the incident.

The plane reportedly suffered extremely minor damage to the engine cowling.

The cause of the emergency landing was engine failure, according to Sprenger. He said the pilot had to make a decision and found a wheat field that would work for them to land on since the plane would not have made it back to the airstrip. An irrigation ditch eventually stopped the plane.

The incident has been turned over to the FAA and NTSB who will determine if further investigation is needed.

Sprenger said no other traffic to the airport was disrupted.

A small plane made a rough landing in a field about 1.5 miles northwest of a runway at Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport at 10 a.m. Thursday.

Mark Taylor of Rocky Mountain Rotors said he flew out to see if the pilot and passenger were OK, both occupants gave him the thumbs up.

The incident remains under investigation. We have messages into both the Gallatin County Sheriff’s Office and the airport and will update the story when more information becomes available.

http://www.kbzk.com



BOZEMAN – A plane made an emergency landing near the Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport on Thursday morning.

The plane landed about 1.5 miles from the airport due to engine failure said Airport Director Brian Sprenger. The plane reportedly suffered only minor damage to the engine cowling.

Sprenger said the pilot had to make a decision and found a wheat field that would work for them to land on since the plane would not have made it back to the airstrip. An irrigation ditch eventually stopped the plane.

The Cessna 175 was carrying two people, who were uninjured in the incident.

Mark Taylor of Rocky Mountain Rotors said he flew out to see if the pilot and passenger were OK, both occupants gave him the thumbs up.

The incident has been turned over to the FAA and NTSB who will determine if further investigation is needed.

Sprenger said no other traffic to the airport was disrupted.

http://www.ktvh.com





A plane made an emergency landing in a field near Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport on Thursday morning.

The plane landed west of Spooner Road north of Belgrade after a report of engine failure. The plane was upright in the field.

No one was injured.

The Gallatin County Sheriff’s Office, Central Valley Fire Department and AMR ambulance service were at the scene.


http://www.bozemandailychronicle.com

Wiscasset Airport (KIWI) panel talks Peregrine, picks up tenant search

Wiscasset’s airport advisory committee on July 19 thought up ways to find a tenant for the upstairs office space, vacant since Peregrine Turbine Technologies moved out last year.

Members said Town Planner Ben Averill had led the search. Funding for the planner job ended June 30. But members said the town needs to stay active on it, or Wiscasset Municipal Airport will keep losing the rental income – $900 a month under Peregrine’s lease.

“(That) was a significant amount of income that has to be made up elsewhere,” Chairman Steve Williams said. “It would be nice to get that (space) rented.”

Member Ray Soule said he has been invited to attend Lincoln County Regional Planning Commission meetings. Those could provide valuable information on finding a renter and other topics, he said. He also suggested putting the rental on Craigslist.

Also July 19, Williams announced member Bryan Buck resigned earlier that day. In an email response to a request for comment, Buck, a pilot, wrote: “The airport is in good hands and my goal now is to fly the cub and enjoy the airport and let some fresh blood advise the select board team.”

Buck’s departure creates an opening for a volunteer for the five-member panel, Williams said. If interested, contact the town office at 882-8200.

Airport Manager Frank Costa was on vacation. Reviewing Costa’s monthly report in his absence, Williams commented on Costa’s suggestion of a study into extending the runway. Williams said the Federal Aviation Administration would not fund a longer runway because the region already has longer ones in Brunswick, Augusta and Rockland. “They’re just not going to do it.”

He also said he would like clarification on the report’s reference to serving Lifeflight with a longer runway. Costa said July 20, the runway can already accommodate a Lifeflight helicopter, but not a Lifeflight plane. He said, for Williams to say the FAA wouldn’t fund an extension was putting up a wall instead of encouraging the airport’s progress.

Members discussed Peregrine Turbine Technologies’ possible return to the airport to conduct testing.  Member Pam Brackett, co-owner of Chewonki Campground opposite the airport on Chewonki Neck Road, said she had a “real concern.” Asked later about her comment, she said if there were additional noise from the airport due to the test facility, that would be a concern for her. Members said it was their understanding Peregrine will be taking over a private hangar.

Soule, who chairs the planning board, told Brackett the campground would be notified when a public hearing is set. Soule said the board would need to review a site plan, “primarily because it comes under the heading of change of business, or a change of occupation. So they need to come before us and do a site plan. There’s quite a bit to it.”

In response to the Wiscasset Newspaper’s request for an update on his plans, Peregrine Turbine Technologies owner David Stapp writes in an email July 20, he has a hangar under agreement to purchase. Its current owner David MacDonald built it as a site to build and test an experimental aircraft, the email continues.

“My purpose for the hangar is to build and test an experimental propulsion system ... The town Select board expressed to me that they considered this no change of use especially since I am storing my aircraft there and therefore no planning board review was necessary. At this point I don't have any plans for a site review per the town's instructions and will look to the Select Board and town manager to advise if they have changed their opinion.”

As for Brackett’s noise concern, Stapp states that the prior week, he went to the campground to let Brackett and her sister know he is sensitive to their concerns about noise “and will be taking steps to mitigate it.

“I have already tasked my engineers with implementing noise abatement methods in the test setup.  Our tests will be taking place in early winter when her campground is not operating. This testing in the hangar is only temporary (approximately two months) and will be complete long before her next camper season begins. Noise generated by our test is expected to be far below the noise generated by just about any aircraft operating at the airport.

Stapp adds, Peregrine Turbine Technologies has a long history of working to benefit the town in job creation, business and special event promotion and increasing the tax base. “We are committed to being good neighbors to our friends here in town. I hope that is clear to all concerned.”

The committee’s next meeting is tentatively set for 5 p.m. Aug. 16 at the airport.

http://www.wiscassetnewspaper.com

Cessna 177 Cardinal, N30033: Incident occurred July 19, 2017 at Fond du Lac County Airport (KFLD), Wisconsin

http://registry.faa.gov/N30033




FOND DU LAC - Disaster was diverted Wednesday night when an airplane in distress battled a storm to land safely at the Fond du Lac County Airport.

It’s that time of year, when air crafts of all kinds from throughout the U.S. and around the globe take to the skies to attend EAA AirVenture in Oshkosh — an annual gathering of aviation enthusiasts.

Fond du Lac County Sheriff’s Capt. Ryan Waldschmidt said no one was injured and the aircraft, a single-engine 1968 Cessna 177, suffered no damage.

The pilot, 75-year-old Mark Thompson and his passenger, Mike Radisch, 54, had been en route from the state of Washington to the Dodge County Airport in Juneau when thunderstorms hit, they told deputies. The headwinds, more than 50 mph, caused the plane to burn fuel much faster than anticipated.

“With less than five gallons of fuel left, they attempted to land at the closest airport in Fond du Lac, however they had difficulty seeing the runway and controlling the aircraft with the rain and wind from the thunderstorm in the area at that time,” Waldschmidt said in a news release. “They circled the airport approximately five times attempting to land before safely being able to put the aircraft down.”

In addition to being low on fuel, they lost communications with air traffic control during the final stretch of their flight, but safely touched down about 9:45 p.m.,while sheriff's deputies, the Wisconsin State Patrol and a fire department crew stood by.

Airport Manager John Wehner said Fond du Lac County’s airport is unmanned after 7 p.m., so no one was on duty when the plane landed.

The airport has been busy preparing for the influx of EAA enthusiasts, and beginning this Saturday, three air traffic controllers from the Federal Aviation Administration will be taking over to operate the airport during the week of AirVenture.

“When they take over, we become a tower-controlled airport because we anticipate about 700 aircraft will be coming into Fond du Lac,” he said.

The week is also a busy one for Fond du Lac’s EAA Chapter, headed by John Zorn and Gary Hilbert. Zorn says it takes a crew of about 100 people to help park the planes, take care of campers and keep the grounds running smoothly.

“Once the airplanes are on the ground they are handed over to us,” said Zorn, a pilot for almost three decades. “We strategically place people around the field, in long-term or short-term parking, and then there's the campers, who literally set up under the wing of their airplanes.”

About 150 campers take advantage of the local EAA Chapter's hospitality, which includes offerings of showers and toilets and food on airport grounds. Other visitors to Fond du Lac during EAA rent rooms out at Marian University, Zorn said, or stay in personal homes through Airbnb.

The weeklong aviation adventure makes money for Fond du Lac County and the local chapter. A $15 airplane fee goes to the county, and out of that, the chapter gets $1.50. Campers are also charged $35. Oshkosh EAA supplies Fond du Lac with equipment, like John Deere Gators, golf carts and motor scooters to get around.

“We are really working for them, so they help us out,” he said.

It’s hard to describe the passion that comes with flying an airplane, the veteran pilot said. In the past four years he’s seen a resurgence of young people showing an interest in getting their pilot’s license, which costs around $8,000 when all is said and done.

“It is the most amazing feeling, to take a 3,000-pound vehicle and take to the air, each time I am still awestruck,” he said. “You can be having the worst day of your life and flying can make you forget about everything else.”

http://www.fdlreporter.com

Officials unveil "Striker" emergency response vehicle at Lehigh Valley International Airport (KABE)

HANOVER TWP, Pa. - The Lehigh-Northampton Airport Authority (LNAA) Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting (ARFF) Division announced the arrival of a 2017 OshKosh "Striker" 6x6 ARFF vehicle for emergency response at Lehigh Valley International. 

Designated "Rescue 1," the new vehicle will replace "Rescue 3," another OshKosh ARFF vehicle which has been in service at lVIA since 1996. The LNAA received an Airport Improvement Program grant from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to complete the $807,251 Striker acquisition. 

The Striker vehicle is fully equipped with a 3,00 gallon water storage tank, 450 pounds of Potassium based dry chemical and 420 gallons of foam. Some of the vehicle's features include a high reach extendable and low attack turret (both containing Hydro-Chem nozzles), a FLIR (forward looking infrared camera) and a piercing tool that can penetrate the skin of a commercial, general aviation or cargo aircraft.

http://www.wfmz.com

See A Helicopter Over Schuylkill River Today? Here’s Why

LOWER POTTSGROVE PA – A helicopter is expected today (Thursday, July 20, 2017), beginning at 8 a.m., to follow bends and turns along portions of the Schuylkill River – north from the City Avenue bridge in Philadelphia, through Lower Pottsgrove, and to the Landingville Dam in Schuylkill County – as it sprays a fishy-smelling larvicide to control black flies commonly known as biting gnats.

The spray consists of a naturally occurring bacteria that is not toxic to fish or other aquatic macroinvertebrates found in the river. It kills the immature form of the black fly while the larvae feed on it in the water, according to a state Department of Environmental Protection announcement.

Spraying is specifically targeted, and will not occur over all of Montgomery County, the department noted. The effort is part of the Pennsylvania Black Fly Suppression Program.

An aircraft flown by Helicopter Applicators of Gettysburg PA will first circle areas to be treated to look for people on the ground, or obstructions in the air. Then the helicopter will fly perpendicular to the water flow, whenever possible, and apply the brown, viscous liquid that contains the bacteria called bacillus thuringiensis israelensis.

http://sanatogapost.com

Bell 206A JetRanger, N1431W: Eversource helicopter to do Greenwich equipment checks

C-PAN Aero LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N1431W


GREENWICH — Eversource Energy will be running aerial inspections of electrical equipment throughout the state and has alerted Greenwich residents.

The utility will be using a blue and silver helicopter with a tail number of N1431W to check its high-voltage electrical equipment on right of ways in Greenwich and elsewhere in Greenwich. The helicopter is equipped with heat-sensing, infrared scanning technology which is used to detect potentially harmful equipment issues before they occur.

Eversource released the announcement on Thursday and said flights would take place through July 26. No official time for when it expects to be going through Greenwich has been announced because it is all dependent on the weather as well as wind speed and how quickly the utility can get through the other parts of the state it is checking.

Spokesman Frank Poirot said they wanted people to be aware of the helicopter so people would not be concerned if they saw it flying over the high-voltage equipment. The flights are done by the utility several times a year to check on various issues. In March Eversource did helicopter flights in Greenwich to monitor trees and vegetation and make sure it wasn’t growing too close to transmission lines.

Flights will take place, weather permitting, throughout the state between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. The flight has nothing to do with the ongoing process from the Connecticut Siting Council about whether Eversource can build a new substation on Railroad Avenue to connect to its Cos Cob substation.

The helicopters will have three people on board them, the pilot, a transmission line specialist and an infrared imagery specialist.

In addition to Greenwich, Eversource will also be checking equipment in Andover, Beacon Falls, Berlin, Bethany, Bethel, Bethlehem, Bloomfield, Bozrah, Branford, Bristol, Brookfield, Brooklyn, Canton, Chaplin, Cheshire, Chester, Columbia, Coventry, Danbury, Darien, Deep River, Durham, East Granby, East Haddam, East Hartford, East Haven, East Lyme, East Windsor, Ellington, Essex, Farmington, Franklin, Glastonbury, Granby, Guilford, Haddam, Hamden, Hampton, Hartford, Harwinton, Hebron, Killingly, Lebanon, Ledyard, Litchfield, Lyme, Manchester, Mansfield, Meriden, Middlebury, Middlefield, Middletown, Milford, Monroe, Montville, Naugatuck, New Hartford, New Milford, Newington, Newtown, North Branford, North Stonington, Norwalk, Old Saybrook, Orange, Oxford, Plymouth, Pomfret, Portland, Putnam, Redding, Ridgefield, Rocky Hill, Roxbury, Salisbury, Shelton, Simsbury, Somers, South Windsor, Southington, Stamford, Suffield, Thomaston, Thompson, Wallingford, Washington, Waterbury, Waterford, Watertown, Westport, Wethersfield, Wilton, Windham, Windsor, Wolcott, Woodbridge and Woodbury.

http://www.greenwichtime.com

Cessna 182 Skylane, N5792B, Jacquin Aviation Inc: Accident occurred June 26, 2016 near Greater Kankakee Airport (KIKK), Kankakee County, Illinois

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA235 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 26, 2016 in Kankakee, IL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/06/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N5792B
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot reported that, after dropping off skydivers, he made a rapid spiraling descent back to the airport. The pilot added that, because the wind had changed such that it resulted in a tailwind, he initiated a go-around during the landing approach; however, when he advanced the throttle, the engine initially surged and then lost power. The pilot made a forced landing in a corn field near the end of the runway. 

After the accident, the pilot drained about 7 gallons of fuel from the airplane. Fuel was present in the carburetor, but the gascolator bowl was empty. No other anomalies were noted. It is likely that the low level of fuel unported during the rapid spiraling descent, which led to the subsequent fuel starvation to the engine.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
Aa total loss of engine power due to fuel starvation, which resulted from the low level of fuel unporting during a rapid spiraling descent.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; West Chicago, Illinois

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Jacquin Aviation Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N5792B

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA235
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 26, 2016 in Kankakee, IL
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N5792B
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 26, 2016, about 1545 central daylight time, a Cessna 182, N5792B, collided with the terrain during a forced landing in a corn field south of the Greater Kankakee Airport (IKK), Kankakee, Illinois. The pilot was not injured. The airplane received substantial damage to the left wing. The aircraft was registered to and operated by Jacquin Aviation, Inc., as a skydiving flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from IKK about 1515.

The pilot reported the accident occurred on the 4th flight of the day. He dropped the skydivers and returned to the airport lining up to land on runway 16, which he had previously used. During the approach, the pilot noticed the wind direction had changed and he now had a tailwind. The pilot initiated a go-around from an altitude of about 200 ft above ground level. He raised the flaps to 30°and advanced the throttle. He reported there was an initial surge in power, then the engine stopped developing power. The pilot made a right turn and landed the airplane in a corn field on the south side of the airport.

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector arrived on scene as the pilot was draining the fuel from the airplane. The pilot drained about 7 gallons of fuel from the airplane. The FAA inspector stated there was some fuel in the carburetor bowl when he removed the plug, but the gascolator was empty. No other anomalies were noted which would have resulted in a loss of engine power. The pilot reported he used the carburetor heat during the landing approach and turned it off when he initiated the go-around.

The pilot speculated that the low level of fuel most likely unported during his rapid spiraling descent after dropping the skydivers which resulted in fuel starvation to the engine.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA235
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 26, 2016 in Kankakee, IL
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N5792B
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On June 26, 2016, about 1400 central daylight time, a Cessna 182, N5792B, collided with the terrain during an off airport forced landing in a corn field just south of the Greater Kankakee Airport (IKK), Kankakee, Illinois. The pilot was not injured. The airplane received substantial damage to the left wing. The aircraft was registered to Jacquin Aviation, Inc., and was operated as a sky diving airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operating on a flight plan. The flight originated from IKK about 1330. 


The pilot reported a loss of engine power while performing a go-around.

Enstrom F-28C, N5697B, DuBois Aviation Inc: Accident occurred July 19, 2017 near Chino Airport (KCNO), San Bernardino County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

DuBois Aviation Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N5697B

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA158
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, July 19, 2017 in Ontario, CA
Aircraft: ENSTROM F 28C, registration: N5697B
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 19, 2017, about 1010 Pacific daylight time, an Enstrom F28-C rotorcraft, N5697B, experienced a partial loss of engine power and landed hard in a dirt pasture about 1/2-mile northeast of the Chino Airport (CNO), Ontario, California. The student pilot, sole occupant, was seriously injured and the helicopter sustained substantial damage to the tailboom and main rotor blades. The helicopter was registered to Dubois Aviation Inc and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 solo instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from CNO at about 1005.

The student pilot reported he entered the downwind leg to set up for the first landing of the day. When abeam his touchdown location, he conducted the prelanding checks with no anomalies noted. Prior to turning base the pilot lowered the collective, reduced the throttle, and started to descend at about 100 feet per minute. During the descent, he observed the engine RPM to be slightly above 2,900 RPM, and he reduced the throttle. The RPMs reduced slightly, however, went back to 2,900 RPM, and the manifold pressure was about 10 inches of HG. At about 400 feet above the ground, he heard the engine sound increase and he observed 3,300-2,500 RPM. Unable to make the runway, he continued the descent towards a pasture and landed hard in the dirt. 


The airplane has been moved to a secure location for further examination.

Raytheon 390 Premier, N84VA, Ali Gator Air LLC: Incident occurred July 18, 2017 at Blue Grass Airport (KLEX), Fayette County, Kentucky

Ali Gator Air LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N84VA





LEXINGTON, Ky. (WKYT)- A plane headed to Springfield, Ohio was forced to make an emergency landing at Blue Grass Airport on Tuesday after the plane began experiencing a fuel leak.

A private, general aviation aircraft, with eight people on board was heading to Springfield, Ohio when the pilot noticed what the thought was a fuel leak on the plane. 

The plane was diverted to Blue Grass Airport.

Once it was on the ground, crews realized the plane did have a fuel leak, and there was fuel on the main runway.

The plane has been removed off the runway and a public safety team was on site, along with a hazardous spill team cleaning up the fuel.

Officials with the airport say main runway is now open. 

http://www.wkyt.com

Cessna 172S, N747LT: Incident occurred July 19, 2017 at Blue Grass Airport (KLEX), Fayette County, Kentucky

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Louisville, Kentucky

http://registry.faa.gov/N747LT

Aircraft on landing, sustained a birdstrike.

Date: 19-JUL-17
Time: 23:36:00Z
Regis#: N747LT
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: LEXINGTON
State: KENTUCKY

Cessna 172N, N4876F, Endless Mountains Air Inc: Accident occurred July 19, 2017 at Seamans Field Airport (9N3), Factoryville, Wyoming County, Pennsylvania

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Endless Mountains Air Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N4876F

NTSB Identification: ERA17CA250
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, July 19, 2017 in Factoryville, PA
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N4876F
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot reported that he had recently returned to flying after a lengthy period of inactivity, and this was his first solo flight after completing a comprehensive flight review. According to the pilot, after completing the traffic pattern, he landed the airplane at the midpoint of the 2,400-foot runway with 10 knots of excess airspeed and a slight tailwind. Despite maximum braking, the airplane overran the departure end of the runway and struck dense brush, which resulted in substantial damage to the engine firewall. The pilot further reported that there were no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Cirrus SR22, N422AK, FSA Air LLC: Incident occurred July 19, 2017 at Brenham Municipal Airport (11R), Washington County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas

FSA Air LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N422AK

Aircraft on landing, nose gear collapsed.

Date: 19-JUL-17
Time: 15:18:00Z
Regis#: N422AK
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR22
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: BRENHAM
State: TEXAS

Robinson R44 Clipper II, N188DD, Awesome Flight LLC: Incident occurred July 19, 2017 off the Gilgo Beach, Long Island, New York



Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Farmingdale, New York

Awesome Flight LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N188DD

Rotorcraft force landed in the water.

Date: 19-JUL-17
Time: 14:24:00Z
Regis#: N188DD
Aircraft Make: ROBINSON
Aircraft Model: R44
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: LONG ISLAND
State: NEW YORK








NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Shane McMahon, the son of World Wrestling Entertainment’s Vince McMahon, was one of two people rescued Wednesday when their small helicopter was forced to make an emergency landing in the water about half a mile off Gilgo Beach in Babylon.

The Robinson R44 Clipper II, which is registered to a company in White Plains, was en route to Westhampton when it went down around 10:30 a.m. after taking off from Westchester County Airport.

The chopper issued a Mayday call prior to going down. A commercial flight headed to John F. Kennedy Airport heard the call and relayed it to controllers.

“Everything happened so quickly, you don’t have much time to react,” McMahon told 1010 WINS’ Al Jones. “It was very unnerving.”

McMahon said he heard a bang and then his pilot told him they were going to land in the water.

As CBS2’s Emily Smith reported, as the helicopter lost power, they inflated the pontoons and made a hard landing on the ocean.

“It is very unsettling when all of a sudden you have something happen. You hear a bang and saying you are going to do an emergency landing in the water, so yes very unnerving,” he said.

As CBS2’s Jennifer McLogan reported, McMahon congratulated the pilot he had hired to chopper him from Manhattan to Westhampton — for skill and calm under duress, calling a mayday above ocean waters off Gilgo beach as they lost power, before banking down into a hard landing.

“[He] was super calm, which made me super calm and we landed perfectly,” McMahon said.

The fortunate outcome was unexpected.

“We heard some noise, and it became very clear to me that I could no longer continue to fly the helicopter, so I decided to make an auto-rotational landing on the water,” Mario Regtien said.

The helicopter went down about 2,000 feet from a lifeguard stand, where two lifeguards jumped into kayaks to help before the U.S. Coast Guard arrived.

“We ran up and got kayaks and we paddled out, a short trip out there. Those guys actually handled it really well, the two gentlemen in the helicopter, actually really calm and collected,” lifeguard Zach Viverito told CBS2’s Jennifer McLogan. “We put them on the kayaks and just swam along with them until the Coast Guard met us about halfway in.”

“We were just getting to work and we saw a helicopter go down pretty hard, saw a big splash,” lifeguard Don Dobbi said. “We ran up and grabbed the kayaks and paddled out to see what was going on, we knew it was out of the ordinary.”

McMahon gave a “big kudos” to the lifeguards.

“Everybody chipped in, it was great,” he said.

The helicopter could be seen floating on pontoons on the water following the emergency landing. Suffolk County police said the two men were wearing life jackets and were uninjured. They were then picked up and brought to shore by a police department Marine Bureau vessel.

When asked if they were the heroes of the day, Viverito said, “I don’t know about that.”

“That is what we are here for,” he said. “So just kind of training, get on the equipment and go right out there.”

The Coast Guard responded to remove the rotorcraft, police said.

The NYPD also assisted in the rescue.

“Great job by NYPD Aviation & SCUBA with assisting in the rescue of two people from a helicopter accident,” the NYPD’s Special Operations Division tweeted Wednesday.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating.

Shane McMahon’s mother, Linda McMahon, is the current head of the Small Business Administration for the Trump administration and previously ran two unsuccessful campaigns for the U.S. Senate in Connecticut.

http://newyork.cbslocal.com

Weatherly 620, N9270W, Jersey Devil Dusters LLC: Accident occurred July 19, 2017 in Pemberton Township, Burlington County, New Jersey

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:
https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Jersey Devil Dusters LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N9270W

NTSB Identification: ERA17CA251
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Wednesday, July 19, 2017 in Pemberton Twp, NJ
Aircraft: WEATHERLY 620, registration: N9270W
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the pilot, during takeoff, when the aerial application airplane was about 15 feet above ground level, he noticed a decrease in engine performance, verified that the engine controls were full forward and turned the fuel boost pump ON. He dropped the hopper load, however the airplane performance continued to decrease. The pilot elected to land the airplane straight-ahead and the airplane impacted trees prior to coming to rest inverted in a bog. Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed substantial damage to the fuselage and wings. Furthermore, after the airplane was removed from the bog, the Federal Aviation Administration inspector who responded to the accident found feathers associated with a Canadian goose in the vicinity of the engine and damaged propeller. According to the pilot there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.




PEMBERTON TWP -- A pilot sustained a minor injury Wednesday evening after a crop duster crash-landed into a cranberry bog, police said. 

The crash occurred around 6:45 p.m., according to Pembertown Township Police. When responders arrived at the scene, they found the crop dusting plane had crashed near Sheep Pen Hill Road, police said. 

The 53-year-old pilot had exited the aircraft on his own, and had only a minor injury, police said.

Around 60 gallons of fuel spilled into the water, prompting firefighters to respond to the scene for hazardous materials, Philly.com reported. 

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash.

BVI Airways: Standoff continues – Government reminds airline to fly



The standoff between the government of the British Virgin Islands (BVI) and the cash-strapped BVI Airways appears far from over, despite both parties earlier declaring that they were trying to settle the impasse.

The dispute follows an agreement through which the BVI government contributed $7 million towards the private airline’s efforts to start direct flights between the BVI and Miami in the United States.

But the airline is now maintaining that it does not have enough money to start flying, adding that its financial challenges were compounded by delays experienced in attaining the necessary regulatory approvals.

There is uncertainty as to whether the BVI government will pump more funds into the carrier. Premier Smith did not make a declaration one way or the other when he yesterday issued his second press statement since the dispute became public.

But the premier yesterday reminded BVI Airways that the government and people of the BVI are waiting for it to fulfil its end of the deal and commence service.

“The government of the [British] Virgin Islands, recognising the need to improve airlift into the territory for our visitors and residents alike, entered into an agreement with BVI Airways to provide the company with $7 million to operate direct flights between Miami and the British Virgin Islands.”

“Having provided the agreed support, this government and people are awaiting the commencement of the much anticipated direct Miami/BVI flights,” Premier Smith said in a release yesterday, July 19.

He, earlier this month, made a similar declaration to the airline. At the time, he said: “The government has fully discharged its responsibility to BVI Airways by providing $7 million as a subsidy in keeping with the terms of the agreement. The government therefore hopes that BVI Airways will begin flights without any further delay.”

Premier defends airport work

BVI Airways, between the premier’s two declarations, announced that it has laid off all pilots and flight attendants.
It also chided central government, as well as the government’s BVI Airport Authority that manages the Terrence B Lettsome International Airport.

It stated that the airport has not completed the contractually agreed improvements, which would ‘meet basic commercially acceptable standards for processing passenger volume of this size’.

Premier Smith, in his response yesterday, defended the pace of the works being executed at the airport.

“The Airport Authority has put in place most of what was agreed to enhance the arrivals and departure experience of BVI Airways passengers including an office, additional seating, air conditioning and two ticket counters,” the premier continued. “The Airport Authority is awaiting definite word on the time of commencement of flight operations to complete any further arrangements specific to BVI Airways.”

http://bvinews.com

Chance Vought F4U-5 Corsair, N179PT: Accident occurred July 19, 2016 at East Troy Municipal Airport (57C), Walworth County, Wisconsin

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA274 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 19, 2016 in East Troy, WI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/06/2017
Aircraft: CHANCE VOUGHT F4U 5, registration: N179PT
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Before the accident flight, the airplane's brakes were replaced with a custom brake system. Testing of the brake system after installation resulted in a failure of the right master cylinder. The cylinder was disassembled and the O-ring was found cut. The mechanic could not find any reason for the cut O-ring, so the O-rings on both master cylinders were replaced. The next brake test resulted in a brake fluid boil, and the brake builder informed the mechanic to change the type of hydraulic fluid. A subsequent ground brake test produced "no issues or hesitation with the brakes at all," to include "a full pressure pedal push to simulate a full locked brake to pressure test [the] system prior to taxi test." A maintenance flight was then conducted, and, during landing, the airplane began to drift to the right. The commercial pilot applied the left brake; however, the brake failed and the pedal “went to the floor.” The airplane departed the runway and collided with a wind sock structure. Postaccident examination revealed that the left brake master cylinder O-ring was cut; however, the reason for the cut could not be determined.

After the accident, the mechanic contacted the master cylinder manufacturer for guidance. The company replaced the master cylinders with an upgraded model. The new cylinders were installed on the airplane and the mechanic, with guidance from the custom brake manufacturer, conducted more testing. A second airplane flew with the newer brake system without issue.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A failure of the O-ring in the left brake master cylinder for reasons that could not be determined, which resulted in a loss of directional control during landing.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Fighters & Legends LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N179PT

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA274
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 19, 2016 in East Troy, WI
Aircraft: CHANCE VOUGHT F4U 5, registration: N179PT
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 19, 2016, about 1120 central daylight time, a Vought F4U-5 Corsair airplane, N179PT, departed the runway surface after landing at the East Troy Municipal Airport (57C), East Troy, Wisconsin. The pilot was not injured and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to Fighters & Legends LLC and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight. The local flight departed 57C about 1115.

The pilot departed from 57C on a maintenance flight, in order to test the airplane brakes. He reported that the brake tested normal during the taxi. He applied the brakes several times in flight, and received positive pressure of the brake pedals. On the full stop landing to runway 8, the pilot applied the brakes and received normal braking action. As the airplane slowed, it slowly drifted to the right. The pilot applied a small amount of left brake to correct the drift and the pedal went to the floor; pumping the pedal did not correct the problem. In order to avoid a ditch, the pilot applied the right brake; however, the airplane's wing collided with the airfield's windsock. Substantial damage was sustained to the airplane's right wing.

Prior to the accident, the airplane's brakes were replaced with a custom brake system using Grove master cylinders. Testing of the brake system after installation resulted in a failure of the right master cylinder. The cylinder was disassembled and the O-ring was found cut. The mechanic could not find any reason for the cut O-ring, so the O-rings on both master cylinders were replaced with Viton O-rings and care was given to carefully place them into the cylinders. The next brake test resulted in a brake fluid boil, so the brake builder informed the mechanic to change the hydraulic fluid from MIL-PRF 5606 to MIL-PRF-83282. A subsequent ground brake test produced "no issues or hesitation with the brakes at all" to include "a full pressure pedal push to simulate a full locked brake to pressure test [the] system prior to taxi test."

After the accident, the mechanic contacted the master cylinder manufacturer (not the brake builder) for guidance. The company replaced the master cylinders with an upgraded model. The new cylinders were installed on the accident airplane and the mechanic, with guidance from the custom brake manufacturer, conducted more testing.

On February 6, 2017, a second Corsair flew with the newer brake system without issue.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA274
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 19, 2016 in East Troy, WI
Aircraft: CHANCE VOUGHT F4U 5, registration: N179PT
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 19, 2016, about 1050 central daylight time, a Vought F4U-5 Corsair airplane, N179PT, was substantially damage while landing at the East Troy Municipal Airport (57C), East Troy, Wisconsin. The pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to Fighters & Legends LLC and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight which operated without a flight plan. The local flight departed 57C about 1030.

Preliminary information obtained by the Federal Aviation Administration indicated that during the landing roll, the airplane began drifting to the right. The pilot corrected with left brake, but was unable to command any braking with the left pedal and was unable to stop the drift. The airplane exited the right side of the runway and collided with a windsock. The airplane's right wing was substantially damaged.

The airplane had recently completed an annual inspection when components of its brake system were replaced. The accident flight was the first flight since the annual inspection.

NTSB Identification: CHI99FA266C
The docket is stored in the Docket Management System (DMS). Please contact Records Management Division
Accident occurred Thursday, July 29, 1999 in OSHKOSH, WI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/22/2000
Aircraft: Chance Vought F4U-5, registration: N179PT
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The three airplanes were part of a formation demonstration flight of eight World War II Navy fighters, divided into four sections of two airplanes each, that had been cleared to takeoff from runway 18 at Wittman Regional Airport, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, during the annual Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) convention, 'AirVenture 99'. Air traffic control clearance for the departing aircraft had been relinquished from the FAA tower to a local 'air boss'. The air boss had cleared all of the airplanes to takeoff as a flight. Witnesses saw the lead airplane, a Bearcat, N14HP, and his wingman, taxi down runway 18 approximately 1,400 feet, turn toward the southwest and stop. Approximately 4 seconds later, the lead airplane in the second section, a Corsair, N712RD, collided into N14HP severing the Corsair's left wing, and the Bearcat's right wing. The Corsair continued down the runway, rolling over on it's left side, came apart, and burst into flames. The remains of the Corsair came to rest in a field east of the runway, approximately 2,000 feet down. The Bearcat was turned approximately 180 degrees and came to rest on the runway's east edge. A second Corsair, the wingman of N712RD, veered off of the west side of runway 18, sustaining substantial damage to it's left wing. Examination of all three airplanes revealed no anomalies.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot of the other airplane not following the instructions briefed by the formation leader, and the pilot's maneuvering his airplane to avoid the airplane in front of him.