Thursday, March 2, 2017

Sheriff: Men flew 200lbs of marijuana from west coast to Brooksville-Tampa Bay Regional Airport (KBKV)










BROOKSVILLE (FOX 13) - A small aircraft carrying around $350,000 of marijuana landed at the Brooksville airport Monday, setting off an investigation involving law enforcement agencies from the local sheriff to Homeland Security. 

The Hernando County Sheriff's Office is now looking for the two men they say flew the Beech Baron twin engine plane from the west coast to Florida. 


Hernando County Sheriff Al Neinhuis said in a news conference Thursday, four large bags containing almost 200 pounds of marijuana, the aircraft and a pickup truck had been seized as part of the investigation. Street value of the seized pot was estimated to be worth between $300,000 and $350,000.

It all started Monday night with what the sheriff said was a surprise call from Homeland Security officials at around 10:30. They asked for help with a plane landing at the Brooksville airport, saying the plane was "acting suspiciously."


Neinhuis said his office keeps a close watch on the airport, and keeps a deputy nearby, so they sent the nearest deputy over to check it out. When she arrived, the deputy said the plane had been parked in a hangar, which was being closed as she arrived. 

When backup got there, they found Joshua Overton and Aaron Andris leaving the hangar. The sheriff said the two were not cooperative and would not let officers search the hangar. While law enforcement, including Homeland Security, worked to get a search warrant for the hangar, the men asked if they were free to leave. With no cause to hold them, officers let them go. 


The search warrant was approved and executed around 6:30 a.m. Tuesday morning. After finding the large amount of pot, the sheriff said they began to investigate the two men. Records show Overton owns the plane and rented the hangar. He is from the St. Petersburg area and does not have a criminal past. 


Andris is from Chico, California and also had a clean criminal history. Both men are wanted for trafficking marijuana, possession of a conveyance (the aircraft), and possession of paraphernalia. The sheriff said if they are caught, or preferably turn themselves in, they will be held under a $41,000 bond each. 





Sheriff Neinhuis said he was not sure if this was an isolated incident for the Brooksville airport, or if the two men had flow drugs in before, adding, "It's probably not the first time they've been involved in drug smuggling."


"I don't think drug traffickers really have a set way of doing things and that's why sometimes it makes them a little difficult," the sheriff said. "We do spend a lot of time monitoring the airport... and try to have a unit in the area most of the time."


The sheriff said anyone with information about where the two men are may contact Crime Stoppers and be eligible for a cash reward up to $1,000.


At the news conference, Senator Wilton Simpson (R-District 10) was on hand to say he appreciated the Hernando County Sheriff's Office.


"This is two in a row. Last month we had a major bust and now this month we have marijuana. The sheriff is saving lots of lives here. There are a lot of sheriff's in our area that are known for being tough on crime. The state is willing to a partner with the sheriff any time."


Sheriff Neinhuis thanked The Lake County Sheriff's Office, agents with Customs and Border Enforcement, Federal Aviation Administration officers from Orlando and Atlanta, Georgia, and Homeland Security officials for help with the investigation. 


Source:   http://www.fox13news.com


Pilot,  Joshua Overton 32, of St. Petersburg, Florida 


Passenger, Aaron Andrus, 38, of Chico, California


BROOKSVILLE, Fla.  (WFLA) – Hernando County Sheriff’s deputies seize nearly 200 pounds worth of marijuana on Monday, with a street value of more than $300,000.

They said Joshua Overton and Aaron Andrus flew the marijuana into the Brooksville Tampa Bay Regional Airport Monday night, but before they touched down, deputies got a call from the Department of Homeland Security telling them the two might be smuggling drugs.

“It’s probably not their first time being involved in drug smuggling,” said Hernando County Sheriff Al Nienhuis at a press conference at the airport Thursday afternoon.

The sheriff said the pair landed the million dollar Beechcraft Baron Monday night, but deputies but didn’t have enough cause to hold them.



Hours later when deputies executed a search warrant, they found the plane packed with pot, but by then, Overton and Andrus were long gone.

“It was pretty sophisticated, as you can see by the packaging,” Sheriff Nienhuis told News Channel 8.

The pot was neatly sealed in the passenger’s compartment in vacuum-packed bags stuffed into duffel bags.

“I would say there’s a very good likelihood this is not the first time they smuggled drugs,” Nienhuis said.

But, was this their first time to Brooksville?  The sheriff said yes.

He said the pair took off from California and thought Brooksville would be off the fed’s radar, but that wasn’t the case.

Now, the sheriff and local lawmakers are glad this pot never made it to its final destination.

“I’m proud that this is not on the streets,” said state Senator Wilton Simpson.  “People are losing their lives or worse in some cases.”

“I think at the very minimum, it inhibits our economic recovery and at the maximum, lives are lost,” Nienhuis told News Channel 8.

Neither man has a criminal record.

If you see them, you’re urged to contact the Hernando County Sheriff’s Office.


Story and video:  http://wfla.com

Don't worry, that helicopter and swarm of Coast Guard boats on Lake Michigan was only a drill



The news crackling over the dispatch radio was grim: a plane crashed into Lake Michigan with 71 passengers and four crew members.

The U.S. Coast Guard began coordinating a massive rescue response, relying on 20 other law enforcement agencies to help get survivors out of the freezing water and to medical centers in the region.

The Coast Guard's Mobile Bay, primarily used for icebreaking, headed out to McKinley Marina Thursday morning while a Coast Guard rescue helicopter from Traverse City, Mich., buzzed overhead. Milwaukee Police Department divers suited up and the Fire Department coordinated from shore inside its mobile command post.

It was only a drill, but also a test of preparedness for such a mass rescue operation.

"The big takeaway is not one agency can do everything, so we have to build that network," said Lt. j.g. Tom Morrell of the Coast Guard's enforcement division.

The Coast Guard Sector Lake Michigan frequently responds to rescues of people in kayaks or paddleboards who have gone too far from shore or people who fall off boats.

"Typically, one to four people is sort of standard," said Ensign Paul Grotelueschen of sector command center. "Anything that goes beyond that enters the realm of a mass rescue operation."



Although rare, planes have crashed into Lake Michigan. Nearly four years ago, two people were killed when a small plane bound for EAA AirVenture crashed into the waters off Cudahy.

In June 2007, six people died when a plane carrying a transplant team from the University of Michigan Medical Center crashed just off Milwaukee's lakefront. The team was in Milwaukee to harvest organs. At the time, Lake Michigan was about 57 degrees, which would allow a person to survive for about 6 hours, officials said.

And in general, statistics have indicated Lake Michigan is the deadliest of the Great Lakes with nearly as many drownings and water rescues since 2010 as the four lakes combined, according to the nonprofit Great Lake Surf Rescue Project.

The Coast Guard conducts ice-rescue training annually with partner agencies — such a drill was happening simultaneously Thursday morning in Cudahy — and has had past mass rescue training sessions in Green Bay and Superior.

The Coast Guard also urged boaters and others who enjoy winter activities on the lake to be prepared.

"Even in warm weather, if you're going out make sure you have the correct safety gear," Morrell said. "Always dress for the water temperature, not the air temperature."

Story, photo gallery and comments: http://www.jsonline.com

Corporate Air adding two new aircraft to meet rising demand

Corporate Air is adding two new ultralong-range Gulfstream aircraft to its fleet in the next few months to keep up with increasing demand it has seen since the November election, according to its business development coordinator.

Mike Vargo, vice president of sales and business development for Corporate Air, said the private aircraft charter and management company has added $100 million worth of aircraft in the last two to three years, and has seen an uptick an interest in its services in the last few months, a trend he attributes, in part, to a shift in attitude following the election of President Donald Trump.

"Interest and activity in private aviation has increased significantly since the election," he said. "Unfortunately, under the previous administration, private aircraft were demonized and mischaracterized grossly, and it was truly unfortunate because private aviation is about jobs, so when people were hiding from their aircraft and not using their aircraft and not buying more aircraft, it kills jobs."

The company currently employs 150, and will add about 10 new jobs with the addition of its new aircraft, Vargo said. Corporate Air, the largest tenant in the Allegheny County Airport in West Mifflin, also operates the county's only flight school, the Pittsburgh Flight Training Center. According to Vargo, while its enrollment for the flight school has been steady, it's working on attracting more students to meet a predicted pilot shortage in the aviation industry, just as the Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics has been trying to cultivate interest in aviation mechanics in the face of another potential industry shortage.

"We're trying to champion ourselves and let people know that it's an option for kids who maybe don't want to go to an institution of higher learning," Vargo said. "I think it's awareness; I don't think a lot of kids understand that this is an opportunity for them."

Corporate Air is looking toward even more expansion, Vargo said — it has existing hangar space at Pittsburgh International Airport and in Washington, D.C., and is looking to lease or purchase hangar space in New York, New Jersey and south Florida.

"Over the past month, we have not been able to keep up. We have not had enough aircraft to meet what has been requested," he said. "It's a good problem to have, but it's a problem nonetheless."

Source: http://www.bizjournals.com

Incident occurred March 02, 2017 at Richard Lloyd Jones Jr. Airport (KRVS), Tulsa, Oklahoma



TULSA -- A plane flipped over at R.L. Jones Airport in south Tulsa Thursday morning.

The student pilot on board was not injured.

The Spartan College of Aeronautics and Technology student was on a solo flight around 9 a.m. when as he was coming in for the landing, something went wrong.

2 Works for You has learned that the pilot possibly did what is called porpoising - when a plane lands hard, bounces up and comes down nose first. The president of Spartan said an investigation is underway.

"We're getting all of the information from the instructor who was watching the flight because this was a solo flight. We are also taking information from the control tower and we have our FAA inspector coming in from Oklahoma City."

The plane sustained damage to the engine and tail fin. The plane just came off an inspection and was good for another 100 hours.

Source:  http://www.kjrh.com

Beech B200 Super King Air, Grant Aviation Inc., N313HS: Incident occurred February 14, 2017 at Unalaska Airport (PADU), Dutch Harbor, Unalaska, Alaska










AIRCRAFT: Beechcraft B200 King Air N313HS, S/N BB1300

ENGINE(S):    Pratt PT6A-52, S/N PCE-RX0230 and Pratt PT6A-52, S/N PCE-RX0229
  
PROPELLER(S):  Hartzell HC-D4N-3A s/n FY1439 and Hartzell HC-D4N-3A s/n FY-828

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks or other information):

ENGINE(S):  Right Engine 4,345.7 Left Engine 252.8

PROPELLER(S):    Right Propeller 451.7 Left Propeller 451.7

AIRFRAME:    11,268.3
                                                
 DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:   Made a gear up landing on paved runway

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES:     Props, engines, belly skins, flaps        
Repair Estimate 1 
Repair Estimate 2

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:  Dutch Harbor, Alaska. Engines are in Wasilla, AK

REMARKS:   The plane has had the engines and propellers removed for inspections. Engine estimates attached.

Read more here:  http://www.avclaims.com/N313HS.htm





A small airplane landed on its belly Tuesday at the Unalaska airport. No one aboard was injured, but the accident shut down the runway for about four hours. 

Returning from Akun Island, the Grant Aviation plane touched down without landing gear around 1:30 p.m., according to a statement by the Alaska State Troopers (AST).

The pilot and two passengers exited safely and declined medical attention. But the aircraft -- a Beech B200 Super King Air -- sat on the runway with bent propeller blades for several hours before officials could bring a crane to move it.

Grant Aviation officials didn’t immediately return calls for comment, but a mechanic at the airport said he didn’t know why the plane came down without landing gear.

The runway sustained minimal damage, according to a spokesperson for the Alaska Department of Transportation (DOT). The extent of damage to the plane is still unclear.

The AST and DOT are investigating the cause of the accident, according to a statement by the Unalaska Department of Public Safety.

Source:   http://kucb.org




Grant Aviation says it wasn’t a mechanical problem that forced one its planes to belly flop at the Unalaska airport last month.

Beyond that, airline officials are keeping quiet about the accident’s cause -- at least for now.

“We’ve all got our theories," said Rob Kelly, Grant's chief financial officer. "But if we say something and the investigation concludes differently, that’s not a good position for us to be in.”

Although Grant is waiting on official findings from the National Transportation Safety Board, the southwest Alaska carrier has already taken action that may point toward human error.

“The pilot is no longer employed by us,” said Kelly.

That pilot was flying two passengers from Akun Island to Unalaska when the accident occurred Feb. 14. As it arrived on the island, the aircraft -- a Super King Air 200 -- touched down without landing gear.

No injuries were reported. Kelly said the plane’s engines and propellers bore the brunt of the impact.

“It looks like there may be significant damage to the engines, so we’re not sure if they’ll be able to be restored,” he said.

While Grant assesses whether the plane can be repaired, Kelly said the airline has sent a replacement and flight service is operating normally around the region.

The last time Grant recorded a crash in Unalaska was about four years ago, when a plane’s landing gear failed to deploy in strong cross winds. No one was injured, but the aircraft never flew again.

Officials say weather was not a factor in last month's accident. 

Source:  http://kucb.org




A small airplane landed on its belly Tuesday at the Unalaska airport. No one aboard was injured, but the accident shut down the runway for about four hours. 

Returning from Akun Island, the Grant Aviation plane touched down without landing gear around 1:30 p.m., according to a statement by the Alaska State Troopers (AST).


The pilot and two passengers exited safely and declined medical attention. But the aircraft -- a Beech B200 Super King Air -- sat on the runway with bent propeller blades for several hours before officials could bring a crane to move it.


Grant Aviation officials didn’t immediately return calls for comment, but a mechanic at the airport said he didn’t know why the plane came down without landing gear.


The runway sustained minimal damage, according to a spokesperson for the Alaska Department of Transportation (DOT). The extent of damage to the plane is still unclear.


The AST and DOT are investigating the cause of the accident, according to a statement by the Unalaska Department of Public Safety.


Source:   http://kucb.org



Grant Aviation Inc:   http://registry.faa.gov/N313HS

FAA Flight Standards District Office: Anchorage 

Aircraft landed gear up.  

Date: 14-FEB-17
Time: 22:23:00Z
Regis#: N313HS
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: B200
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Aircraft Operator: GRANT AVIATION
City: UNALASKA
State: ALASKA



A small airplane landed on its belly Tuesday at the Unalaska airport. No one aboard was injured, but the accident shut down the runway for about four hours. 

Returning from Akun Island, the Grant Aviation plane touched down without landing gear around 1:30 p.m., according to a statement by the Alaska State Troopers (AST).

The pilot and two passengers exited safely and declined medical attention. But the aircraft -- a Beech B200 Super King Air -- sat on the runway with bent propeller blades for several hours before officials could bring a crane to move it.

Grant Aviation officials didn’t immediately return calls for comment, but a mechanic at the airport said he didn’t know why the plane came down without landing gear.

The runway sustained minimal damage, according to a spokesperson for the Alaska Department of Transportation (DOT). The extent of damage to the plane is still unclear.

The AST and DOT are investigating the cause of the accident, according to a statement by the Unalaska Department of Public Safety.

Source:   http://kucb.org


Grant Aviation says it wasn’t a mechanical problem that forced one its planes to belly flop at the Unalaska airport last month.

Beyond that, airline officials are keeping quiet about the accident’s cause -- at least for now.

“We’ve all got our theories," said Rob Kelly, Grant's chief financial officer. "But if we say something and the investigation concludes differently, that’s not a good position for us to be in.”

Although Grant is waiting on official findings from the National Transportation Safety Board, the southwest Alaska carrier has already taken action that may point toward human error.

“The pilot is no longer employed by us,” said Kelly.

That pilot was flying two passengers from Akun Island to Unalaska when the accident occurred Feb. 14. As it arrived on the island, the aircraft -- a Super King Air 200 -- touched down without landing gear.

No injuries were reported. Kelly said the plane’s engines and propellers bore the brunt of the impact.

“It looks like there may be significant damage to the engines, so we’re not sure if they’ll be able to be restored,” he said.

While Grant assesses whether the plane can be repaired, Kelly said the airline has sent a replacement and flight service is operating normally around the region.

The last time Grant recorded a crash in Unalaska was about four years ago, when a plane’s landing gear failed to deploy in strong cross winds. No one was injured, but the aircraft never flew again.

Officials say weather was not a factor in last month's accident. 

Source:  http://kucb.org




Grant Aviation Inc:   http://registry.faa.gov/N313HS

FAA Flight Standards District Office: Anchorage 


Aircraft landed gear up.  


Date: 14-FEB-17

Time: 22:23:00Z
Regis#: N313HS
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: B200
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Aircraft Operator: GRANT AVIATION
City: UNALASKA
State: ALASKA

A small airplane landed on its belly Tuesday at the Unalaska airport. No one aboard was injured, but the accident shut down the runway for about four hours. 


Returning from Akun Island, the Grant Aviation plane touched down without landing gear around 1:30 p.m., according to a statement by the Alaska State Troopers (AST).


The pilot and two passengers exited safely and declined medical attention. But the aircraft -- a Beech B200 Super King Air -- sat on the runway with bent propeller blades for several hours before officials could bring a crane to move it.


Grant Aviation officials didn’t immediately return calls for comment, but a mechanic at the airport said he didn’t know why the plane came down without landing gear.


The runway sustained minimal damage, according to a spokesperson for the Alaska Department of Transportation (DOT). The extent of damage to the plane is still unclear.


The AST and DOT are investigating the cause of the accident, according to a statement by the Unalaska Department of Public Safety.


Source:   http://kucb.org

Piper PA-32-RT-300, Simmons Pet Properties LLC, N3016L: Incident occurred March 02, 2017 at Palm Beach County Park Airport (KLNA), West Palm Beach, Florida

Simmons Pet Properties LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N3016L

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: South Florida  

Aircraft landed gear up.  

Date: 02-MAR-17
Time: 22:10:00Z
Regis#: N3016L
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA32
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: WEST PALM BEACH
State: FLORIDA





LANTANA, Fla. (CBS12) — A small plane had a hard landing at Lantana airport after the landing gear did not collapse, according to Fire Rescue.

Two people were on board.

Fire Rescue is on scene evaluating and say there are no injuries or fire reported.

FAA will be investigating.

Story and video:  http://cbs12.com

Maule M-5-235C Lunar Rocket, N9281E, registered to and operated by the pilot, accident occurred April 24, 2018 (and) Maule M-5-180C, N56552, accident occurred March 02, 2017 in Roxbury, McPherson County, Kansas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N9281E

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Roxbury, KS
Accident Number: CEN18LA148
Date & Time: 04/24/2018, 1355 CDT
Registration: N9281E
Aircraft: MAULE M 5-235C
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On April 24, 2018, about 1355 central daylight time, a Maule M 5-235C airplane, N9281E, impacted a ground object and terrain during takeoff from a roadway near Roxbury, Kansas. The private pilot sustained serious injuries. The airplane received substantial wing damage during the impact with terrain. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The flight was originating at the time of the accident and the destination is unknown.

At 1353, the recorded weather at the Salina Regional Airport, near Salina, Kansas, was: Wind 320° at 21 kts; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition scattered clouds at 11,000 ft; temperature 20° C; dew point 9° C; altimeter 30.16 inches of mercury. Remarks peak wind 320° at 27 kts at 1341. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: MAULE
Registration: N9281E
Model/Series: M 5-235C
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No 
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSLN, 1289 ft msl
Observation Time: 1353 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 17 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 20°C / 9°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 11000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 21 knots, 320°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.16 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Roxbury, KS
Destination: 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 38.551111, -97.427222 (est)


ROXBURY -- A Wabaunsee County man was hurt in a plane crash in McPherson County on Tuesday.

The Kansas Highway Patrol says 57-year-old Shannon Randal Scot of Alma was piloting a Maule M5 235C, a single-propeller plane, when he had troubles during takeoff shortly before 1:45 pm. Scot's plane hit a sign and lost control, ending up in a grove of trees about half a mile east of the small town of Roxbury, about 15 miles east of Lindsborg and approximately 30 miles south-southeast of Salina.

Scot was taken to Salina Regional Hospital for treatment. His condition has not been released, although the Kansas Highway Patrol says injuries were not life-threatening.

KVOE's television partner KWCH in Wichita says the pilot is the same individual who crashed another plane in the same area of McPherson County last year, although his name at that time was listed as Randal Shannon of Drexel, Mo. After the crash in March 2017, Scot apparently walked away from the plane and went to a meeting at a Roxbury bank without calling 911. He told media afterward he didn't make the call because he wasn't hurt and the crash didn't damage somebody else's property.

http://www.kvoe.com



A 57-year-old pilot of a small airplane was injured when he crashed while trying to take off  on a rural McPherson County road on Tuesday afternoon.

According to the Kansas Highway Patrol, Shannon Scot from Alma was attempting to take off in a Maule M-5-235C Lunar Rocket headed east on Smoky Valley Road. The plane hit a sign, lost control, and ended up in trees on the north side of the road.

Scot was transported to Salina Regional Health Center with non-life threatening injuries.

The crash happened at 1:40 in the afternoon Tuesday, a half-mile east of Roxbury just north of Smoky Valley Road.

ORIGINAL: The pilot of a small airplane was injured when he crashed while trying to take off in rural McPherson County on Tuesday afternoon.

According to the Kansas Highway Patrol, the pilot was attempting to take off when the aircraft hit a sign and crashed into a tree line.

The pilot was transported to Salina Regional Health Center with non-life threatening injuries.

The crash happened at around 2:00 in the afternoon Tuesday, east of Roxbury in McPherson County.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.ksal.com



Maule M-5-180C, N56552: Accident occurred March 02, 2017 in Roxbury, McPherson County, Kansas 

Additional Participating Entity: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Wichita, Kansas 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N56552



Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Location: Roxbury, KS
Accident Number: GAA17CA170
Date & Time: 03/02/2017, 1315 CST
Registration: N56552
Aircraft: MAULE M5
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, while landing on a road in gusting crosswind conditions, the right wing lifted to about a 60° angle. He immediately initiated a go-around and added full power and right aileron and lowered the nose. The airplane had drifted off the center of the road to the left heading toward power lines, and the pilot chose to go under them. After the airplane cleared the power lines, the left wing tip struck the ground, and the airplane cart-wheeled. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings, the fuselage, and the empennage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during a go-around.

Findings

Aircraft
Directional control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Crosswind - Effect on operation
Tower/antenna (incl guy wires) - Decision related to condition

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Loss of control in flight (Defining event)

Other
Attempted remediation/recovery
Abrupt maneuver
Low altitude operation/event
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
Dragged wing/rotor/float/other
Roll over 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 56, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/20/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/09/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 367 hours (Total, all aircraft), 153 hours (Total, this make and model), 326 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 11 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 6 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: MAULE
Registration: N56552
Model/Series: M5 180C
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1984
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 8080C
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/19/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2400 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1115.8 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-360-CIF
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSLN, 1289 ft msl
Observation Time: 1853 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 14 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 1°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 13°C / -6°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 13 knots, 330°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.44 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: CAMDENTON, MO (OZS)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Roxbury, KS
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1010 CST
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  38.550833, -97.652778 (est)

By the time emergency personnel arrived at the site of a Kansas plane crash this week, the uninjured pilot already had:

Cleaned his personal belongings out of the plane.

Walked to a nearby bank.

Attended a business meeting.

Called federal aviation and transportation officials.

And caught a ride out of town.

The pilot, Randy Shannon, had no idea that local authorities considered him “missing” after a passerby spotted the crumpled plane Thursday afternoon in a field near Roxybury, Kansas, and called 911.

Read more here: http://www.kansascity.com

Authorities say a pilot went missing for several hours after a small plane crash-landed in a central Kansas field.

Kansas Highway Patrol Trooper Ben Gardner says the plane went down around 3:30 p.m. Thursday in a rural area near the small town of Roxbury. The Federal Aviation Administration says wind caught the Maule M-5 and that the left wing struck the ground during the landing.

Gardner says troopers tried reaching out to hospitals in the area in an effort to locate the pilot but were unsuccessful. Gardner says the patrol didn’t hear from the pilot until he called dispatchers about six hours later.

Gardner says the pilot’s plane was disabled and that it’s unclear how he left the scene. Gardner says investigators are trying to determine what happened.

A pilot was able to walk away when his  small plane crashed near the McPherson County community of Roxbury Thursday afternoon.

The Maule M-5-180C plane went down at around 3:30 in a field.

A witness told KSAL News at the scene that she heard the crash. A few minutes later when she approached it the pilot was gone, presumably headed to seek medical treatment.

Kansas Highway Patrol Trooper Craig Davis told KSAL News at the scene that McPherson County law enforcement were the first to arrive. He says that the pilot was not at the crash site when law enforcement arrived. They were still in search of the pilot late in the afternoon.

The patrol is investigating to determine what caused the plane to go down.

The plane ended upright, and was not leaking fuel.

The small community of Roxbury is located in the northeast corner of McPherson County, between Salina and McPherson, or 18 miles east of Lindsborg.

Source: http://www.ksal.com