Sunday, August 28, 2016

American Airlines, Boeing 737-800, N931AN: Incident occurred September 16, 2016 at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (KPHX), Phoenix, Arizona

AMERICAN AIRLINES INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N931AN







PHOENIX (AP) -  Authorities say an American Airlines jetliner bound for Phoenix made an emergency landing without incident at its destination after a tire blew out on takeoff from Portland, Oregon.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Allen Kenitzer said the Boeing 737-800's pilot declared an emergency Friday morning en route to Sky Harbor International Airport.

APhoenix Fire Department spokesman said fire trucks followed the plane as it rolled to a stop and converged on it when it pulled off a runway.

There were no injuries.

Fire Capt. Rob McDade said firefighters who inspected the plane's landing gear confirmed the blown tire but found nothing else wrong.

The plane was then towed to a gate for the passengers to get off.

McDade says the flight was carrying 157 crew members and passengers.

Story and video: http://www.tucsonnewsnow.com

Cessna 182D Skylane, N9936T: Fatal accident occurred August 28, 2016 near Rock Creek Airport (RC0), Clinton, Missoula County, Montana

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: WPR16FA170
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 28, 2016 in Clinton, MT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/09/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N9936T
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot was conducting a local flight in the airplane, which he was planning to purchase. A witness saw the airplane initially overfly the runway from east to west, then turn back to the east and onto a right downwind for landing to the west on runway 25; the witness, who was a pilot, reported that the wind was directly down the runway about 8 knots. When the airplane was on a short final approach about 15 ft above the runway, it suddenly turned 90° to the right, in what the witness estimated was a bank angle of about 30° to 40°. The airplane continued at a low altitude toward the north perimeter of the airport where it impacted a stand of trees, then proceeded through the trees before coming to rest upright on the south shoulder of an interstate highway. Shortly thereafter, a postcrash fire erupted and consumed the airplane. A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal any mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. The reason for the sudden right turn while on short final approach could not be determined during the investigation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The sudden right turn on approach to landing for reasons that could not be determined because postaccident examination did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.


Mark Melotz

Darrell Ward


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Helena, Montana
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors, Inc.; Mobile, Alabama

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N9936T




NTSB Identification: WPR16FA170
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 28, 2016 in Clinton, MT
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N9936T
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On August 28, 2016, about 1445 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 182D, N9936T, impacted terrain following a loss of control while attempting to land at the Rock Creek Airport (RC0), Clinton, Montana. The private pilot and the passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The local flight was being operated as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal, and a flight plan was not filed. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which departed about 1400 from Missoula International Airport (MSO), Missoula, Montana, with RC0 as its destination.

According to a friend of the pilot who is also a pilot and witnessed the accident, the airplane initially overflew the airport from east to west, then turned back to the east on an extended right downwind for runway 25. The witness stated that when the airplane was on final approach it was stable, and the wind was out of the west, "...right down runway 25 at about 8 knots." The witness further stated that when the airplane was about 15 ft above the runway and preparing to land, it suddenly turned 90° to the right, at what he estimated to be about a 30° to 40° bank angle. The airplane subsequently collided with a stand of trees that bordered the runway on the north and then impacted the ground before coming to rest upright on the shoulder of an interstate highway (I-90). Shortly thereafter, a fire erupted, which consumed the forward two-thirds of the airplane.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot held a private pilot certificate for airplane single-engine and multiengine land airplane ratings. The pilot's personal flight logbook was not recovered during the investigation. According to data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the pilot was issued a third-class airman medical certificate on December 12, 2014, with the restriction, "must have available glasses for near vision." On the application for this medical certificate, the pilot listed a total flight time of 632 hours.

The witness/friend reported that for several months, the pilot had been attempting to purchase the airplane and had been flying it. He estimated that the pilot had accumulated 5 to 8 hours of flight time in the airplane.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The Cessna 182D was a four-seat, high-wing, fixed-gear airplane, serial number 18253036. The airplane was equipped with a Continental Motors O-470-L1 engine, serial number 66983-6-L, and a McCauley 2A36C29-A, two-bladed, adjustable pitch propeller.

According to partial copies of maintenance records, as of the most recent annual inspection, which was completed on June 22, 2016, the total time on the engine since major overhaul was 934.8 hours, with a tachometer reading of 2,135.0 hours. The previous annual inspection was completed on June 15, 2005, at a tachometer reading of 2,133.0 hours; the engine had accumulated 2 hours in the 11-year span between the two inspections.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1453, MSO, located about 23 nautical miles west of the accident site, reported wind calm, visibility 10 miles, sky clear, temperature 23°C, dew point -1°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.07 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Examination of the accident site indicated that the airplane struck tress that were located about 650 ft. west-northwest of the approach end of runway 25 and about 270 ft. north of the runway centerline. The airplane came to rest upright on the south shoulder of I-90 on a magnetic heading of about 145°. The airplane was destroyed by thermal and impact damage.

A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine, attended by representatives from the National Transportation Safety Board, the Federal Aviation Administration, Textron Aviation, and Continental Motors, Inc., revealed the following:

The majority of the fuselage was consumed by the postcrash fire. The right wing leading edge was crushed aft in a curve pattern, which was most pronounced about mid-span. The left wing leading edge was crushed aft, with slightly more crushing at the wing tip area. The empennage aft of the baggage compartment was not burned and remained intact.

Flight control cable continuity was established for all flight controls from the cockpit to the control surface attach points. There was a separation of the aileron balance cable, which appeared to be a result of a tension overload. The flap handle was found in a flap extended position; however, as it was not in a detent, exact flap position could not be determined. The trimmable horizontal stabilizer screw jack was measured at 7.1 inches, which equates to the normal takeoff position.

The engine remained partially attached to the airframe and exhibited thermal and impact damage. The induction and exhaust systems were impact damaged, and the oil sump was crushed upward. The airframe firewall was wrapped around the rear of the engine.

The exhaust system was crushed upward, and the muffler was partially crushed and pushed into the oil sump. The induction system balance tube was crushed into the crankcase.

Both magnetos were partially separated from their mounting flanges and exhibited thermal and impact damage. Each rotated freely when rotated by hand but did not produce spark, and water was observed leaking from both. Examination of both magnetos by a magneto repair station revealed that the left magneto did not function due to thermal damage. The right magneto functioned properly producing spark at all terminals.

The spark plugs exhibited light and dark colored combustion deposits, and the electrodes were worn out when compared to the Champion Check-a-Plug chart. The ignition harness exhibited thermal damage.

The carburetor remained attached to the induction system and was thermally damaged. The mixture control arm and shaft were bent. The throttle control arm moved with resistance; however, debris from the post impact fire was observed around the throttle plate. The fuel screen was removed and found to be free of debris. When the fuel bowl was removed, thermal damage to all of the interior components was observed.

The fuel strainer sustained thermal and impact damage, which compromised the component. Some light debris was noted on the fuel strainer screen. The glass bowl was intact.

The oil pump was disassembled. The pump housing contained oil and exhibited normal operating signatures and evidence of light particle passage. The oil cooler remained attached to the engine and exhibited thermal and impact damage.

The exterior of the cylinders exhibited thermal damage. When the combustion chambers were examined with a lighted borescope, no anomalies were noted. The crankshaft was rotated by hand using the propeller. Continuity through the valve train to the accessory section was confirmed, and there was thumb compression on all six cylinders.

The starter was separated from the starter adaptor. The generator remained attached to the engine and exhibited thermal and impact damage.

The vacuum pump was removed and disassembled with no anomalies noted.

With the propeller governor removed, the drive gear turned freely by hand; no oil was being discharged. The control arm moved freely by hand from stop to stop.

The two-bladed propeller remained attached to the crankshaft propeller flange. One blade was relatively undamaged. The other blade was loose in the hub, bent slightly forward at mid blade, and exhibited leading edge polishing and chord-wise scratches.

The examination of the engine and airframe did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Montana State Medical Examiner performed an autopsy on the pilot. The cause of death was attributed to multiple blunt force injuries.


The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, conducted forensic toxicology examinations on specimens from the pilot. No carbon monoxide was detected in blood; no ethanol was detected in urine, and testing was not performed for cyanide. The drug salicylate, a metabolite of aspirin, was detected in urine.

NTSB Identification: WPR16FA170
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 28, 2016 in Clinton, MT
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N9936T
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 28, 2016, about 1445 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 182D, N9936T, was substantially damaged following a loss of control and impact with terrain while attempting to land at the Rock Creek Airport (RC0), Clinton, Montana. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The local flight was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, and a flight plan was not filed. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which had departed about 45 minutes prior to the accident from the Missoula International Airport (MSO), Missoula, Montana, with RC0 as its destination.

According to a witness who observed the accident, who is also a certified commercial pilot, upon the airplane's arrival it overflew the airport from east to west, then turned back to the east on an extended right downwind. The witness stated that when the airplane was on final approach it was stable, with the wind being out of the west, "...right down runway 25 at about 8 knots." The witness further stated that when the airplane was about 40 feet above the runway and preparing to land, it suddenly veered 90 degrees to the right, in what he estimated to be about a 30-degree bank angle. The airplane subsequently collided with a stand of trees that bordered the runway on the north, then impacted the ground before coming to rest upright on the shoulder of an Interstate highway. Shortly thereafter, a fire erupted, which consumed the forward two-thirds of the airplane.


The airplane was recovered to a secured location for further examination.






ROCK CREEK -  Fans, family and friends continue to mourn the loss of "Ice Road Trucker" Darrell Ward, trying to understand why a life so full was cut short in a plane crash at Rock Creek.

o cause has been determined for a single engine plane crash that killed two people on Sunday, including a popular reality TV star. Crews spent the day cleaning up the wreckage and transporting it to Bozeman where it will be examined further.

The crash happened around 3 p.m. Sunday when a single engine plane piloted by 56-year-old Mark Melotz from Arlee, and 52-year-old Darrell Ward from Deer Lodge crashed while trying to land at a small air strip just east of Rock Creek on I-90.

Ward had starred in the popular History Channel reality show, "Ice Road Truckers" since 2012. The Missoula County Sheriff's Office says Melotz picked Ward up in Missoula before the incident, but it unknown why they attempted to land at this air strip.

Officials from the NTSB were on scene Monday morning trying to determine what caused the crash.

"We have had the recovery team come out," said lead investigator Thomas Little. "They've picked the airplane up and are taking it back to Bozeman, back to a salvage company and we will be laying the aircraft out and we'll start an extensive examination tomorrow with the airplane laid out, which is much more extensive than we can do in the field."

Little says this investigation could take months to complete, as representatives from the companies who manufactured the plane and its engine will also comb through the wreckage and file a report to Little, who will then write up a final report on the findings. 

"We're in the preliminary stages of this whole thing and it takes awhile," Little said. "We don't get in a rush, we're very methodical in how we do this."

Little says the plane was purchased by Melotz as recently as a week before this crash. 

Darrell Ward rose to stardom over the past several seasons of "Ice Road Truckers", a fan favorite for his direct, and often confrontational style. Tagged as "The Montana Legend", Ward's personal slogan was "any road, any load!"

He was appearing in the tenth season of the show this summer, being invited back for another season just days ago.

Ward was not only well known in the trucking industry, but here in Western Montana. He frequently took jobs hauling heavy equipment to help wildland firefighters, such as the Copper King Fire earlier this month. 

He was also known for giving back, recently organizing a food drive for Louisiana flood victims and planning an appearance in Nova Scotia for Special Olympics. 

But in the hundreds of posts online today, he's being remembered most as a father, grandfather and friend. 







MISSOULA, Mont. - A witness reports hearing a plane that crashed outside Missoula Sunday, killing two men.

One of them was a Deer Lodge man known for his role on the History channel's "Ice Road Truckers." Darrell Ward was 52 years old.

Mark Melotz, 56, of Arlee, was also killed when their Cessna plane went down along Interstate 90 east of Missoula. Officials say they were trying to land on a small airfield at Rock Creek.

A federal investigator is in Missoula, retracing what happened after Malotz stopped at the Missoula airport, picked up Ward and then headed east to Rock Creek.

The Rock Creek airport is a strip of land cluttered with weeds and clumps of grass. It's not used very much.

Dan Ekstrom won't forget what he saw Sunday.

"Looked to me like he was doing what they call touch and go's on the airport, he wasn't landing every time or maybe he was never landing, I didn't pay that much attention to him, but I could hear the engine really roar when he’d take back off after touching down," Ekstrom said.

The sheriff's department says Malotz bought the Cessna just last week from a man in Ronan. It is one of just two accidents that Ekstrom can remember.

For now, fans, friends and family remember the men lost along the side of I-90.

Ward was reportedly in talks to make a new documentary about finding plane wrecks.

Officials aren't sure which man was piloting the craft. It may take up to a year to get answers.​

Story and video:   http://www.nbcmontana.com

“Ice Road Truckers” star Darrell Ward was one of two people killed in Sunday’s plane crash near the Rock Creek exit on Interstate 90.

The Missoula County Sheriff’s Office identified the victims as Ward, 52, from Deer Lodge, and the pilot, Mark Melotz, 56, of Arlee.

 “It is with great sadness to report we have lost our Montana Legend at the young age of 52,” said a release posted Monday morning on Ward’s Facebook page.

“Darrell Ward had just left The Great American Truck Show in Dallas, Texas where he enjoyed meeting numerous fans and friends and was heading to Missoula to begin filming a pilot for his new documentary style show involving the recovery of plane wrecks when he and his co-pilot crashed and lost their lives,” it said.

The Cessna 182-D  crashed on the edge of interstate as it appeared to be attempting to land at the Rock Creek Airport south of Clinton.

Missoula County Sheriff’s Department Patrol Captain Bill Burt said witnesses said the plane appeared to be attempting to land at the south end of the runway.

“Something went drastically wrong,’’ he said. “The plane was trying to climb and appeared to have stalled.’’

The National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the incident.

The news release on Ward’s Facebook page said he’d just gotten the news that “Ice Road Truckers” would continue for an 11th season, to begin filming in the winter of 2017.

“When Darrell wasn’t hitting the Ice Roads he would be back in Montana doing what Darrel loved best as a log hauler and occasionally helped local authorities fight forest fires,” it said.



Press Release: It’s with great sadness to report we have lost our Montana Legend at the young age of 52.

Darrell Ward had just left The Great American Truck Show in Dallas, Texas where he enjoyed meeting numerous fans and friends and was heading to Missoula to begin filming a pilot for his new documentary style show involving the recovery of plane wrecks when he and his co-pilot crashed and lost their lives. An investigation is ongoing and more information will be made available at a later time as the National Transportation Safety Board will be handling they investigation.

They things Darrell loved most were his family including his kids and grand-kids & trucking.

Darrell Ward rose to fame with his role on the extremely popular History Channel’s reality show, Ice Road Truckers. Darrell just finished filming Season X earlier this year for the show and had just learned that he had a green light this past weekend for an additional season on the show originally slated to begin filming in the winter of 2017. When Darrell wasn’t hitting the Ice Roads he would be back in Montana doing what Darrel loved best as a log hauler and occasionally helped local authorities fight forest fires.

Trucking has always been a large part of Darrell’s life; from running the harvest rigs with his grandparents and family, to driving trucks from Montana to Alaska and all roads in between. In his free time, you could usually find Darrell giving back to the community any chance he got, he had promoted the most recent food drive to help victims in the Louisiana Floods and was scheduled to appear as the grand marshal for the Truck Convoy for Special Olympics in Nova Scotia.

In his free time, Darrell enjoyed hunting, fishing, camping, dirt bike riding and all things outdoors. A self-proclaimed “ADRENALINE JUNKIE”, Darrell was up for any adventure.

His motto, “ANY ROAD, ANY LOAD” fits his personality perfectly.

While many of you will share in this loss, we ask that you respect the family’s privacy during their time of grief. His manager and best friend M. Bob Stanton and long time friend Chuck Campbell are expected to make a lengthier statement shortly.

Bruce for Bob/Chuck


https://www.facebook.com






Two people were killed on Sunday afternoon when a small plane crashed near Rock Creek, just off Interstate 90, east of Missoula.

Undersheriff Jason Johnson with the Missoula County Sheriff’s Office told KGVO News that the fatal crash occurred at about 3:00 p.m.

“Deputies responded this afternoon at about 3 p.m. along with Missoula Rural Fire and the Montana Highway Patrol to a small single engine plane, believed to be a Cessna, that crashed near the Rock Creek exit of Interstate 90,” Johnson said. “Unfortunately, the two occupants of the plane did not survive the crash.  The identity of the occupants will not be released until proper notification to family has been completed.”

Johnson said the National Transportation Safety Board has been notified, and is en route to the scene.

“In incidents like this,” Johnson continued, “the crash investigation will be conducted by the National Transportation Safety Board. The sheriff’s office will conduct coroner duties related to this incident, but all other information will need to be obtained from the NTSB investigators.

Johnson said due to the crash, traffic in the area was delayed.

“The incident required at least one lane of eastbound traffic to be closed while first responders worked the scene,” he said.

The crash started a small grass fire that was headed towards the nearby treeline, but the first responders were able to extinguish it quickly.

It is not known where the aircraft was coming from, or its intended destination, or whether it was attempting to land on a small airstrip in the area.

Source:   http://newstalkkgvo.com




A small plane crashed Sunday afternoon near the Rock Creek exit of Interstate 90, killing two people, according to the Missoula County Sheriff's Office.

The crash at about 3 p.m. Sunday closed at least one lane of eastbound traffic.

The identity of those on board will not be released until their families have been notified, said Missoula County Undersheriff Jason Johnson.

"Our thoughts and prayers go out to the families involved," he said.

The National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the crash, while the sheriff's office will conduct coroner duties, he said.

Source:   http://missoulian.com




EAST OF MISSOULA -   Missoula County Sheriff's officials declared two people dead at the scene of a single engine plane crash that occurred about 3 p.m. east of Clinton  on I-90 near mile marker 126. 

The plane struck the ground east of Rock Creek and south of the eastbound lanes of I-90. The east bound lanes are open to single vehicle traffic. 

The cause of the wreck remains under investigation.

The National Transportation Safety Board will be handling the investigation.

Source:  http://www.kxlh.com

Cessna 182L Skylane, N42474, Pipe Dream Aviation LLC: Fatal accident occurred July 20, 2014 in Sedona, Arizona

Pipe Dream Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N42474

Flight Standards District Office: FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07

NTSB Identification: WPR14FA303
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 20, 2014 in Sedona, AZ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/25/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 182L, registration: N42474
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot was conducting a personal cross-country flight. A witness reported observing the airplane flying into a canyon from above the tree line near the top of the canyon. Another witness, who did not see the airplane, reported hearing the airplane’s engine accelerate, become quiet, and accelerate again, which was followed shortly thereafter by an explosion. The airplane impacted terrain at the bottom of a canyon and was destroyed. A postcrash examination of the airplane revealed no anomalies what would have precluded normal operation. 


It is likely the pilot failed to maintain adequate airspeed and exceeded the airplane’s critical angle-of-attack while entering the canyon, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall from which there was insufficient altitude to recover. In addition, the calculated density altitude of 9,675 ft would have adversely affected the airplane’s performance.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot’s failure to maintain adequate airspeed and his exceedance the airplane’s critical angle-of-attack while maneuvering through a canyon in high-density altitude conditions at low altitude, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall.



Jonathan McGeary (pilot)


Sabrina Giebelen

Johanna Naber 

Levi Wallace





HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 20, 2014, about 1530 mountain standard time, a Cessna 182L, N42474, collided with the terrain in Fay Canyon near Sedona, Arizona. The private pilot and three passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed by impact and postcrash fire. The airplane was registered to Pipe Dream Aviation LLC and operated by the private pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight. The flight departed Flagstaff Pulliam Airport, Flagstaff, Arizona about 1430 with a destination of the Sedona Airport (SEZ), Sedona, Arizona.

Multiple witnesses located in Fay Canyon at the time of the accident stated that the airplane flew in from the top of the canyon. One of the witnesses didn't see the airplane but heard the engine accelerate then get quiet and accelerate again. An explosion was heard shortly after. The other witness saw the airplane above the tree line at the end of the canyon before losing sight of it in the trees.

A 9-1-1 call recorded a statement from a witness that was hiking on the summit of Bear Mountain, adjacent to Fay Canyon. He stated that an airplane was flying in the area and shortly after saw smoke rising from a nearby canyon near where he last saw the airplane.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

A review of FAA airman records revealed that the 22-year-old pilot held a private pilot certificate with a airplane single engine land rating. His third-class medical certificate was issued in November 19, 2010, with no limitations. According to the pilot's last medical application, the pilot reported a total flight experience of 10 total hours and 10 hours in the last six months. According to family members, the pilot had about 170 hours of total flight time, and about 40 in the accident airplane at the time of the accident. The pilot's flight logbook was not found during the investigation.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The 4-seat, high-wing, fixed tricycle-gear airplane, serial number (S/N) 18259032, was manufactured in 1968. It was powered by a Continental O-470 modified to a P. Ponk O-470-50, STC conversion engine, serial number 191847-8-R/2735. The airplane was also equipped with a McCauley adjustable blade propeller; model number 2A34C66-NP.

Review of the aircraft maintenance logbooks revealed that the most recent annual inspection was completed on February 7, 2014, at an airframe total time of 3,029.8 hours and an engine time since major overhaul of 126.1 hours. The most recent airframe logbook entry, dated March 21, 2014, at an airframe total time of 3,030.3 hours, stated that the fuel vent/feed line couplings in the left and right hand wing roots were replaced.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

A review of recorded data from Earnest A. Love Field Airport (KPRC), Prescott, Arizona, automated weather observation station 36 miles southwest of the accident site, revealed at 1453 conditions were wind 190 degrees at 7 knots, with gusts to 19 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, clear sky, temperature 31° Celsius, dew point 2° Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 30.18 inches of mercury.

A review of recorded data from KSEZ, automated weather observation station about 6 miles southeast from the accident site, revealed at 1515 conditions were wind 250 degrees at 8 gusting to 14 knots, variable from 220 to 300 degrees, visibility 10 statute miles, clear sky, temperature 32° Celsius, dew point 2° Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 30.16 inches of mercury.

Using the reported weather conditions and the elevation of the canyon rim near Bear Mountain (6,400 feet), the calculated density altitude was about 9,675 feet.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Examination of the accident site by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) revealed that the airplane impacted trees and terrain near the bottom of a steep rugged canyon. The first identified point of contact (FIPC) was a tree about 18-inches in diameter that was uprooted. The debris path was about 100 feet in length and about 40 feet wide and on a 90 degree magnetic heading from the FIPC to the engine. Postimpact fire was found throughout the debris path and through surrounding terrain. About 20 acres of land was burned. The largest airframe structural members were wing spar sections that measured about three to four feet in length. Flight control cable continuity was confirmed through cable separations that exhibited tension overload. The separations were located near the mid-cabin area. The rudder control cables were continuous from the cabin controls to the rudder horn attachment points. Remnants of the right horizontal stabilizer and elevator were found near the main wreckage. The elevator trim actuator extension was measured to be about 1-1/4 inches which equated to about the neutral position. The flap actuator jack screw was found in the retracted position. All flight control surfaces were thermally damaged and were accounted for at the accident site. The fuel selector valve assembly was found in the "Both" position. The engine was found inverted with impact and thermal damage. The mounting structure was partially attached to the engine. The firewall was crushed and remained partially attached to the engine. The propeller assembly separated from the crankshaft propeller flange. The blades remained attached to the hub and had thermal discoloration. One blade had about 6 inches of missing material from the tip and leading edge damage near the separation of the tip. The other blade had s-type bending throughout its span and trailing edge damage.

Examination of the recovered engine was conducted on July 24, 2014 at the facilities of Air Transport in Phoenix, Arizona, by the NTSB IIC, FAA, Textron Aviation, and Continental Motors Inc. The examination revealed no evidence of any pre-collision mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. For further information see the Engine Examination Summary in the public docket for this accident.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Yavapai County Sheriff's Office conducted an autopsy on the pilot on July 22, 2014. According to the report the medical examiner determined that the cause of death was "a result of multiple blunt force trauma," and contributing to his death was "thermal injury."

The FAA's Civil Aeromedical Institute (CAMI) in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed forensic toxicology on specimens from the pilot. According to CAMI's report, no drugs of abuse were detected.

Delta B717 flights start at Ellis Airport (KOAJ) in Jacksonville, Onslow County, North Carolina



ONSLOW COUNTY, N.C. (WITN) - Albert J. Ellis Airport in Onslow County once again has a mainline airline flying in and out of the airport.

Delta Airlines landed its inaugural B717 flight on Sunday afternoon.

According to Airport Director Chris White, Delta will be the first mainline airline to serve Ellis Airport since the 1980s when US Air and Piedmont Airlines operated flights in and out of Onslow County.

White says the fuel efficient B717 entering the OAJ market is a result of increasing demand and is made possible in part by the capabilities of the new passenger terminal, which opened last August.

Delta will initially operate the 717 aircraft as one of their 4 daily flights, 5 days per week and if demand continues to increase, additional flights may be upgraded.

Source:  http://www.witn.com

Black Hawk helicopters dispatched to assist crews fighting Box Canyon Fire



DRAPER, Utah — The Utah National Guard has been activated to assist in battling a wildfire in Summit County, officials confirmed Sunday.

Utah Guard’s 97th Aviation Troop Command and 2nd Battalion 211th Aviation responded to the Box Canyon  Fire with two UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters, according to a press release from the Utah National Guard. Two pilots and a crew chief will join firefighters about 12 miles east of Oakley in the Smith and Morehouse Creek area today and Monday.

As of Saturday, the fire had consumed about 3,947 acres. Over the last few days, “unstable weather systems brought heavy winds into the area, increasing the fire’s activity,” according to a press release from U.S. Forest Service.

Pilots of the helicopters will use a 600-gallon Bambi bucket to make repeated drops of water on the flames, according to the Utah National Guard.

Ledgefork campground, Smith and Morehouse boat ramp, and Mud Lake Flats are now closed, as well as Smith and Morehouse trail and Erickson Basin, according to the U.S. Forest Service. Other area campgrounds remain open, though air quality at Smith and Morehouse campground may be affected by smoke.

The fire was human caused and is 20 percent contained.

Source:   http://fox13now.com

Piper PA-18-150 Super Cub, N8998Y: Accident occurred August 27, 2016 near Harding Lake, Fairbanks, Alaska

http://registry.faa.gov/N8998Y

FAIRBANKS, Alaska Search teams rescued a Fairbanks pilot who crashed his plane near Harding Lake Saturday morning. 


Alaska State Troopers say that William Larry, 69, was the only person on board his Piper Super Cub aircraft when it went down about seven 7 northeast of Harding Lake. 


The search and rescue effort included two Alaska Wildlife Trooper aircraft and the US Army’s 52nd Aviation Regiment. 



Just before 2pm, Larry was found and taken to the Fairbanks Memorial Hospital by a Blackhawk helicopter, Troopers say, for injuries he sustained during the crash.

Source: http://www.ktuu.com

Two United pilots are 'arrested at Glasgow Airport for being too drunk to fly to New Jersey' - as it's revealed both are military veterans

  • Brady Grebenc, 35, and Carlos Licona, 45, were arrested Saturday at 9am
  • The pair had been scheduled to fly from Glasgow, Scotland, to Newark, New Jersey
  • But they were taken in by police after 'concerns were raised'
  • They are currently in police custody on suspicion of trying to fly drunk
  • Both claim to be military vets and instructors with decades of experience
  • Licona was awarded in 2013 by the FAA for being a 'positive example'
  • Grebenc is a captain and was in the 43rd Flying Training Squadron
  • New crew eventually took the 141 passengers to New Jersey ten hours later

These are the two United pilots who were arrested at Glasgow airport on suspicion of being too drunk to fly their transatlantic passenger jet from Scotland to the US.


Concerns about Carlos Roberto Licona and Brady Grebenc, were reportedly raised on Saturday, before the 9am UA162 flight from Glasgow to Newark, New Jersey.


Grebenc, 35, and Licona, 45, both claim to be military veterans who have worked as flight instructors, and Licona was awarded in 2013 by the FFA for 'setting a positive example' to other pilots.



The flight, carrying 141 passengers, eventually took off on Saturday evening with a new crew on board.

The men are being held at Goven police station and are expected to appear at Paisley Sheriff Court on Monday.

According to his LinkedIn page, Licona has spent the last 28 years working in Military Intelligence, working for the United States Air National Guard.

At the same time, the account says, he worked as a pilot, check airman and simulator instructor for Colgan Air from September 2003-January 2014. He has been working at United since then.

In 2013, Licona was awarded with inclusion on the FAA Airmen Certification Database, according to Aviation Business Gazette

The award recognizes 'certified pilots who have met or exceeded the high educational, licensing and medical standards established by the FAA,' the site said.

Grebenc is a native of Fort Worth, Colorado, living in Columbus, Mississippi. 

His LinkedIn page says that he is an 'Instructor Pilot with 8+ years of service, United States Air Force and United States Air Force Reserve. 

'Five years international fixed wing flying experience. Four years experience instructing primary flying skills in the Joint Primary Pilot Training Environment.'

In total, he says, he has logged '3,200+ hours of Accident and Incident-free flying in high-performance fixed-wing aircraft.'

He has been working at United since April 2015. Prior to that he had been a US Air Force T-6 instructor pilot for around five-and-a-half years, four-and-a-half of that as a reservist.

Before that, he was a KC-135 Instructor Pilot in the US Air Force for three years and eight months. 

One of this Facebook photographs shows him wearing the patch of the 43rd Flying Training Squadron. A Columbus Air Force Base photograph lists his rank as captain.

Another photo on his page shows the patch of the 22d Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron, which has been deployed in combat in the War on Terror.  

A Police Scotland spokesman said: 'Police Scotland can confirm that two men aged 35 and 45 have been arrested and are presently detained in police custody in connection with alleged offences under the Railways and Transport Safety Act 2003, Section 93.'

The section of the Act relates to carrying out pilot function or activity while exceeding the prescribed limit of alcohol.

A spokesman for Glasgow Airport added: 'We are aware of the police incident yesterday involving two pilots.'

The incident follows the appearance in court last month of two Canadian pilots charged with being drunk as they prepared to fly a passenger jet from Scotland to Toronto.

Jean-Francois Perreault, 39, and Imran Zafar Syed, 37, were arrested on Monday July 18 before they were due to take off on the Air Transat flight from Glasgow Airport.

The men were remanded in custody when they first appeared at Paisley Sheriff Court, also charged under section 93 of the same Act.

At a second hearing at the same court they were granted bail on condition they surrender their passports.

Section 93 of the Railway and Transport Safety Act states: 'A person commits an offence if he performs an aviation function at a time when the proportion of alcohol in his breath, blood or urine exceeds the prescribed limit, or he carries out an activity which is ancillary to an aviation function at a time when the proportion of alcohol in his breath, blood or urine exceeds the prescribed limit.'

For pilots, the limit of alcohol in the case of breath is nine micrograms of alcohol in 100 milliliters, according to the Act.

A United Airlines spokesperson refused to comment on the case, instead referring to a statement that reads: 'The two pilots have been removed from service and their flying duties.

'We are co-operating with the authorities and will conduct our own investigation as well. The safety of our customers and crew is our highest priority.' 

The Air Force has been contacted for comment. 

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk

OUR OPINION: Tupelo Regional Airport (KTUP) plans benefit from ‘shovel ready’

Tupelo Regional Airport’s commercial air service appears to be on a potentially strong path to recovery with Contour Airlines’ daily service to Nashville, a major airport with strong connections worldwide.

At the same time, the service challenges the airport faced infrastructure problems not uncommon to airfields of any size. The financial impact of the challenges was complicated by loss of federal revenue when passenger service dipped below 10,000 boardings per year. Under the Essential Air Service program contract every passenger means a set amount of revenue to the airline, and 10,000 is the minimum number for full financial benefit.

Earlier this month, U.S. Sen. Thad Cochran and Sen. Roger Wicker, both Mississippi Republicans, announced approval of a $950,000 taxiway resurfacing grant from the Federal Aviation Administration.

The grant was possible because the Tupelo Airport Authority had the project “shovel ready,” and the FAA used year-end funds to respond to the need. It almost goes without saying the two senators and the rest of the congressional delegation also went to bat for the money.

The airport authority acted on the taxiway applications in late spring.

The taxiway parallels the north-south runway, and it is used by virtually every air plane landing or taking off in Tupelo.

The FAA grant will pay for remilling the taxiway and repaving with asphalt.

In addition to the Tupelo work, Ripley’s airport will receive grants totaling $616,688, which will be used to mill and overlay 4,400 feet of runway at the general aviation facility.

All the grants underscore the importance of the federal role in air service and facilities at every level. They all are expensive, and they all serve a need beyond anything called recreational flying.

Airport authority member Jim Newman said the federal role in airport maintenance and construction is as important as investment in highways, rail and waterways.

Last year, Cochran and Wicker, along with U.S. Rep. Trent Kelly, R-Miss., announced a similar $716,779 grant for runway safety improvements, fencing installation and runway rehabilitation at the Tupelo airport.

Earlier this summer, the senators announced a $20.3 million FAA grant for 19 other Mississippi airport facilities.

Last spring, a new FAA reform bill was approved by the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee, of which Wicker is a member. The legislation was signed into law by President Obama on July 15.

Cochran chairs the Senate Appropriations Committee, which in May approved the FY-2017 Transportation, Housing and Urban Development Appropriations Bill with $3.35 billion to support the Airport Improvement Program.

Mississippi could not safely maintain airports on its own. And as with other issues, Mississippi leaders should take advantage of every available federal dollar for improvements.

Source:   http://djournal.com/opinion

Sidney-Richland Municipal Airport (KSDY), Richland County, Montana: New manager hired

Ryan Huotari, a Richland County native, is the new airport manager for the Sidney-Richland Airport.



Richland County native Ryan Huotari has always loved aviation, and he has recently been hired to serve as the airport manager for the Sidney-Richland airport.

Huotari replaces Terrance Ward, who left the position because of a good career opportunity. Ward’s final day on the job was Aug. 13, and Huotari took over the duties on Aug. 15.

“He’s done a lot in aviation,” Walt McNutt, a member of the airport authority, said about Huotari. “He’s work on airplanes in the past and has a lot of hands-on experience both with the books and on the line.”

Huotari’s experience includes being the assistant airport manager during 2011.

“I’ve been around it since 1997,” Huotari said of airport work.

The 1995 Sidney High School graduate earned a two-year degree in Williston. While attending classes there, Huotari worked for the airline and served as the fixed base operator at the airport.

He then moved to Utah in order to attend flying school. During that time, he ran the fuel department for the airport in Provo, Utah. Huotari went on to earn his bachelors degree in aviation/professional pilot from Utah Valley University. He has a minor in marketing/management.

While working at the airport in Utah, Huotari also performed flight instruction. “One of my flight instructors did home loans and was overwhelmed by that. So I helped him out and did that for years.”

But when Huotari came to eastern Montana for a visit in October 2012, he heard the position of assistant airport manager was open. “I was ready to get back home.”

He served as assistant manager from November 2010 to January 2012. He then took a position with EOG Resources. He said it was difficult to leave the company and co-employees to become airport manager.

“Aviation is definitely where my heart is,” Huotari said.

He is proud of the airport that is provided in Sidney. The airport has more deplanements than any other Montana airport east of Billings.

“Getting more people interested in flying would be great,” Huotari said. “It’s a great airport. It’s cheaper to land here than in some of the ones close to our area.”

He noted new hangar spots are available. The airport also features a new taxiway.

“There’s been a lot of changes since I was here in 2011,” Huotari said. “It’s a lot busier.”

Huotari is excited about the Wings of Freedom Air Show to take place in Sidney on Sept. 24-25.

Huotari and his wife, Keela, have a 17-year-old son and a 12-year-old daughter.

During their free time, the family enjoys water skiing and boating at Fort Peck. They also keep busy attending hockey tournaments and dance competitions.

“It’s great to be back,” Ryan said. “It’s nice to raise my kids in this environment. It’s great to be home.”

Source:  http://www.sidneyherald.com

Cessna 172R, Christiansen Aviation Inc., N984RA: Fatal accident occurred August 27, 2016 near Lakefront Airport (KNEW), New Orleans, Louisiana

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

CHRISTIANSEN AVIATION INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N984RA

Federal Aviation Administration Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Baton Rouge FSDO-03

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA338
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 27, 2016 in New Orleans, LA
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N984RA
Injuries: 2 Fatal, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 27, 2016, about 2015 central daylight time, a Cessna 172R, airplane, N984RA, impacted water, returning to the Lakefront Airport (KNEW), New Orleans, Louisiana. The commercial rated pilot and one passenger were fatally injured, a second passenger received minor injuries and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by Christiansen Aviation, Inc., Wilmington, Delaware, under the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 136 as a local tour flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and the airplane was not on a flight plan. 

According to preliminary information gathered by investigators, the pilot and passengers were returning to the airport; the surviving passenger reported everything appeared normal, other than she thought they were low. The airplane then impacted water about a mile from runway 09. 

After recovery of the wreckage, the airplane's was recovered to a secure facility for further examination.





The small plane that crashed into Lake Pontchartrain Saturday evening was pulled from the water Tuesday morning. New Orleans firefighters used a crane to pull out the wreckage.

Inside were the bodies of two men, the pilot and the passenger. 

A couple from Baton Rouge chartered a plane to take an aerial tour of the city. The young woman was pulled to safety and spent the night at Ochsner Hospital before being released Sunday. Tuesday family members of the pilot and young passenger got the worst news possible.

The father of Reginald Hilliard Junior was distraught and comforted by friends, still in disbelief that his 25-year-old son was gone.

"I didn't believe it. I refused to believe it. My son's a fighter. He refused to give up. He refused to quit," said Reginald Hilliard, Senior. 

He says 'Lil Reg was a fighter from the start. He was told he would not live to be two months after getting spinal meningitis. Today he owns a tattoo place in Baton Rouge, was a rap artist, and a father.

"He has a daughter who is five and she always called him her best friend, she always says her daddy is her best friend," said his cousin Yolanda White.

The family says Reggie was a great swimmer. That's why they believe he pushed his girlfriend Brianna Davis out of the plane. They said she couldn't swim. A party yacht saw the crash and got her out of the water. The family is calling Reggie a hero.

"He was afraid of planes and this was his first flight ever," said White. 

The pilot Jim Biondo, 58, of Thibodaux, had been flying for decades, and friends say he lived to fly.

"He would drive an hour each way just to come fly an hour tour," said Lindy Hammonds, an aircraft mechanic and friend. 

He had just finished taking the couple on an aerial tour of the city.

"Just a good guy. A good pilot. I know from things that were said the people that were on the tour with him enjoyed it. They had a good time. They had a great flight," said Hammonds.

Now Biondo's wife and Reggie's family wait to find out why.

"But we gonna get through because we have faith and we know God is in control," said White.

The plane was intact and when it came out of the water just 1,000 yards from the runway. The airport director, Ben Morris, said the plane hit a rainstorm around the time of the crash.

 Hilliard's family said they believe the pilot misjudged the runway.

 The pilot's friend said that wind microbursts, common during storms, cause planes to stop and fall.

 But there is no official cause at this time.


Story and video:   http://www.wwltv.com



Family members of James Biondo named the 58-year-old certified flight instructor as the pilot killed in a Lake Pontchartrain plane crash Saturday (Aug. 28) that also claimed the life of a 25-year-old Baton Rouge artist and father.

Biondo, a Raceland resident, and Reginald Hillard Jr. of Baton Rouge were found Tuesday inside the single-engine Cessna, which authorities pulled from the water near Lakefront Airport. Hillard's girlfriend, Briana Davis, escaped from the plane and was rescued by a good Samaritan after the crash.

The cause of the crash remains under investigation.

The plane ride was a surprise gift from Reginald Hilliard, Jr.'s girlfriend, and the first time he overcame his fear of flying, his family said.

Davis booked the flight as a surprise for Hillard, whom family members said had never been on an airplane and was afraid of flying. The flight, "Big Easy Lights at Night," is offered through New Orleans Aerial Tours, according to a receipt Davis posted on Instagram. The tour company is operated by Flight Academy of New Orleans, LLC.

Biondo is listed as a certified flight instructor in Flight Academy of New Orleans' website. The company's registered agent, Ankur Prem Hukmani, declined to comment when reached by phone Tuesday.

Biondo's wife and brother confirmed his death. Both declined to be interviewed.

Hillard's cousin, Yolanda White, said Davis told family members that the tour had ended and they were returning to Lakefront Airport when she realized they were in the water.

Davis told the family that Hillard began kicking a side door and window in the plane, and was able to open it just enough to push Davis out, White said. Hillard was a good swimmer, White said, but was unable to get out before the airplane took what Davis described to the family as a nosedive to the bottom of Lake Pontchartrain.

Rescue crews found the plane Sunday afternoon using side-scan sonar.


Source:   http://www.nola.com




NEW ORLEANS – The New Orleans Fire Department says two bodies have been found in the wreckage of a small plane that crashed into Lake Pontchartrain just north of the New Orleans Lakefront Airport.

Spokesman Gregory Davis said the Cessna was pulled from the water Tuesday morning by a crane and the aircraft was placed on a barge.  He said the bodies of the pilot and one passenger were in the plane's cabin.The passenger was identified as Reginald Hillard Jr., 25, by family members. The pilot was identified as Jim Biondo, 58, of Thibodaux. 

"They said that he was in the plane. I still didn't believe it," said Reginald Hillard Sr., of Baton Rouge, who was at the lakefront.

Hillard Sr. was told of the official identification minutes after the plane was pulled from the water three days after the crash.  

Relatives said Reginald was afraid of flying, but put aside his fears when his girlfriend, Briana Davis, surprised him with an aerial tour of the city.

A family member said Reginald was able to unbuckle Davis from her seat and push her out of the aircraft after it hit the water. 

Davis was able to get out of the sinking plane and was rescued by a nearby boater.

"The couple had hired the aircraft to take them on a night time flight around the city of New Orleans," said Lakefront Airport Director Ben Morris.

"They did that, they were coming back in, and again, it appears they hit a little rain shower, a very significant rain shower, a rainstorm. They were making their approach to the airport, and at that point, they disappeared off the radar."

"It's a very sad thing because she did tell us that she and her boyfriend were holding hands when she slipped out of the aircraft," Morris said.

Family members were at the site as the plane was pulled from the water and lifted onto the barge. 

Divers located the plane just 1,000 feet short of the Lakefront Airport runway Sunday.

A crane mounted on a barge was brought in Monday evening to lift the plane out of the water.

Story and video:   http://www.wwltv.com






After a small plane with three people aboard crashed Saturday evening into Lake Pontchartrain just short of the runway at Lakefront Airport, rescuers spent Sunday searching the lake for the wreckage of the aircraft as well as its missing pilot and one of the passengers.

At 6:30 p.m. Sunday, Capt. Edwin Holmes of the New Orleans Fire Department reported that searchers had located the site of the crash about 1,000 feet west of the airport runway. He said retrieval of the plane would begin early Monday.

"More information on the two missing passengers should become forthcoming with tomorrow’s recovery effort," Holmes said.

The Cessna plane — carrying a pilot and two passengers — was returning from an aerial tour of New Orleans about 8:15 p.m. Saturday and was approaching the airport's runway when it suddenly disappeared from radar, Lakefront Airport Director Ben Morris said Sunday morning.

Several other pilots at the airport said they saw it go down an estimated 100 to 150 yards from shore, Morris said.

One of the two passengers, a woman, was rescued from the water by boaters in a private yacht.

While the extent of her injuries was unknown, she was conscious and able to talk to investigators when she was brought to shore, though she appeared to be in shock and was taken to a hospital, Morris said.

New Orleans Police Department divers, New Orleans Fire Department and U.S. Coast Guard rescue boats and a Coast Guard helicopter resumed the search for the plane's wreckage and the two missing men Sunday morning.

What officials Sunday morning initially thought was the plane's wreckage turned out to be unrelated debris in the lake, NOPD spokeswoman Dawne Massey said.

Officials from the Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the cause of the crash, Morris said.

The pilot apparently hit a rain squall on his way back from the tour, Morris said, but it will be difficult to determine why the plane fell until the wreckage can be examined.

The pilot was a private pilot who had chartered the aircraft from a flight school at the airport, Morris said. “My understanding is that he had 10,000 hours, so he's a very experienced pilot,” he said.

The chance of finding survivors many hours after such a crash into the water is “grim,” Morris said. The plane was likely about 300 feet in the air when it fell, and it would have hit the surface of the lake at nearly 80 mph, he said.

Though officials had an idea of where the plane went down, Gulf tides that move through the lake likely carried the wreckage elsewhere, Morris said.

“This lake moves constantly,” he said. “The aircraft, once it got below the surface, may have started drifting. There's always some tidal movement that could do strange things with an aircraft.”

Source:   http://www.theadvocate.com

Lakefront Airport Director Ben Morris gestures toward the runway that a Cessna was trying to reach before it crashed Saturday night while a New Orleans Fire Department searches for the wreckage in Lake Pontchartrain Sunday morning.



After a small plane with three people aboard crashed Saturday evening into Lake Pontchartrain just short of the runway at Lakefront Airport, rescuers continued Sunday to search the lake for the wreckage of the aircraft as well as its missing pilot and one of the passengers.

The plane — carrying a pilot and two passengers — was returning from an aerial tour of New Orleans about 8:15 p.m. Saturday and was approaching the airport's runway when it suddenly disappeared from radar, Lakefront Airport Director Ben Morris said Sunday morning.

Several other pilots at the airport said they saw it go down an estimated 100 to 150 yards from shore, Morris said.

One of the two passengers, a woman, was rescued from the water by boaters in a private yacht, Morris said.

While the extent of her injuries was unknown, she was conscious and able to talk to investigators when she was brought back to shore, though she appeared to be in shock and was taken to a hospital, Morris said.

New Orleans Police Department divers, New Orleans Fire Department and U.S. Coast Guard rescue boats and a Coast Guard helicopter resumed the search for the plane's wreckage and the two missing people Sunday morning, Morris said.

What officials Sunday morning initially thought was the plane's wreckage turned out to be unrelated debris in the lake, NOPD spokeswoman Dawne Massey said.

Officials from the Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the cause of the crash, Morris said.

The pilot apparently hit a rain squall on his way back from the tour, Morris said, but it was impossible to determine why the plane fell without a chance to inspect the wreckage.

“We have to find the aircraft and the two missing passengers at this point,” Morris said. “The main priority right now is finding the two people that were on the aircraft.”

The pilot was a private pilot who had chartered the aircraft from a flight school at the airport, Morris said. “My understanding is that he had 10,000 hours, so he's a very experienced pilot,” he said.

The chance of finding survivors many hours after such a crash into the water is “grim,” Morris said. The plane was likely about 300 feet in the air when it fell, and it would have hit the surface of the lake at nearly 80 mph, he said.

Though officials have an idea of where the plane went down, Gulf tides that move through the lake have likely carried the wreckage elsewhere, Morris said.

“This lake moves constantly,” he said. “The aircraft, once it got below the surface, may have started drifting. There's always some tidal movement that could do strange things with an aircraft.”

Boaters who wanted to volunteer to assist in the search effort were urged to call the Coast Guard at (504) 365-2533 to coordinate.

Source: http://www.theadvocate.com




NEW ORLEANS —Wreckage that was believed to be from a plane that went down Saturday evening in Lake Pontchartrain turned out to be unrelated debris, police said.

A spokesperson for the New Orleans Police Department said officials confirmed Sunday that the debris is not related to the plane. In an earlier update, officials believed the debris was wreckage from the aircraft.

The crash was reported just before 9 p.m. Saturday at the Lakefront Airport. New Orleans police said a Cessna aircraft went down in the lake with three people on board.

One of the passengers, a woman, was picked up by a private yacht and taken to a hospital. Police are still looking for the other passengers, two men.

None of the passengers have been identified.

New Orleans police, New Orleans firefighters and members of the U.S. Coast Guard are involved in the search.

Search crews will continue the search for the plane to locate the wreckage.
















11:15: The NOPD now says the wreckage it first thought was from the plane is unrelated debris. Its dive team continues the search for the plane using sonar technology.

10 a.m.: Divers were preparing to go back into the water to the wreckage site.

9:45 a.m. Sunday: NOPD said the woman recovered from Lake Pontchartrain last night was a passenger in the plane. The pilot and another passenger had not been found.

Original story

The U.S. Coast Guard was still searching for two men missing Sunday morning (Aug. 28) after a Cessna airplane crashed into Lake Pontchartrain near Lakefront Airport in New Orleans the night before.

A woman who was also in the plane was rescued by a private yacht after a good Samaritan called 911, the New Orleans Police Department said. She was transported to Oschner hospital, and no further information was given about her condition.

As midnight passed, four friends from Algiers who had just finished dinner at the Lighthouse Bar and Grill on the Inner Harbor Navigational Canal had parked their truck along the lake and were shining a spotlight over the pitch-black water, hoping to help rescue boats and a helicopter scan the surface to spot the missing men. The group had seen an emergency flare shoot up from the lake around 8:45 while they were dining, and watched Coast Guard boats rush toward the scene as ambulances arrived.

The friends usually take a boat to the dockside restaurant for dinner, but not Saturday night.

"Too bad we didn't bring a boat," said Nick Melson, one of the four. "Otherwise, we could've helped out more. Almost brought it out tonight, but ended up not."

Petty Officer 3rd Class Lexie Preston said the Coast Guard received a report of a plane crash at 8:20 p.m. She described it as a "Cessna training flight." She did not know who owned the plane or how it had crashed.

Responding to the good Samaritan's emergency call, the Coast Guard sent two rescue boats and a helicopter to the scene near the Seabrook bridge.

New Orleans Police and Fire departments are assisting in the search. Divers are attempting to find the missing passengers and the wreckage.

Anyone with information is requested to contact the Coast Guard's Sector New Orleans at 504-365-2200.

Source:   http://www.nola.com





NEW ORLEANS – The Coast Guard and New Orleans Police are searching Lake Pontchartrain after a small plane crashed into the water near the New Orleans Lakefront Airport Saturday night.

According to WWLTV in New Orleans, NOPD and Coast Guard crews rescued one person and were still searching for two more people.

A spokesperson for the U.S. Coast Guard said details are limited at this time, but a number of people were onboard when the Cessna training flight crashed Saturday night around 8:30 p.m.

The one person was rescued by a good samaritan and transferred to a New Orleans hospital in unknown condition.

Video from the scene shows boats deployed on the water as well as helicopters searching by air.

Involved in the search are:

-Coast Guard Station New Orleans 45-foot Response Boat- Medium crew

-Coast Guard Station New Orleans 29-foot Response Boat-Small crew

-Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopter aircrew from Air Station New Orleans

Source:   http://www.wbrz.com



NEW ORLEANS - A woman was rescued and two men were still missing after a small plane crashed into Lake Pontchartrain Saturday night, officials said.

The crash happened north of Lakefront Airport and involved a small plane that went down into the lake.  It happened just after 8:30 p.m.

The Coast Guard and NOPD said a woman was rescued by a good Samaritan.  The NOPD said a private yacht rescue the woman, who was then transferred to a 45-foot Coast Guard vessel, and taken by EMS to the hospital in unknown condition for further medical care.

According to a statement, Coast Guard Sector New Orleans received a report from a good Samaritan at 8:20 p.m. of a Cessna training flight crashing into the water.

NOPD rescue divers and Coast Guard helicopters are on scene leading the rescue effort along with the NOFD.

Source:   http://www.wwltv.com

















A plane crashed in Lake Pontchartrain in the vicinity of the Seabrook Bridge near Lakefront Airport in New Orleans on Saturday night (Aug. 27), the U.S. Coast Guard said. A good Samaritan rescued one person from the plane crash; two people who were on board the plane are still missing, the agency said.

Petty Officer 3rd Class Lexie Preston said the Coast Guard received a report of the crash at 8:20 p.m. Preston said the good Samaritan, whose name she did not have, turned the rescued person over to the Coast Guard. 

The person's gender, name and condition were not available. An NOPD source said the person was transported by EMS to Ochsner Hospital.

Two Coast Guard boats and a Coast Guard helicopter were searching for the two missing people. The New Orleans Police and Fire departments are assisting, Preston said.

Source: http://www.nola.com