Thursday, March 22, 2018

Kitfox Series 6, N993JK: Accident occurred August 08, 2017 at Reno/Stead Airport (KRTS), Washoe County, Nevada

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N993JK

Location: Reno, NV
Accident Number: GAA17CA478
Date & Time: 08/08/2017, 1220 PDT
Registration: N993JK
Aircraft: KING JOHN E JR KITFOX
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis 

According to the pilot in the tailwheel-equipped, experimental, amateur-built airplane, he attempted to land in shifting wind conditions. He reported that, during the landing flare on runway 8, a wind gust from the south caused the right wing to rise. He reported that he made the approach with full flaps applied and about 60 knots airspeed and corrected with right aileron, but the airplane landed with a left sideload. During the landing roll, the airplane veered to the right, and the left main landing gear wheel separated from the airplane. The airplane then veered to the left and sustained substantial damage to the lower left side of the fuselage.

The pilot reported that he "knew the winds were swirling and should have taken another look at it or found another runway for the newer developing wind conditions."

METARs at the accident airport are issued about every 20 minutes. Ten minutes before the accident, the METAR indicated that the wind was from 080° at 6 knots. About 10 minutes after the accident, the METAR indicated that the wind was from 140° at 5 knots.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during landing in variable wind conditions.

Findings

Aircraft
Directional control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Variable wind - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing-landing roll
Other weather encounter
Attempted remediation/recovery
Loss of control on ground (Defining event)

According to the pilot in the tailwheel-equipped, experimental amateur-built airplane, he attempted to land in shifting wind conditions.

He reported that during the landing flare on runway 8, a wind gust from the south caused his right wing to rise. He reported that he made the approach with full flaps applied and about 60kts airspeed, and corrected with right aileron, but the airplane landed with a left side load. During the landing roll, the airplane veered to the right and the left main landing gear wheel separated from the airplane. The airplane then veered to the left and sustained substantial damage to the lower left side of the fuselage.

The pilot reported that, "I knew the winds were swirling and should have taken another look at it or found another runway for the newer developing wind conditions."

METARs at the accident airport are issued about 20 minutes apart. 10 minutes prior to the accident, the METAR indicated that the wind was from 080° at 6kts. About 10 minutes after the accident the METAR indicated that the wind was from 140° at 5kts.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information


Certificate: Private
Age: 50, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/02/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/05/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 209 hours (Total, all aircraft), 50 hours (Total, this make and model), 209 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 55 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 21 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: KING JOHN E JR
Registration: N993JK
Model/Series: KITFOX SERIES 6
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2002
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: S6004-024
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/20/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1550 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 824 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: 912-ULS
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: RTS, 5026 ft msl
Observation Time: 0710 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 98°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 13°C / 11°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots, 240°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.18 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Reno, NV (RTS)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Reno, NV (RTS)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0800 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Airport Information


Airport: RENO/STEAD (RTS)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 5050 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 08
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:  7608 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage:  Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  39.668056, -119.876389 (est)

Piper Meridian PA-46-350P, N10DK: Incident occurred March 22, 2018 at John Wayne Airport (KSNA), Santa Ana, Orange County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Long Beach

Aircraft landed then veered off the runway and collapsed the nose gear.

http://registry.faa.gov/N10DK

Date: 22-MAR-18
Time: 19:50:00Z
Regis#: N10DK
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA-46-350P
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: COSTA MESA
State: CALIFORNIA





















SANTA ANA (CBSLA) — A small plane skidded off a runway Thursday at John Wayne Airport, but no injuries were reported.

Some commercial flights were delayed after the private single-engine Piper Malibu skidded off the runway around 12:50 p.m., according to officials.

Only one person is believed to have been aboard the plane, but was not injured.

Although the runway was visibly wet, it wasn’t clear whether rain may have played a role in the incident, or whether the plane was taking off or landing at the time.

The runway was temporarily closed to remove the plane and forced inbound flights to hold or divert, according to reports.

Images posted to social media appeared to show the plane in a stopped position along a grassy area between the airport’s runways with its nosegear broken.

An airport spokesperson told KNX 1070 the aircraft’s nosegear had been sheared off before it landed in the so-called “safety area” between runways.

The runway reopened just after 2 p.m., according to the airport.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://losangeles.cbslocal.com



SANTA ANA – A small plane slid off a runway while landing at John Wayne Airport on Thursday afternoon, temporarily delaying commercial flights.

The Piper Malibu, shortly before 1 p.m., skidded off of a runway, shearing off the nose gear of the aircraft and coming to rest in a “safety area” between the short runway and a long runway used for commercial aircraft, said Deanne Thompson, a John Wayne Airport spokeswoman.

The pilot, who was the only person aboard, was not injured, Thompson said.

Both runways were temporarily closed while airport workers removed the plane, delaying some commercial flights. The runways were re-opened by 2 p.m., Thompson said.

It wasn’t immediately clear if the inclement weather or mechanical issues forced the pilot to lost control of the plane.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.ocregister.com

De Havilland Canada DHC-6-320 Twin Otter, N716JP, Bald Mountain Air Service Inc: Accident occurred March 20, 2018 in Deadhorse, Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fairbanks, Alaska

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 


Bald Mountain Air Service Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N716JP





Location: Deadhorse, AK

Accident Number: ANC18LA027
Date & Time: 03/20/2018, 1945 AKD
Registration: N716JP
Aircraft: DEHAVILLAND DHC 6 TWIN OTTER
Injuries: 1 Serious, 5 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled 

On March 20, 2018, about 1945 Alaska daylight time, a wheel-equipped, twin-engine, turbine-powered de Havilland DHC-6 (Twin Otter) airplane, N716JP, struck a pedestrian after takeoff from a remote sea ice airstrip, about 140 miles north of Deadhorse, Alaska. The pedestrian sustained serious injuries, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The captain, first officer, and the three passengers on board the airplane were not injured. The flight was operated by Bald Mountain Air Service, Inc., Homer, Alaska, as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135 visual flight rules (VFR) on-demand commercial flight when the accident occurred. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the airplane's point of departure, and a VFR flight plan was on file. The flight was en route to Deadhorse at the time of the accident.


During a telephone interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), on March 23, the accident airplane's captain said that the purpose of the flight was to provide ongoing logistical support of ICEX 2018, which involves, in part, U.S. Navy and U.K Royal Navy submarines operating beneath the frozen Arctic Ocean during a 5-week exercise. The captain stated that the flights used an airstrip on the sea ice that was lined on both sides with snow berms. The airstrip included one runway oriented north/south and an intersecting runway oriented east/west. He said that weather conditions at the time of the accident consisted of clear skies with ice pack haze. He noted that the sun was low on the horizon, resulting in shadows on the airstrip, and that flat light conditions made it difficult to discern topographical features.


The captain said that, after back-taxiing the airplane to the south end of the airstrip and just before beginning the takeoff roll to the north, both pilots saw the pedestrian standing near the departure end of the airstrip on the left side and near the intersection of the east/west runway. He said that during the takeoff roll, the airplane veered slightly to the left of centerline, so he applied differential engine power to correct the veer, and the airplane returned to the centerline. As the takeoff roll continued, the airplane subsequently became airborne, so he lowered the nose to remain within ground effect and gain airspeed before initiating a climb. He said that as the airspeed increased, he started to climb the airplane, then initiated a left turn. During the turn, both pilots said they heard a loud thump, which was immediately followed by an aileron control anomaly. The captain reported that he continued the left turn and subsequently entered a left downwind traffic pattern for an emergency landing to the north. The captain said that after landing, both pilots saw the pedestrian lying near a snow berm on the left side of the airstrip.


A postaccident examination of the airplane revealed substantial damage to the left wing and left aileron. The pedestrian sustained a serious head and neck injuries because of the collision, and he was subsequently medevacked to Anchorage, Alaska for treatment.


During a hospital room interview with the NTSB IIC, on March 25, the injured pedestrian, who was an employee of the Arctic Submarine Laboratory, reported that just before the two pilots boarded the airplane, it was agreed that he would position himself alongside the airstrip to get a photo of the airplane's departure. The pedestrian noted that, as the accident airplane approached, he positioned himself behind a 3- to 4-ft tall snow berm, which was clear of the airstrip. He said that, as the airplane's takeoff progressed, it did not climb as quickly as it had during previous departures. The pedestrian said that the last thing he remembered before the collision was seeing the airplane's left wing getting lower to the ground as the airplane continued to accelerate toward him. The next thing he remembered was waking up in the medevac helicopter.


The closest weather reporting facility was the Deadhorse Airport, 140 miles south of the accident site. The 1953 observation reported, in part: Wind, 270° at 12 knots; visibility, 9 statute miles with light snow; clouds and sky condition, 2,900 ft scattered, 4,600 ft overcast; temperature, minus 4° F; dew point, minus 9° F; altimeter, 30.47 inches of Mercury.


The airplane was equipped with a solid-state cockpit voice recorder (CVR), and a download of the CVR data is pending. 



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Manufacturer: DEHAVILLAND

Registration: N716JP
Model/Series: DHC 6 TWIN OTTER 300
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: BALD MOUNTAIN AIR SERVICE INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site:

Condition of Light: Dusk
Observation Facility, Elevation: PASC
Observation Time: 1953 AKD
Distance from Accident Site: 140 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: -20°C / -23°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 2900 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 12 knots, 270°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 4600 ft agl
Visibility:  9 Miles
Altimeter Setting:  30.47 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Departure Point: Deadhorse, AK
Destination: Deadhorse, AK (PASC)

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 2 None

Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 3 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 5 None
Latitude, Longitude:   (est)




A man survived being struck by a plane that was taking off from sea ice 140 miles north of Deadhorse on the Beaufort Sea, according to the National Transportation Safety Board.

The man, whose name has not been released, worked at the Arctic Submarine Laboratory supporting exercises during which U.S. and British navy submarines surface through the sea ice north of Alaska. That’s according to a preliminary report from the NTSB, which continues to investigate the March 20 plane strike.

NTSB investigator Clint Johnson said the man was trying to snap a photo for his kids and was standing behind a snow berm next to an ice runway as the de Havilland DHC-6 Twin Otter took off.

“He was going to be leaving the ice within the next couple of days,” Johnson said. “He did want to get a picture of these small Lego figurines with the airplane in the background.”

The man told Johnson he talked to the pilot about taking the photo beforehand, though Johnson said the pilot, in a separate interview, did not recall the conversation.

Johnson described what the man says he saw as the plane started taking off:

“The airplane accelerated toward him. It didn’t climb as he anticipated,” Johnson said. “The airplane started a turn to the left, which means the left wing got closer to the ground. The next thing he knew is he saw the wing, and that’s all that he remembers. He remembered waking up in the medivac helicopter on the way to Deadhorse.”

According to the NTSB report, the pilot and co-pilot heard a loud thump, and they had trouble with the plane’s controls. They made an emergency landing back on the airstrip and found the man with serious head and neck injuries.

While the rest of the camp has since been removed from the ice, Johnson said the plane was not flyable and was left behind. He said the Twin Otter was still there as of Tuesday morning, a week later, with substantial damage to its left wing, and there were plans to use a heavy-lift helicopter to retrieve it from the drifting and deteriorating sea ice.

The plane’s owner, Homer-based Bald Mountain Air Service, released a written statement about the incident Tuesday but did not answer questions about the plane’s status.


https://www.alaskapublic.org

Beech A36 Bonanza 36, N1810L: Incident occurred March 20, 2018 at Ocean Ridge Airport (E55), Gualala, Mendocino County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Francisco

Nose gear collapsed on landing.

http://registry.faa.gov/N1810L

Date: 20-MAR-18
Time: 22:47:00Z
Regis#: 1810L
Aircraft Make: BEACHCRAFT
Aircraft Model: 36
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: GUALALA
State: CALIFORNIA

Cessna A185E, N748: Incident occurred March 21, 2018 in Tavares, Lake County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando

Aircraft overturned on Lake Dora.

Spearfish Aviation Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N748

Date: 21-MAR-18
Time: 16:30:00Z
Regis#: 748
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 185
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: TAVARES
State: FLORIDA

Gulfstream G150, N23EW: Incident occurred March 21, 2018 at O'Hare International Airport (KORD), Chicago, Illinois

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Chicago

Winglet scraped fence.

Encore Wire Corporation: http://registry.faa.gov/N23EW

Date: 21-MAR-18
Time: 22:45:00Z
Regis#: 23EW
Aircraft Make: GULFSTREAM
Aircraft Model: G150
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: CHICAGO
State: ILLINOIS

Piper PA-24-250 Comanche, N6785P: Accident occurred March 21, 2018 at Starke County Airport (KOXI), Knox, Indiana

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; DuPage, Illinois 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N6785P


Analysis 

The flight instructor reported that, during landing, while the student pilot was flying, the airplane ballooned. He added that he took the flight controls and landed on the runway.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing.

The flight instructor reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The flight instructor's improper landing flare, which resulted in a hard landing.

Findings

Aircraft
Landing flare - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Instructor/check pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing-flare/touchdown
Hard landing (Defining event)

Abnormal runway contact

Location: Knox, IN
Accident Number: GAA18CA195
Date & Time: 03/21/2018, 1655 CDT
Registration: N6785P
Aircraft: PIPER PA24
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Hard landing
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

The flight instructor reported that, during landing, while the student pilot was flying, the airplane ballooned. He added that he took the flight controls and landed on the runway.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing.

The flight instructor reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 40, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/11/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 35.1 hours (Total, all aircraft), 7.3 hours (Total, this make and model), 14.5 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 4.3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1.9 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 54, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/02/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/01/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 2024 hours (Total, all aircraft), 15 hours (Total, this make and model), 1896.4 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 200 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 75 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N6785P
Model/Series: PA24 250
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1960
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 24-1916
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/01/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6049.1 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-540-A
Registered Owner: AZAM ZAYED
Rated Power: 250 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPPO, 811 ft msl
Observation Time: 2155 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 348°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 2°C / -8°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 16 knots/ 20 knots, 330°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.12 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: GRIFFITH, IN (05C)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Knox, IN (OXI)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1430 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: STARKE COUNTY (OXI)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 684 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 36
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4401 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  41.325556, -86.662222 (est)

Cessna 182E Skylane, N3024Y: Accident occurred March 20, 2018 at Rapid City Regional Airport (KRAP), Pennington County, South Dakota

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Rapid City, South Dakota 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N3024Y

Analysis

The pilot reported that, while departing from a short snow-covered airstrip, the airplane's nose wheel lifted off upon arriving at the "go/no go" decision point. He added that, about 30 ft. further the airplane encountered deeper snow and the nose landing gear lowered to the ground. Subsequently, he reduced the throttle and aborted the takeoff. The airplane exited the airstrip to the left, the right wing encountered terrain, and the airplane spun 180° and came to rest in a ditch.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the elevator and both wings.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's selection of unsuitable terrain for takeoff, which resulted in a loss of control and runway excursion.

Findings

Aircraft
Directional control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Decision making/judgment - Pilot (Cause)
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Snow/slush/ice covered surface - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Takeoff
Loss of control on ground (Defining event)
Runway excursion

Location: Rapid City, SD
Accident Number: GAA18CA173
Date & Time: 03/20/2018, 1020 MDT
Registration: N3024Y
Aircraft: CESSNA 182
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that, while departing from a short snow-covered airstrip, the airplane's nose wheel lifted off upon arriving at the "go/no go" decision point. He added that, about 30 ft. further the airplane encountered deeper snow and the nose landing gear lowered to the ground. Subsequently, he reduced the throttle and aborted the takeoff. The airplane exited the airstrip to the left, the right wing encountered terrain, and the airplane spun 180° and came to rest in a ditch.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the elevator and both wings.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 69, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Unknown
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/01/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 3920 hours (Total, all aircraft), 306 hours (Total, this make and model), 26 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N3024Y
Model/Series: 182 E
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1962
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18254024
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/17/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2800 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-470 SERIES
Registered Owner: CURTIS LEE TEMPLE
Rated Power: 230 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KRAP, 3168 ft msl
Observation Time: 1552 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 303°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: -3°C / -4°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.94 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Rapid City, SD
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: RAPID CITY, SD (RAP)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1020 MDT
Type of Airspace:  Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:   43.973889, -102.903611 (est)

Stinson 108-3, N6067M: Incident occurred March 21, 2018 in Bonham, Fannin County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; North Texas

Engine failure lead to off-airport landing.

http://registry.faa.gov/N6067M

Date: 21-MAR-18
Time: 18:00:00Z
Regis#: 6067M
Aircraft Make: STINSON
Aircraft Model: 108
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: BONHAM
State: TEXAS

LAK-12, N63010: Accident occurred March 20, 2018 near Sunriver Airport (S21), Deschutes County, Oregon

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N63010

Analysis 

The glider pilot reported that, at 8,800 ft, he encountered a strong sink rate of about 400-600 ft per minute. He added that he was unable to find any thermals and decided to head towards a nearby airport to land. He soon realized that he would not be able to reach the airport and chose to land on a highway instead. During landing, the wings struck road signs and came to rest on the right side of the highway.

The glider sustained substantial damage to the wings.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the glider that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The glider pilot's inadequate flight planning, which resulted in an off-airport landing.

Findings

Aircraft
Altitude - Attain/maintain not possible (Cause)

Personnel issues
Flight planning/navigation - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Sign/marker - Contributed to outcome

Factual Information

History of Flight

Enroute-cruise
Loss of lift (Defining event)

Landing

Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Location: Sunriver, OR
Accident Number: GAA18CA172
Date & Time: 03/20/2018, 1447 PDT
Registration: N63010
Aircraft: LITHUANIAN FACTORY OF AVIATION LAK 12
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of lift
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The glider pilot reported that, at 8,800 ft, he encountered a strong sink rate of about 400-600 ft per minute. He added that he was unable to find any thermals and decided to head towards a nearby airport to land. He soon realized that he would not be able to reach the airport and chose to land on a highway instead. During landing, the wings struck road signs and came to rest on the right side of the highway.

The glider sustained substantial damage to the wings.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the glider that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 50, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Single
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/15/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/30/2016
Flight Time: (Estimated) 209 hours (Total, all aircraft), 45 hours (Total, this make and model), 112 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: LITHUANIAN FACTORY OF AVIATION
Registration: N63010
Model/Series: LAK 12 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Glider
Year of Manufacture: 1992
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 6228
Landing Gear Type: Retractable 
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1433 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 0
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer:
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series:
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBDN, 3462 ft msl
Observation Time: 2155 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 17 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 33°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 13°C / -5°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 9 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots, 210°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.91 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: BEND, OR (BDN)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Sunriver, OR
Type of Clearance: Unknown
Departure Time: 1313 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 43.863611, -121.407778




A LAK-12 glider crash-landed along Highway 97 near the Sunriver exit Tuesday afternoon, Deschutes County sheriff's deputies said.

The LAK-12 landed shortly before 3 p.m. near the South Century Drive exit to Sunriver, coming to a rest just off the shoulder of the southbound lanes and not blocking the road, Deschutes County sheriff's deputies said,

Deputies said the pilot was flying from Bend to Paulina Peak and back, was the glider's only occupant and was able to get out on his own, declining medical attention.

When he realized he would not be able to make it back to Bend, the pilot diverted to Sunriver Airport but didn't make it, deputies said.

Sheriff's Sgt. William Bailey said the pilot is a 50-year-old Bend resident and a licensed and certified glider pilot. He said the pilot landed along the highway shoulder and might have done so without incident, if one of the glider's long wings hadn't clipped a road sign along the highway.

Federal Aviation Administration records indicate the LAK-12 glider is owned by Henry Irvine of Bend. 

There were no injuries, but traffic was affected at times as the glider was disassembled and removed from the scene in a trailer.

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