Wednesday, May 18, 2016

Paul Welke honored with two prestigious Federal Aviation Administration awards

Federal Aviation Administration staff John Farnham (left) shakes hands with Paul Welke (far right) after he was honored with the Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award Award from FAA office manager in Grand Rapids, Mark Kosco (center).


Paul Welke (left) opens a gift presented to him by Ken Tough, (right) chair of the Charlevoix Airport Advisory committee after a ceremony where Welke was honored with the Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award Award and the Charles Taylor Master Mechanic Award. Also pictured next to Welke is Charlevoix Municipal Airport manager Liz Myer and in the center is Charlevoix City Council member Shirley Gibson as they congratulate Welke on his achievement.



CHARLEVOIX — A Beaver Island pilot was honored with the most prestigious award given by the Federal Aviation Administration — recognizing half a century of flight during a ceremony at the Charlevoix Municipal Airport on May 11.

Paul Welke, of Island Airways, was presented with the Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award Award and the Charles Taylor Master Mechanic Award in front of family, friends, city officials and fellow pilots in the airport's hangar last Tuesday.

“Just in awe,” Welke said. “This is more overwhelming than I could have imagined. I didn’t even know these awards existed.”

The award recognizes professionalism, skill and expertise in aviation and 50 years of flight. These awards are the highest aviation awards given to civilians and recognize pilots for maintaining safe operations.

“It is certainly very humbling,” Welke said.



Welke was presented with a lapel pin, a Blue Ribbon award documenting his flight history and a plaque for his aviation service. Welke also reassured those in attendance that this celebration was no retirement party.

“I’m not going anywhere,” Welke said. “I still will be flying because there is no other place I’d rather be. I enjoy what I'm doing.”

Island Airways uses the same airstrip Welke grew up using to land the family plane. He soloed his first flight at 16 years old in 1965. He became a private pilot as a cadet in 1967 in a L16 and Welke got his commercial rating in 1972.

For his first flying job in 1972 he was paid $3 per flight, said wife, Angel Welke. “Anyone who has known Paul for a long time would know that aviation is his life.”

In the last eight years, Welke has flown nearly 5,000 hours and been on duty more than 14,000 hours. He has done 13,246 landings and takeoffs and in his total career flown more than 32,000 hours and an estimated 100,000 career landings and takeoffs, Angel said.

Welke’s connection to Beaver Island has fostered some deep relationships with island year-round and summer residents.

"Nearly everyone on the island has a Paul story,” Angel said. “I think practically everyone can say he flew this family member off or themselves for one reason or another. That’s just Paul. The phone goes off at 2 a.m. and he is flying.”

One family that attended the ceremony recalled how Welke risked his own safety to search for family who was on a charter plane that went down on the island in the winter of 2001.



“He saved myself and our three kids and asked for nothing in return,” said Mirth Gault, who was on board the flight that stormy February day. “He is a very special person to our family."

Not knowing if anyone was looking for them was beginning to take its toll on Mirth, she added.

“I was just about to give up,” she said. “It was 15 hours since we crashed and then Paul’s plane flew over us.”

Before Welke began the search, the storm had grounded the U.S. Coast Guard, said Robert Gault.

“The weather was so bad they would not go up,” Gault said. “But Paul stood next to his plane on the runway and waited for a break the clouds break and he went up.”

Gault describes the situation as desperate and time was not on their side. The weather was drastically getting worse. Temperatures at the time of the crash were around 36 degrees. By the time Welke was able to get in the air 15 hours later it was snowing far worse than before and the temperatures had plummeted to 17 degrees and were still declining, Gault said.

“God was on our side,” he said. “If Paul didn’t find them when he did, they would have died in the plane, that night. The next day, after the rescue the snow covered the plane. Without Paul, I would have been without my family. To think about how desperate that situation was and for him to go up in that weather is just selfless.”

The Gault family said Paul’s honor and recognition from the FAA is well deserved.

“He is the most humble guy you will meet,” Gault said. “If anyone deserves these two awards, it is Paul Welke.”

Welke now joins the ranks of Chuck Yeager and Neil Armstrong, who are also recipients of the award.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.petoskeynews.com

Incident occurred May 17, 2016 - Treasure Coast, St. Lucie County, Florida





Severe weather caused damage on the Treasure Coast Tuesday as a line of storms swept eastward.

A small single-engine plane overturned at Treasure Coast International Airport Tuesday.

The wife of the plane's owner told NewsChannel 5 that they were working on the plane, saw the storm coming, and decided they needed to move it to the hangar.

The plane flipped while a mechanic was moving the aircraft. He was not seriously hurt, according to fire officials.

There was also damage to 3 trailers at Road Runner Travel Resort, St. Lucie County Public Information Manager Erick Gill said. He added that so far there have not been any major injuries reported.

Whitney Mann sent photos to our Facebook page showing damage to a building at Kings Highway and Angle Road.

Fire crews also responded to 3 small brush fires, according to St. Lucie County Fire District spokeswoman Catherine Chaney.

A downed tree was spotted at mile marker 143 along northbound I-95.

Several roads were also inundated with water due to the heavy rain.

Story and video:  http://www.wptv.com

Pellston Regional Airport (KPLN) expands flight options for summer



EMMET COUNTY, Mi. (WPBN/WGTU) -- Employees at Pellston Regional Airport are hoping to make summer getaways to and from northern Michigan a little easier for their customers.

Starting June 9th, the airport will expand its service options by adding a flight a day to Minneapolis.

It will be the first time in years that a Minneapolis route has been offered to customers of the Pellston airport.

"It's great to have that service back," said Pellston Airport Manager Kelley Atkins. "The best way to ensure that it stays in our lineup is for people to utilize that flight. I'm optimistic, I really am. It was well received the last time we had it."

Additionally, flights to Detroit will increase from 2 to 3 a day in June and then 4 in July.

The expansion has been made possible by the airline Sky West which is a partner to Delta Airlines.

"It's very positive," said Atkins. "Sky West has indicated to me that they value our market a great deal and that we are important to them."

According to Atkins, the most important affect of the new flight options will be the ability of summer time tourists to easily make their way into Emmet county.

A recent Community Benefits Assessment stated that the airports operations generate an extra $38 million dollars a year for the local economy. 

The expanded Detroit and Minneapolis flight options will stay available to customers until the end of September. 

Story and video:  http://upnorthlive.com

Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (PANC) launches new online community flight tracker


Anchorage, ALASKA (KTUU) A new website allows you track aircraft in the Anchorage airspace in live time 24/7.

Ted Stevens International Airport debuted the website on Wednesday. Airport Manager John Parrot says it's in response to a recommendation from a recent noise compatibility study.

"People wanted a way to know what planes are flying above them," Parrot said.

The Community Flight Tracker allows people to see the plane model, altitude, flight number, flight path, origin and destination all 24 hours a day.

To visit the flight tracker, click here.

Story and video:  http://www.ktuu.com

Amazon Looking to License or Acquire Freight-Management Technology: Online retail firm has previously leased cargo planes, registered to arrange cargo shipments


The Wall Street Journal
By Erica E. Phillips
Updated May 18, 2016 11:40 a.m. ET


Amazon.com Inc. is on the hunt for technology to help it run its rapidly expanding freight-transportation network, according to people at companies that have been contacted by the retailer.

The online retail firm recently signed deals to lease cargo planes and registered to arrange ocean-cargo shipments, marking the company’s entry into the $150 billion-a-year global business of freight forwarding. Analysts believe the moves are part of a larger effort to reduce shipping costs for sellers on the company’s website, cutting out the middlemen for shipments of goods from Asian factories to Amazon warehouses in the U.S.

Now, Amazon is looking to license or acquire technology that could find the most efficient shipping routes and hire fleets of trucks, ships and planes to move sellers’ goods. In the last two weeks, Amazon has reached out to several freight-services-technology companies requesting information about their offerings, people at the companies said. A person at one of those companies said an Amazon representative told him the retailer is seeking out existing technology to save time on development.

A representative for Amazon didn’t respond to a request for comment.

Most large retailers and manufacturers use transportation-management software to manage the flow of goods through their supply chains. But many smaller companies still book space on a ship or cargo plane via phone call, or even fax, and often their goods are tracked using emailed spreadsheets. Freight startups, including Flexport Inc. and Haven Engineering Inc., say they want to make arranging freight transportation as easy as booking a vacation online, and provide tracking for shipments as they make their way around the world.

It is a field that has attracted funding from Silicon Valley investors, though the new crop of companies have yet to pose a serious threat to the world’s leading forwarders, many of which are working on similar technology of their own.

For Amazon, acquiring a freight-forwarding platform would allow the company to drive more volume toward its own cargo-handling arm, driving down costs for sellers, who in turn can keep prices low for customers, said Satish Jindel, president of SJ Consulting Group Inc., a logistics-research firm.

Amazon appears to be “saying to its sellers, ‘We’re going to give you the Amazon experience,’ ” he said. “You’re outsourcing production anyway, why not outsource your entire supply chain?”

With the right technology, Amazon’s plans could pose a threat to established forwarders as well, by winning over their small- and medium-size clients—many of whose goods are destined for Amazon distribution centers anyway.

Amazon’s entry into the freight forwarding business would also present a direct challenge to the startups. Ryan Petersen, chief executive of Flexport, said when Amazon asked for a presentation on his company’s technology, “I declined politely.”

Original article can be found here:   http://www.wsj.com

Jerry Gable receives Federal Aviation Administration award for 50 years of safe flying

Jerry Gable receives the Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award from FAA representative Barbara Olsen-Gwin.
~


The Federal Aviation Administration has presented its highest honor, the Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award, to Southport resident Gerald Holton (“Jerry”) Gable.

The award, conferred by the FAA administrator earlier this year and recorded in the National Register, recognizes pilots who have flown safely for 50 years without accident or incident. 

The award itself was presented by local FAA representative Barbara Olsen-Gwin recently during a ceremony at Cape Fear Regional Jetport. Gable is the first Brunswick County resident to receive the Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award.

Like many young men growing up in the 1940s and ’50s, Gable was fascinated with airplanes and flying. He and his brother built a number of flying model airplanes, and they belonged to an active model airplane club in Albion, Michigan, their childhood home. Gable occasionally went flying with a friend of his father’s who owned a Piper Cub.

In 1958 he met Lois, to whom he has now been married for 56 years. Her father, as luck would have it, was a private pilot and owned a 1946 Aeronca 7AC Champ. He told Gable on his second visit to his farm that if he intended to marry his daughter, he was going to have to learn to fly.

It took a couple years to finish college and start a career and a family, but on August 18, 1965, Gable soloed the Champ and he went on to achieve his commercial pilot’s license.

Gable’s career as a physicist largely involved research and development on government aircraft projects. His final assignment was as team manager for the X-29 Forward Swept Wing Fighter project for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), and his retirement party from Grumman Aerospace Corp. coincided with the first-flight celebration of the X-29 in 1985.

The Gables flew light aircraft over the years for personal travel and, after the hectic world of government contract work, he didn’t really “retire;” the couple moved to the Southport-Oak Island area, where they started “Pelican Post” magazine, Oak Island Press and Map Makers. One of the main reasons for choosing this area was its proximity to an excellent small airport.

The Gables have an antique— they call it “classic”—1962 Cessna Skyhawk which they have flown all over the country and regularly to the Bahamas. Even though they have tried to maintain the classic look of the plane, they have upgraded the instrumentation to the very latest technology.

Gable worked closely with the N.C. Department of Transportation’s Aviation Division on its ADS-B demonstration and evaluation program, and his was one of the first planes equipped with the new ADS-B navigation and traffic control technology in 2005.

ADS-B is now being implemented worldwide to replace radar and other 20th century air traffic control technologies.

Gable is a 50-year member of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) and a member of the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA), and serves on the board of directors of local chapter 939. He has flown nearly 100 Young Eagles in the EAA youth flying program.

Original article can be found here:  http://stateportpilot.com

Cessna T210J Turbo Centurion, N2263R: Incident occurred May 18, 2016 at McCarran International Airport (KLAS), Las Vegas, Clark County, Nevada

http://registry.faa.gov/N2263R

Date: 18-MAY-16
Time: 23:15:00Z
Regis#: N2263R
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 210
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Las Vegas FSDO-19
City: LAS VEGAS
State: Nevada

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING GEAR COLLAPSED, LAS VEGAS, NEVADA.



LAS VEGAS (KSNV News3LV) — Officials are investigating a hard landing at McCarran Airport.

The call originally came in around 4:17 p.m. Wednesday as a possible crash, but McCarran official Christine Crews confirmed it was a hard landing involving a Cessna small aircraft.


The hard landing was caused by a collapsing landing gear. While landing, the gear collapsed from the plane.


No injuries or fires are reported, and no damage was made to the airport.


Only one person was on the plane at the time of the landing.


Runway Two-Five Left, running parallel to Sunset Road, is closed until the aircraft is moved.


McCarran officials confirm there are no flight delays or cancellations as of this time.


Story and video:  http://news3lv.com


A small Cessna aircraft's landing gear collapsed upon landing at McCarran International Airport on Wednesday.

It was reported around 4:17 p.m. There was only one person on board. There were no injuries.

Runway 25 west is closed until the plane can be cleared.

Story and video:   http://www.ktnv.com

Landing gear collapsed during an aircraft’s landing at McCarran International Airport on Wednesday afternoon.

About 4:15 p.m., a Cessna’s landing gear “collapsed” when it landed at McCarran International Airport, spokeswoman Christine Crews said. One person was on board the aircraft, and no injuries were reported, she said.

Crews said that the pilot did not make an emergency call before landing. It is unclear if this was a mechanical failure, she said.

The runway where the plane landed was closed after landing, but no flight delays were expected.

Original article can be found here: http://www.reviewjournal.com

Cessna P210N Centurion, Stubblefield Construction Company, N6609P: Fatal accident occurred May 18, 2016 in Sheridan Lake, Tribune, Kansas

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Denver FSDO-03

Stubblefield Construction Company: http://registry.faa.gov/N6609P


NTSB Identification: CEN16FA188 

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, May 18, 2016 in Sheridan Lake, CO
Aircraft: CESSNA P210N, registration: N6609P
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 18, 2016, about 0901 mountain daylight time, a Cessna P210N, N6609P, sustained substantial damage when it impacted a field in a flat spin about 4 miles northeast of Sheridan Lake, Colorado. The pilot, the sole occupant, received fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the Stubblefield Construction Company under the provisions of the 14 Code of Federal Regulations as a Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and the airplane was receiving visual flight rules (VFR) flight following from the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) in Denver, Colorado. The airplane departed the Rock Springs-Sweetwater County Airport (RKS), Rock Springs, Wyoming, about 0645 and was en route to the Wiley Post Airport (PWA), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Earlier that morning, the pilot departed the Nampa Municipal Airport (MAN), Nampa, Idaho, about 0222 and landed in RKS about 0442. A witness at RKS reported that the pilot had the airplane topped off with 68 gallons of fuel. He reported that the pilot slept in the pilot's lounge for about one hour before departing to WPA.

Radar track data indicated that the airplane was flying on a southeast heading at 17,300 ft pressure altitude until 0847. Then the airplane started a series of turns, climbs, and descents that proceeded in a northerly direction. The air traffic controller stated on the radio that he suspected that the pilot might be hypoxic, and instructed the pilot to descend to a VFR altitude below 12,500 ft. The airplane started to descend and its last recorded radar return at 0900:32 indicated that the airplane's pressure altitude was 9,200 ft.

The airplane impacted a harvested field of milo in a wings-level, flat attitude. The left wing was canted aft and the right wing was canted forward indicative of a left hand spin. The tail was slightly to the left of the fuselage and the engine was slightly to the right. The fuselage was leaning slightly to the left. The landing gear was found in the retracted position.

The left wing remained attached to the fuselage. It was bent forward at the root and was bent upward at the flap/aileron junction where the wing was resting on the ground. There was no leading edge compression damage. The left flap was in the retracted position.

The right wing remained attached to the fuselage. It was bent downward at the root and was bent upward in the middle of the right aileron area where the wing was resting on the ground. There was no leading edge compression damage to the right wing. The right flap was hanging down approximately 10 degrees. Examination of the flap cables indicated the right flap cable was separated near the right wing root. The bottom side of the right wing had oil residue from the wing root extending outward toward the outboard end of the right flap.

The tail was fractured almost completely around its circumference at the dorsal. The rudder and elevators remained attached to the empennage. The rudder balance weight was separated from the top of the rudder and it was lying on the ground directly below the rudder.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


EADS, Colo. (AP) — Authorities say a man was killed when he crashed his small airplane into a field near the Colorado-Kansas border.

According to the Kiowa County Sheriff's Office, 64-year-old John Lee Stubblefield, of Meridian, Idaho, crashed his Cessna P210 northeast of Sheridan Lake on Wednesday morning.

Two F16 aircraft and a B1 Bomber were training in the area and found the crash site.


The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash, the cause of which has not been released.

Media Release: Fatal Airplane Crash Under Investigation in Kiowa County 

Eads, Colo. –May 18, 2016 – Kiowa County Sheriff’s Office is on the scene of a fatal airplane crash in Eastern Kiowa County. 

One fatality is confirmed following a single engine aircraft crash near Highway 96 and County Road 71.  

Representatives from the  Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) enroute to the crash site to begin an investigation.

The Kiowa County Sheriff’s Office received a 911 call just after 9:30 a.m. 

Multiple agencies responded to the incident including the Kiowa County Fire Protection District’s fire and ambulance crews and the Colorado State Patrol.  

The coroner is responding to the accident site.  

The Kiowa County Sheriff’s Office will remain at the incident site until the FAA and NTSB arrive. 

Updates on this incident will be posted to the Kiowa Sheriff Facebook account at https://www.facebook.com/kiowacountysheriffcolorado/?fref=ts   

Flight instruction returns to Vermilion Regional Airport (KDNV), Danville, Illinois



DANVILLE – Flight training is returning to the Vermilion Regional Airport.

It’s been 21 years since the last full service fixed-base operator operated by airport board member Steve Foster offered a flight school.

Foster said he sold the business in 1995.

The Vermilion Regional Airport Authority Board of Commissioners this week voted to allow Midwest Aircraft Services to operate flight training at the airport located on North Bowman Avenue.

“It’s aircraft rental and flight instruction,” said Airport Manager Mike Potter of his wife Tracey’s business.

Tracey said they’ll have two aircraft to rent and independent flight instructors.

Tracey is a licensed mechanic and also still manages the airport in Morehead, Ky.

“We have kids who also help out down there,” she said, adding that she’ll continue to manage as long as they make it work both here and there.

Tracey Potter said flight instruction is the way to go to get the community involved and get new people involved in aviation.

Mike Potter said they have a fixed-base operation at the airport and normally it does maintenance and flight instruction at an airport.

“I talked with him to see if he wanted to pursue that and if he was interested in doing it. He really wasn’t,” Mike Potter said, adding that Tracey could have helped him set it up.

Potter said the board’s approval was to not be in conflict of the operator already at the airport. He said they received the board’s blessing.

He said the board was interested in seeing flight instruction return. The board is exploring options to bring more people and business back to the airport.

“We haven’t worked out the details,” Mike Potter said about the hangers to use and other details.

He said basically he knew what the board wanted to see happen and he wanted to get the ball rolling.

“I knew that’s what they wanted,” Mike Potter said.

They will have two airplanes and a third one coming from Kentucky.

Mike Potter has already been teaching three people, from Danville, Oakwood and Rossville, to fly in the evenings after work.

There also are five other students lined up with another flight instructor as soon as an airplane was available here, Potter said.

He’s hoping to get more flight instructors lined up before they “get overwhelmed.”

Potter said a person must be 16 years old to fly solo, 17 years old to get a license and 18 to get a commercial license. For a glider, a 14-year-old can receive a license.

“I’ve flown with as young as 12- and 13-year-olds,” he said of dual flight instruction.

It can cost $6,000 to $7,000 to get a license, Potter said, adding that most students also reach 50-60 hours of flight time above the 40 minimum hours needed.

“We think it’s a real good start,” Foster said about the flight training interest here.

“It’s good to do the training in the evenings,” Foster said. “It’s great to get something like that going.”

“We’re going in the right direction,” he said of the airport.

Airport officials also are working with the state, city and county on economic development ideas.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.commercial-news.com

Cameron A315, Napa Valley Balloons Inc., N69520: Accident occurred November 14, 2016 in Winters, Yolo County, California (and) Incident occurred May 17, 2016 in Napa County, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

NAPA VALLEY BALLOONS INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N69520

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Sacramento FSDO-25


Aviation Accident Factual Report -   National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA082
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, November 14, 2016 in Winters, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/06/2017
Aircraft: CAMERON A315, registration: N69520
Injuries: 1 Serious, 14 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of a balloon reported that while aloft he observed the wind increase to about 10 miles per hour, so he briefed his passengers on how to brace for a “high wind landing” and possible basket tip-over. The pilot further reported that he descended to about 3 feet above ground, and once over the target landing area he “shut off [the] fuel tanks and burners then pulled the smart vent (rapid deflation valve).” Subsequently, on touch down the basket bounced once and skidded about 15 to 20 yards before stopping with the basket tipping over on its side. 

The pilot reported that he secured the basket and while the passengers were exiting the basket, his ground crew informed him that a passenger had injured her ankle. According to the pilot, the injured passenger did not speak English as her first language and he was unsure if she braced appropriately for the landing or if she sustained the serious injury while exiting the basket. The pilot reported that another passenger informed him that the passenger sustained the injury while she was exiting the basket.

The pilot did not report any preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the balloon that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The passenger's improper egress from the balloon basket, which resulted in a serious injury.

Date:  17-MAY-16
Time:  14:45:00Z
Regis#:  N69520
Aircraft Make:  CAMERON
Aircraft Model:  A315
Event Type:  Incident
Damage:  None
Activity:  Sightseeing
Flight Phase:  LANDING (LDG)
City:  NAPA
State:  California

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Sacramento FSDO-25


HOT AIR BALLOON FORCE LANDED ON A LEVY 3 MILES FROM THE AIRPORT, PERSONS ON BOARD WERE RETRIEVED BY HELICOPTER, NO INJURIES, NO DAMAGE, NAPA, CALIFORNIA. 



NAPA (KPIX 5) – Tourists who were taking in the scenic Napa Valley on a hot air balloon ride Tuesday had their journey turn into a rescue mission, when the balloon went off course and made an emergency landing near the Napa River.

“They got a nice balloon ride and a free helicopter ride,” CHP flight officer Tom Lipsey told KPIX 5.

Lipsey said as CHP helicopters were out training, he noticed something colorful from the flight hanger.

“We looked over there, saw a hot air balloon that was pretty far south of where we normally see them,” he recalled.

A helicopter found the balloon on a remote levee, miles off course, near the Napa River. The pilot told Lipsey he didn’t have enough fuel to lift off.

“The winds were kind of shifting all over as we were landing, so I think it was just a really strange day for winds and maybe caught them off guard,” Lipsey said.

The balloon belongs to Napa Valley Balloon Inc. Representatives told KPIX 5 the people on the balloon ride were tourists that were part of a Robert Mondavi wine tasting trip.

The helicopter had to make multiple trips to rescue the 16 tourists and the pilot.

One of the tourists posted on Instagram a selfie from the chopper.

“I know they were taking a lot of selfies and videos of us flying over there so I am sure they got good memories there,” Lipsey said.

Napa Valley Balloon Inc. said the strong winds forced their pilot to land on the levee, but no one was ever in danger.

Story and video:  http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com



NAPA, California -- Tourists who were taking in the scenic Napa Valley on a hot air balloon ride Tuesday had their journey turn into a rescue mission when the balloon went off course and made an emergency landing near the Napa River, CBS San Francisco reported.

"They got a nice balloon ride and a free helicopter ride," California Highway Patrol flight officer Tom Lipsey told CBS SF.

Lipsey said as CHP helicopters were out training, he noticed something colorful from the flight hanger.

"We looked over there, saw a hot air balloon that was pretty far south of where we normally see them," he recalled.

A helicopter found the balloon on a remote levee, miles off course, near the Napa River. The pilot told Lipsey he didn't have enough fuel to lift off.

"The winds were kind of shifting all over as we were landing, so I think it was just a really strange day for winds and maybe caught them off guard," Lipsey said.

The balloon belongs to Napa Valley Balloon Inc. Representatives told CBS SF the people on the balloon ride were tourists that were part of a Robert Mondavi wine tasting trip.

The helicopter had to make multiple trips to rescue the 16 tourists and the pilot.

One of the tourists posted on Instagram a selfie from the chopper.

"I know they were taking a lot of selfies and videos of us flying over there so I am sure they got good memories there," Lipsey said.

Napa Valley Balloon Inc. said the strong winds forced their pilot to land on the levee, but no one was ever in danger.

Story and video:  http://www.cbsnews.com

Piper PA-23-250, Keystone Aerial Surveys Inc., N170TA: Incident occurred May 16, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

KEYSTONE AERIAL SURVEYS INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N170TA

Date: 16-MAY-16
Time: 18:40:00Z
Regis#: N170TA
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA23
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Philadelphia FSDO-17
City: PHILADELPHIA
State: Pennsylvania

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, GEAR COLLAPSED, PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA.

Southwest Airlines, Boeing 737-700, N774SW: Incident occurred May 17, 2016 at Los Angeles International Airport (KLAX), California

SOUTHWEST AIRLINES CO:  http://registry.faa.gov/N774SW

Date: 17-MAY-16
Time: 16:45:00Z
Regis#: SWA 3345
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 737
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: Unknown
Damage: None
Activity: Commercial
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Aircraft Operator: SWA-Southwest Airlines
Flight Number: SWA3345
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA El Segundo (Los Angeles) FSDO-23
City: LOS ANGELES
State: California

SOUTHWEST AIRLINES FLIGHT SWA3345 BOEING 737 AIRCRAFT,REGISTRATION NOT REPORTED, ENCOUNTERED TURBULENCE ENROUNTE, 1 FLIGHT CREW ATTENDANT SUSTAINED UNKNOWN INJURIES, NEAR LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA.

Rectrix Aviation readies island flights; second company may also add service



HYANNIS — There’s still work to do, but Rectrix Aviation is moving ahead with plans to launch scheduled commuter flights between Hyannis and Nantucket this summer.

The company, which has a facility at Barnstable Municipal Airport and offers private jet charters, announced Tuesday it had purchased two Beechcraft King Air 300 turboprop planes for the new route.

The 11-seat aircraft are now getting makeovers, including the installation of new leather seating, Wi-Fi and upgraded electronics, plus new exterior paint with the Rectrix trademark blue tail and red “R.” Each plane will carry up to nine passenger and two pilots will be aboard for each flight.

Richard Cawley, CEO of Rectrix Commercial Aviation Services Inc., said the company expects to begin the new service this summer, once it secures FAA approval and completes extensive training for pilots and ground handlers.

“We’re hiring all new people and there’s a lot that goes into launching this service,” Cawley said. “Eventually we will fly hourly, or every hour and a half, seven days a week, but we’re going to ramp up slowly.”



Nantucket Memorial Airport has signed a lease with Rectrix Aviation for office and terminal counter space, according to airport spokesman Noah Karberg.

Year-over-year passenger traffic at the airport has been declining as more and more tradesmen providing services to the island have opted for less costly ferry service. That was one of the reasons Tom Cunningham cited when his company, Island Airlines, closed without warning in December and later filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

Cape Air stepped up to help fill the gap by offering a dozen weekly flights in addition to its regular scheduled service and that of the company’s other brand, Nantucket Airlines, but there’s still demand for additional Hyannis-Nantucket service, Karberg said.

“There was a large hole left by the departure of Island Airlines. At one point we had three air taxis operating here,” he said. “We’re hoping to come back and really showcase this airport.”

And there may well be a third carrier on the horizon.

Barnstable Airport Manager Bud Breault said Noreast Aviation Services Inc. in New Bedford has expressed interest in operating a shuttle service between Hyannis and the island, though he hasn’t received a formal proposal.

Breault added that Rectrix, too, still needs to discuss its plans with the Barnstable Municipal Airport Commission.

“There’s nothing official yet. They’ll have to talk to the airport commissioners,” he said. “But we want this to happen. We’d like both. Competition is good, especially when it leads to better rates for passengers.”

Travelers to and from Nantucket have a number of other flying options this season. JetBlue resumed its seasonal New York-JFK and Boston service earlier this month and ahead of last year, with Washington-Reagan National flights set to start on Friday. The airline also has added two more Boston flights on Fridays and Sundays.

American Airlines will add three flights per week to New York's LaGuardia Airport starting June 4 and is “upgauging” this route and its exiting Reagan National service that starts June 2 to a larger Embraer 170 regional jet, according to Karberg, increasing capacity from 50 to 70 passengers.

Delta is continuing its twice daily jet service to and from JFK and has will also add a Saturday LaGuardia flight in early June. United will continue to offer three-flight-daily service to Newark starting July 1. And Cape Air continues to offer scores of daily flights to and from Boston, New York-White Plains and New Bedford.

“We are really grateful that we have the level of interest we have from the major carriers this summer,” Karberg said.

Original article can be found here: http://www.capecodtimes.com

North American AT-6 Texan, N3198G: Fatal accident occurred May 17, 2016 at Falcon Field Airport (KFFZ), Mesa, Maricopa County, Arizona

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

N3198G LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N3198G 

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07

NTSB Identification: WPR16FA112
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, May 17, 2016 in Mesa, AZ
Aircraft: NORTH AMERICAN AT 6, registration: N3198G
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 17, 2016, about 1842 mountain standard time, a North American AT-6, N3198G, was destroyed when it impacted terrain shortly after departure from Falcon Field Airport (FFZ), Mesa, Arizona. The pilot and the passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to Wings of Flight Foundation, and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 air tour flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan had been filed. The local flight originated from FFZ at 1841 mountain standard time.

Multiple witnesses reported that shortly after takeoff they heard "popping" sounds accompanied with a loud "bang" and it appeared that the engine was not producing enough power. As the airplane exited the airport boundary, above an airport perimeter road, it made an 180-degree turn. Immediately thereafter, the airplane impacted the ground and a postimpact fire ensued. 

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.



Flag flies at half-staff at Mesa's Falcon Field Airport after the deadly crash.

Ataberk Besler



Amerika'nın Arizona eyaletinde 18 yaşındaki Türk genci Ataberk Besler tek motorlu uçak kazasında hayatını kaybetti.

Çanakkaleli olduğu öğrenilen Ataberk Besler, öğrenci değişim programıyla ABD'ye gitti. Salı günü ABD'nin Arizona kentinde geçirdiği uçak kazasında ise hayatını kaybetti. Besler, ailesi ve sevenlerini yasa boğdu.

18 yaşındaki Besler'in bindiği, İkinci Dünya Savaşı döneminden kalma 1945 model tek motorlu küçük uçak, salı akşamı Mesa kentinde düştü.

Kazada, AT-6 tipi uçağı kullanan 43 yaşındaki pilot Jesse R. Goodwin de yaşamını yitirdi. Uçağın kalkıştan kısa süre sonra düştüğü bildirildi.

https://www.sadecehaber.com


Jesse R. Goodwin, 43, was the pilot.

Picture by Goodwin family



The flag at Mesa's Falcon Field Airport flew at half-staff  as the community mourned and honored the pilot and young passenger who were killed when a small World War II-era plane crashed Tuesday night.

The pilot was identified Wednesday afternoon as Gilbert resident Jesse R. Goodwin, 43, an American Airlines pilot. His 18-year-old passenger was Ataberk Besler, an exchange student in the AFS-USA program from Canakkale, Turkey.

They were aboard the single-engine AT-6 when it crashed at the airport near Higley and McKellips roads.

First responders were called to the scene at about 6:30 p.m. on reports of a small plane that had crashed and burned during takeoff, said Ian Gregor, a spokesman with the Federal Aviation Administration.

A dust storm moved through the area Tuesday evening, but authorities said it was unclear if weather was a factor in the crash.

The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the incident, Gregor said.

Goodwin was a first officer, or co-pilot, at American who also frequently flew vintage planes.

"First Officer Jesse Goodwin was part of the American Airlines family and we are saddened by this loss," Polly Tracey, an airline spokeswoman, said to The Republic. "All of us at American extend our condolences to his loved ones."

Joshua Ledlow, a director of a historical documentary titled Patriot Skies, took to Facebook on Wednesday to share his memories of recently taking photos of Goodwin flying over Canyon Lake in a Stearman Biplane, a craft used as a military trainer in the 1930s and 1940s.

"The day I took these photos I discovered more than airplanes," Ledlow wrote, describing Goodwin as "one hell of a pilot and even better person."

"These guys had the life. Blue skies and sunshine for days. My passion for film making and their passion to fly made something magical that day … a day I will never forget. Today our hearts are broken as we have lost one of our own ... my heart goes out to his family, friends and the entire aviation community at Falcon Field. We will continue to tell our story in your memory …"

Ledlow wrote that he also had flown with Daniel Cordon and pilot brothers Brian and Dale Churchill, all Mesa residents who are registered to the aircraft involved in the crash. Cordon, a member of the Wings of Flight Foundation — a group of riders based at Falcon Field — was interviewed by the FAA on Wednesday morning at the airport hangar.

Planes were taking off and landing again at the field Wednesday morning.

Corinne Nystrom, airport director at Falcon Field, said, "There's camaraderie in the love of aviation. It gets everyone through a lot."

She said the familial relationship was not unique to Falcon Field but existed among all who shared a love and passion for aviation.

Dick Stich, a retired U.S. Air Force pilot and member of the Falcon Warbirds — a group also based at the Mesa airport — said those in the close-knit Falcon Field community were shocked at the news of the crash.

"It is very, very, very, very rare for accidents involving these planes," Stich said, vouching for the AT-6 reliability. "These airplanes are maintained especially well and these accidents don't happen often."

"I'm sick to my stomach that we lost guys from the field," Stich said. "We're all friends and comrades."


Story and video:   http://www.azcentral.com



Mesa emergency crews responded to a small-plane crash near Falcon Field on Tuesday night, according to fire and medical personnel.

The crews were called to the airport near Higley and McKellips roads before 7 p.m. Tuesday.

There, first responders found two people dead in a plane crash, according to Mesa fire and medical teams.

About 6:30 p.m., a North American AT-6 Texan crashed and burned during takeoff at Falcon Field, according to Ian Gregor, a spokesman with the Federal Aviation Administration.

The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the crash, Gregor said.

The incident came as a shock to those in the close-knit Falcon Field community, said Dick Stich, a retired U.S. Air Force pilot and member of the Falcon Warbirds. The group is based at the Mesa airport and memorializes pilots and veterans who have passed away by doing flyovers in the "Missing Man" formation.

“I’m sick to my stomach that we lost guys from Falcon Field,” Stich said. “Our group will offer anything we can do to help those guys out. We’re friends, comrades.”

Stich said he did not know the people who crashed on Tuesday but that they were not members of the Falcon Warbirds. However, he added that the AT-6 was a dependable aircraft.

Falcon Field was founded in 1941 as a training base for British pilots during World War II. Today, the city of Mesa owns and operates the airport, where student pilots from all over the world train. In 2011, Falcon Field celebrated its 70th anniversary as the fifth-busiest general-aviation airport in the country, logging more than 229,000 takeoffs and landings.

Story and video:  http://www.azcentral.com





MESA, AZ (KPHO/KTVK) - Two people were killed when a fixed-wing airplane crashed as it was taking off from Falcon Field Airport in Mesa Tuesday evening.

Emergency crews were dispatched at about 6:45 p.m. The Mesa Fire and Medical Department confirmed the fatalities less than 30 minutes later.

The single-engine AT-6 burst into flames on impact.

Detective Steve Berry of the Mesa Police Department said the plane experienced a mechanical difficulty. The plane, which had taken off in tandem with another aircraft, crashed as the pilot was turning right.

A witness, however, told Jeff Van Sant that the plane was about to hit another aircraft. According to Martin Cervantez, it looked like the pilot lost control while maneuvering to avoid a collision, causing the plane to cartwheel.

Berry could not confirm that account, saying only that everything was "very preliminary." He said the pilot of the other plane circled and landed without incident.

Aerial video from the scene showed the demolished plane on Greenfield Road on the west side of the airport. The nose section housing the propeller broke off the body of the aircraft and was lying a few feet away. A portion of the wreckage was covered with a tarp and there was what appeared to be fire-suppression foam all over the roadway.

It's not clear if weather was a factor in the crash. Berry said the storm that swept through the Phoenix metro area had not yet moved in.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board will investigate.

Greenfield will be closed between McDowell and McKellips throughout the night.

The AT-6 was flown during World War II and into the 1970s. The warbird, which is often used for both static displays and aerial demonstrations at airshows throughout the country, was the go-to stand-in for various Japanese planes in movies about World War II.

FAA records show the plane that crashed was manufactured in 1942 and registered to a Mesa-based LLC.

Falcon Field, which serves as a reliever to Phoenix Sky Harbor International and Phoenix-Mesa Gateway airports, is located at Greenfield and McKellips roads. The Commemorative Air Force Airbase Arizona, which offers rides aboard an SNJ/T-6 Texan, a trainer for the type of plane that crashed, is located there.

Story and video: http://www.fox10tv.com


MESA, AZ (KPHO/KTVK) - Two people were killed when a fixed-wing airplane crashed as it was taking off from Falcon Field Airport in Mesa Tuesday evening.

Emergency crews were dispatched at about 6:45 p.m. The Mesa Fire and Medical Department confirmed the fatalities less than 30 minutes later.

The single-engine AT-6 burst into flames on impact.

Detective Steve Berry of the Mesa Police Department said the plane experienced a mechanical difficulty. The plane, which had taken off in tandem with another aircraft, crashed as the pilot was turning right.

A witness, however, told Jeff Van Sant that the plane was about to hit another aircraft. According to Martin Cervantez, it looked like the pilot lost control while maneuvering to avoid a collision, causing the plane to cartwheel.

Story and video:  http://www.azfamily.com





MESA, Ariz. - Two people are dead after a plane crash near Falcon Field in east Mesa. Police told 12 News the aircraft crashed on takeoff and burned. 

The bodies of two people were found among the wreckage.

The cause is under investigation. 

The plane came to rest just after 6:30 p.m. Tuesday evening in the middle of Greenfield Road between McDowell and McKellips roads.

“The nose of the aircraft is facing to the west,” said Detective Steve Berry of the Mesa Police Department. 

“For some reason that is unknown at this point, [the pilot] had difficulties -- mechanical or otherwise,” said Berry. “and kind of veered to the right before going down and crashing on the roadway.”

Mesa Police say once it hit the ground, the plane caught on fire and burned from there.

Emergency crews from the Mesa Fire and Medical station onsite responded.

“Crews make a rapid approach to the aircraft to do a quick triage and identify any savable victims,” said Captain Ken Hall of Mesa Fire and Medical. “Unfortunately in this incident, there were two victims in there that could not be saved.”

Investigators are still trying to figure out who is involved and what caused the deadly outcome.

“A tragic situation,” said Berry. “We’re right in the middle of a major roadway here in Mesa and certainly, never to minimize the tragedy, but obviously you could imagine if this had, say, hit another carload of people or bus or something of that nature. It’s an unfortunate situation for everyone involved.”

Detective Berry says so far there are no indications weather was a factor in the crash.

It was fairly windy in east Mesa late Tuesday evening, but Berry says it was pretty clear in the area when the crash happened.

Mesa Fire and police are still on scene maintaining the initial part of the investigation until the FAA and NTSB take over later Tuesday night or Wednesday.

Story and video:  http://www.12news.com