Monday, May 08, 2017

Beech B19 Sport, N18925, registered to an individual and operated by Hyde Flight School: Accident occurred May 08, 2017 in Weatherford, Parker County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Irving, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 


http://registry.faa.gov/N18925

Location: Weatherford, TX
Accident Number: CEN17LA179
Date & Time: 05/08/2017, 1000 CDT
Registration: N18925
Aircraft: BEECH 19
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel starvation
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On May 8, 2017 about 0925 central daylight time, a Beech B19, N18925, experienced a partial loss of engine power and impacted terrain during a forced landing near Granbury, Texas. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The flight instructor and a student pilot received minor injuries. The airplane was registered to an individual and operated by Hyde Flight School under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight originated from Granbury Regional Airport, Granbury, Texas about 0845.

The flight instructor stated that there were no airplane discrepancies after its preflight. The fuel level in the left and right fuel tanks was visually checked and was "slightly above the bottom tabs, which meant there was 30 gallons of fuel on board" (The aircraft type certificate data sheet stated that the useable fuel per fuel tank was 29.4 gallons). The student pilot stated that the airplane runup and takeoff were performed with the fuel selector positioned to the left fuel tank. The flight instructor stated that after about 30 minutes of airwork, the fuel boost pump was selected on, and the fuel tank selector was positioned to the right fuel tank. The flight instructor said that he visually checked the fuel selector was against the right detent. The student pilot "glanced" at the fuel gauges, which indicated that the left fuel tank gauge was "just above half" a tank, and the right fuel tank gauge indicated "slightly higher" than half a tank. The flight instructor stated that the boost pump remained on for the next maneuver, which was a simulated forced landing. He said that for the maneuver, the student pilot turned the carburetor heat on, reduced throttle to idle, and flew a best glide airspeed beginning from 3,000 feet mean sea level. At 2,000 feet mean sea level, the flight instructor told the student pilot to abort the maneuver because the airplane was not going to attain the intended landing field. When the student pilot advanced the throttle control forward and turned the carburetor heat off, there was no response from the engine, which remained at idle power. The flight instructor said he cycled the throttle control and turned the carburetor heat on. He told the student pilot to check the magnetos and turn the ignition to the start position. Engine power was not restored, and the flight instructor performed a forced landing during which the airplane struck trees at an airspeed near aerodynamic stall.

Post-accident examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector from the North Texas Flight Standards District Office revealed the fuel selector was positioned to the left fuel tank. There was no useable fuel in the left fuel tank, and the right fuel tank contained about 14 gallons of fuel.

Post-accident examination of the engine (Lycoming O-320-D3G, serial number L10175-39A) revealed that the throttle and mixture controls from the cockpit to the carburetor were attached and secure. There was no fuel in the fuel lines, which were attached, secure, and unbroken from the firewall to the carburetor. The engine exhibited compression in all cylinders and engine continuity of valve and drive trains was confirmed during hand rotation of the engine. Electrical continuity from the magnetos through the ignition system was confirmed. Engine timing was checked and confirmed to be within the engine manufacturer's specifications. The fuel quantity transmitters were not tested due to concern of fire if electrical power was placed on the airplane for the test.

A fuel receipt showed that the airplane was last fueled on May 6, 2017 with 15.15 gallons of fuel. According to the FAA inspector, the operator stated the airplane flew two flights with a total flight time of 2.7 hours after the last fuel purchase. There was no fuel purchase for the airplane on the day of the accident.

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 68, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/09/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/20/2016
Flight Time:  6575 hours (Total, all aircraft), 66 hours (Total, this make and model), 6480 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 105 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 44 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 34, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/21/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  6 hours (Total, all aircraft), 6 hours (Total, this make and model), 6 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BEECH
Registration: N18925
Model/Series: 19
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1977
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: MB-872
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection:
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines:
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer:
ELT:
Engine Model/Series:
Registered Owner:  Individual
Rated Power:
Operator: Hyde Flight School
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: GDJ, 778 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1015 CDT
Direction from Accident Site:  145°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 2200 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts:  12 knots / 15 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 140°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 16°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Granbury, TX (GDJ)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Weatherford, TX
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0845 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class E; Class G 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor

Latitude, Longitude:  32.634722, 97.913889 (est)

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA179
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 08, 2017 in Weatherford, TX
Aircraft: BEECH 19, registration: N18925
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 8, 2017 about 1000 central daylight time, a Beech B19, N18925, impacted terrain during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near Granbury, Texas. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The flight instructor and student pilot received minor injuries. The airplane was registered to an individual and operated by Hyde Flight School under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight originated from Granbury Regional Airport, Granbury, Texas at time unknown.



WEATHERFORD - A student pilot and flight instructor both walked away from a small plane crash in Parker County Monday morning, officials said.

Texas Department of Public Safety spokesman Lonny Haschel told WFAA the plane lost power in the middle of the training flight and crashed near FM 1189 and Old Dennis Road, less than 10 miles southwest of Weatherford.

No fire was reported.

Both the pilot -- a 34-year-old man -- and the 68-year-old passenger suffered minor injuries but did not need to be taken to a hospital for treatment.

The plane involved was identified as a Beech B19 Sport that took off from Granbury Regional Airport roughly 45 minutes before the crash.

The Federal Aviation Administration will lead an investigation into the incident.

Original article can be found here: http://www.wfaa.com

PARKER COUNTY (CBSDFW.COM) – A small plane has crashed in Parker County.

The private aircraft went down just after 10:00 a.m. in a wooded area in the 5000 block of Old Dennis Road.

A spokesperson with the Texas Department of Public Safety said there were two people, the pilot and a flight instructor, onboard.

The two reportedly had minor injuries and were treated at the scene.

No one went to the hospital as no one on the ground was injured.

The cause of the crash has not yet been determined.

The FAA is investigating.

Original article can be found here:   http://dfw.cbslocal.com

Grumman G-164B Super Ag Cat, N6944K, Wilson Flying Service Inc: Accident occurred May 08, 2017 in Walnut Ridge, Lawrence County, Arkansas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA267 
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Monday, May 08, 2017 in Walnut Ridge, AR
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/14/2017
Aircraft: GRUMMAN ACFT ENG COR-SCHWEIZER G 164, registration: N6944K
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of a tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, during a go-around, the airplane veered to the left off the runway. He added that the main landing gear went into the mud, and the airplane nosed over. 

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the empennage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observation system about 4 nautical miles from the accident site reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was from 200° at 6 knots. The Federal Aviation Administration inspector reported that the pilot landed to the north. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to maintain directional control during the go-around with a tailwind.

 Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Little Rock, Arkansas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Registered Owner: Wilson Flying Service Inc

Operator: Wilson Flying Service Inc


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA267
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Monday, May 08, 2017 in Walnut Ridge, AR
Aircraft: GRUMMAN ACFT ENG COR-SCHWEIZER G 164, registration: N6944K
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of a tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, during a go-around, the airplane veered to the left off the runway. He added that, the main landing gear went into the mud and the airplane nosed over.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the empennage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.


The automated weather observation system about 4 nautical miles from the accident site reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was from 200° at 6 knots. The Federal Aviation Administration Inspector reported that the pilot landed to the north.


WALNUT RIDGE, AR (KAIT) -  A man walked away without a scratch after his crop duster made a crash landing in Lawrence County Monday morning.

According to Chris Jones with the Lawrence Co. Office of Emergency Management, the crash happened around 9 a.m. at Wilson Flying Service, Highway 34 North.

The pilot was reportedly landing at the airstrip when his aircraft slid off the runway and turned over.

Jones said it is unknown what caused the crash. Though the plane was damaged, no injuries were reported.

The Lawrence Co. Sheriff’s Office, the Lawrence Co. Office of Emergency Management and the Walnut Ridge Fire Department all assisted in this accident.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.kait8.com

Cessna 190, N4498C: Accident occurred May 04, 2017 at Ernest A. Love Field (KPRC), Prescott, Yavapai County, Arizona

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 



Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N4498C

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA290
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, May 04, 2017 in Prescott, AZ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/20/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 190, registration: N4498C
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of a tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, during a right turn from the runway to the taxiway, he “exited too fast,” and the airplane ground looped to the right. He added that he taxied the airplane to the ramp without further incident.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

A review of recorded data from the automated weather observation station located on the airport reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was from 050° at 7 knots. The airplane landed on runway 21L.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s use of excessive speed during a right turn from the runway to the taxiway, which resulted in a loss of directional control.

Powerplant System / Component Malfunction / Failure: Robinson R44 Astro, N981RR; accident occurred May 05, 2017 in Santa Barbara, California

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Van Nuys, California
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania
Robinson Helicopter Company; Torrance, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N981RR


Location: Santa Barbara, CA
Accident Number: WPR17LA097
Date & Time: 05/05/2017, 1402 PDT
Registration: N981RR
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER R44
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Powerplant sys/comp malf/fail
Injuries: 3 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal - Sightseeing 

On May 5, 2017, at 1402 Pacific daylight time, a Robinson R44 helicopter, N981RR, lost engine power and landed hard following an autorotation near Santa Barbara, California. The flight instructor and two passengers sustained serious injuries, and the helicopter was destroyed by post impact fire. The helicopter was registered to Spitzer Helicopter LLC, and operated by Santa Barbara Helicopter Tours, as a revenue sightseeing flight under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. The local flight departed Santa Barbara Municipal Airport, Santa Barbara, California, about 1345.

The flight was planned to be a standard 20 minute, "City Tour" for the two passengers, which included a roundtrip flight from the airport to the Santa Barbara Zoo area, about 10 miles east.

The outbound flight was uneventful with the pilot requesting a special VFR (visual flight rules) clearance due to low cloud ceilings. On the return leg, the weather had not improved, and the pilot requested a special VFR clearance to land. The airport controllers directed the pilot to hold outside of the airport's airspace due to landing traffic, and the pilot circled the city for about 10 minutes until the landing request was granted. He then proceeded to follow the 101 Highway west towards the airport, and a brief time later he noticed that the engine began to lose partial power, coincident with the clutch actuator light illuminating. He pulled the clutch actuator circuit breaker while evaluating his landing options. He began to maneuver the helicopter for landing at a golf course, rather than the highway or congested areas below, and a few seconds later the engine lost all power.

He immediately initiated an autorotation, with the intention of landing on the golf course. During the final stage of the descent, he realized he would not be able to reach the grass due to a wall, so he landed just short in a parking lot. During the landing flare, the helicopter's main rotor blades struck the roof of a building, and the helicopter landed hard, spreading both skids (See Figure 1). All occupants egressed from the helicopter, while the golf course superintendent, who heard the impact, attempted to extinguish a fire which had developed at the rear of the helicopter's fuselage. Within a few minutes the fire had spread, ultimately engulfing the main cabin as the local fire department arrived about 5 minutes later.

Multiple witnesses reported seeing an object fall from the helicopter as it flew over the highway, and post-accident examination revealed that the engines number 3 cylinder head assembly and piston were missing (See Figure 2). A search was conducted by volunteer search and rescue personnel from the Santa Barbara County Sherriff's Department, and the assembly was located the following day, in a field about 1/4 mile north of the wreckage location (See Figure 3).


Figure 1 - Helicopter at the Accident Site

Figure 2 - Helicopter at the Accident Site with Cylinder #3 Missing

Figure 3 - Cylinder #3 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 40, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/22/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/22/2017
Flight Time:  1520 hours (Total, all aircraft), 944 hours (Total, this make and model), 1419 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 98 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 20 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: ROBINSON HELICOPTER
Registration: N981RR
Model/Series: R44
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 2001
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 0961
Landing Gear Type: Ski;
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/06/2017, Continuous Airworthiness
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2200 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 36.5 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3709 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: O-540
Registered Owner: SPITZER HELICOPTER LLC
Rated Power: 260 hp
Operator: Santa Barbara Helicopter Tours
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Commercial Air Tour (136); On-demand Air Taxi (135)
Operator Does Business As: Santa Barbara Helicopter Tours
Operator Designator Code: 9D3A 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSBA, 20 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 5 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1353 PDT
Direction from Accident Site: 265°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 800 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 240°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 29.9 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 14°C / 12°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: SANTA BARBARA, CA (SBA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: SANTA BARBARA, CA (SBA)
Type of Clearance: Special VFR
Departure Time: 1345 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class C

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 2 Serious
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 34.432778, -119.751111

Tests And Research

Engine Examination

The engine was disassembled following the accident by technical representatives from Lycoming Engines under the supervision of the NTSB investigator-in-charge, and inspectors from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Complete examination reports are contained in the public docket, the following is a summary of findings.

The engine remained attached to the aft frame support assembly and the forward engine mounts. It sustained extensive thermal damage, partially consuming most of its ancillary components.

The entire number 3 cylinder assembly had separated from the engine, and neither its pushrods were recovered. The lower section of the crankcase deck adjacent to the underside of cylinder 3, along with the entire oil sump was consumed by fire.

The crankshaft could be viewed through the opening, and was intact. The number 3 connecting rod remained attached to the crankshaft, and protruded from the opening. The outboard (piston) end of the rod was not present.

The engine was examined for evidence of signatures typically associated with overspeed, as defined in Lycoming Service Bulletin SB369N. The valves, springs, and rocker arm assemblies for each cylinder were intact and undamaged. The valves slid easily out of their valve guides, and did not exhibit any indications of valve head "mushrooming" or burs to the areas in contact with the valve keys. The valve keys and exhaust valve caps were all undamaged, and the remaining pushrods were straight. The camshaft was intact, and all lobes and bearing surfaces were shiny in appearance and free of score marks.

The oil filter had sustained thermal damage and was removed from the housing and disassembled. The filter element was black and charred, and contained bronze-colored non-ferrous metallic debris similar in appearance to connecting rod (piston-end) bushing material.

Materials Laboratory Examination

The engine crankcase, 6 connecting rod wrist pins, 12 wrist pin plugs, the through bolts, main crankshaft bearings, and the number 3 and 4 cylinder and piston assemblies were sent to the NTSB Materials Laboratory for examination.

Examination revealed that the number 3 cylinder attachment studs and throughbolts all exhibited varying combinations and degrees of necking damage, smearing deformation, and rough and matte gray fracture features, all of which were consistent with ductile overstress.

The damaged number 3 connecting rod had fractured just short of the bushing, which was missing. The corresponding piston was mostly intact, and the wrist pin was in place. The piston had multiple impact marks on the underside surfaces and piston skirt. The skirt was deformed inward at the forward and aft sides, trapping the piston within the cylinder barrel.

A segment of the upper side of the piston skirt was fractured and missing, and a similar shaped segment of the skirt at the lower side of the barrel was fractured and flattened against the cylinder attachment flange. The damage to both segments was consistent with contact with the number 3 connecting rod.

At the upper side of the cylinder flange, the attachment holes were elongated. The location of the hole elongation was consistent with the direction of shear deformation observed in the corresponding studs. At the lower side of the cylinder, the flange was bent, and cracked though the middle two attachment holes. The cracks were associated with deformation consistent with ductile overstress fracture.

Most of the number 3 cylinder attachment flange around the attachment holes appeared dark gray, but portions of the flange were either coated in an orange oxidized layer, or appeared light gray and smeared. Machining marks were visible around most of the surfaces, including many of the oxidized areas.

The crankcase was separated to reveal the mating sides of the crankcase halves. The mating surfaces had a smooth, polished appearance with scattered pits. Similar pit features were also observed on other machined surfaces including the saddle surfaces supporting the main journal bearings and the camshaft journal bore surfaces.

The connecting rod for cylinder 3 was fractured where the wrist pin bore intersected the beam section of the rod. A curved impact mark was observed on the outboard end of the connecting rod. The shape of the impact mark was consistent with the inboard end of the cylinder barrel skirt at the "6 o'clock" position. The rod end surfaces were obliterated by post-fracture contact damage, and fine features of the fractures were mostly obliterated by oxidation. Remaining fracture surfaces were visually smooth with sliding contact marks, consistent with ductile overstress fracture in compressive shear loading. Elongated dimple features were observed on remaining fracture surfaces, also consistent with ductile overstress fracture.

The outboard ends of the number 2, 4, and 6 connecting rods had a bright blue color, and a slight blue tint was also noted at the outboard ends of connecting rods 1 and 5.

The wrist pins from cylinders 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6 were mostly free of mechanical damage, but were tinted brown, bluish gray, and black consistent with heat exposure. By comparison, the number 3 wrist pin had mechanical damage in the area corresponding to the connecting rod attachment and was light gray in color across most of the surface. Bushings in three of the connecting rods had shifted out of position laterally, and in two cases, the bushing split line had rotated from its installed position by about 45o.

Examination of the inboard and outboard surfaces of the number 3 wrist pin revealed a bluish gray circumferential tint band on one side where it intersected the boss on the piston, and a brown circumferential tint band adjacent to the other boss. Circumferential gouges and galling were present on the surface between the two tint bands. A longitudinal mark with galled material was present on the outboard side of the wrist pin.

Maintenance History

According to the last entry in the maintenance records on April 6, 2017, the engine had accumulated 1,473 hours of flight time since a Lycoming factory rebuild in 2011. The engine tachometer was destroyed in the fire, but according to the operator, the helicopter had accumulated an additional 36.5 hours during that time.

The records indicated that the oil system was serviced in accordance with Lycoming Engines Mandatory Service Bulletin SB-480E, which required oil changes at 50-hour intervals
along with a check for premature or excessive engine component wear, indicated by the presence of metal particles, shavings, or flakes in the oil filter element or screens. The last oil change took place on April 1, 2017, 39.8 hours before the accident, and the logbook entry specifically noted that the oil filter and screens were examined at that time.

SB-480E stated that Lycoming encourages the use of spectrograph oil analysis to monitor engine component wear rates.

No oil from the engine was ever sent for spectrographic analysis, and there was no evidence to indicate the connecting rods or connecting rod bushings were changed since the engine was rebuilt.

Maintenance Bulletins and Directives

Lycoming Engines Mandatory Service Bulletin SB-630, subject, "Connecting Rod Bushing Inspection After Cylinder Removal" was issued about one month before the accident on April 10, 2017. It applied to all Lycoming engines, and required the inspection of the connecting rod bushing for indications that it had shifted out of position. Compliance was mandated at the next maintenance event that required cylinder removal.

Mandatory Service Bulletin SB-632, subject, "Identification of Connecting Rods with Non-Conforming Small End Bushings" was issued July 17, 2017 and subsequently updated to SB-632B on August 4, 2017. The bulletin called for identification and replacement of connecting rod bushings. Compliance was required within 10 hours of engine operation; however, the accident engine was not one of the models affected by the bulletin. The FAA mandated compliance with SB-632B by issuing Airworthiness Directive AD 2017-16-11, on August 15, 2017.

According to Airworthiness Bulletin AWB 85-020 Issue 3, issued by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority of Australia (CASA), all Lycoming reciprocating aircraft engines which were new, factory rebuilt, or factory overhauled during the 2011 calendar year were susceptible to premature wear of the connecting rod bushings. The bulletin noted that in both those engines, and all engines referenced in SB-632B, one or more bushings may shift axially during operation, leading to wear of the protruding edge of the bushing against the piston. The bulletin further stated that the development of this premature wear condition is relatively slow and predictable, and that regular oil and oil filter inspections have shown to be effective in detecting this condition.

Representatives from Lycoming Engines stated that they had no evidence to corroborate the findings of AWB 85-020 regarding 2011 calendar year engines. Specifically, that there were no changes to systems, process, or materials that would explain the failures related to 2011-year engines operating in Australia. Furthermore, the FAA did not find evidence that would have necessitated the release of a similar directive in the United States.


The helicopter was fitted with the fuel tank bladders required in Robinson Helicopters Service Bulletin SB-78B



NTSB Identification: WPR17LA097
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 05, 2017 in Santa Barbara, CA
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER R44, registration: N981RR
Injuries: 3 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 5, 2017, at 1402 Pacific daylight time, a Robinson R44, N981RR, lost engine power and landed hard following an autorotation near Santa Barbara, California. The helicopter was registered to Spitzer Helicopter LLC, and operated by Santa Barbara Helicopter Tours, as a revenue sightseeing flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight instructor and two passengers sustained serious injuries, and the helicopter was destroyed by post impact fire. The local flight departed Santa Barbara Municipal Airport, Santa Barbara, California, about 1345. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed.

The flight was planned to be a standard 20 minute "City Tour" for the two passengers, which included a roundtrip flight from the airport to the Santa Barbara Zoo area, about 10 miles east.

The outbound flight was uneventful with the pilot requesting a special VFR (visual flight rules) clearance due to low cloud ceilings. On the return leg, the weather had not improved, and the pilot requested a special VFR clearance to land. The airport controllers directed the pilot to hold outside of the airport's airspace due to landing traffic, and the pilot circled the city for about 10 minutes until the landing request was granted. He then proceeded to follow the 101 Highway west towards the airport, and a brief time later he noticed that the engine began to lose partial power, coincident with the clutch actuator light illuminating. He reset the clutch actuator circuit breaker while evaluating his landing options. He began to maneuver the helicopter for landing at a golf course, rather than the highway or congested areas below, and a few seconds later the helicopter lost all power.

He immediately initiated an autorotation, with the intention of landing on the golf course. During the final stage of the descent, he realized he would not be able to reach the grass area due to a wall, so he landed just short in a parking lot. During the landing flare, the helicopter's main rotor blades struck the roof of a building, and the helicopter landed hard, spreading both skids. All occupants egressed from the helicopter, while the golf course superintendent, who heard the impact, attempted to extinguish a fire which had developed at the rear of the helicopters fuselage. Within a few minutes the fire had spread, ultimately engulfing the main cabin as the local fire department arrived about 5 minutes later.

Multiple witnesses reported seeing an object fall from the helicopter as it flew over the highway, and post-accident examination revealed that the engines number 3 cylinder head assembly and piston were missing. A search was conducted by volunteer search and rescue personnel from the Santa Barbara County Sherriff's Department, and the assembly was located the following day, in a field about 1/4 north of the wreckage location.



At about 2 p.m. on Friday, a single-engine helicopter with Santa Barbara Helicopter Tours crash landed in La Cumbre Country Club’s parking lot after experiencing mechanical problems while completing a ride along the coast. The three passengers managed to get out of the copter just before it was consumed in flames. They were transported to Cottage Hospital with moderate injuries.

According to County Fire Department spokesperson Capt. Dave Zaniboni, the male pilot notified the Santa Barbara Municipal Airport tower, where the chopper is based, that he needed to make an emergency landing. The copter crashed into two vehicles in a maintenance area near a diesel and gasoline fueling station in the parking lot. Firefighters arrived on the scene and put out the fire quickly before it spread.

The helicopter was a 2001 Robinson R44 registered out of Riverside. The 260-horsepower machine seats four. The company has been offering various aerial views of Santa Barbara County seven days a week for about six years. Before that, the company operated a helicopter touring company in Oxnard.

A woman who answered the phone at Santa Barbara Helicopter Tours identified herself as the mother of the pilot. She said before hanging up, “I am already upset and worried about it so don’t ask me any questions about it.”


http://www.independent.com

Westmont alumni Courtney Crosby and Turner Conrad were listed in fair condition at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital on Monday, recuperating from injuries suffered when the helicopter they were flying in crashed at La Cumbre Country Club. Pilot Michael Ower was released from the hospital.

The pilot and two passengers of a tour helicopter that crashed in Hope Ranch on Friday are recovering from the ordeal after being taken to Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital.

Michael Ower, the owner of Santa Barbara Helicopter Tours, was released from the hospital by Monday, said Cottage spokeswoman Maria Zate.

The two Westmont alumni traveling with him, Courtney Crosby and Turner Conrad, were listed in fair condition.

The trio were hospitalized with moderate injuries after the helicopter, which had toured Santa Barbara’s harbor and downtown area, went down near the La Cumbre Country Club at 4015 Via Laguna Drive near Santa Barbara.

The three were able to extricate themselves from the wrecked aircraft, which caught on fire after a fuel spill caused by the crash.

Westmont College President Gayle Beebe told attendees of Saturday’s graduation that Crosby, a graduating senior and volleyball player, missed the day’s commencement ceremony due to a surgery to repair several injured vertebrae, but that she was expected to fully recover.

Westmont spokesman Scott Craig told Noozhawk that a family member of Conrad, Crosby’s boyfriend who graduated in 2016, had told him both “are doing OK,” but need rest and rehabilitation.

The R44 Robinson helicopter was owned by Spitzer Helicopter, a Riverside County company, and leased to Santa Barbara Helicopter Tours, which is based at the Santa Barbara Airport.

Capt. Dave Zaniboni of the Santa Barbara County Fire Department told Noozhawk that the chopper had finished its tour and was headed back to the airport when it encountered mechanical problems.

Ower told the airport tower it was going down, Zaniboni said.

It then crash-landed in a maintenance area of La Cumbre Country Club, skidding into several vehicles in a parking lot.

A preliminary report from the National Transportation Safety Board, which is investigating the incident, was still pending on Monday afternoon.

Original article can be found here:   https://www.noozhawk.com


SANTA BARBARA, CALIF. -- A helicopter returning from a tourist flight crashed and burned at a golf club Friday, injuring three people on board, authorities said.

The Robinson R44 Astro went down around 2 p.m., said Ian Gregor of the Federal Aviation Administration.

The helicopter, based at Santa Barbara Municipal Airport, had just finished a tour of the harbor area and was returning to the airport when it developed a mechanical problem and crash-landed in the parking lot of the club maintenance area, Santa Barbara County fire Capt. Dave Zaniboni said.

The rotorcraft hit two vans, but nobody on the ground was hurt.

The male pilot and the passengers, a man and a woman, were able to get out of the helicopter before it caught fire, Zaniboni said. They were taken to a hospital with moderate injuries, he said.

The fire gutted the vans and incinerated the chopper except for its tail.

FAA records show the aircraft is registered to Spitzer Helicopter LLC, a Riverside-based helicopter leasing company.

The company's president, Eric Spitzer, said the helicopter has been leased by a tour company in Santa Barbara for the last three years and he hadn't spoken to the pilot after the crash Friday.

The helicopter, a 2001 Robinson R-44, was inspected by the FAA last week and is checked before every flight, Spitzer said. An FAA spokeswoman did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the helicopter's most recent inspection.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.sanluisobispo.com

Schempp-Hirth Ventus B, N804T: Incident occurred May 07, 2017 in King City, Monterey County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Jose, California  

http://registry.faa.gov/N804T

Glider found abandoned near a road on private property.  

Date: 07-MAY-17
Time: 00:00:00Z
Regis#: N804T
Aircraft Make: SCHEMP-HIRTH GLIDER
Aircraft Model: VENTUS B
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: KING CITY
State: CALIFORNIA

Piper PA-28-180, N888AW: Incident occurred May 06, 2017 at Vance Brand Airport (KLMO), Longmont, Colorado

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver 

CAG International Inc dba: http://registry.faa.gov/N888AW

Aircraft while taxiing, struck two (2) parked aircraft.

Date: 06-MAY-17
Time: 14:20:00Z
Regis#: N888AW
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: LONGMONT
State: COLORADO

Cessna 172P Skyhawk, N173LL, Lani Lea Sky Tours LLC: Accident occurred May 03, 2017 at Molokai Airport, Kaunakakai, Hawaii

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA268 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, May 03, 2017 in Kaunakakai, HI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/31/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N173LL
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot reported that she was practicing touch-and-go landings on an asphalt runway. She initiated an approach and bounced the landing and then she initiated a go-around. She was airborne when she pushed the carb heat in and applied full throttle “but mistakenly put flaps up, all at once.” The airplane descended to the runway and landed hard. During the landing roll, she pulled the throttle back to idle, gained her bearings, and then initiated a takeoff. She noticed a binding and restriction in the elevator and yoke control movements while remaining in the airport’s pattern. She declared an emergency and landed the airplane on the runway. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the elevator control column.

The manufacturer’s Pilot’s Operating Handbook identified the Balked Landing procedure as:
Throttle – Full Open
Carburetor Heat – Cold
Wing Flaps –20° (Immediately)
Climb Speed – 55 KIAS
Wing Flaps – 10° (Until obstacles are cleared) Retract (After reaching a safe altitude and 60 KIAS)

The student reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilot’s incorrect flap configuration during the go-around, which resulted in a hard, forced landing.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu, Hawaii

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Lani Lea Sky Tours LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N173LL

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA268
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, May 03, 2017 in Kaunakakai, HI
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N173LL
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot reported that she was practicing touch and go landings to an asphalt runway. She initiated an approach and bounced the landing, then she accomplished a go-around. However, she was airborne when she pushed the carb heat in and applied full throttle, "but mistakenly put flaps up, all at once." The airplane descended to the runway and landed hard. During the landing roll, she pulled the throttle back to idle and gained her bearings, then she initiated a takeoff. She noticed a binding and restriction in the elevator and yoke control movements while remaining in the airport's pattern. She declared an emergency and landed the airplane on the runway. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the elevator control column.

The manufacturer's pilot operating handbook identifies the Balked Landing procedure as:

1. Throttle – Full Open

2. Carburetor Heat – Cold

3. Wing Flaps –20° (Immediately)

4. Climb Speed – 55 KIAS

5. Wing Flaps – 10° (Until obstacles are cleared) Retract (After reaching a safe altitude and 60 KIAS)

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.