Sunday, May 17, 2020

Fire (Non-Impact): Cessna 172S Skyhawk, N785SP; accident occurred July 28, 2018 at Knox County Airport (4I3), Mount Vernon, Ohio


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbus, Ohio

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms
 
http://registry.faa.gov/N785SP


Location: Mount Vernon, OH
Accident Number: WPR18LA207
Date & Time: 07/28/2018, 1045 EDT
Registration: N785SP
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Fire/smoke (non-impact)
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 28, 2018, about 1045 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172S airplane, N785SP, was destroyed following an inflight fire in the traffic pattern at Knox County Airport (4I3), Mount Vernon, Ohio. The student pilot sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to a private individual and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the cross-country flight that departed Newark-Heath Airport (VTA), Newark, Ohio, about 1025. The flight was destined for Zanesville Municipal Airport (ZZV), Zanesville, Ohio.

According to the student, several minutes after takeoff, he maneuvered the airplane to enter the traffic pattern at 4I3, to accomplish touch-and-go landings. Initially, the student noticed his left foot was getting hot. Shortly thereafter, he noticed a fire near the rudder pedals. He pulled back the throttle and expedited his approach for landing. Subsequently, the fire continued to enlarge while he landed the airplane. After landing, he discharged the fire extinguisher and safely egressed from the airplane; a few seconds later the cockpit area was engulfed in flames.

Postaccident examination of the airplane by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airworthiness inspectors revealed that there was evidence of a fuel-fed fire, which emanated from the rear, lower center portion of the engine. Substantial thermal damage was observed in the area where the mechanical fuel pump is mounted to the oil cooler. The bottom hose connection was observed to be separated from the oil cooler. Furthermore, the bottom portion of the fuel pump was observed missing.

The fire started and eventually enlarged from an unknown source that could not be determined from the available evidence.

According to the FAA inspector, the airplane had complied with all appropriate Airworthiness Directives (ADs). Furthermore, the airplane had no maintenance write ups for fuel leaks or odors in the previous 20 flight hours. 

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 53, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/03/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 4000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 100 hours (Total, this make and model), 12 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 6 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N785SP
Model/Series: 172 S
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2001
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 172S8712
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2299 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO360 SER
Registered Owner: Toshiyuki Hara
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator:On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: 4I3, 1191 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1056 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.16 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / 15°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Newark, OH (VTA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Zanesville, OH (ZZV)
Type of Clearance: Unknown
Departure Time: 1025 EDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Knox County (4I3)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1191 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 28
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5498 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing; Touch and Go; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: In-Flight
Ground Injuries:N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 40.328889, -82.526111 (est)

Fuel Related: Cessna 210C, N3611Y; accident occurred July 21, 2018 in Blum, Hill County, Texas


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Irving, Texas
Continental; Mobile, Alabama
Textron Aviation Inc; Wichita, Kansas 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf
 


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

http://registry.faa.gov/N3611Y

Location: Blum, TX
Accident Number: CEN18LA287
Date & Time: 07/21/2018, 1155 CDT
Registration: N3611Y
Aircraft: Cessna 210C
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel related
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 21, 2018, at 1155 central daylight time, a Cessna 210C, N3611Y, was substantially damaged during a forced landing to a field near Blum, Texas. The airline transport pilot was uninjured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight departed from Granbury Regional Airport (GDJ), Granbury, Texas, and was destined to Hilltop Lakes Airport (0TE4), Hilltop Lakes, Texas.

The pilot stated that she completed a preflight inspection during which she sumped the fuel system. The fuel sump samples did not contain water or contaminant. She said that her first attempt to start the engine was unsuccessful, so she waited about 30 minutes for the starter to cool before attempting another start. Upon the second start attempt, the engine started and "ran normally," and the subsequent engine run-up was "normal".

After takeoff, the airplane departed GDJ traffic pattern and proceeded on course at a cruise-climb airspeed; all "engine indications were "normal". Upon reaching a cruise altitude of 3,500 ft mean sea level, engine power and speed were set to 22 inches of manifold pressure and 2,200 rpm, and the mixture was set to 13 gallons per hour. About 20 minutes after departure, the engine began to run "rough" and because of the hot weather conditions the pilot suspected vapor lock. She switched the fuel selector position from the right to the left fuel tank, but the engine roughness worsened so she switched the selector back to the right fuel tank. She then selected the boost pump to LOW and then HIGH, but those selections had no effect on the engine roughness. The engine began to lose power rapidly. The pilot retarded the throttle control but that did not affect the engine.

About 1,000 ft above ground level, the pilot selected a field for a forced landing. She said that she complied with the aircraft manufacturer's procedure and landed on the field with landing gear retracted because the engine driven hydraulic pump was being powered by a windmilling engine. She selected flaps to 30 degrees and advanced the throttle control to silence the gear warning horn. On short final to the field, she turned the ignition switch OFF. She said that the landing touchdown was "firm," and the airplane slid to a stop very quickly. She estimated that 2 minutes elapsed from the onset of engine roughness to landing.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Investigator-in-Charge (IIC) asked the pilot why she did not lower the landing gear for the forced landing; she said the airplane checklist stated that the landing gear was not to be lowered, and that it would take her about 3 minutes to manually pump the landing gear down. She said it would take her about 3 minutes to manually pump the landing gear down during landing gear swing tests that she did during the airplane's maintenance. She said the 3 minutes was without air loads on the airplane because it was a gear swing test with the airplane on jacks. She said that she would rather focus on flying the airplane rather than pumping the landing gear during the approach for the forced landing. She said that the outcome landing with the landing gear partially extended would have been worse than landing with the gear retracted. She said the she did not have enough time to lower the landing gear due to the altitude the airplane was at during the approach to a field. She said there is no way to tell if a field is rough while the airplane is 2 miles away from the field.

When the pilot was asked on separate occasions by the NTSB IIC and the FAA inspector whether she advanced the mixture control to the full rich position when the engine roughness occurred; she said that she did not remember. She said that she did not change the mixture control position after the forced landing. The pilot later stated that the mixture was only slightly leaned because of the low cruise altitude. She said its normal while flying the accident airplane to start leaning as climb power is set, or even during takeoff from high elevation airports. She said that at some point in trying to restart the engine, she thought that she moved the mixture to full rich, but it wasn't much of a move. She said the time available to attempt a restart was very short. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Flight Engineer
Age: 76, Female
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used: 
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Glider; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/09/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/20/2017
Flight Time:   2598.3 hours (Total, all aircraft), 605.2 hours (Total, this make and model), 2206.6 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 1.1 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 1.1 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0.5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N3611Y
Model/Series: 210C
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1962
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 21058111
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/01/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2998 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1547.3 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-470-S2
Registered Owner: Pilot
Rated Power: 260 hp
Operator: Pilot
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

The airplane was equipped with a Continental IO-470-S2, serial number CS-102886-3-A-I, engine that was last overhauled at the time of installation onto the airframe, dated January 15, 1976. At the time of the accident, the time since overhaul of the engine was 474.45 hours.

The pilot held an airframe and powerplant mechanic certificate and performed maintenance on the airplane. The pilot stated she owned the airplane since its new purchase in 1962 and was last flown in 2003. In 2004 she decided to begin flying the airplane. The airplane received its last annual inspection in September 2018. She suspected that the loss of engine power occurred at the time of the accident was due to vapor lock because of two prior occurrences of power losses that occurred on hot days, as follows:

On May 29, 2003 from a flight from Mineral Wells Airport (MLW), Mineral Wells, Texas to Horseshoe Bend Airport (F78), Weatherford, Texas the airplane experienced an engine power loss occurred during landing rollout when the engine was at idle and would not restart. She said the idle speed was adjusted "slightly" and subsequent engine starts and ground runs were normal "once the engine had cooled."

On July 19, 2003, while en route from F78 to Easterwood Field Airport (CLL), College Station, Texas, the engine ran rough and subsequently quit. The engine was restarted after the throttle was retarded rapidly to idle from where it had been set for cruise. The engine ran from there until landing at Marlin Airport (T15), Marlin, Texas and died again on landing rollout. The following day the engine started and ran normally through a full-power ground run. An airframe and power plant mechanic with inspection authorization helped her in draining every sump, checking every vent, and checking every fuel filter that we could access. Nothing out of the ordinary was found.

The pilot stated that following the engine power loss on July 19, 2003, all the fuel lines in the engine compartment were replaced. She said that the airplane electric boost pump was modified after both losses of engine power due to a sticking solenoid valve in the fuel/vapor return line between the engine driven fuel pump and fuel selector. The removal of the solenoid valve and replacement of two electrically-driven fuel boost pumps with one fuel boost pump was completed through a major repair and alteration dated September 2, 2004, to modify the fuel boost pump system to the configuration installed in Cessna 210D airplanes.

The 1963 Cessna 210C Owner's Manual stated that flaps are operated hydraulically by the same system that operated the landing gear. The airplane retractable tricycle landing gear is extended and retracted by hydraulic actuators, powered by an engine-driven hydraulic pump.

The Owner's Manual Forced Landing (Complete Engine Failure) procedure stated, in part, "(5) If field is smooth and hard, extend the landing gear within gliding distance of field. (6) If engine is windmilling, extend flaps as necessary within gliding distance of field." The Owner's Manual does not require manual extension of the landing gear following engine power loss.

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: CPT, 854 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1130 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 360°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 240°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.99 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 36°C / 17°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Granbury, TX (GDJ)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Hilltop Lakes, TX (0TE4)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:1100 CDT 
Type of Airspace: Class E Wreckage and Impact Information
Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 32.054444, -97.308611 (est) 

A post-accident examination of the accident site by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the airplane was resting on a flat and dry dirt field with the landing gear retracted and the flaps extended to the full flap, 30-degree position. The FAA inspector stated that it had not rained for about six weeks and the surface was hard and its surface was in a condition as some turf airstrips. The master switch, ignition key switch, boost pump switch, and the fuel selector were in the OFF positions. The throttle and propeller controls were in the full forward positions. The mixture control was near the idle cutoff position. The left and right fuel tanks were each about ½ full of liquid consistent with 100 low lead aviation fuel. The fuselage was wrinkled.

Following the recovery of the airplane to a salvage facility, the engine with the airframe were secured to a trailer and the propeller replaced in preparation for and engine test run under the supervision of a NTSB Air Safety Investigator. The fuel supply to the engine was plumbed into the left wing tank fuel lines. The top spark plugs were removed and exhibited features consistent with normal operation. The plugs were then reinstalled. The engine was primed using the electric boost pump and started immediately and allowed to warm up. The propeller was cycled at an engine speed of 1,000 rpm. A magneto check was performed at an engine speed of 1,800 rpm and the corresponding reduction in speed was approximately 125 rpm. There were no anomalies when engine power was increased to full power. The external fuel supply was then plumbed into the right wing fuel tank lines and a second test run was performed with similar results. Both test runs were about 5-6 minutes in duration. There were no fuel system leaks noted during the test runs.

The fuel selector was removed, and its examination revealed no blockage and no mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

The fuel pump, fuel servo, and manifold valve were removed for subsequent flow testing at Continental Motors under the supervision of an NTSB Air Safety Investigator. Testing of the fuel pump revealed that the pump produced adequate fuel flow and pressure for an IO-470 engine. Bench testing of the fuel servo and the manifold valve yielded results that did not meet factory specifications for a new part; fuel injection systems must be set up and adjusted to each individual engine and airframe combination. The throttle body/metering unit had a leak during benched testing. The leak during bench testing emanated from an internal O-ring. There were no leaks from the throttle body/metering unit during the engine test run.

Landing Gear Not Configured: Aviat A-1B Husky, N990HP; accident occurred May 15, 2020 in Lake Guntersville, Marshall County, Alabama

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Birmingham, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N990HP

Location: Guntersville, AL
Accident Number: ERA20CA187
Date & Time: 05/15/2020, 1845 CDT
Registration: N990HP
Aircraft: Aviat A1B
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing gear not configured
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot of the amphibious float equipped airplane reported that while landing on the water, he experienced a very hard, violent landing with a nose down pitch attitude and the airplane nosed over. He further reported that, prior to the landing on the water he had previously departed a land based airport and while on final approach to the lake for landing, he was distracted by a boat in the area and did not verify that the landing gear was retracted for a water landing. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings and right-wing lift struts. The pilot also reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.  

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 31, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Multi-engine Sea; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider; Helicopter
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane; Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:No 
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/10/2019
Occupational Pilot:Yes 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/21/2020
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 1749 hours (Total, all aircraft), 149 hours (Total, this make and model), 1209 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 65 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 24 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Aviat
Registration: N990HP
Model/Series: A1B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2000
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 2109
Landing Gear Type: Amphibian;
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/26/2019, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2200 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 99 Hours
Engines:1 Reciprocating 
Airframe Total Time: 1854.8 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C126 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-360-A1P
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: 4A6, 650 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1855 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 36°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 6000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 180°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 16°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Guntersville, AL (8A1)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Huntsville, AL (HSV)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1800 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 34.554722, -86.123056 (est)





GUNTERSVILLE, Alabama (WAFF) - A float equipped Aviat A-1B Husky crashed in Lake Guntersville around 6 p.m. Friday, May 15th according to the Guntersville Police Department.

According to  Guntersville Police Department, two people were able to get out of the plane safely.

The Guntersville Fire Department responded to the scene and helped to rescue the people. The police department and Alabama Law Enforcement Agency Marine Patrol were also there.

The Aviat A-1B Husky was pulled out of the water around 10 p.m. Friday, May 15th. A portion of Highway 69 was closed while crews got the plane out.

Alabama Law Enforcement Agency and the Federal Aviation Administration will handle the investigation.

https://www.waff.com

System/Component Malfunction/Failure (Non-Power): Cessna 180, N3125D; accident occurred June 22, 2018 in Fairbanks, Alaska











The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fairbanks, Alaska

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N3125D

Location: Fairbanks, AK
Accident Number: ANC18LA048
Date & Time: 06/22/2018, 1730 AKD
Registration: N3125D
Aircraft: CESSNA 180
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Sys/Comp malf/fail (non-power)
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 22, 2018, about 1730 Alaska daylight time, a tailwheel equipped Cessna 180 airplane, N3125D, sustained substantial damage during an off-airport landing at Upper St George Creek, about 50 miles south of Fairbanks, Alaska. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 visual flight rules personal flight when the accident occurred. The private pilot and passenger were uninjured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. The flight departed Fairbanks International Airport (PAFA), Fairbanks, Alaska about 1700.

According to the pilot, he was landing with a right crosswind and after touchdown, as the airplane began to decelerate, he applied left brake in an effort to maintain directional control. He stated that the left rudder/brake pedal was "soft" and traveled to its full forward limit and directional control was lost. The airplane weathervaned into the wind and skidded sideways before the left main wheel went off the cleared landing area and into brush. The left wing and left horizontal stabilizer subsequently impacted terrain, which resulted in substantial damage.

Upon exiting the airplane, the pilot found the brake line had separated at the compression fitting near the brake caliper where the brake line transitioned from a rigid line to a flexible line.

The brake line tube and fitting hardware was removed from the airplane and sent to the NTSB Materials Laboratory in Washington DC for further evaluation. The interior surface of the failed end had circumferential marks up to 0.136 inch from the end consistent with the formation of a flared end with a flaring tool. The sleeve was trapped within the nut from the failed end, and deposits of gray metal appearing consistent with deformed brake tube material was observed deposited on internal threads of the nut up to 3 threads from the end of the sleeve.

According to Federal Aviation Administration Advisory Circular AC 43-13-1B, Acceptable Methods, Techniques, and Practices – Aircraft Inspection and Repair, a double flare is used on soft aluminum tubing having a 3/8-inch outside diameter or less. No evidence of folded walls consistent with a double flare was noted at either end of the submitted brake line tube.

No records could be located that showed the manufacture or assembly date of the fractured brake line components.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age:45, Male 
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present:No 
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/30/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/30/2017
Flight Time:  181 hours (Total, all aircraft), 132 hours (Total, this make and model), 145 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 12 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N3125D
Model/Series: 180
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1955
Amateur Built:No 
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 31923
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/07/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2550 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 11 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3192.8 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-470 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 225 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PAFA, 432 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 37 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0053 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 3°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 4500 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 6000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 14 knots / 18 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / Unknown
Wind Direction: 280°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / Unknown
Altimeter Setting: 29.91 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 20°C / 11°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: FAIRBANKS, AK (FAI)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Fairbanks, AK (AK7)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1700 AKD
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: GOLD KING CREEK (AK7)
Runway Surface Type: Dirt
Airport Elevation: 1720 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry; Vegetation
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion:None 
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 64.192778, -147.946111 (est)

Accident occurred May 17, 2020 near Cascade Locks State Airport (KCZK), Hood River County, Oregon






CASCADE LOCKS, Oregon – A small plane crashed into the Columbia River on Sunday, May 17th and the two people who were onboard survived the crash, the Hood River County Sheriff's Office said.

Deputies were called out at about 11:45 a.m. on reports of a single-engine plane crash in Cascade Locks near the marina.

The only two people who were in the plane - a man and woman from Bellevue, Washington - managed to swim to shore, the Hood River County Sheriff’s Office said. They were both taken to Portland-area hospitals with minor injuries.

Witnesses said they saw the plane trying to land a the Cascade Locks State Airport, but it appeared that the aircraft landing gear wasn't down. The plane then "nosed over toward the river and skipped along the water," sinking near the middle of the Columbia River.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating what led up to the crash.

No word on when crews will work to remove the plane from the river.

https://katu.com

Cessna P210N Pressurized Centurion II, N1JA: Fatal accident occurred May 15, 2020 near Burlington Municipal Airport (KBUU), Racine County, Wisconsin

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N1JA


Location: Burlington, WI
Accident Number: CEN20LA179
Date & Time: 05/15/2020, 1815 CDT
Registration: N1JA
Aircraft: Cessna P210
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 15, 2020, about 1815 central daylight time, a Cessna P210N airplane, N1JA, was substantially damage when it was involved in an accident near Burlington, Wisconsin. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

According to witness information, the pilot departed West Bend Municipal Airport (EBT), West Bend, Wisconsin, earlier that day to fly to Burlington Municipal Airport (BUU), Burlington, Wisconsin, in order to troubleshoot with maintenance personnel an avionics connection with his electronic flight device. Shortly after departure from BUU to EBT, the pilot returned to BUU due to a malfunction with the horizontal situation indicator. Inspection of the airplane with a mechanic revealed that the airplane's alternator belt had failed. The alternator belt was replaced with a new belt, and the pilot again departed BUU. Shortly after departure from BUU, the pilot communicated over the radio that he was again returning to BUU. A witness, located at BUU, observed the airplane on final approach at a low altitude and low airspeed. He stated that the airplane "clearly stalled", contacted trees, and disappeared from his view.

The airplane came to rest upright in wooded terrain about 1/2 mile short of runway 29. Examination of the airplane revealed several tree impacts with both wings and forward fuselage.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N1JA
Model/Series: P210 N
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Jadair International Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: BUU, 780 ft msl
Observation Time: 1815 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 8°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm / ,
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.94 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Burlington, WI (BUU)
Destination: Burlington, WI (BUU)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  42.688333, -88.291111 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.



BURLINGTON — The pilot who crashed a plane just east of the Burlington Municipal Airport Friday night has died, Racine County Medical Examiner Michael Payne confirmed Tuesday.

The pilot — 80-year-old David Lee Schmutzler of Port Washington — succumbed Saturday to the injuries he sustained in the crash, Payne said.

Schmutzler was the president and owner of Jadair International in Port Washington, which specializes in water recycling and solids reclamation for the industrial and agricultural industry.

According to Federal Aviation Administration database records, Schmutzler was a single-engine flight instructor.

According to his obituary from Eernisse Funeral Homes and Cremation Service in Port Washington, Schmutzler is survived by his wife of 20 years, Barbara Bode, six children and eight grandchildren. A funeral date had not been set as of Tuesday.

The cause of the crash had not yet been determined as of Tuesday. The FAA has handed over the investigation into the crash to the National Transportation Safety Board. The Journal Times has reached out several times to the NTSB for an update on the crash, but the agency had not responded by Tuesday.

Crash details

City of Burlington police and fire crews were dispatched at about 6:15 p.m. Friday after a report that an aircraft had crashed near the Burlington Municipal Airport, according to a news release from the Burlington Police Department issued Saturday.

Responding officers located the crash site west of 3801 Bieneman Road, which is north of West Chestnut Street (old Highway 11/Highway JS).

The FAA said that the plane, a Cessna Centurion aircraft, had departed from West Bend with an intended destination of Burlington.

Members of the City of Burlington police and fire departments, Racine County Sheriff’s Office, Town of Burlington Fire Department and Rochester Fire Company responded to the call and first responders rendered life-saving measures to Schmutzler, who was trapped inside the aircraft.

Firefighters on scene reported via radio that Schmutzler was conscious, talking to rescuers and had a visible head injury. He was extricated by 6:50 p.m., radio reports indicated.

The pilot was transported to Froedtert Hospital in Wauwatosa, where he died the next day.

Medical condition not clear

The FAA database on fliers indicated that no medical information was available regarding Schmutzler. A call Tuesday to the FAA for additional information regarding Schmutzler’s medical clearance was not returned.

Robert Katz, a commercial pilot and certified flight instructor in Texas who researches crashes, said if a pilot did not have medical clearance to fly that would present “an absolute risk to public risk.”

“The conscious choice to fly without a valid medical certificate is the most common offense committed by the pilot community,” Katz said.

https://journaltimes.com

David L. Schmutzler
November 11, 1939 - May 16, 2020

David L. Schmutzler passed away at Froedert Memorial Hospital on Saturday, May 16th, 2020. David found eternal life after sustaining critical injuries when his aircraft went down near the Burlington Airport. He was President and owner of Jadair International, Port Washington, Wisconsin. David was born in Peoria, Illinois on November 11, 1939 to Jack Schmutzler and Dorothy Schuh. He was 80 years old.

David graduated from Purdue University with a bachelor’s degree in engineering science. He served in the United States Air Force and was honorably discharged after three years of service. Following his service, he worked in the field of engineering in Utah and Wisconsin. Eventually, David joined his father, Jack, in the development and manufacturing of water recycling equipment for the mining and construction industry. David never stopped working, praying and believing in the work and success of his products and his flying. He had a strong faith and hope that drove his life missions. He had a passion for flying and enjoyed his work as a sea plane, single and multi-engine flight instructor. He will be sorely missed in our lives and in the air.

He was a loving husband, father and grandfather and is survived by his wife of 20 years, Barbara M. Bode, children; Brighton Schmutzler of Park City, Utah, Shane (Becky) Schmutzler of Port Washington, Wisconsin, Dunn Schmutzler of Greendale, Wisconsin, step-children; Anne Bourguignon of Colorado, Mike Bourguignon of Colorado, Mark (Carrie) Bourguignon of California, grandchildren; Allison, Emmalee, Savannah, Ammon, Miriam, Quinn, Sydney and Vivienne; brother Paul Schmutzler and former wife Sondra Green. He is preceded in death by his parents and sister-in-law, Linda Schmutzler.

David’s family will have a Memorial Service at St. John’s Lutheran Church LCMS. Interment will take place at Union Cemetery in Port Washington. Donations would be welcome in his honor to St. John’s Lutheran Church (217 North Freeman Drive, Port Washington, WI, 53074). David’s family will welcome friends and extended family for a celebration of life at a later date.

https://www.eernissefuneralhome.com




BURLINGTON — The Racine County Medical Examiner says the pilot and lone occupant of the small plane that crash in Burlington on May 15th has died.

Officials identified the man as 80-year-old David Schmutzler of Port Washington. They say he died on Saturday morning at Froedtert Hospital.

An autopsy is underway and the Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the cause of the crash.

https://fox6now.com



BURLINGTON -- A small plane crashed into the woods on Friday evening, May 15th, less than one mile from its Racine County destination, leaving the 80-year-old pilot hospitalized.

City of Burlington Police and Fire responded to reports of a downed aircraft near the Burlington Municipal Airport around 6:15 p.m. on Friday. The plane was traveling from West Bend to the Burlington Municipal Airport, when the flight took a harrowing turn.

"I've been saying for years, one of these days, one is going to crash here," said Roger Bieneman, who lives near the site of the crash. "And it did."

Around the time of the crash, Bieneman was home when one of his neighbors rushed over and said: "Did you hear the big boom?"

Bieneman hopped on his golf cart and went looking for the source of the sound. He found it along his property line.

"You can see he came down really hard, knocked several trees over, pulled them right up at the stumps." said Bieneman.

Burlington police said an 80-year-old man from Port Washington was flying the Cessna P210N Pressurized Centurion II. Authorities said he was trapped inside when they arrived at the scene and needed to be extricated. Life-saving measures were performed and he was transported to the hospital for treatment.

"They finally had to tear the plane apart to get him out, and took him away," said Bieneman.

The Federal Aviation Administration tells FOX6 News they are investigating the cause of the crash. As of Saturday evening, authorities had not yet provided an update on the pilot's condition.

https://fox6now.com