Sunday, May 20, 2018

Piper PA-34-200T Seneca, N82806: Fatal accident occurred August 02, 2016 near Flagstaff Pulliam Airport (KFLG), Coconino County, Arizona

Homer 'Mac' McClure in 2012 receives a volunteer award with Flights for Life Marketing Director Jane Tellier. 

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona
Piper Aircraft; Vero Beach, Florida
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N82806 


Homer 'Mac' McClure


Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Flagstaff, AZ
Accident Number: WPR16FA158
Date & Time: 08/02/2016, 2122 MST
Registration: N82806
Aircraft: PIPER PA 34-200T
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Unknown or undetermined
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 2, 2016, about 2122 mountain standard time, a Piper PA-34-200T Seneca II airplane, N82806, was destroyed when it impacted trees and terrain shortly after takeoff from Flagstaff Pulliam Airport (FLG), Flagstaff, Arizona. The airline transport pilot received fatal injuries. The personal flight was being conducted as a medical delivery mission for the volunteer organization Flights for Life (FFL) under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed at FLG at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed for the cross-country flight that was destined for Falcon Field (FFZ), Mesa, Arizona.

The pilot owned the airplane and based it at FFZ. Commercial flight tracking data indicated that the airplane departed FFZ about 0945 and landed at Show Low Regional Airport (SOW), Show Low, Arizona, about 1030. The airplane then departed SOW about 1055, arriving at FLG about 1140. According to the line service technician at FLG who met the airplane at the time of its arrival, it was "pouring" rain. The technician, who was an employee of Wiseman Aviation, a FLG fixed base operation (FBO), reported that the pilot did not want any fuel, and that the pilot unloaded some of his personal items about 30 minutes after landing, once the rain had stopped. The pilot then spent the day in the FBO, generally working on his computer, while awaiting a United Blood Service (UBS) delivery that was expected about 2100.

About 1900, the pilot and technician relocated the airplane closer to the terminal, and the pilot began "cleaning" and/or rearranging some contents in the airplane to make room for the expected cargo. The technician later asked the pilot again if he needed fuel, and he declined. He and the FBO owner reported that it was a "dark night" and that it was cloudy, but not raining, when they left the airport, which was before the accident airplane departed.

The UBS employee who delivered the cargo reported that the total load was four "large" boxes and two "small" boxes. She stated that full large boxes weigh about 30 pounds (lbs) each; small boxes weigh about 10 lbs each; and two of the large boxes were not full. The pilot loaded all the boxes via the aft left-side cargo door(s). He placed the large boxes on the floor of the aft cabin and the two small boxes on top of them. The UBS employee reported that the pilot then closed the door(s) and that he did not restrain the boxes with a net or by any other means.

The FLG air traffic control tower was closed by the time the pilot was ready for engine start and departure. While the airplane was still on the ground, the pilot contacted Phoenix approach control by radio, and requested visual flight rules (VFR) flight following services for a flight to FFZ. The controller provided altimeter and transponder information, and shortly thereafter, the airplane departed.

At 2119:44, the pilot radioed Phoenix approach that he was "off [runway] two one" and climbing to 11,500 feet. At 2120:17 the controller advised the pilot of "radar contact one mile south" of FLG and instructed him to maintain VFR. At 2120:21 the pilot radioed his acknowledgement; this was the last radio transmission from the flight. At 2122:57, the controller advised the pilot that radar contact had been lost and instructed him to report leaving 9,000 feet. There was no response from the pilot to that instruction, nor were there any distress calls or other abnormal communications from the pilot. The controller attempted multiple times to contact the flight, and also had Albuquerque ARTCC (ZAB) attempt contact. There was no response by the flight to either facility.

The first ground-based tracking radar return was acquired at 2119:49. At that time, the airplane was located approximately midfield, with a transponder-indicated altitude of 7,300 feet. The radar location and heading data were consistent with a departure from runway 21. The radar track indicated that the airplane initially maintained the approximate runway heading. The track then turned right about 30°, and then nearly 90° left, to a southerly track. The track then made a near-180° right turn to the north before radar contact was lost. The last radar return was received about 2122:19 and showed the airplane descending through an altitude of 7,400 ft.

The radar returns indicated that, for about the first 60 seconds of the flight, the airplane climbed at a rate of about 1,000 feet per minute (fpm). This climb rate was consistent with the airplane's normal, two-engine climb rate. The climb rate then decreased to and remained about 400 fpm the next 60 seconds. By the end of that period, the airplane reached a maximum transponder-indicated altitude of 8,400 ft. It then descended about 3,000 fpm during the next 20 seconds, when the radar data ended at an altitude similar to the terrain elevation. The final segment of the radar track and the position of the last radar data target were consistent with the observed orientation and location of the debris field.

The impact site was located adjacent to a road, about 2.6 miles southwest of FLG. The airplane was highly fragmented, and earwitnesses reported that the engines were operating at high power just prior to impact. Ground scar and propeller signatures were consistent with both engines operating at impact. Initial post-recovery evaluation of the wreckage did not reveal any mechanical anomalies, including fire, that would have precluded continued normal operation.


Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 76, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider; Helicopter
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/01/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:  
Flight Time: (Estimated) 11858 hours (Total, all aircraft) 

The 76-year-old pilot held multiple certificates and ratings, including an airline transport pilot certificate with an airplane multiengine land rating. He held an FAA second-class medical certificate dated March 1, 2016, with the limitation that he must have glasses available for near vision. On his application for the medical certificate, the pilot reported a total flight experience of 11,858 hours, including 77 hours in the previous 6 months.

According to the pilot's son, who was a pilot for a major US airline, the pilot flew 4 to 5 FFL missions per month, and about 200 hours per year. The son reported that the pilot usually hand-flew the airplane to cruise altitude before engaging the autopilot and would hand-fly the descents as well. The son reported that, in addition to the autopilot's wing leveling/navigation functions, the pilot also used the autopilot altitude hold function. Finally, the son stated that the airplane "was a very stable platform." To the son's knowledge, the pilot only operated VFR, in part because FFL "did not allow [instrument flight rules] IFR." The pilot's instrument and night currency were unable to be determined. 


Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N82806
Model/Series: PA 34-200T 220T
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1980
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 34-8170021
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/02/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 4751 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 7453 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: TSIO-360 SER
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 0 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 1980 and was equipped with two Continental Motors TSIO-360-series engines. The engines rotated in opposite directions; when viewed from behind, the left propeller rotated clockwise, and the right propeller rotated counterclockwise.

The pilot purchased the airplane in March 2015. Maintenance records indicated that the most recent annual inspection was completed in May 2016, when the airframe had a total time (TT) in service of about 7,453 hours. The left engine had a TT of about 3,993 hours, with about 342 hours since overhaul. The right engine had a TT of about 353 hours since new.

According to the pilot's son, the airplane was equipped with a KFC 200 two-axis autopilot and a flight director, and both "worked very well." All annunciators worked normally, and the horizontal situation indicator had recently been overhauled. The son reported that the pilot was "a stickler" for ensuring that all mechanical items were in proper working condition, and that he "was not aware of [any] vacuum [gyro instrument air] issues."

Review of the maintenance records for the 16 months preceding the accident did not reveal any uncorrected maintenance deficiencies, or any entries that warranted additional investigation. Review of the weight and balance records and the loading data indicated that the airplane was within its weight and balance envelope for the accident flight. 


Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: FLG, 7000 ft msl
Observation Time: 2057 MST
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 56°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 10000 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 15°C / 14°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.35 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Flagstaff, AZ (FLG)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Mesa, AZ (FFZ)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 2119 MST
Type of Airspace:


Flagstaff Information

The 2057 FLG automated weather observation included calm winds, visibility 10 miles, scattered clouds at 10,000 ft above ground level (agl), temperature 15°C, dew point 14°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.35 inches of mercury. The 2157 observation included winds from 240° at 3 knots (kts), visibility 10 miles, a broken cloud layer at 11,000 ft, with unchanged temperature, dew point, and altimeter setting.

The National Weather Service (NWS) surface analysis chart station model for Flagstaff for 2000 indicated a light westerly wind about 5 kts, clear skies, temperature 16°C, and dew point 12°C.

The NWS national composite radar image at 2125 for the Flagstaff area depicted only very light intensity echoes associated with a dissipating area of echoes. Data from the NWS Flagstaff Weather Surveillance Radar-1988, Doppler (WSR-88D), which was located 41 miles southeast of the accident site, indicated the absence of any significant weather echoes.

Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite number 15 (GOES-15) data indicated that a broken to overcast layer of altocumulus to altostratus type clouds extended over the Flagstaff area and the accident site. The measured cloud top temperatures corresponded to cloud tops near 29,000 ft above mean sea level (msl) in that region.

The terminal area forecast (TAF) for FLG, which has a coverage area radius of 5 statute miles, called for light and variable winds at 5 kts or less, visibility better than 6 miles, scattered clouds at 6,000 ft agl, broken ceiling at 10,000 ft agl, with a temporary period (between 1700 and 2000) of light rain showers and a broken ceiling at 7,000 ft agl.

The area forecast for northern Arizona for the period of the accident was for a broken ceiling between 12,000 and 14,000 ft msl, cloud layers to 25,000 ft msl, with widely scattered light rain showers and thunderstorms.

Solar and Lunar Illumination Information

Local sunset occurred at 1928, and civil twilight ended at 1756. The moon rose at 0527 and set at 1922; the phase of the moon was new (unilluminated disk).

Enroute and Destination Weather Information

The 12-hour surface prognostic chart valid for 0500 on August 3, 2016, depicted a high-pressure system over northern Arizona with a thermal low-pressure system over southeastern California and a trough extending southward. A large area of scattered thunderstorms and rain showers was depicted over almost all of Arizona.

No TAFs are issued for the destination airport, FFZ. The closest airport to FFZ that issues TAFs was Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport (IWA), located about 10 miles south of FFZ. The IWA forecast, valid from 1900 August 2 to 1700 August 3 was as follows:

- Wind 350° at 18 kts with gusts to 30 kts, visibility 6 statute miles, thunderstorms in the vicinity, scattered clouds at 6,000 ft agl, scattered cumulonimbus at 10,000 ft agl, and broken ceiling at 12,000 ft agl

- Temporary (from 1900 to 2100): wind variable direction at 20 kts with gusts to 40 kts, visibility 3 statute miles, thunderstorms and rain, broken cumulonimbus ceiling at 8,000 ft agl, overcast at 12,000 ft agl

- From 2200 on: wind 120°, visibility 6 statute miles, showers in the vicinity, scattered clouds at 10,000 ft agl, and broken ceiling at 20,000 ft agl

The 2125 NWS national composite radar image depicted a band of light to moderate echoes extending from eastern Arizona southwestward through the Phoenix area. The GOES-15 satellite image depicted a large area of cumulonimbus clouds over the Phoenix and Mesa areas, with the anvil extending northward to the Sedona area.

Airport Information

Airport: Flagstaff Pulliam (FLG)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 7000 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Unknown

FLG was situated at an elevation of 7,014 ft msl, about 3 miles south of the city in semi-rural, mountainous terrain. The surrounding terrain for several miles to the east, south, and west was sparsely populated, with little ground lighting.

FLG was equipped with a single paved runway, designated 3/21, which measured 8,800 ft by 150 ft. The runway was lighted. The airport was equipped with an air traffic control tower, but the tower had closed for the night at 2100. 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  35.106389, -111.724167

The accident site was located on Coconino National Forest property on the east side of Arizona Hwy 89A, about 2.6 nautical miles (nm), on a true bearing of 236º, from the FLG runway 3 threshold. The elevation of the accident site was about 6,950 ft msl. The wreckage trajectory/debris field was oriented on a true heading of 042º. The debris field site terrain was level, with moderately spaced trees (primarily pines, about 60 to 100 ft tall) and generally sparse undergrowth. A residential neighborhood, with widely-spaced homes and an integral golf course, was situated about 1/3 of a mile east of the accident site.

The wreckage was highly fragmented. The debris field measured about 60 ft by 600 ft. The airplane cut/broke the tops off eight trees; these tree locations, and their remaining heights, were catalogued. Some of the fractured tree trunks were 12 to 15 inches in diameter at their separation points. Some tree limbs, up to about 4 inches in diameter, displayed clean angular cuts at their ends, consistent with being severed by a rotating propeller.

The largest wreckage elements included the mid-forward fuselage, the right-wing root and aft nacelle section, and a section that included the left firewall, engine mount, wing spar section, and left main landing gear (LMLG) assembly. These three elements comprised the main wreckage. The engines had separated from the airplane, and the propellers had separated from the engines. Each propeller hub retained all three blades, and all three blades in each hub were significantly damaged. This damage was consistent with both engines developing power at impact. A few flight and engine instruments were identified in the wreckage. Damage to the flight gyroscopic instruments precluded determination of their functionality, or whether they were operating during the flight or impact.

Several hundred pages of maintenance records and other airplane documentation were scattered throughout the debris field. Some pages were loose, and some were partially- or wholly-contained in notebooks. Multiple computers and other portable electronic devices were present at the accident site. Some were intact and in flight/travel bags, and some were extensively damaged and/or not contained in any cases.

The debris field was mapped. Left-side airplane/engine components were generally located towards the left side of the debris field, and right-side airplane/engine components were generally located towards the right side of the debris field; overall, this was consistent with the airplane not being inverted at impact. Refer to the separate "Debris Field" document in the NTSB public docket for this accident for detailed information.

The wreckage was recovered and transported to a secure facility. A two-dimensional layout of some of the wreckage was conducted, and all flight control surfaces were accounted for. The flap setting at impact could not be determined. Damage precluded determination of flight control system continuity, or the condition or airworthiness of the pre-accident airplane.

All major airframe, engine, and propeller components were accounted for, and their damage patterns were consistent with all components being present and intact at the time of impact. No evidence of any pre-impact mechanical deficiencies or failures of the airframe, engines, or propellers was observed. No evidence consistent with in-flight or post-impact fire was observed.

Refer to the NTSB public docket for this accident for additional details. 

Medical And Pathological Information

On his FAA medical certificate applications, the pilot reported using amlodipine and valsartan to treat hypertension, and levothyroxine for hypothyroidism, and aspirin. None of these medications are considered impairing.

The Coconino County (Arizona) Office of the Medical Examiner, Arizona, performed an autopsy of the pilot and determined that the cause of death was "multiple injuries due to aircraft accident." Examination of the body for natural disease was significantly limited by the severity of the pilot's injuries; neither the brain nor heart were available for examination. The autopsy report did not contain any findings (either positive or negative) on the pre-impact health of the pilot.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing and identified metoprolol in muscle and lung tissue. Metoprolol is a prescription blood pressure medication often marketed with the names Lopressor and Toprol.

Metoprolol is used alone or in combination with other medications to treat high blood pressure. It also is used to prevent angina (chest pain), and to improve survival after a heart attack. Metoprolol also is used in combination with other medications to treat heart failure. Metoprolol is in a class of medications called beta blockers. Metoprolol is also sometimes used to prevent migraine headaches and to treat irregular heartbeat and movement disorders caused by medications for mental illness. It is not generally considered impairing.

In addition, ethanol was identified in muscle tissue, but was not detected in kidney tissue. When ethanol is ingested, it is rapidly distributed throughout the body's tissue and fluids fairly uniformly. Ethanol may also be produced in the body after death by microbial activity. In such post-mortem cases, the amount of ethanol identified in different tissues may vary widely. 

Additional Information

Flights for Life Information

According to its website, FFL is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing free air transportation to transport blood for UBS. FFL works in cooperation with hospitals, blood banks, health-care agencies, and private individuals, and flies scheduled and on-demand missions, primarily within Arizona. The pilot was a well-known, long serving, and active member of FFL. The pilot became a member in 2006. He spent 4 years as the FFL Mission Safety Officer and then became the FFL President. At the time of the accident, the pilot had been the president for 3 years.

The January 2016 edition of the FFL Member Handbook, which was current at the time of the accident, specified the particular conditions, requirements, limitations, and recommendations for the FFL pilots and the conduct of the mission flights. The pilot's status as the FFL President did not relieve him from complying with any of the guidance in the FFL Member Handbook. Comparison of the Member Handbook guidance with the known circumstances of the accident flight revealed several instances of non-compliance.

The following two paragraphs, excerpted from the FFL Member Handbook, list the pilot requirements for day and night cargo flights.

Pilot Requirements for Day Cargo Flights.

1. 100 Hours minimum [pilot-in-command] PlC time.
2. 5 Hours minimum time in aircraft make and model to be flown, or 10 Hours minimum if in high performance aircraft.
3. 25 Hours minimum time flying cross-country.
4. Be in an "Active" pilot status.

Pilot Requirements for Night Cargo Flights.

1. Same requirements as for day Cargo flights, except as listed below:
a. 300 Hours minimum PlC time, or 200 hours minimum with Instrument Rating.
b. 50 Hours minimum time flying cross-country.
c. 30 Hours minimum night flight, or 15 hours with an Instrument Rating.

The handbook did not specify any instrument currency requirements for either day or night flights.

The handbook stated, "All FLIGHTS FOR LIFE, INC., flights will be conducted in accordance with Visual Flight Rules (VFR), except [that] Marginal VFR and IFR [instrument flight rules] to VFR on Top flights are permissible, but are restricted to daylight hours only." The forecast and observed weather conditions were consistent with the potential for IFR conditions enroute to FFZ.

The handbook also stated, "It is strongly recommended that flight plans be filed for all flight distances greater than 50 nautical miles." The straight-line distance between FLG and FFZ was about 101 nautical miles (nm), but the pilot did not file a flight plan for the accident flight.

The handbook recommended two pilots for night flights. In contrast, the pilot was the only pilot planned for, or onboard, the airplane. The accident flight was not the first occurrence of such a situation for this pilot; review of FFL flight records as far back as 2008 indicated repeated occurrences of solo night flights.

Gyroscopic Flight Instruments

The airplane manufacturer's Pilot's Operating Handbook (POH) included the following information about the airplane's flight instrumentation. "The directional gyros and attitude indicators are driven by positive air pressure. The pressure system consists of a pressure pump on each engine, plus plumbing and regulating equipment. Check valves and a pressure air manifold…allow pressure instruments to function during single-engine operation, or in the event of malfunction of one of the pressure pumps.…Operation of the gyro pressure system can be monitored via a pressure gauge on the instrument panel, to the left of the copilot's control wheel shaft. The two warning indicators mounted on the gauge serve to alert the pilot should one of the engines be producing less than sufficient pressure to operate the gyro instruments. Additional warning of a possible malfunction in the gyro pressure system is provided by a light in the annunciator panel."

There was no specific POH procedure for failure of an instrument air pressure pump; the only related POH procedures were for a decrease in instrument air pressure below the minimum allowable limit of 4.5 inches of mercury, which would not typically occur with the failure of one pump. The POH guidance stated that, if the pressure decreases below the minimum limit, engine speed should be increased to 2,575 rpm, and the airplane should be descended to an altitude at which a pressure of 4.5 inches of mercury can be maintained.

The investigation did not locate any records of any recent pre-accident problems or anomalies with the flight instruments. Damage to the flight gyroscopic instruments precluded determination of their functionality, or whether they were operating during the flight or impact.

The instrument air pressure pumps were recovered and shipped to the manufacturer (Tempest) for examination. The pump installed on the left engine was model number AA3215CC, and the pump installed on the right engine was model AA442CW-6. The pumps were examined in late June 2017 at the Tempest facility, with FAA oversight. According to the manufacturer's report, the vanes in the left pump were found to be "worn well beyond" their service limits. Powdery residue found inside that pump indicated that the left pump was inoperative at the time of impact. The internal condition of the right pump was consistent with it operating at the time of impact. Impact damage to the air system lines, check valves, and other components precluded determination of the pre-accident functionality of the system.

Detailed information regarding the instrument air system and the pump examinations is contained in the NTSB public docket for this accident.



NTSB Identification: WPR16FA158
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 02, 2016 in Flagstaff, AZ
Aircraft: PIPER PA 34-200T, registration: N82806
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 2, 2016, about 2122 mountain standard time, a Piper PA-34-200T Seneca II, N82806, was destroyed when it impacted trees and terrain shortly after takeoff from Flagstaff Pulliam Airport (FLG), Flagstaff, Arizona. The airline transport pilot received fatal injuries. The personal flight was being conducted as a medical delivery mission for the volunteer organization Flights for Life (FFL), under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed at FLG at the time of the accident. No flight plan was filed.

According to its website, FFL is "a non-profit organization dedicated to providing free air transportation to transport blood for the United Blood Service (UBS) of Arizona." FFL works in cooperation with hospitals, blood banks, health-care agencies and private individuals, and flies scheduled and on-demand missions, primarily within Arizona. The pilot was a well-known, long serving, and very active member of FFL.

The pilot owned the accident airplane, and based it at Falcon Field (FFZ), Mesa, Arizona. Commercial flight tracking data indicated that the airplane departed FFZ about 0945, and landed at Show Low Regional Airport (SOW), Show Low, AZ about 1030, and then departed SOW about 1055, arriving at FLG about 1140. According to the line service technician at FLG who met the airplane, at the time of its arrival, it was "pouring" rain. The technician, who was an employee of Wiseman Aviation, a FLG fixed base operation (FBO), reported that the pilot did not want any fuel, and that the pilot unloaded some of his personal items about 30 minutes after landing, once the rain stopped. The pilot then spent the day in the FBO, generally working on his computer, while awaiting a UBS delivery that was expected about 2100. About 1900 the pilot and technician re-located the airplane closer to the terminal, and the pilot began "cleaning" and/or re-arranging some contents in the airplane to make room for the expected cargo.

About 2000, a Beech King Air operated by Tri-State Care Flight arrived at FLG for a patient pickup, and the line service technician tended to that airplane. About 2040, the FBO owner stopped by and spoke briefly with the Seneca pilot, whom he had known for about 5 years. Shortly thereafter the FBO owner left, and the technician asked the pilot again if he needed fuel, and he again declined. The technician then left the airport. Neither he nor the FBO owner witnessed the loading of the Seneca, or saw the King Air or the Seneca depart. Both FBO personnel reported that it was a "dark night" and that it was cloudy, but not raining, when they left.

The UBS employee who delivered the cargo reported that the total load was four "large" boxes and two "small" boxes. She stated that full large boxes weigh about 30 lbs each, small ones weigh about 10 lbs each, and that two of the large boxes were not full. The pilot loaded all the boxes via the aft left-side cargo door(s). He placed the large boxes on the floor of the aft cabin, and the two small boxes on top of them. The UBS employee reported that the pilot then closed the door(s), and that he did not restrain the boxes with a net or any other means.

The FLG air traffic control tower closed at 2100. Sometime after that, while still on the ground, the Seneca pilot contacted Phoenix Approach control, and advised them that he was requesting VFR (visual flight rules) flight following for a return trip to FFZ. At 2119:44, the Seneca pilot radioed to Phoenix Approach that he was "off [runway] two one" and climbing to "eleven thousand five hundred" feet. At 2120:17 the controller advised the pilot of "radar contact one mile south" of FLG, and advised him to maintain VFR. At 2120:21 the pilot radioed his thank you; this was the last radio transmission from the flight. At 21:22:57, the controller advised the pilot that radar contact had been lost, and thereafter made repeated, unanswered calls to the flight.

Ground-based Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) radar tracking data first detected the airplane at 21:19:49. The radar returns indicated that the airplane climbed at a rate of about 1,000 feet per minute (fpm) for about 60 seconds, and then the climb rate decreased to and remained at about 400 fpm for the next minute. The airplane reached a maximum radar altitude of 8,400 feet, and then descended to ground impact during the next 20 seconds.

The impact site was located about 2.6 miles, on a true bearing of 236º, from the threshold of FLG runway 3, at an elevation of about 6,950 feet above mean sea level (msl). The airplane was highly fragmented; the debris field measured about 80 feet wide by about 500 feet long, and was oriented on a true heading of 042º. Earwitnesses reported that the engines were operating at high power. Ground scar and propeller signatures were consistent with both engines operating at impact. Initial post recovery evaluation of the wreckage did not reveal any mechanical anomalies, including fire, that would have precluded continued normal operation.

According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 1980, and was equipped with two Continental Motors TSIO-360 series engines. The pilot purchased the airplane in March 2015. Maintenance records indicated that its most recent annual inspection was completed in May 2016, when the airframe had a total time (TT) in service of about 7,453 hours. The left engine had a TT of about 3,992 hours, with about 342 hours since overhaul. The right engine had a TT of about 353 hours.

The 76 year old pilot held multiple certificates and ratings. On his most recent application for an FAA second-class medical certificate in March 2016, he reported a total flight experience of 11,858 hours.

FLG was situated at an elevation of 7,014 feet msl. It was equipped with a single paved runway, 3/21, which measured 8,800 feet by 150 feet.

The 2057 FLG automated weather observation included calm winds, visibility 10 miles, scattered clouds at 10,000 ft, temperature 14 degrees C, dew point 14 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.35 inches of mercury. The 2157 observation included winds from 240 degrees at 3 knots, visibility 10 miles, a broken cloud layer at 11,000 feet, with unchanged temperature, dew point, and altimeter setting.

Aeronca 11AC, N86078: Fatal accident occurred July 03, 2016 near William 'Tiny' Zehnder Field Airport (66G), Frankenmuth, Saginaw County, Michigan

Analysis

The pilot and passenger were on a local pleasure flight in a single-engine airplane. A witness reported that the pilot was doing touch-and-go landings. The wind was calm, so the pilot departed to the east and then returned to land to the west. The witness did not see the crash but heard the impact and then saw smoke. The airplane impacted a cornfield about 1/4 mile east of the airport. A postcrash fire consumed or thermally damaged the majority of the airplane. The fire and impact damage limited the scope of the examination; however, no evidence of pre-impact abnormalities was noted with the engine or airframe. The pilot's autopsy and toxicology testing found no evidence of any medical condition or medication use that would have impaired his performance, and he had favorable weather conditions for the flight. The accident was consistent with the pilot's loss of control for undetermined reasons.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's loss of control for undetermined reasons based on available information.

Findings

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Not determined
Not determined - Unknown/Not determined (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Maneuvering
Loss of control in flight (Defining event)
Unknown or undetermined


Eugene L. Root Jr. (Papa) and Samuel A. Simon (grandson to Eugene) flew home together to be with Jesus late Sunday afternoon July 3, 2016, Eugene was 54 and Samuel was 9.


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Grand Rapids, Michigan 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N86078


Location: Frankenmuth, MI
Accident Number: CEN16FA240
Date & Time: 07/03/2016, 1722 EDT
Registration: N86078
Aircraft: AERONCA 11AC
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 3, 2016, about 1722 eastern daylight time, an Aeronca Chief 11AC airplane, N86078, impacted terrain near Frankenmuth, Michigan. The pilot and the passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and the airplane was not on a flight plan. The local flight originated from the William 'Tiny' Zehnder Field Airport (66G), Frankenmuth, Michigan.

A witness, who was located at 66G, said the wind was calm, and the pilot was making touch-and-go landings, departing to the east and then landing to the west. The witness added that he heard the crash and saw smoke east of the airfield.  

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 54
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/15/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 600 hours (Total, all aircraft)

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. He held a third-class medical certificate that was issued on May 15, 2016, with the limitation: must have glasses available for near vision. At the time of the medical exam, the pilot reported 600 total flight hours and 0 hours in the previous 6 months. The pilot's most current flight records were not located during the investigation. 



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: AERONCA
Registration: N86078
Model/Series: 11AC NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1946
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 11AC-501
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/12/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 553.9 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: A&C65 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 65 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held:  None

The Aeronca Chief 11AC is a high-wing, single-engine airplane with fixed, conventional landing gear and powered by a 65-horsepower, four-cylinder, reciprocating Continental engine and a fixed pitch propeller. The fuselage is mixture of thin aluminum skin and welded steel tubes covered with fabric. The wings are covered with fabric with wood spars. 

A review of the airplane's maintenance records revealed the last annual inspection was completed June 12, 2016, with an airplane tachometer time of 553.7 hours and 191.9 hours since engine overhaul. The previous annual inspection was dated June 21, 2015 andlisted a tachometer time of 552.29 hours and a time since engine overhaul of 190.49 hours. 



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting:
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Precipitation
Departure Point: Frankenmuth, MI (66G)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Frankenmuth, MI (66G)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  EDT
Type of Airspace:

At 1715, the automated weather observation station located at the Saginaw County H W Browne Airport, Saginaw, Michigan, about 10 miles northwest of the accident site, recorded the wind calm, 10 miles visibility, a clear sky, temperature 80°F, dew point 39°F, and an altimeter setting of 30.05 inches of mercury.  

Airport Information

Airport: William Zehnder Field Airport (66G)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 645 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Touch and Go 

66G is a privately owned, open to the public, non-towered airport, located 2 miles southeast of Frankenmuth, Michigan. Pilots are to use the CTAF (Common Traffic Advisory Frequency) for communications. 66G has a single turf runway orientated 09/27 that measures 2,530 ft by 100 ft. The airport is at an elevation of 645 ft.  

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 43.315000, -83.705278

The on-site examination of the wreckage revealed the airplane impacted terrain about 1/4 mile east of 66G. The wreckage was located in a cornfield with the height of the corn varying between 5 and 7 ft. A postcrash fire consumed a majority of the airplane. 

The right wing had extensive thermal damage, and the inboard and outboard sections of the wing displayed heavy impact damage. The left wing also had thermal/fire damage and minor impact damage near the outboard tip. The airplane's cabin was consumed by fire with only the tubular frame remaining; the aft section of the fuselage's fabric was also burnt away, exposing the tubular frame. Other than a piece of fabric that remained on the rudder, the fabric on the empennage was burned away. The elevators were in the down position, and the trim tab was pushed down past its limit. The tailwheel assembly was twisted to one side, and the tailwheel was separated and located under the aft section of the fuselage. The engine and cowling area were thermal and impact damaged. The wooden two-bladed propeller remained attached to the engine, and the outboard sections of both blades were broken off, with a splintered appearance. 

Aileron control continuity was established with the exception of the aileron cable's fastener, located behind the cabin area, which was melted by the fire, and the cable at the right aileron bellcrank, which appeared separated by overload. Rudder and elevator control continuity were established from the respective control surface to the control column.

After the initial on-site documentation of the wreckage, the airplane's engine was separated from the airframe and transported to another facility for further examination.

The engine sustained extensive fire damage. When the propeller was rotated by hand, continuity through the valve train and to the accessory section was observed. The carburetor was broken from its intake flange. The oil screen was removed and was found clear of contaminants. The left magneto contained an impulse coupling and would not rotate. Both magnetos had thermal/fire damage. 

The top set of sparkplugs were removed. The spark plugs exhibited light colored combustion deposits, and the electrodes exhibited normal signatures.

Although the examination was limited by thermal and fire damage, no pre-impact abnormalities were noted during the airframe or engine examinations.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Saginaw County Medical Examiner's Office, Saginaw, Michigan, conducted an autopsy on the pilot. The cause of death was determined to be "blunt force chest trauma."

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, conducted toxicological testing of the pilot's specimens. The specimens were not tested for cyanide. The tests were negative for ethanol and tested drugs.

Additional Information

A personal smartphone was located at the accident site and shipped to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Lab in Washington, DC, for download and data extraction. A review of photos extracted from the phone revealed six images taken on the day of the accident from the front seat of the airplane that featured the area around the airport. The first image time stamp was 1708:57, and the final image time stamp was 1709:54.



NTSB Identification: CEN16FA240 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 03, 2016 in Frankenmuth, MI
Aircraft: AERONCA 11AC, registration: N86078
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 3, 2016, about 1720 eastern daylight time, an Aeronca Chief AC11, airplane, N86078, impacted terrain near Frankenmuth, Michigan. The private rated pilot and passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal fight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and the airplane was not on a flight plan. The local flight was originating from the William 'Tiny' Zehnder Field Airport (66G), Frankenmuth, Michigan, at the time of the accident.

Several witness reported seeing the airplane earlier. One witness said the wind was calm, and the pilot was doing "touch-n-goes"; departing to the east and then landing to the west. The witness added that they heard the crash and saw smoke. 

The on-site examination of the wreckage revealed the airplane impacted about a quarter mile, east of the 66G airport. A post-crash fire consumed much of the airplane.  After the initial on-site documentation of the wreckage, the airplane's engine was recovered to a secure facility for further examination.

Diamond DA40 Diamond Star, N143RD: Accident occurred May 20, 2018 at Marlborough Airport (9B1), Middlesex County, Massachusetts

Skylands Air LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N143RD

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA288
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, May 20, 2018 in Marlborough, MA
Aircraft: DIAMOND AIRCRAFT IND INC DA 40, registration: N143RD

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.





MARLBOROUGH — A small aircraft overshot the runway and crashed into a fence on Farm Road at Marlborough Airport at 1:37 p.m. Sunday, according to the Marlborough Fire Department.

None of the four passengers were injured in the crash and were able to get out of the plane by themselves, according to Lieutenant Michael Quinn.

Quinn said firefighters had to use the Jaws of Life to disentangle the plane from the fence. 

The airplane had taken off in New Jersey and the passengers were on their way to a hockey tournament.

“The kids continued on their way to the tournament,” said Quinn.

The owner of the airport, Sandy Stetson, was on the scene. She said the crash was the first in several years.

“They were going too fast and couldn’t stop,” said Stetson. She estimated the people on board were of high school age.

John Hathaway, a retired firefighter, was in his home listening to the scanner when he heard reports of the crash. He said he was surprised by the initial report because he had not heard anything even though he lived across the road.

“The fence was completely wrapped around the plane at first and we didn’t hear a thing,” said Hathaway, watching firefighters respond to the crash with his 17-year-old son, Ian.

According to Quinn, the Federal Aviation Administration was on its way to investigate the crash. 

Original article ➤ http://marlborough.wickedlocal.com




MARLBOROUGH, Mass. — A small plane crashed through a fence and onto a roadway at Marlborough Airport Sunday afternoon.

The FAA said the plane was trying to land on Runway 14 when it went long and crashed through the fence at 1:35 p.m. The agency said it would investigate.

Records from FlightAware indicate the Diamond DA40 aircraft had flown from Sussex, New Jersey to the area.

The plane's tail number indicates the aircraft is registered to Skylands Air LLC in New Jersey, according to the FAA.

No injuries were reported in the incident on Sunday. 

Story and video ➤ http://www.wcvb.com

MARLBORO (CBS) – A small airplane with four people on board overshot the runway and went through a fence at Marlboro Airport, though no one was injured.

A Diamond DA40 was attempting to land on Runway 14 around 1:30 p.m. But the landing didn’t go as planned and the plane ended up with its nose through a metal fence.

The pilot and three passengers were uninjured.

No fuel leak resulted from the incident. 

The plane was towed away from the airport.

Original article ➤ http://boston.cbslocal.com

Beech P35 Bonanza, N112MB: Accident occurred June 18, 2016 near Westerly State Airport (KWST), Washington County, Rhode Island



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boston, Massachusetts 
Continental Motors Inc.; Mobile, Alabama 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N112MB



Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Westerly, RI
Accident Number: ERA16LA217
Date & Time: 06/18/2016, 1235 EDT
Registration: N112MB
Aircraft: BEECH P35
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 18, 2016, about 1235 eastern daylight time, a Beech P35 airplane, N112MB, ditched in Block Island Sound after a total loss of engine power near Westerly, Rhode Island. The private pilot received minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a visual flight rules flight plan was filed, but not activated, for the personal flight. The airplane was owned and operated by the pilot and the flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight originated from Francis S. Gabreski Airport (FOK), Westhampton Beach, New York, with an intended destination of Taunton Municipal Airport (TAN), Taunton, Massachusetts.

In an interview with a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Inspector, the pilot stated that while en route, he attempted to reduce the manifold pressure, however it did not respond. Next, he heard a "loud bang," followed by oil covering the windscreen of the airplane, and the engine lost total power. Furthermore, the pilot reported that the propeller rpm "was all over the place" prior to the total loss of engine power. He ditched about 2 miles west of Westerly State Airport (WST), Westerly, Rhode Island. After landing in the water, the pilot egressed without incident, and the airplane sank.

The airplane was recovered and an examination revealed that the wings, empennage, and fuselage sustained substantial damage during the accident sequence. In addition, a hole was noted in the top of the engine crankcase.

According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 1962 and was powered by a 260-hp Continental Motors, Inc., IO-470-N21B reciprocating engine. The airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on December 29, 2015, at a recorded tachometer reading of 2,812 hours, airframe total time of 5,186 hours, and engine time since major overhaul of 99 hours. The pilot indicated that, at the time of the accident, the engine had accumulated 109 hours of engine time since major overhaul.

The engine was equipped with an F&M Enterprises Inc. (model C6LC-L) oil filter adapter, which was not original equipment, but could be installed on the engine under FAA Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) number SE09356SC. The oil filter adapter installation was completed on December 1, 2011, which was the same time as the engine overhaul. A review of the oil filter adapter manufacturer's installation instructions revealed that, during installation, the oil filter adapter body was torqued to 65 ft lbs, and it should be retorqued after 10 hours of operation. The oil filter adapter required one fiber gasket and one copper crush gasket to be used in the installation. In addition, manufacturing guidance indicated that at each annual inspection or 100-hour inspection, the mechanic was to inspect the oil filter adapter for oil seepage, the safety wire, the security of the adapter, and record the results of the inspections in the logbook.

Maintenance guidance for the oil filter adapter included instructions for replacing the gaskets anytime the oil filter adapter was removed from the engine and reinstalled, and at 300 hours or 3 years, whichever occurred first. The most recent maintenance on the oil filter adapter recorded in the engine logbook was completed on August 25, 2012, at an engine time since major overhaul of 40 hours.

An examination of the engine revealed that the oil filter adapter tightening break away torque was 13.58 ft lbs and the loosening torque was less than 13.33 ft lbs, as the torque wrench would not register any lower torque. Furthermore, the fiber gasket located between the adapter and the engine was torn and partially extruded from the adapter. The oil filter adapter was removed and the fiber gasket was removed. The fiber gasket was torn in one location and the crush deformation not symmetrical around the gasket. In addition, the Nos. 2 and 4 connecting rods had separated from the crankshaft. All connecting rod journals exhibited thermal damage and signatures consistent with lubrication distress.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 62, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/14/2014
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 664 hours (Total, all aircraft), 222 hours (Total, this make and model), 525 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft) 



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BEECH
Registration: N112MB
Model/Series: P35 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1962
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Utility
Serial Number: D-6945
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 12/29/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3128 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 10 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5186 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental Motors Inc.
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-470-N21B
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 260 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: WST, 81 ft msl
Observation Time: 1253 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 14°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C / 10°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots, 170°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.24 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: WESTHAMPTON BEACH, NY (FOK)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: TAUNTON, MA (TAN)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1230 EDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: WESTERLY STATE (WST)
Runway Surface Type: Water
Airport Elevation: 81 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Water--choppy
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  41.319444, -71.809167 (est)

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA217
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 18, 2016 in Westerly, RI
Aircraft: BEECH P35, registration: N112MB
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 18, 2016, about 1235 eastern daylight time, a Beech P35, N112MB, performed a forced landing to the ocean after a total loss of engine power near Westerly, Rhode Island. The private pilot received minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The airplane was owned and operated by the pilot and the flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight originated from Francis S. Gabreski Airport (FOK), Westhampton Beach, New York, with an intended destination of Taunton Municipal Airport (TAN), Taunton, Massachusetts.

In an interview with a Federal Aviation Administration Inspector, the pilot stated that while enroute, he attempted to reduce the manifold pressure, however it did not respond. Next he heard a "loud bang," oil covered the windscreen of the airplane, and the engine lost total power. Furthermore, the pilot reported that the propeller rpm "was all over the place" prior to the total loss of engine power. He performed a forced landing to the ocean about 3 miles west of Westerly State Airport (WST), Westerly, Rhode Island. After landing in the water, the pilot egressed without incident, and the airplane sank.

The airplane was recovered and a postaccident examination revealed that the wings, empennage, and fuselage sustained substantial damage during the accident sequence. In addition, a hole was noted in the top of the engine crankcase.  The engine was retained for further examination.