Tuesday, March 05, 2019

Loss of Engine Power (Total): Piper PA-28-181 Arrow II, N5646V, accident occurred March 13, 2018 at Chesapeake Regional Airport (KCPK), Norfolk, Virginia

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Richmond, Virginia

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N5646V




Location: Chesapeake, VA
Accident Number: ERA18LA101
Date & Time: 03/13/2018, 1130 EDT
Registration: N5646V
Aircraft: PIPER PA28
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis

The private pilot was conducting touch-and-go landings; the airplane was about 200 ft above ground level after a takeoff when the engine lost total power. The pilot cycled the throttle during the straight-ahead descent, which restored power momentarily before the forced landing. During the ground roll, the nose landing gear separated, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. A postaccident test run of the engine using the fuel available in the airplane’s tanks and the intact fuel system revealed that the engine operated normally with no anomalies noted. The weather conditions at the time of the accident were conducive to the formation of serious carburetor icing at descent engine power settings. The pilot stated that he had not activated the carburetor heat at any point during the flight. Because the engine operated normally after the accident, the weather conditions were conducive to the formation of carburetor icing, and the pilot failed to use carburetor heat during the approach, it is likely that the engine lost power due to the accumulation of carburetor ice before and during the takeoff.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to apply carburetor heat during the approach for a touch-and-go landing, which resulted in a total loss of engine power during the subsequent takeoff.

Findings

Aircraft
Intake anti-ice, deice - Not used/operated (Cause)

Personnel issues
Use of equip/system - Pilot (Cause)
Identification/recognition - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Conducive to carburetor icing - Effect on equipment (Cause)


Factual Information

On March 13, 2018, about 1130 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28-181, N5646V, was substantially damaged during a forced landing shortly after takeoff from Chesapeake Regional Airport (CPK), Chesapeake, Virginia. The private pilot and pilot-rated passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local personal flight conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

In a written statement, the pilot described completing the preflight inspection, run-up, takeoff, and one circuit in the airport traffic pattern with no anomalies noted. He performed a touch-and-go landing on runway 23, and when the airplane had climbed to about 200 feet, the engine stopped producing power. The pilot elected to land straight ahead off the departure end of the runway, and cycled the throttle during the descent, which only restored power momentarily before the forced landing was completed.

During the ground run, the nose landing gear separated, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the wing structure and the fuselage.

In a telephone interview with a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, the pilot provided an account that was consistent with his written statement. He provided greater detail about the positions of the fuel selector, fuel boost pump switch, mixture control, and his use and positioning of engine and flight controls throughout the flight. When asked at what point he had applied carburetor heat, the pilot replied that he did not apply carburetor heat at any point during the flight.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA first-class medical certificate was issued January 9, 2017. The pilot reported 188.1 total hours of flight experience, of which 139.8 were in the accident airplane make and model.

According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 1977. Its most recent 100-hour inspection was completed at 3,618 total aircraft hours.

At 1115, the weather reported at CPK included clear skies, 10 miles visibility, and winds from 290 degrees at 12 knots gusting to 21 knots. The temperature was 6° C, the dew point was -4° C, and the altimeter setting was 29.87 inches of mercury.

A review of atmospheric conditions at CPK at the time of the accident revealed conditions conducive to formation of "serious" carburetor icing at descent engine power settings.

The wreckage was examined at the operator's facility by the FAA inspector who confirmed the damage and noted that the remainder of the airplane was intact. He raised the nose of the airplane by anchoring the tail, and an engine start was attempted using the airplane's own battery, fuel system, and the fuel present in the fuel tanks. The engine started immediately, accelerated smoothly, and ran continuously without interruption. Magneto and carburetor heat checks were performed, and the results were within the manufacturer's parameters.



Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 25, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/09/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  188.1 hours (Total, all aircraft), 139.8 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: PIPER
Registration: N5646V
Model/Series: PA28 181
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1977
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 28-7790487
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/16/2018, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection: 19 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3618 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-360 SER
Registered Owner: ATLANTIC AVIATION LLC
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: EPIX AVIATION LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCPK, 20 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1115 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 321°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 12 knots / 21 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 290°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.87 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 6°C / -4°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Chesapeake, VA (CPK)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Chesapeake, VA (CPK)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: CHESAPEAKE RGNL (CPK)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 18 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Soft; Vegetation; Water--calm
Runway Used: 23
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5500 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing; Touch and Go

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  36.665556, -76.320556 (est)

Cessna 140, N2394V: Incident occurred March 04, 2019 at Livermore Municipal Airport (KLVK), Alameda County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California

Entered partial ground loop causing nose to dip and prop strike.

Red Sky Aviation LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N2394V

Date: 04-MAR-19
Time: 17:01:00Z
Regis#: N2394V
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 140
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LIVERMORE
State: CALIFORNIA

Beechcraft A36 Bonanza, N618BH: Incident occurred March 04, 2019 near Hammond Northshore Regional Airport (KHDC), Tangipahoa Parish, Louisiana

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Landed in a field.

Base Craft LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N618BH

Date: 04-MAR-19
Time: 18:28:00Z
Regis#: N618BH
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: A36
Event Type:
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: HAMMOND
State: LOUISIANA

Indigo Airbus A320: Incident occurred June 29, 2019 in Delhi, India

NTSB Identification: ENG19WA028
Scheduled 14 CFR Non-U.S., Commercial Indigo
Incident occurred Saturday, June 29, 2019 in Delhi, India
Aircraft: AIRBUS A320, registration:
Injuries: Unavailable

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

The government of India has notified the NTSB of an incident involving a AIRBUS A320 airplane that occurred on June 26, 2019. An Indigo Airbus A320 powered by two Pratt & Whitney PW1127G-JM geared turbofan engines experienced issues with the No. 1 (left) engine during climb from Dehradun, Indian to Bangalore, India. During climb, the flight crew heard a loud bang followed by a No. 1 engine stall and indications of high exhaust gas temperature and high engine vibrations. The airplane was diverted to Delhi, Indian for an uneventful landing. Post landing engine inspection of the No. 1 engine confirmed damage to that engine.

The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative as the state of manufacturer of the engine to assist the government of India's investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13. All investigative information will be released by the government of India.

CommutAir d.b.a. United Express, Embraer ERJ-145, N14171: Accident occurred March 04, 2019 at Northern Maine Regional Airport at Presque Isle (KPQI), Maine

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N14171


Location: Presque Isle, ME
Accident Number: DCA19FA089
Date & Time: 03/04/2019, 1143 EST
Registration: N14171
Aircraft: Embraer EMB145
Injuries: 3 Minor, 28 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 121: Air Carrier - Scheduled 

On March 4, 2019, at 1143 eastern standard time, CommutAir flight 4933, an Embraer EMB-145XR, N14171, d.b.a. United Express, landed between runway 1 and taxiway A in light to moderate snow at Northern Maine Regional Airport at Presque Isle (KPQI), Presque Isle, Maine. This was the second approach to runway 1 after having conducted a missed approach during the first approach. Radar track data show that the airplane was aligned right of runway 1 during both approaches. Of the 31 passengers and crew onboard, two passengers and 1 crewmember received minor injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The flight was operating under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 as a regularly scheduled domestic passenger from Newark International Airport (KEWR), Newark, New Jersey, to KPQI.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Embraer
Registration: N14171
Model/Series: EMB145 XR
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Commutair
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Flag carrier (121)
Operator Does Business As: United Express
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Newark, NJ (KEWR)
Destination: Presque Isle, ME (KPQI)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor, 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 Minor, 26 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 Minor, 28 None
Latitude, Longitude:

Rick and Cassie Daigle, owners of Too Far North Fitness in Fort Kent, were on this United flight that ended up off the runway at the airport in Presque Isle on Monday morning. Cassie Daigle took this photo inside the plane shortly after it stopped. Rick Daigle said the scene inside the airplane as it landed was one of chaos with people screaming and seat parts popping off. 



PRESQUE ISLE, Maine (WABI) A United Express flight had a rough landing at Presque Isle's airport Monday leaving a pilot and four passengers with minor injuries, that according to city officials.

The plane left Newark, New Jersey and landed in Presque Isle around 11:30 Monday morning.

The plane touched down then slid off the runway.

A local official said it was the pilot's second attempt at a landing.

There were 28 passengers and three crew members on board.

There is visible damage to the aircraft.

Part of the landing gear was torn away, and the nose cone was damaged.

The plane will remain in place until the FAA arrives to assess the situation.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wabi.tv





PRESQUE ISLE, Maine — A United Airlines flight from Newark to Presque Isle landed roughly on its second approach and then slid off the runway Monday as passengers screamed and some seat parts popped off, according to one occupant.

Of the 28 passengers and 4 crew members on board, four passengers and the pilot were taken to the hospital with minor injuries, said Kim Smith, Presque Isle public information officer.  

Presque Isle International Airport will be closed until further notice as representatives of the Federal Aviation Administration investigate, Smith said.

The United flights for the Newark-Presque Isle service are operated by CommuteAir, which is partly owned by United. The service runs two outbound and inbound flights per day on weekdays and one outbound and one inbound flight per day on weekends.

The aircraft that arrived around 11:30 a.m. Monday also sustained unspecified damage and is remaining in place until investigators with the Federal Aviation Administration can assess the incident, Smith said.  

It is not clear what may have caused this to happen, Smith said.

The accident closed the airport Monday, and it is not known immediately when outgoing and incoming flights will resume, she said.

Rick and Cassie Daigle, owners of Too Far North Fitness in Fort Kent, were on the flight returning from Columbus, Ohio, where Cassie Daigle was competing in a kettlebell event at the Arnold Sports Expo.

Rick Daigle said from the airport via an interview using Facebook messenger that passengers realized there was a problem even before the plane hit the runway.

“Well, the first attempt they pulled up before landing … so obviously something was wrong,” he said. Contradicting the report that the plane landed on the runway and then skidded off, he said, that “the actual ‘landing,’ if you want to call it that, completely missed the runway. The first impact was hard and violent.”

Daigle said the plane then bounced four or five times before coming to a stop at a location far from the runway.

“The plane literally is nowhere near the actual runway,” he said, adding that snowplows had to remove snow so that emergency responders could get to the plane to help the injured passengers.

The scene inside the airplane as it landed was one of chaos with people screaming and seats coming apart, Daigle said.

“We smelled some burning, but nothing was on fire. We were just in shock.”

Daigle said his wife hit her head during the incident and once the couple returns to Fort Kent she plans to be evaluated at Northern Maine Medical Center as a precaution.

“We climbed out on a ladder with the help of local firefighters,” he said.

The Daigles were still at the airport as of 2 p.m. after having been interviewed by emergency medical technicians and a United representative, Daigle said.

The Daigles are parents to a 4 1 /2 year old son.

“Cass did say to me she will be OK when she sees Keegan,” Rick Daigle said.

“I do want answers though,” he said.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://thecounty.me