Monday, October 21, 2019

Van's RV-8, N249BW: Fatal accident occurred October 20, 2019 in White Plains, Calhoun County, Alabama

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Birmingham, Alabama
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N249BW

Location: White Plains, AL
Accident Number: CEN20FA009
Date & Time: 10/20/2019, 1130 CDT
Registration: N249BW
Aircraft: Vans VANS RV-8
Injuries:1 Fatal 
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On October 20, 2019, about 1130 central daylight time, an experimental Vans RV-8 airplane, N249BW, impacted remote mountainous terrain near White Plains, Alabama. The airline transport pilot and sole occupant sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a visual flight rules (VFR) personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and a VFR flight plan was filed. The flight departed from the Northwest Alabama Regional Airport (MSL), Muscle Shoals, Alabama, about 1000.

According to the pilot's family members, the purpose of the flight was for the pilot to fly from MSL to the Big T Airport (64GA), Senoia, Georgia, after the completion of a family visit. The family reported that the pilot intended to fly direct to 64GA with no stops. After not hearing from the pilot by mid-afternoon, concerned family members contacted the Federal Aviation Administration and the U.S. Air Force Rescue Coordination Center. A search was initiated for the missing airplane and the wreckage was located about 2230 by first responders on private property near the Mountain Longleaf National Wildlife Refuge on a north to south oriented mountain ridge.

The NTSB investigator-in-charge and two aviation safety inspectors from the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the accident site on October 22, 2019. The investigative team members documented the accident site and the wreckage. The airplane came to rest on a heading of 123°, at an elevation of about 1,700 ft above mean sea level, and on about a 50° incline in a heavily wooded area, as shown below in figure 1.

Figure 1 – View of the wreckage looking to the northwest, downslope.

The wreckage was recovered from the accident site and transported to a secure location for a future examination of the airframe and engine. The two-seat capacity airplane, serial number 82872, was built from a kit by the pilot in 2010. The airplane was equipped with a Lycoming Engines IO-360-A1B6 engine.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Vans
Registration: N249BW
Model/Series: VANS RV-8 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KANB, 600 ft msl
Observation Time: 1602 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 14°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm / ,
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 1000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.97 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Departure Point: White Plains, AL
Destination: Senoia, GA (64GA) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 33.749722, -85.723333 (est)

Harvell Jackson Walker

CALHOUN Co., Ala. (WBRC) - A pilot who was killed in a small plane crash in Calhoun County has been identified.

Calhoun County Coroner Pat Brown identified the man as Harvell Jackson Walker, 70, of Fayetteville, Georgia. A Facebook profile that appears to be his shows a profile photo of the man in a pilot's uniform, sitting in what appears to be the cockpit of a commercial jetliner.

Calhoun County Sheriff Matthew Wade says his office received a call from an Air Force base in Panama City, Florida, at 7 p.m. Sunday, when their search and rescue team reported losing a plane on radar, and saying its flight plan indicated the plane was past due to return.

A preliminary search of the coordinates, where the plane was last spotted on radar, showed the area somewhere in White Plains. An initial search turned up nothing.

Wade says the Air Force contacted him later with more exact coordinates. Also a family member had notified them the “Find My iPhone” feature on Walker’s iPhone indicated a similar area. Wade said a second search revealed the plane, and Walker’s body.

Wade said the wreckage turned up on Bains Gap Mountain, on heavily wooded privately owned land. He says he was told the plane was an RV8.

"I looked it up, it's a sporty-looking plane," Wade said.

Investigators with the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board were on the scene Monday, looking through the wreckage for anything that might lead them to determine a cause of the crash.

Walker was the only person on the plane.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wbrc.com

UPDATE: The pilot has been identified as 70-year-old Harvell Walker Jr. from Fayetteville, Georgia.

Calhoun County Sheriff Matthew Wade says his department got a call from the United States Air Force Sunday night about a plane that had not checked in.

Wade said coordinates showed the plane was near Bains Gap Road in Anniston.

Walker's daughter called the Calhoun County Sheriff's Office and shared information she had from the Find My iPhone app.

Deputies were able to locate the crash site and found Walker deceased.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are expected to be at the crash site Monday morning to investigate the crash.

Wade says those organizations will be handling the investigation.

One person was killed Sunday night in a small plane crash in Calhoun County.

According to our news partner, The Anniston Star, the Sheriff's Office found the pilot dead inside the plane in a wooded area off Bains Gap Road.

That person has not been identified.

The Sheriff says the airport lost contact with the plane around 7:00 Sunday night.

It was a private, single-engine plane. The Sheriff believes the pilot was going from Muscle Shoals to Peachtree City, Georgia.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://abc3340.com

Sportine Aviacija LAK-17B FES, N830DK: Fatal accident occurred October 18, 2019 in Tamaqua, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N830DK

Location: Tamaqua, PA
Accident Number: ERA20FA013
Date & Time: 10/18/2019, 1542 EDT
Registration: N830DK
Aircraft: SPORTINE AVIACIJA LAK17
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On October 18, 2019, about 1542 eastern daylight time, a Sportine Aviacija Lak-17B motorized glider, N830DK, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain near Tamaqua, Pennsylvania. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal local flight that departed Blairstown Airport (1N7), Blairstown, New Jersey about 0945. The glider was owned and operated by the commercial pilot, under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

A witness was also a glider pilot stated that the accident flight was among a group of three other cross-county glider flights that intended to depart 1N7, fly over Burnt Cabins, Pennsylvania, and then return to 1N7. The witness stated that he departed 1N7 around 0930, and the accident glider took off around 0945. He further stated that it was not common for the glider pilots to fly together but they would maintain radio contact throughout the day and help each other with geographical points and finding thermals for lift. He said that around 1400 the accident pilot radioed and said that he was at Burnt Cabins and turning around to return to 1N7. Around 1515, the accident pilot reported that he was climbing in a weak thermal near Tamaqua, Pennsylvania. That was the last communication he heard from the accident pilot.

According to another witness, he was working outside when he looked up and saw "an airplane" about .5 mile away heading straight down. He stopped and watched "the airplane" for a few seconds before it disappeared behind some trees.

The glider was located on the side of a ridgeline at an elevation about 1,100 ft mean sea level. The wreckage was inverted and on a 210° heading. The wings remained attached to the fuselage. The leading edges of both wings had tree limb impressions along the length of the wings. The cockpit, canopy and nose were crushed by impact forces. The instrument panel was destroyed. The 5-point harness remained intact and was cut by rescue personnel. The single landing gear was retracted. The flaps remained attached to the wings and were retracted. The ailerons were fractured off both wings. The tail section was fractured off the fuselage. The rudder and elevator remained attached to the tail section. Flight control continuity was established to all flight controls through broken torque tubes and cables. The torque tubes fractures were consistent with overstress separations as a result of impact forces. The electric motor was fractured off the motor mounts. The propeller blades were destroyed, and the motor would not rotate due to impact damage. The two battery packs were still mounted in the battery bracket behind the pilot seat. The battery posts were fractured off. A FLARM and LxNav avionics system was removed from the wreckage and forwarded to the National Transportation Safety Board Vehicle Recorders Laboratory, Washington, DC, for data download.

The single seat motorized glider was issued a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airworthiness certificate in the experimental category for the purpose of exhibition/air racing on June 8, 2015. It was equipped with a Front Electric Sustainer (FES) system, which was electrically driven by two lithium battery packs.

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate, with ratings for airplane single-engine land and glider. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on October 4, 2010. He reported 300 hours of total flight experience at that time.

The recorded weather at Jake Arner Memorial Airport, located 8 miles southeast of the accident site, at 1539, was: wind from 280° at 9 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; clear sky; temperature 14° C; dew point 2° C; altimeter 29.93 inches of mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: SPORTINE AVIACIJA
Registration: N830DK
Model/Series: LAK17 B
Aircraft Category: Glider
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: 22N, 1939 ft msl
Observation Time: 1939 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 14°C / 2°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots / , 280°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.93 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Blairstown, NJ (1N7)
Destination: Blairstown, NJ (1N7)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 40.743333, -76.018333

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 


WALKER TOWNSHIP, Pennsylvania -- It was just before 4 p.m. Friday when a glider plane crashed on Wildcat Mountain about a mile and a half behind a pond near Tamaqua.

According to the coroner, William D. Hanson, 65, of Queens, New York, was pronounced dead at the scene. Hanson was the only person on board. It took crews several hours to locate the glider plane in a rural wooded area of Walker Township. Officials believe Hanson was killed instantly.

"I heard an airplane, you know, a prop plane, you know, noisy, kind of loud for maybe five or 10 minutes, but like I said, not uncommon. There's helicopters, airplanes, military airplanes that go by," said Chris Houtz of Walker Township.

One neighbor was shocked to learn the sputtering noises he heard may have come from the fatal crash that killed Hanson.

Officials from the coroner's office say after a lengthy search, crews found Hanson's LAK-17 model glider plane in pieces. It appeared as though he crashed into a patch of bushes.

"From what we understand, it was an experimental glider, and I mean, it was made of fiberglass, so I guess when it hit it just kind of came apart," explained Schuylkill County Deputy Coroner Albert Barnes.

"He had extensive internal injuries from the head down to the toes, and there was damage to the spine. This was not a survivable injury," said Dr. David Moylan, Schuylkill County Coroner.

Moylan believes the flight left from New Jersey. Officials still don't know how the plane crashed.

Members of the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board have begun what they anticipate will be a three-day long investigation, which will include factors like weather, flight plan, and pilot qualifications.

The coroner's office will work with the Federal Aviation Administration to complete a toxicology report on the pilot.

"The maximum is eight hours from bottle to throttle. I'm sure this gentleman complied. We normally send our toxicology to the NMS Laboratories in Willow Grove, but the 
Federal Aviation Administration has requested we use their laboratories, so we're going to cooperate in every way," Moylan added.

Moylan believes Hanson intended to land his glider back in New Jersey after the flight, but the National Transportation Safety Board has yet to confirm those details.

Story and video ➤ https://wnep.com

The death of a New York City man in a glider crash in Schuylkill County has been ruled accidental.

The county coroner says 65-year-old William Hanson of Queens died of multiple blunt force trauma but his death was “as close as instantaneous as possible” in Friday afternoon crash in Walker Township.

Dr. David Moylan III said he believes the flight originated in New Jersey. Officials said the LAK-17 model glider plane was found in pieces after it apparently went down into a patch of bushes. Deputy Coroner Albert Barnes said the experimental aircraft was made of fiberglass and apparently ”just kind of came apart” in the crash.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.


https://www.mcall.com

Loss of Engine Power (Partial): Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee, N8447R; accident occurred March 12, 2017 near Peter O. Knight Airport (KTPF), Tampa, Hillsborough County, Florida



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N8447R




Location: Tampa, FL
Accident Number: ERA17LA128
Date & Time: 03/12/2017, 1335 EDT
Registration: N8447R
Aircraft: PIPER PA28
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 12, 2017, about 1335 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28-140, N8447R, impacted the water during a forced landing shortly after takeoff from Peter O Knight Airport (TPF), Tampa, Florida. The private pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight to Sebastian Municipal Airport (X26), Sebastian, Florida. The personal flight was conducted in accordance with the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, he rented the airplane two days prior to the accident flight, to fly from X26 to TPF for several days. The flight on March 10 was uneventful. On March 12, he arrived at the airport around 1230 and started his preflight inspection of the airplane. The pilot stated he "sumped" the tanks and the fuel was clear of debris. The rest of the preflight inspection was normal and no anomalies were noted. The engine run-up and magneto checks were normal, and he started his take-off roll on runway 22.

At 60 knots airspeed, he rotated and started to climb. Upon reaching about 100 ft above ground level, he noticed a loss of engine power and the rpm started to drop. He verified fuel and oil pressure were good and started looking for a place to land. He further stated he could not abort the take-off and land safely on the runway, so he decided to try to turn back to the airport and land on the cross runway. During the turn, he realized he would not make it back to the airport and decided to ditch the airplane into the surrounding water. Once he ditched the airplane, he exited through the cockpit door and a local boater picked him up and took him to shore.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the left wing separated from the airplane. The windshield was fractured in several areas and the right wing leading edge was damaged.

Further examination of the wreckage by an investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board revealed the induction hose from the air filter to the carburetor was collapsed and the spring inside the duct was positioned sideways.

The duct was sent to the airframe manufacturer for a visual examination. The examination revealed that the duct was not approved for installation on the PA-28-140 aircraft. Specifically, duct was not of a type that was approved for negative pressure environments. Also, the duct was not of the correct length, and it was not a double walled duct. Based on available information, it could not be determined when the duct had been installed onto the airplane.

The FAA issued a Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB), CE-14-23, on August 6, 2014, which recommended that operators and owners of the PA-28 inspect the air inlet hose [duct] and verify that it was an approved part and did not exhibit any loose or broken cords on the external surface. The inspection should also confirm that there was no loose or displaced supporting wire, or signs of wear, perforation, deterioration, and that the part had not collapsed. If any of these conditions were observed, then the hose must be replaced before next flight.

The operator reported that they were unaware of the SAIB, and following the accident, immediately grounded their fleet of airplanes and inspected them for the approved Piper duct. They found that all the airplanes had the unapproved duct installed and immediately ordered and installed the approved part.



Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 44, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/14/2012
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  231 hours (Total, all aircraft), 75 hours (Total, this make and model), 135 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 6 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: PIPER
Registration: N8447R
Model/Series: PA28 140
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1966
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 28-22331
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/07/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2150 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5400 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C91 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: 0-320 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 140 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KTPF, 8 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0735 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 7°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 100°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.06 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / 17°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Tampa, FL (TPF)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: SEBASTIAN, FL (X26)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1537 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class E 

Airport Information

Airport: PETER O KNIGHT (TPF)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 7 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 22
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3583 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 27.910556, -82.449722 (est)

Piper PA-32-301 Saratoga, N534Z: Fatal accident occurred October 20, 2019 near Raleigh-Durham International Airport (KRDU), Morrisville, Wake County, North Carolina

Harvey Partridge was piloting the plane he and his wife, Pat were in when something went wrong and the plane went down in a state park near the Raleigh-Durham airport October 20th. The NTSB is investigating.


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina
Piper Aircraft; Vero Beach, Florida

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N534Z

Location: Raleigh, NC
Accident Number: ERA20FA014
Date & Time: 10/20/2019, 1921 EDT
Registration: N534Z
Aircraft: Piper PA32
Injuries:2 Fatal 
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On October 20, 2019, about 1921 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-32-301, N534Z, was destroyed following a collision with terrain in Raleigh, North Carolina, while on approach to Raleigh-Durham International Airport (RDU), Morrisville, North Carolina. The private pilot and one passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to a corporation and was operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Night, visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight. The flight originated at Columbus Airport (CSG), Columbus, Georgia about 1605 and was destined for RDU.

According to preliminary air traffic control data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the pilot initially requested the RNAV GPS Runway 5R approach to RDU; however, due to local traffic he was told to expect the RNAV GPS Runway 32 approach. The pilot subsequently reported that he had GPS and autopilot issues and the controller subsequently provided radar vectors to NOSIC waypoint for the straight-in approach to runway 32. The controller asked the pilot if he had NOSIC identified, and the pilot reported that he did. The pilot continued the approach and intercepted the final approach course inbound for runway 32. The pilot reportedly "broke out" of the clouds on a 7 mile final at an altitude of 1,800 ft mean sea level (msl). The controller cleared the pilot for the visual approach to runway 32, and the pilot responded that he saw "lots of lights" but he did not see the runway. Between 6 and 7 miles from the runway, at 1,300 ft msl, the controller issued the pilot a low altitude alert with instructions to climb to 2,000 ft. The pilot responded that he thought he had the airport beacon in sight and the controller again cleared him for the visual approach to runway 32; the pilot did not respond. About 5 miles from the runway, at 1,400 ft, the pilot asked, "How am I doing on altitude?" The controller responded that he was "fine" and confirmed 1,400 ft. The controller again asked the pilot if he had the runway in sight, and stated that if he did, he was cleared for the visual approach. The pilot responded that he only could identify the beacon, so the controller told him that he would turn up the intensity of the runway lights. When the airplane was between 3 and 4 miles on final and at 1,000 ft, the controller again asked him if he had the runway in sight, and the pilot responded that he believed it was coming into view. The pilot was directed to contact RDU tower and communication was established with tower when the airplane was about 1,000 ft msl and 3 miles from the runway. The tower controller asked the pilot if he had the runway in sight; the pilot confirmed that he did. The controller then asked the pilot if he was on a 2-mile final; the pilot did not respond. No further communications were received from the pilot and radar contact was lost. The wreckage was subsequently located about 1000 on October 21.

The airplane crashed in a thickly-wooded area within the confines of the 5,579-acre William B. Umstead State Park. The wreckage path was about 400 ft long and about 50 ft wide, oriented on a heading of 320ยบ. The main wreckage was located about 1.2 miles southeast of the runway 32 threshold. The initial point of impact was a 100-ft-tall pine tree, and a large section of the right wing remained lodged near the top of the tree. There was no fire. The engine was found separated from the airframe and the propeller assembly was separated from the engine. Flight control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit area to the flight control surfaces. All aircraft components and structure were accounted for at the accident site.

The pilot, who co-owned the airplane, held an FAA private pilot certificate with ratings for multiengine land, single engine land, and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA third class medical certificate was issued on December 13, 2017. At that time, he reported 4,000 hours of flight experience.

Reported weather conditions at RDU, at 1951, included overcast clouds at 1,400 ft, greater than 10 miles visibility, and no precipitation. Sunset occurred at 1831 and evening civil twilight ended at 1857.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N534Z
Model/Series: PA32 301
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night/Dark
Observation Facility, Elevation: KRDU, 435 ft msl
Observation Time: 1951 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / 14°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Light and Variable / , Variable
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 1400 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.9 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Columbus, GA (CSG)
Destination: Raleigh, NC (RDU)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None 
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 35.854167, -78.757778 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

Harvey and Patricia Partridge

  





















MORRISVILLE, North Carolina — Two days after a small plane crashed on approach to Raleigh-Durham International Airport Sunday night, crews removed the wreckage of the doomed Piper PA-32-301 Saratoga Tuesday from Umstead State Park.

A large crane was brought in to extricate the mangled plane from the wooded park, made up of nearly 6,500 acres that sits adjacent to RDU.

Dr. Harvey Partridge and Patricia Partridge, both 72, of Terra Ceia, Florida, were killed when the plane went down Sunday around 7:30 p.m. The couple was arriving in North Carolina for a vacation, according to family friends.

Friends of the family told WRAL News that Harvey Partridge was an experienced pilot who had logged thousands of hours in the air.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash, which occurred on a cloudy night with a low cloud ceiling.

The plane struck a tree and was found about 10 a.m. Monday upside down near the Reedy Creek multi-use trail following an extensive overnight search.

A statement by the FAA identified the plane as a Piper PA-32-301 Saratoga that was on approach to Runway 32 when radar contact with the small aircraft was lost. That runway is the smallest of three landing strips and perpendicular to RDU's primary runway.

Flight tracking data shows that the Partridges' took off from Columbus, Georgia, and their plane circled RDU multiple times.

According to an RDU spokeswoman, airport workers were notified at 7:25 p.m. Sunday by air traffic controllers from the Federal Aviation Administration that a small aircraft approaching the airport disappeared from radar somewhere over Umstead State Park, which is adjacent to the east side of RDU.

Story and video ➤ https://www.wral.com


Dr. Harvey Partridge and his wife Pat were killed when their plane crashed on approach to Raleigh-Durham International Airport. Harvey Partridge founded St. Petersburg's Partridge Animal Hospital in 1978. 


Two people were killed when a small plane crashed in William B. Umstead State Park as it was attempting to land at Raleigh-Durham International Airport on Sunday evening.

The State Highway Patrol announced the fatalities at noon Monday. They were later identified as Dr. Harvey Partridge, a veterinarian, and his wife Patricia Partridge, both 72, of Terra Ceia, Florida, near St. Petersburg, where Partridge founded Partridge Animal Hospital. A post on the hospital’s Facebook page described Partridge as “an experienced pilot.”

The plane was found off the Reedy Creek Trail shortly after 10 a.m. Monday, more than 14 hours after it was reported missing, said RDU spokeswoman Crystal Feldman. She said she did not have information about where the flight originated.

The plane is a Piper PA-32, a single-engine plane that seats up to six people, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. The federal agency said the plane was approaching Runway 32, a small general aviation runway that extends east-west, perpendicular to the airport’s two main runways, when air traffic controllers lost contact with it.

The National Transportation Safety Board will lead the investigation to determine what caused the crash. Board spokesman Keith Holloway said an investigator will examine the plane and the scene of the crash, review communications, radar data and weather information and try to speak to witnesses, if any. The investigator also will review maintenance records for the plane and the pilot’s medical and flying history.

The NTSB will release a preliminary report, describing the facts surrounding the crash, in about 10 days, Holloway said. A final report identifying the likely cause of the crash could take a year or more to complete.

FAA air traffic controllers contacted the airport about 7:25 p.m. Sunday to say they had lost radar contact with a plane as it approached RDU. A statement from the airport later in the evening said the small general aviation aircraft was near Umstead State Park, which borders the east side of RDU.

The airport’s runways were closed for about 20 minutes as fire and rescue crews responded to the report of a missing plane.

Searchers combed through Umstead in the dark Sunday night looking for the plane. Feldman said a State Highway Patrol helicopter looked for a heat signature on the ground, which might indicate the plane’s location, but the search was suspended about 2 a.m.

“Umstead State Park is 5,200 acres of dense forest with few roads and little to no light,” Feldman said Sunday. “It could take a very long time for us to find this plane.”

The search resumed at dawn Monday. It was led by the Raleigh Fire Department, with help from a dozen state and local rescue and law enforcement agencies.

Kendall Hocutt, the Raleigh Fire Department’s assistant chief of operations, described the search area as “rugged,” but did not provide any more details about where the plane crashed. Reedy Creek Trail runs the length of the park, from near RDU to where it emerges on the Raleigh side at Reedy Creek Road.

Umstead closed for the day Monday. The park will remain closed until the bodies have been removed from the plane and the NTSB investigator is finished with the site, said parks spokeswoman Katie Hall. It could reopen as early as Tuesday morning, Hall said, but perhaps as late as Wednesday.

Small planes often fly over the forests of Umstead on their approach to RDU, and a handful have crashed in the park over the years. In 1992, Wake County Commissioner Herb Stout and his passenger, Brian R. Benson of Durham, died when their Piper Arrow crashed into the woods as Stout prepared to land.

The pilot of a skydiving plane on its way from Illinois to North Carolina for maintenance was killed when the twin-engine aircraft crashed into the park shortly after midnight in the summer of 2000. Two passengers survived and spent three hours huddled in a sleeping bag near the wreckage until a park ranger, drawn by the smell of aviation fuel, found them.

Story and video ➤ https://www.newsobserver.com

Dr. Harvey Partridge


RALEIGH, North Carolina (WNCN) — A husband and his wife are dead after a plane crashed short of Raleigh-Durham International Airport Sunday night

After multiple agencies had to stop searching because of darkness, crews were able to locate the single-engine Piper off of the Reedy Creek Trail in the Umstead State Park on Monday.

The park is still closed, and as investigators try to piece together what happened those who live in the area tell CBS17 they were surprised to find out a plane crashed because they didn’t hear or see anything.

“We thought somebody had been hiking in the park and had an accident,” said Tamara Dunn.

After a decade of living on the doorstep of the Umstead State Park, Dunn says it’s all too common to see first responders headed into the forest, but something about Sunday night seemed different.

“First, the police department went by, and then the fire department went by,” said Dunn. “We walked down to check on our neighbor and make sure everything was OK down there. That’s when we found out a plane had gone down inside the park.”

As crews searched into the night for the wreckage Dunn did the only thing she could to try and help.

“We ended up leaving the porch light on just in case someone came wandering out and saw the light,” said Dunn.

Nearly 15 hours after the plane crashed into the 5600-acre state park it was discovered along a popular hiking trail.

“It was a rugged area,” said Raleigh Assistant Fire Chief Kendall Hocutt. “There was a lot of debris, and trees. It was difficult to locate which caused us some issues.”

The pilot, 72-year-old Harvey Partridge, and his wife Patricia passed away in the crash.

“I think the airport does a really great job with their safety,” said Dunn. “I think that sometimes tragedies happen for whatever reason. Until they have more information it’s going to be hard to say.”

The NTSB has investigators on the scene of the crash.

CBS17 is told the NTSB will be looking into the flight path, the weather conditions, and the pilot’s history.


Story and video ➤ https://www.cbs17.com




RALEIGH, North Carolina — A Florida couple – a 72-year-old veterinarian and his wife – died when a plane crashed Sunday night in Raleigh.

Search and rescue crews located the plane around 10 a.m. Monday in William B. Umstead State Park, upside down in a tree near the Reedy Creek multi-use trail following an extensive overnight search.

"It was a rugged area, a lot of debris, trees," said Raleigh Fire Department Assistant Chief Kendall Hocutt about the crash site. "It was difficult to locate."

Dr. Harvey Partridge and Patricia Partridge, both 72, of Terra Ceia, Fla., were on board. Friends of the family told WRAL News that he was an experienced pilot who had logged thousands of hours in the air.

The couple was on vacation in North Carolina, friends said.

Raleigh-Durham International Airport officials said the National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the crash along with the State Highway Patrol and North Carolina Parks officials.

According to an RDU spokeswoman, airport workers were notified at 7:25 p.m. Sunday by air traffic controllers from the Federal Aviation Administration that a small aircraft approaching the airport disappeared from radar somewhere over Umstead State Park, which is adjacent to the east side of RDU.

A statement by the FAA identified the plane as a Piper PA32 that was on approach to Runway 32 when radar contact with the small aircraft was lost. That runway is the smallest of three landing strips and perpendicular to RDU's primary runway.

Flight tracking data shows that the Partridges' took off from Columbus, Ga., and their plane circled RDU multiple times.

"If you have the airport in sight, if you have 3-2 in sight, you can do a visual approach. Just look for a visual approach runway 3-2," the tower told Harvey Partridge.

"The only thing I see is the beacon," he answered.

"Ok. We’re going to turn the lights up to see if you can see the runway," the tower answered.

Airport fire and first responder crews were dispatched to the scene, which prompted the airport to suspend operations for about 30 minutes, said Crystal Feldman, vice president of communications, government and community affairs at the airport.


All flights were running on a normal schedule Monday morning.


Almost 15 agencies from Raleigh, Durham, Cary, Wake Forest, Holly Springs and New Hope were assisting with search and rescue efforts Monday.


Story and video ➤ https://www.wral.com