Saturday, June 24, 2017

Aero Commander 200D, N929DM, Meyers 200 LLC: Accident occurred June 24, 2017 near Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport (KECP), Panama City, Bay County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Vestavia Hills, Alabama
Continental Motors Inc; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Meyers 200 LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N929DM

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA212
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 24, 2017 in Panama City, FL
Aircraft: AERO COMMANDER 200D, registration: N929DM
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 24, 2017, about 1300 central daylight time, an Aero Commander 200D, N929DM, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing while approaching Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport (ECP, Panama City, Florida. The pilot and the passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to a private company and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and the flight was operated on a visual flight rules flight plan. The flight originated from the Malden Regional Airport (MAW), Malden, Missouri, about 1030.

The pilot stated that he was on a 5-mile final for runway 16 at an altitude of about 2,000 ft mean sea level (msl), when he heard a "muffled bang" come from the engine. The engine then lost partial power. The pilot said he turned off the autopilot, trimmed for best glide, and prepared to make a forced landing on a highway since he knew he would be unable to make the runway. During this time, the pilot adjusted the mixture control to troubleshoot the problem and brought the throttle full forward, but to no avail. The pilot said he did no turn on the auxiliary fuel boost pump or switch fuel tanks, and instead focused on trying to make a safe landing.

The pilot stated that the airplane descended quickly and he ended up landing in a clearing between a set of power lines and a forest. The airplane stalled right before touchdown and landed hard on the right main landing gear. The airplane skidded, turned around and came to rest upright on a southwesterly heading. The pilot said that he recalled hearing "silence" just prior to touchdown and believes that the engine had stopped producing power before impact.

A review of on-scene photographs revealed that both wings and the fuselage were substantially damaged. The wreckage was retained for further examination.


The weather conditions reported at ECP at 1328 included wind from 220 degrees at 8 knots, gusting to 18 knots, visibility 10 miles, scattered clouds 2,900 ft, broken clouds 3,800 ft, temperature 30° degrees C, dewpoint 23° C, and a barometric altimeter setting of 30.04 inches of mercury.





Panama City Beach, Fla. — A pair of Jonesboro residents are in stable condition after the plane they were in made an emergency landing Saturday in Bay County, Fla.

James McLeod of Jonesboro, who was the pilot, made the emergency landing around 1 p.m. Saturday in an Aero Commander m200 aircraft.

According to The Florida Highway Patrol, McLeod was trying to make the landing when the plane lost power for an unknown reason and crashed onto the south shoulder of State Road 20 near State Road 77.

McLeod and a passenger, Erin McLeod, of Jonesboro were taken to the hospital with serious injuries.


http://katv.com







BAY COUNTY (WKRG) — A pilot had to make an emergency landing Saturday afternoon.

According to an emailed press release, James McLeod, 32, attempted to make an emergency landing.

The aircraft lost power and crash landed on the south shoulder of State Road 20.

The pilot, James McLeod, and the passenger, Erin McLeod, were transported to Gulf Coast Hospital with serious injuries.

They are in stable condition.

It is unknown why the aircraft lost power.  

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the accident with some assistance from the Florida Highway Patrol.

http://wkrg.com

Butler County Regional Airport (KHAO) administrator to be terminated




HAMILTON, Ohio

Citing continued financial difficulties with the Butler County Regional Airport, the commissioners are set to fire the administrator Ron Davis on Monday.

At every budget hearing with Davis for the past several years the commissioners have shown frustration that Davis hasn’t been able to make the airport financially viable. County Administrator Charlie Young told the Journal-News when the tax budgets came in recently they knew they can no longer sustain Davis’ $93,710 annual salary.

With benefits the total general fund outlay is $110,310.

“There has been a continuing effort to meet our budget goals and we have come to the conclusion we cannot meet our budget goals with the expense we’ve had of the administrator’s position,” Young said. “We just don’t have the funding for that position at the level we’ve been paying.”

Young said general fund monies have bailed the airport out to the tune of $40,000 to $50,000 annually, up to as much as $100,000. That doesn’t even include the $155,000 in debt payments every year.

 



Commissioner Don Dixon said they could not allow the airport to continue to be a drain on county coffers.

“If we are not able to change the operations or change the revenue stream, we have to make the books balance,” he said. “The way to make the books balance is to cut what you can cut and the first thing you can cut is personnel.”

In the short term the county is asking the fixed base operator Cincinnati Jet, Development Director David Fehr and other staff to fill the void.

Dixon said for the long term they plan to go out to bid for a part-time, contracted administrator for Hogan Field.

“We’re looking at part-time contractor with no benefits at all,” Dixon said.

Davis, who has been at the airport almost 18 years, said he has no comment at this time. His termination is effective June 30.


http://www.journal-news.com

Wanted: New flight school at Tri-Cities Regional Airport (KTRI)



BLOUNTVILLE — Help is wanted at Tri-Cities Airport in the pilot training department.

The former flight training instructor has retired, and Airport Authority commissioners listened to a pitch from Airport Executive Director Patrick Wilson on Thursday to restore that service.

“It relates back to growing general aviation, but there is a significant pilot shortage in the airline industry,” Wilson advised. “Flight training at airports like this is where a lot of those pilot careers start.”

Wilson said airport staff is working to lease the existing flight training office to Morristown Flying Service.

“They’ve been operating a flight school at the Morristown Airport since 1984, and since 1996 it has been owned and operated by J.B. Marshall,” Wilson told commissioners. “We continue to hear positive things about J.B. He’s a pretty well-known name in the aviation community in Tennessee. They would like to operate a flight school here. … They want to rebuild the student base that was here. … It’s going to take a little bit of time to rebuild the demand.”

The new operation, said Wilson, would be called Flying Service at Tri-Cities.

Pilot training would be offered using Cessna 182s, according to Wilson.

For more about the airport, go to www.triflight.com.


http://www.timesnews.net

Cessna 172 Skyhawk, N6474B: Accident occurred June 24, 2017 near Elton Hensley Memorial (KFTT), Fulton, Callaway County, Missouri

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA241 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 24, 2017 in Fulton, MO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/02/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N6474B
Injuries: 2 Minor, 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot and two passengers were conducting a local sightseeing flight when the engine “sputtered ever so slightly” and then regained power. Three to 5 seconds later, engine power dropped to about 700 rpm. The pilot checked the engine controls in an attempt to regain engine power; when power was not restored, he initiated a forced landing to a field. During the forced landing, the airplane landed about 3/4 down the length of a field and impacted adjacent trees.

During an initial examination, about 1 ounce of water was found in the gascolator. Continuity was established from the cockpit engine controls to the respective engine components. Fuel was found in the carburetor bowl and in the wing fuel tanks. A follow-up engine examination and functional test run did not produce any anomalies that would have prevented normal operation and production of rated horsepower. It is likely the water contamination found in the gascolator resulted in the partial loss of engine power. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The partial loss of engine power due to water contamination in the fuel system.

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA241
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 24, 2017 in Fulton, MO
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N6474B
Injuries: 2 Minor, 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 24, 2017, about 0930 central daylight time, a Cessna 172 airplane, N6474B, impacted trees during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near Fulton, Missouri. The private pilot and two passengers were not injured, and two passengers sustained minor injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. The airplane was owned and operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight departed the Elton Hensley Memorial Airport, Fulton, Missouri, about 0915.

According to the pilot, prior to the local sightseeing flight, he completed a preflight inspection of the airplane. He noted "little to no water" when he sumped the left wing fuel tank, and stated he sumped the right wing fuel tank. The left wing fuel tank contained about 9 gallons of fuel, and the right wing fuel tank contained about 7 to 8 gallons of fuel. 

While maneuvering during a local sightseeing flight, the engine "sputtered ever so slightly" and then regained power. About 3 to 5 seconds later, the engine dropped to about 700 RPM. The pilot checked the engine controls in an attempt to regain power. The pilot initiated a forced landing to a field. During the forced landing, the airplane landed about 3/4 down the available length of a field and impacted adjacent trees.

During an initial examination at the accident site by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, the inspector found about 1 ounce of water in the gascolator. Continuity was established from the cockpit engine controls to the respective engine components. Fuel was found in the carburetor bowl and in the wing fuel tanks.

On July 26, 2017, at the recovery facility, the engine was examined by FAA inspectors and a representative of Continental Motors. The engine was visually examined and no anomalies were noted. An external supply of aviation fuel was plumbed into the gascolator on the firewall of the airframe. Due to two broken rear engine mounts, a ratchet strap was used to secure the engine to the airframe engine mount. The engine started normally on the second attempt and allowed to warm up. The throttle was advanced to 1,000 RPMs and a magneto check was performed. Each magneto produced a drop of 50-75 engine RPMs. The engine was advanced to 2,300 RPM, and then back to 1,000 RPM for a second magneto check. The magneto check results were the same as the first magneto check. The throttle was reduced to idle, and the engine was shutdown using the mixture control. According to Continental Motors, the engine examination and functional test run did not produce any anomalies that would have prevented normal operation and production of horsepower. 

The airplane was configured to seat and restrain a total of 4 occupants.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Kansas City, Missouri

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N6474B

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA241
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 24, 2017 in Fulton, MO
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N6474B
Injuries: 2 Minor, 3 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 24, 2017, at 0933 central daylight time, a Cessna 172 airplane, N6474B, impacted trees during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near Fulton, Missouri. The private pilot and one passenger sustained minor injuries, and 3 passengers were not injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. The airplane was owned and operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight departed the Elton Hensley Memorial Airport, Fulton, Missouri, about 0915.

According to the pilot, while maneuvering during a local sightseeing flight, the engine "sputtered and coughed" and then regained normal power. Shortly thereafter, the engine lost power and he attempted to restart the engine. The restart attempts were unsuccessful and the pilot initiated a forced landing to a field. During the forced landing, the airplane landed in a field and impacted adjacent trees. The airplane was recovered for further examination.



CALLAWAY COUNTY, Mo. - UPDATE 12:30 p.m.: The Callaway County Sheriff's Office received reports of an airplane that crashed in a field around 9:30 a.m. Saturday.

Sheriff Clay Chism said when deputies arrived to the 6700 block of Route O, they found that all five passengers made it off the plane safely.

Chism said only two of the passengers suffered minor injuries. No one was transported to the hospital by emergency vehicles.

Chism said the plane was head toward Elton Hensley Memorial Airport in Fulton when the pilot noticed the plane was malfunctioning.

The Federal Aviation Administration was called to investigate the crash.

http://www.abc17news.com

Aeronca 7AC Champion, N83643: Accident occurred March 09, 2015 in Garrison, Benton County, Iowa

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Moines, Iowa

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf



NTSB Identification: GAA15LA019
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, March 09, 2015 in Garrison, IA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/19/2015
Aircraft: AERONCA 7AC, registration: N83643
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that he was landing the tailwheel-equipped airplane in variable wind conditions. During the landing roll, he applied both heel brakes. When the pilot released the brakes, the right brake did not release. The airplane veered right of the landing path on the dirt airstrip, and the left wing struck a power line pole. During postaccident examination, the brakes operated normally with no anomalies noted. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The malfunction of the right brake for reasons that could not be determined because postaccident examination revealed no anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

On March 9, 2015, about 1800 Central date time, an Aeronca 7AC airplane, N83643, had a main landing gear right brake malfunction during the landing at a private dirt airstrip in Garrison Iowa. The airplane was operated as a visual flight rules (VFR) personal flight, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, when the accident occurred. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and the pilot and sole passenger were not injured. The airplane was stopped after the left wing contacted a power line pole. The pilot reported that he was landing the tailwheel-equipped airplane in variable wind conditions. During the landing roll he applied both heel brakes. When the pilot released the brakes he reported that the right brake did not release. The airplane veered to the right of the landing path and the left wing contacted a power line pole. The airplane sustained substantial to its left wing.

An FAA Certificated Airframe & Powerplant (A&P) mechanic identified normal operation of the brake during the airplane's recovery. 

At the direction of the National Transportation Safety Board Investigator-In-Charge, on April 13, 2015 the brake assembly was disassembled and re-inspected by an FAA A&P Mechanic. No mechanical anomalies were found, and the brake operated normally before and after the inspection.

Letter: In Response to “Life Under the Flight Path” by Marvin Smith, Dana Point

Art Burnevik, Dana Point

Thank you to Marvin Smith to express my thinking about “the noise.” I live on board [a vessel] in the Dana Point Harbor and I would like the EPA and the Coastal Commission to convene a multi-million dollar “conversation” about sea lions barking at night and doing something about the fog horn and the sound of the waves on days with particularly heavy surf.

Not!

Smith touched on what I see as a burgeoning social malady that appears to be limitless PLS (Perfect Life Syndrome). From the perfect razor, the perfect underwear, the perfect smile, the perfect shirt length, the perfect car; it just follows that everything and everybody around the core of the unadaptable must comply with a flawed premise. This premise is that airplanes are causing excessive noise and disturbing the “balance of nature” for Dana Point residents. If it is natural silence that appeals, then move to the jungle or the country.

In the Dana Point Harbor, my peaceful, natural environment is stifled on weekend nights by Cattle Boat Charters with live bands playing so loud it drowns out my sound system and nearly rattles the Ibuprofen tablets in my medicine chest. I find boats with high cubic inch, straight pipe exhausts extremely annoying.  The primary aircraft traveling my flight path are mostly military. I salute them as a sign of strength and security. I’m sure there are those people with PLS that would prefer that we close Pendleton to make theirs a more “perfect” environment.

Between the Harley mid-life cruisers and the audio sound systems with mind-thumping base output heard from a block away, I think Smith has the right idea. Focus on the obvious sound pollution. If you buy a house next to the railroad tracks, don’t ask the railroad to move. The idea of a perfect world may apply to underwear and razors, but let’s face it, no matter where you live, people must adapt. If you live next to John Wayne or in Newport Beach and you don’t like jets, why move there in the first place?

Complaining about the limited daytime jet noise in Dana Point is nonsense. Sorry, it’s not a perfect world.

http://www.danapointtimes.com/letter

Rans S-12 Airaile, N154BH: Accident occurred March 07, 2015 near Cherokee County Airport (KJSO), Jacksonville, Texas




The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Irving, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N154BH

NTSB Identification: CEN15LA169
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, March 07, 2015 in Rusk, TX
Aircraft: HOKE BOBBY F RANS S 12, registration: N154BH
Injuries: 2 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 7, 2015 about 1230 central standard time, a Rans S-12 Experimental Ultralight, N154BH, registered to a private individual, collided with trees and the ground while maneuvering to land after reported engine problems while in the landing pattern at the Cherokee County Airport (JSO), near Rusk, Texas. The pilot and passenger sustained serious injuries and the aircraft was substantially damaged. The local flight was being conducted under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area and a flight plan was not filed.

According to the FAA, about 2 weeks prior to the accident, the passenger had purchased the ultralight aircraft. The purpose of the flight was to become familiar with the newly acquired aircraft. The PIC had about 11,000 hours of total flight time, with about 2 hours in the accident make and model. The PIC's most recent BFR was conducted on December 9. 2014. According to a written bill of sale, the passenger purchased the airplane on February 19, 2015. The aircraft's most recent conditional inspection was conducted on March 3, 2015.

Witnesses reported that the ultralight aircraft was doing touch and go landings at JSO. They reported that the engine did not sound normal and observed the aircraft maneuver toward a field before it stalled, collided with trees and impacted the ground. The pilot and passenger were transported to the hospital after the accident. The FAA traveled to the accident scene and inspected the accident area and wreckage. There was evidence of fuel smell at the accident site. Inspection of the airframe and engine at the accident site did not reveal any abnormalities.

The reported weather observation METAR at JSO about the time of the accident was:

KJSO 071735Z AUTO 00000KT 10SM BKN100 12/M05 A3048 RMK AO2 T01211051

According to the Icing Probability Chart, with a temperature of 12 degrees and dew point of 5 degrees, the aircraft engine was operating in an area conducive to severe icing at any power setting.

The NTSB did not receive a NTSB form 6120, Pilot/Operator Report or statements from the pilot and passenger. It is unknown if the passenger/owner had flight experience.




CHEROKEE COUNTY, TX  -  Two East Texas men are recovering after their plane crashed Saturday afternoon near Cherokee County Airport.

The fixed wing single engine plane went down around 12:30 p.m. in a wooded area northwest of the airport runway near CR 1614 and CR 1621. Officers say that Robert Gatewood and Jake Wise were airlifted to ETMC Tyler for their injuries, one of which is in serious condition. 

A friend who was watching the men fly this afternoon says they just recently bought the lightweight plane.

"When I saw the plane go down, his son and I hopped in his truck and drove to the north end of the airport. We had to climb the fence because we couldn't get out. We knew the plane had gone down in the woods on the north end here. We both climbed the fence and started searching," Joe Parrish said.

It is not clear what caused the crash. Witnesses say the men were practicing touch-and-go landings when the crash happened.

http://www.ktre.com

Bellanca 17-30A Super Viking, N575JH: Accident occurred June 24, 2017 at Burnet Municipal Airport (KBMQ), Burnet County, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA366
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 24, 2017 in Burnet, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/07/2017
Aircraft: BELLANCA 1730, registration: N575JH
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, during the landing, as the nosewheel touched down, the airplane “hopped a bit” and began to veer left. He applied right rudder and brakes to no avail. He released the rudder and brakes, and the airplane exited the left side of the runway and impacted a raised taxiway.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s improper landing flare and subsequent failure to maintain directional control during the landing.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N575JH


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA366
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 24, 2017 in Burnet, TX
Aircraft: BELLANCA 1730, registration: N575JH
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, during the landing, as the nose wheel touched down, the airplane "hopped a bit" and began to veer left. He applied right rudder and brakes with no avail. He released the rudder and brakes, and the airplane exited the left side of the runway impacting a raised taxiway.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.



A small plane carrying only its pilot was damaged while landing at around 7:21 a.m. Saturday at Burnet Municipal Airport, officials said.

Department of Public Safety officer Andrew Thomas said the pilot, Mark Rankin, was uninjured and that the airport runway was not damaged.

“It was a pretty simple crash,” Thomas said. “The plane touched down and the pilot said it started pulling to the left. He entered a little skid and it pulled him off the runway. He came to rest in the median.”

Thomas said the plane, a Bellanca 17-30A Super Viking, had damage to its wing, undercarriage and propeller blade.

The incident occurred before rain fell in the area, the officer said. 

A representative for the Federal Aviation Administration told the American-Statesman that the plane was categorized as having “Extensive damage.” 

The National Transportation Safety Board was notified and an investigation has been opened.

The aircraft was en route from Spicewood Airport where maintenance on the runway was causing planes to be relocated, Thomas said.

Rankin, a vice president in Austin at the car-shopping company Edmunds, said he’s been flying for about 12 years without anything like this having happened before.

http://www.statesman.com

(AUSTIN) — A small plane crashed Saturday morning after skidding off the runway at the Burnet Municipal Airport according to the Texas Department of Public Safety.

The crash happened at 7:31 a.m.

As the plane was landing it began skidding to the left off the runway.

While the aircraft, a Bellanca 17-30A Super Viking, remained upright on its belly, it did have a broken wing.

The pilot was removed from the plane without any injuries according to DPS.

The Federal Aviation Administration has been notified and the official cause of the crash is still being investigated.

http://kxan.com

Cessna 172P Skyhawk, N54974, Associated Air Activities Inc: Accident occurred February 21, 2015 at Greater Kankakee Airport (KIKK), Kankakee County, Illinois

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Associated Air Activities Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N54974

NTSB Identification: CEN15CA151
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, February 21, 2015 in Kankakee, IL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/21/2015
Aircraft: CESSNA 172P, registration: N54974
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The flight instructor and student pilot were practicing landings to a full stop. During the 6th landing, the student pilot over controlled the airplane during the landing flare. The flight instructor attempted to correct the flight control inputs; however, he was unable to overcome the strength of the student pilot on the flight controls. The airplane struck a bank of snow on the left side of the runway and nosed over. The left wing and fuselage were substantially damaged. The flight instructor reported no pre-impact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilot's improper flight control inputs resulting in the loss of control during the landing flare.

The flight instructor and student pilot were practicing landings to a full stop. During the 6th landing, the student pilot over controlled the airplane during the landing flare. The flight instructor attempted to correct the flight control inputs; however, he was unable to overcome the strength of the student pilot on the flight controls. The airplane struck a bank of snow on the left side of the runway and nosed over. The left wing and fuselage were substantially damaged. The flight instructor reported no pre-impact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Man Steals Van and Then Attempts To Enter Plane: Lakeland Linder Regional Airport (KLAL)

 
Gregory A. Hock, 37, of Lakeland is charged with two counts of grand theft, one count of trespassing, one count of burglary and resisting arrest. (Photo: Lakeland Police Department)


LAKELAND — On the run, a suspect did his best to fly away. 

 He tried to get into a plane that was about to take off, the Lakeland Police Department reported.

Before all that, Lakeland police said Gregory Hoch, 37, stole a van on Harden Boulevard and drove 5 miles to Lakeland Linder Regional Airport on the run from a man who may have seen him enter the van near Lakeside Village.

In the end, Hoch, of 619 Charles St., was charged with two counts of grand theft, one count of trespassing, one count of burglary to an occupied conveyance (airplane), and resisting arrest without violence, Lakeland police reported.

After his arrest, police said Hoch told Lakeland police Lt. Eric Harper that he wanted to make the pilot fly him somewhere.

“I was just trying to get away from you,” Harper said Hoch told him.

The incident started about 2 p.m. Thursday while surveyor Allen Stokes Jr., 32, of Orlando, was working at 3304 Harden Blvd., at Lakeside Village, for National Data and Surveying Services.

Stokes had stepped out of his 2008 Dodge van and was removing tools from the rear of the vehicle when he saw a man riding by on his bicycle. Seconds later, the man was driving away, police reported.

A witness, Gregory Mulvihill, 58, of Clearwater saw Hoch get into the van and suspected it had been stolen. He called police and began to follow the van.

At one point, Hoch hit a curb and blew a tire, but continued down the road for 5 miles to Lakeland Linder.

Harper, who was nearby in a cruiser, met Mulvihill near the airport. Mulvihill pointed to Hoch, who at this point had run through a business, Double M Aviation, and entered the airfield, police reported.

Harper pursued Hoch onto the runway and ordered him to stop several times as he ran around a number of planes.

Hoch then jumped onto the wing of a 1978 Piper PA-28R Arrow that was running in preparation to taxing down the runway. He started pulling on the door of the plane.

Harper chased Hoch onto the wing of the plane, pulled him off just as he began to enter through the passenger door, and the two fell back — first onto the wing, then the ramp.

Police said Hoch was taken into custody, then driven to the LPD.

The pilot, Rodrigo Cabal, of Winter Garden, was not injured.

When police arrested Hoch he had $384. Hoch told officers that he had taken the money from the Dodge van.


On June 22, 2017 at 2:02 p.m., the Lakeland Police Department responded to a motor vehicle theft that had just occurred at 3304 Harden Blvd.

The victim, Allen Stokes, Jr. of Orlando was working at the location as a surveyor for National Data and Surveying Services. Stokes had stepped out of his 2008 Dodge van and was removing tools from the rear of the van. He observed the suspect, Gregory A. Hoch, 37 years old, riding by on a bicycle. The next thing the victim knew, Hoch was in the driver’s seat driving off in the van.

A nearby witness, Gregory Mulvihill, saw the incident unfold and followed the stolen van. At one point, Hoch hit a curb and blew a tire, but continued for approximately 5 miles to the Lakeland Linder Regional Airport.

Lieutenant Eric Harper, who was nearby in a marked patrol car, responded to the area and made contact with Mulvihill. At this time, Mulvihill pointed out Hoch who had run through a business, Double M Aviation, and entered the airfield owned by the City of Lakeland. After gaining access to the ramp, Lt. Harper ordered Hoch to stop running several times as he ran around several planes. Hoch then jumped onto the wing of a taxing 1978 Piper PA-28R Arrow that was running and preparing to taxi down the ramp. Hoch started pulling on the planes door to gain entry. Lt. Harper, pursued Hoch onto the wing of the airplane and pulled Hoch from out of the airplane just as he had gained entry. Hoch and Lt. Harper fell back on the wing and then the ramp. Hoch resisted arrest and was eventually taken into custody and transported to the Lakeland Police Department.

No injures were sustained during the incident.

Hoch made a spontaneous statement saying that he was going to make the pilot take him somewhere. Hoch was also in possession of $384.00 in property that he removed from the stolen Dodge van when he was arrested.

Hoch was charged with:

2 counts of Grand Theft
1 count of Trespassing
1 count of Burglary to an Occupied Conveyance (Airplane)
Resisting Arrest without Violence.

http://www.theledger.com

American Airlines worker accused of brawling with police


Moore (Source: Mecklenburg County Jail)



CHARLOTTE, N.C  - An American Airlines worker is accused of fighting with officers at Charlotte’s airport after the airline kept him off a flight because he’d cursed and threatened a federal Transportation Security Administration agent.

A federal grand jury charged Jordan Lee Moore, 30, of Winston-Salem with two counts of interference with security screening personnel, according to a bill of indictment unsealed on Friday in U.S. District Court in Charlotte.

The ruckus began after Moore tried to go through security at about 5:30 p.m. on March 30 using the TSA PreCheck Line at Checkpoint B without a valid boarding pass with TSA PreCheck designations, the indictment said.

Moore moved close to the security officer’s face, hurled a racial slur and said he would kill him, according to the indictment. Moore then walked to Checkpoint C, where a Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police officer ordered him to leave the airport.

Moore instead entered the TSA security lane at Checkpoint D, where an American Airlines security worker asked for identification. Moore wore what appeared to be a company ID badge, but the airline worker couldn’t see it and Moore refused to display it, the indictment said.

The worker then told Moore he could not fly on the airline that day or any other day until they resolved “this matter,” referring to Moore’s earlier threat to the TSA officer, according to the indictment.

Two CMPD officers approached, told Moore he could not travel that day and began to escort him from Checkpoint D when Moore saw the original TSA officer, cussed at him and ran down a flight of stairs to the arrivals/baggage claim level. He boarded a departing bus.

According to the indictment, Moore returned to the airport two hours later and approached Checkpoint D, where the lead TSA officer recognized him from his picture that had been distributed to officers at all checkpoints.

The officer told him to wait a moment and to show him his identification, which Moore did. Moore proceeded to the Checkpoint D baggage screening area without permission, the indictment said. As he put his baggage on the conveyor belt, a transportation security manager told him he was not allowed to fly that day, the indictment said.

“I am going in,” Moore replied. “Just watch me.”

The situation deteriorated. CMPD officers at Checkpoint D told Moore he could not pass, to which he replied: “You cannot stop me. I am an airline employee.”

CMPD officers told him to leave the airport, and they began removing the bin with his items from a screening table when Moore said, “Don’t touch my stuff, bitch.”

Officers tried to arrest him, but Moore began fighting with them. It took five CMPD officers to put him in restraints, according to the indictment.

Because of the second altercation, Checkpoint D was closed and passengers were redirected to other checkpoints.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police also charged Moore with disorderly conduct in a public building, second-degree trespass and resisting a public officer. He is free on bail.

“We have been actively cooperating with law enforcement, and the employee has been suspended pending the investigation,” American Airlines spokeswoman Katie Cody said.

Efforts by the Observer to reach Moore were unsuccessful. A woman who said she is his mother said she was “in total shock” to learn of the indictments. “I don’t believe that at all,” she said. “He wouldn’t fight anybody. He would never put his hands on anybody.”

Her son, who works in sales for the airline, was trying to fly to Indianapolis, where his father lives and had “severe medical issues,” she said.

http://www.wbtv.com

Piper PA-28-181 Archer III, N199PA, Fort Myers Flying Club: Fatal accident occurred June 24, 2017 near Page Field Airport (KFMY), Fort Myers, Lee County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida
Piper Aircraft Co.; Vero Beach, Florida
Lycoming; Atlanta, Georgia

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Cub Club Inc dba Fort Myers Flying Club: http://registry.faa.gov/N199PA

NTSB Identification: ERA17FA210 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 24, 2017 in Fort Myers, FL
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-181, registration: N199PA
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 24, 2017, about 0748 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA28-181, N199PA, impacted a building and terrain during takeoff from Page Field Airport (FMY), Fort Myers, Florida. The pilot incurred serious injuries and the pilot-rated passenger was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight to Marion County Airport (X35), Dunnellon, Florida. The personal flight was conducted in accordance with the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, he conducted a normal preflight inspection of the airplane and noted no anomalies. He sampled fuel from the fuel tanks twice and found no water or debris. The engine start was normal with all instruments in the normal operating range, and he observed similar indications during the engine run-up. He further stated that he started his takeoff roll and verified the engine RPM was reaching 2,450. He lifted off the ground at 65 knots and pitched the airplane to 5 degrees nose up, with a goal of 80 knots. At 75 knots, he felt a loss of engine power and the RPMs started to decrease. He switched fuel tanks and applied carb heat, but the engine continued to lose power. The pilot decided to make an emergency landing on a nearby street. He turned to the right to line up with the street but the wing contacted a tree and then hit the side of a building.

The airplane came to rest against a building across the street from the airport. The airframe wreckage was examined at the accident site, and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The engine compartment, cockpit, cabin area, empennage and the majority of both wings were consumed by post-crash fire. Flight control cable continuity was confirmed from the cockpit area to the flight control surfaces. The two-bladed propeller fractured off the engine and was located in the ceiling of the building. One blade exhibited "S" bending and the other blade was fractured in several pieces. The starter ring gear, starter ring gear support, cowling and windshield pieces were located in the building.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. He held an FAA third-class medical certificate, issued January 5, 2017. At the time of the medical examination, the pilot reported 523 total hours of flight experience.
The four seat, low-wing airplane, was manufactured in 1999. It was powered by a Lycoming O-360-A4M, 180-horsepower engine, equipped with a two-blade Sensenich propeller.

The engine and airframe were retained for further investigation.

Marc Scott and Anthony Greco



FORT MYERS, Fla. The group of pilots whose president flew the plane that crashed into a daycare Saturday is stopping further flights until inspections are performed.

Fort Myers Flying Club President Anthony Greco Jr. was injured and his passenger was killed when the plane crashed into the daycare at Chico’s corporate headquarters on Metro Parkway.

Accudata Vice President of Sales Marc Scott, 37, was identified as the passenger Monday by the Lee County Sheriff’s Office.

Certified aircraft mechanics will perform the inspections, which are on top of the annual inspections the planes have already undergone, Fort Myers Flying Club Vice President Mike Jackson said.

The move is a precaution designed to ensure the club’s pilots of the safety of the planes, Jackson said. The club hopes the inspections are completed in a week.

Greco managed to get away just minutes before the plane burst into flames. Following the crash, he was taken to Lee Memorial Hospital with serious injuries, but was not listed as a patient Sunday.

A Piper PA-28-181 Archer III aircraft crashed into the structure — which sustained significant damage– around 8 a.m. Saturday following takeoff from Page Field, officials said.

The day care center remained closed Monday, though Chico’s headquarters was open. Parents reliant on child care are able to work from home until further notice.

No one was inside the daycare at the time of the plane crash.

The National Transportation Security Board removed portions of the wreckage to be taken to a salvage facility in Jacksonville. The comprehensive investigation is expected to take between 10 to 14 days.


http://www.winknews.com

Daniel P. Boggs, Investigator In Charge
National Transportation Safety Board



FORT MYERS, Fla. The day care center at Chico’s will be closed Monday, a spokesperson for the company said, two days after a small plane crashed into it.

The rest of the campus at the company’s headquarters will be open, spokeswoman Jessica Wells said. The day care center was closed at the time of the crash, which killed a passenger and seriously injured the pilot.

The remains of the downed plane were removed Sunday morning from the roof of the day care on 11215 Metro Parkway.

The Piper PA-28-181 Archer III aircraft crashed around 8 a.m. Saturday following takeoff from Page Field, officials said.

Pilot Anthony Greco, president of the Fort Myers Flying Club, managed to get out of the plane moments before it burst into flames. He was taken to Lee Memorial Hospital with serious injuries.

WINK News reporter Jessica Alpern uploaded video and went live via Facebook as the remnants of the plane were taken away.

The remnants of the plane will move to an aircraft salvage facility near Jacksonville, according to officials.

The facility was empty at the time of the crash, but the structure suffered significant damage.

The pilot, Anthony Greco Jr., president of the Fort Myers Flying Club, managed to exit the plane before it burst into flames. Greco suffered serious injuries and was taken to Lee Memorial Hospital.

The National Transportation Safety Board will conduct a further investigation once the remains of the plane are removed.

“Planes are a lot safer than cars, and pilots are very well trained,” said Dan Boggs, a National Transportation Safety Board Investigator. I’ve been a pilot for 22 years and you go through a lot of training.”

Following removal, it will take approximately 10 to 14 days to conduct a comprehensive investigation, according to officials.

The circumstances leading up to the incident and identity of the person killed in the wreck were unclear.

http://www.winknews.com



Investigators hauled off the wreckage of a private plane Sunday that crashed shortly after takeoff from Page Field on Saturday. One passenger was killed in the crash.

And a group of Lee County and Cape Coral construction industry groups said that one of their members, Anthony Greco of  ACRA Electric, was the pilot of the crashed plane.

Investigators were at the site of the crash Sunday, clambering onto the roof of the daycare center on the campus of Chico's FAS, just off Metro Parkway.

A National Transportation Safety Board member identified as an aircraft safety inspector and another person were seen on the awning and then on the building's main roof around noon as the wreckage was being loaded on a truck. Investigators took the wreckage to a storage space at the airport early Sunday.

At the center of the investigation is why the small airplane faltered on takeoff Saturday and then slammed into the building, leaving one person dead and Greco seriously injured.

Greco was able to scramble out before it exploded into flames, officials said. The passenger did not make it out. The daycare center was unoccupied.

Dan Boggs, lead investigator from the NTSB, said the plane wreckage would be examined in Fort Myers for a day or two.

"Once were done examining it we'll take it to an airplane salvage facility in the northern part of the state," Boggs said.

He said, however, that if something is uncovered in the examination, the plane could be kept here longer.

Next up for the investigation, Boggs said, will his preliminary report in 10 to 14 days.

Boggs would not confirm an identity of the pilot or the passenger but several business associations in Cape Coral issued a statement saying that Greco, two-time president of the Cape Coral Construction Industry Association, a city resident and vice president of ACRA Electric, was in good condition.

Bill Johnson Jr, executive vice president and CEO of the CCCIA, said his organization and the Cape Coral Chamber of Commerce, Cape Coral Council for Progress and Lee County Building Industry Association  issued a statement to members Saturday about Greco and the crash.

"Anthony is in the hospital and his passenger passed in the accident. Please keep them and their families in your thoughts and prayers," the release said.

http://www.news-press.com












FORT MYERS, Fla. The remains of a downed plane were removed Sunday morning from the roof of a daycare center on Metro Parkway following a deadly crash.

A Piper PA-28-181 Archer III aircraft crashed around 8 a.m. Saturday into Chico’s Daycare on 11215 Metro Parkway following take off from Page Field, officials said.

WINK News reporter Jessica Alpern uploaded video of crews removing the aircraft from the roof of the building.

The facility was empty at the time of the crash, but the structure suffered significant damage.

The pilot, Anthony Greco Jr., president of the Fort Myers Flying Club, managed to exit the plane before it burst into flames. Greco suffered serious injuries and was taken to Lee Memorial Hospital.

The National Transportation Safety Board will conduct a further investigation once the remains of the plane are removed.

“Planes are a lot safer than cars, and pilots are very well trained,” said Dan Boggs, a National Transportation Safety Board Investigator. I’ve been a pilot for 22 years and you go through a lot of training.”

Following removal, it will take approximately 10 to 14 days to conduct a comprehensive investigation, according to officials.  The circumstances leading up to the incident and identity of the person killed in the wreck were unclear.

http://www.winknews.com



























The local business community has rallied around one of its own, injured while piloting a small plane that crashed shortly after takeoff at Page Field Saturday morning. The aircraft's lone passenger was fatally injured.

Anthony Greco, a long-time Cape Coral resident and vice president of ACRA Electric, is in "good condition" following the crash of his single-engine Piper PA-28, according to an update from four professional organizations sent to members Saturday night.

"Anthony is in the hospital and his passenger passed in the accident. Please keep them and their families in your thoughts and prayers," the joint release from the Cape Coral Construction Industry Association, Cape Coral Chamber of Commerce, Cape Coral Council for Progress and Lee County Building Industry Association states.

The accident occurred at approximately 7:50 a.m. The plane apparently rapidly lost altitude and the crashed into Building 9 on the Chico's campus off Metro Parkway. The facility, a daycare, was empty and no one on the ground was hurt.

The name of the passenger has not yet been released.

"Anthony and the entire Greco family have been leaders in this community for over 25 years, and now it will be (our) turn to help them in their time of need," the organizations said.

"We as a collection of community partners that Anthony, the Greco Family and ACRA Electric have been a long-time part of, stand ready to assist the family in any way necessary."

http://www.cape-coral-daily-breeze.com




FORT MYERS, Fla. -  A plane crashed into a building Saturday morning on the Chico's campus in Fort Myers, killing the passenger and seriously injuring the pilot.

It happened shortly before 8 a.m. along Metro Parkway.

The plane was taking off from Page Field when it crashed into Building 9 — a day care center — at Chico's.

NTSB spokesperson Dan Boggs says the pilot attempted to make an emergency landing on Metro before it crashed.

The plane was a Piper PA-28-181 Archer III that belonged the Fort Myers Flying Club.

Anthony Greco, president of the Fort Myers Flying Club, was piloting the plane, according to the Mike Jackson, the club's vice president.

Greco is listed in good condition at Lee Memorial, according to the hospital. Boggs says Greco was seen staggering down the sidewalk shortly after the crash.

The passenger, who hasn't been identified, was killed. The sheriff's office is handling the death investigation aspect of the crash.

"This is a horrible tragedy. We don't know why it occurred; we don't know why these things happen," Jackson said.

Jackson says both Greco and his passenger were experienced pilots. He says Greco became president of the flying club last year.

"He has been a member of the flying club for years and I consider him to be a very experienced pilot," he said of Greco.

Fort Myers Flying Club instructor Ed Fink says the Piper PA-28-181 Archer III that crashed has never had problems before and is inspected yearly.

"The airplane gets an annual inspection, and in addition to that, it gets a 50-hour inspection," he said.

Pilots are also required to have their license, training, and flight hours.

"I don't know how many hours of flight time either of our pilots had. I know that I would trust them with my life and so I consider them both to be excellent pilots," Jackson said.

Now the pilot community is coming together, mourning one of their own.

"When they (crashes) happen, all we can do is wrap our arms around one another and comfort one another," Jackson said.

Surveillance video from a nearby business shows the plane flip as it hits the building. It burst into flames shortly after hitting the ground.

"There was no one inside the daycare center so we are very relieved about that," said Victoria Moreland, Port Authority spokesperson.

Boggs says the on-site investigation should take two to three days, with the preliminary report expected to take up to two weeks. They're going to be looking into a number of records and working with the plane's manufacturer to figure out what went wrong.

The plane is expected to be removed from the scene Monday afternoon.

Pilot Ted Ehrlich, readying his own flight, radioed into air control immediately after the crash to tell them what he heard.

"I heard the engine failing and watched the takeoff, and it never climbed," he told them in audio obtained by NBC2 courtesy of Broadcastify.

Witness Richard Waltman works at nearby Sunrise Remodeling.

"As I was leaving, I saw this plane going really low, and when he passed the trees, his wing clipped the trees, flipped over at the side of the building, did a somersault and landed in front and blew up," Waltman said.

"It was crazy. It was like did anybody survive? They didn't survive this. They didn't have no time. Because it was so bad that the plane was shredded when they landed and when I blew up it was like wow."

Matt Rutherford described the scene as "chaos."

"A whole bunch of chaos ... Everybody is trying to get to the plane," he said.

"I'm kind of surprised it doesn't happen more than that; they are always flying super low right over this anyway. It's just crazy."

Ashley DeRose saw the crash happen right in front of her.

"(It) was flying very low, I'd say about 20 or 25 feet above my car," she said.

"The top of the actual plane hit the top of the building, it did like a flip; a somersault, and then it hit the ground and set on fire."

She says she called 911 immediately as passersby scrambled to get to the victims, but were unable to.

A spokesperson for Bright Horizons, which operates the day care, says the day care will remained closed until they receive further information from Chico's.

The day care serves Chico's employees, many of them saying on our Facebook page they were thankful the day care was closed for the day.

Chico's is telling parents who use the day care that they can do what they need to for the time being, including work from home. The company is working on sending out an official email regarding the crash.

Statement from Chico's:

We are still assessing the situation and doing whatever we can to assist the sheriff's department and other authorities in the investigation.
Statement from FAA:

 "A Piper PA 28 Cherokee Aircraft crashed during takeoff at Page Field today around 8 am. The National Transportation Safety Board will determine the probable cause of the accident. The FAA will investigate."

http://www.nbc-2.com




FORT MYERS, Fla. (WSVN) — A small plane crashed into an empty daycare center in Fort Myers and burst into flames, killing one person and sending another to the hospital, Saturday morning.

According to the National Transportation Safety Board, a Piper PA-28 was taking off from Page Field Airport in Fort Myers, just before 8 a.m., when something went wrong.

Surveillance video captured the moments before the aircraft crashed into the side of the building.

According to witnesses, the facility is located on the property of the global headquarters for the women’s clothing company Chico’s.

One witness who asked not to be identified saw the plane as it hurtled toward the ground. “I saw the plane flying real low, and his right wing clipped the trees, and when that happened, he lost control and landed on the side of the building and somersaulted in front and landed in front of the daycare for Chico’s and exploded about five seconds later,” he said.

A plume of smoke could be seen billowing into the air from a nearby street as first responders rushed to the scene.

“Ten, 15 seconds after it hit, it had exploded pretty loud and was engulfed in flames for a while,” said another witness. “It probably went off about two more times after that.”

There were two people on board the plane at the time of the crash.

According to the Lee County Sheriff’s Office, one person was killed in the crash, and one other person was taken to a local hospital.

The daycare building, which was empty on a Saturday and is maintained by Chico’s on its property, sustained extensive damage. Chunks of concrete are now missing from the top of the structure, and nearby awnings were torched.

Firefighters acted fast to put out the flames. “We were on scene within five minutes of the original call,” said South Trail Fire Department spokesperson Christie Knudsen.

The aircraft belongs to the Fort Myers Flying Club.

Chico’s officials informed employees they can work from home while the daycare remains closed.

The Federal Aviation Administration has been notified of the crash, as the NTSB continues to investigate.

http://wsvn.com








FORT MYERS, Fla. One person was killed after a plane crashed into Chico’s Daycare Saturday morning on Metro Parkway, the Lee County Sheriff”s Office said.

A Piper PA-28-181 aircraft crashed into the daycare center just before 8:00 a.m. at 11215 Metro Parkway during takeoff from Page Field, officials said.

The pilot managed to get out of the plane moments before the plane burst into flames.

“He was staggering down the sidewalk … he was out of the airplane,” said Dan Boggs, the National Transportation Safety Board’s lead investigator in the crash. “Before anybody could get around the corner, it burst into flames.”

The passenger was killed while the pilot was taken to Lee Memorial Hospital with serious injuries, Boggs said.

No one was inside of the daycare at the time of the crash, deputies said. The building sustained significant damage.

http://www.winknews.com