Tuesday, July 02, 2019

Cessna 172M Skyhawk, N20600: Incident occurred June 28, 2019 at Pensacola International Airport (KPNS), Escambia County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Alabama and NW Florida

Aircraft on departure went off end of runway.


SkyWarrior Flight Training Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N20600 

Date: 28-JUN-19
Time: 16:40:00Z
Regis#: N20600
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: PENSACOLA
State: FLORIDA

Piper PA-28-180, N5279L: Incident occurred June 28, 2019 at Lakeland Linder International Airport (KLAL), Polk County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Carverair LLC

Makana Partners LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N5279L

Date: 28-JUN-19
Time: 19:30:00Z
Regis#: N5279L
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LAKELAND
State: FLORIDA

Abnormal Runway Contact: Cessna 180A, N5239D; accident occurred June 28, 2019 at Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport (KECP), Panama City, Bay County, Florida

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Vestavia Hills, Alabama 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N5239D

Location: Panama City, FL
Accident Number: GAA19CA415
Date & Time: 06/22/2019, 1555 EDT
Registration: N5239D
Aircraft: Cessna 180
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Abnormal runway contact
Injuries: 4 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

The pilot in the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, he performed a wheel landing on the concrete runway surface. During the landing roll, with the tailwheel on the ground, the airplane swerved to the right and he corrected with left rudder and left brake. The airplane's left wing and left elevator struck the ground. He was able to regain control of the airplane and taxi to the parking.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 72, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/11/2019
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/21/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 26500 hours (Total, all aircraft), 2000 hours (Total, this make and model), 24500 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 12.1 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 7.1 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5.3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N5239D
Model/Series: 180 A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1957
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 50137
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/14/2019, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2650 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5342 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-470-K
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 230 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KECP, 69 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2053 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 145°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 3100 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 12 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 210°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.07 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C / 24°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Alexandria, LA (AEX)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Panama City, FL (ECP)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1305 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: Northwest Florida Beaches Intl (ECP)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 68 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 16
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 10000 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 3 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 None
Latitude, Longitude: 30.358333, -85.795556 (est)

Cessna 208B, N80JF: Accident occurred June 29, 2019 at Plant City Airport (KPCM), Hillsborough County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N80JF

Location: Plant City, FL
Accident Number: ERA19TA211
Date & Time: 06/29/2019, 0910 EDT
Registration: N80JF
Aircraft: CESSNA 208
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Skydiving 

On June 29, 2019, about 0910 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 208B, N80JF, was substantially damaged while landing at Blackwater Creek Ultralight Flightpark (9FD2), Plant City, Florida. The commercial pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to ISR Aviation LLC and operated as Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 skydiving flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed for the flight. The local flight originated about 0900.

According to the pilot, the airplane performed normally during the preflight, takeoff, and skydiving operations. Then, while on the final approach leg to runway 35, about 80 ft above ground level and a "few feet before the threshold," the windshield became "foggy outside" and the pilot could not see the runway. He did not attempt to abort the landing because the jumpers were in the area and he did not want to risk hitting any of them or trees surrounding the runway. The pilot maintained the airplane heading and descent, he felt the main landing gear touchdown, applied reverse thrust, and then felt the nose landing gear collapse before the propeller struck the ground and the airplane came to rest.

Review of a witness video recording revealed that during the landing, the nose landing gear contacted the runway first, followed by the main landing gear, and the airplane bounced. Next, the nose landing gear impacted the runway prior to collapsing and the airplane continued down the runway out of view.

An examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the nose landing gear separated from the airplane. In addition, part of the fuselage structure and an engine mount were substantially damaged.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N80JF
Model/Series: 208 B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No 
Operator: ISR Aviation LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: ZPH, 90 ft msl
Observation Time: 0915 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 5 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C / 23°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 80°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.14 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Plant City, FL (9FD2)
Destination: Plant City, FL (9FD2)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 28.137500, -82.146667 (est) 

Unknown or Undetermined: Cessna 172S Skyhawk, N3504A; fatal accident occurred June 26, 2019 in Pescadero, California

Image of final radar data points.

Surveillance camera location.


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Jose, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N3504A

Location: Pescadero, CA
Accident Number: WPR19FAMS1
Date & Time: 06/26/2019, 2102 PDT
Registration:N3504A
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Unknown or undetermined
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation -

On June 26, 2019, about 2037 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 172S, N3504A, departed Watsonville, California, for an unknown destination. Since that time, neither the airplane nor the person presumed to be the pilot has been located. The airplane is presumed to have been destroyed by impact in the Pacific Ocean, and the pilot is presumed to have received fatal injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) ground-based radar tracking data for June 26 revealed a series of transponder code 1200 returns from an aircraft that appeared to have departed from Watsonville Municipal airport (WVI) starting at 2038:34. The first radar data return indicated an altitude of 200 ft mean sea level (msl), and the track was consistent with a departure from runway 20. The airplane flew a course to the southwest in a constant climb until it reached an indicated altitude of 4,500 ft. At that point, it was about 5 nautical miles (nm) offshore, which was about 8 nm from WVI. The airplane then began a turn to the west-northwest and climbed to a maximum altitude of 4,900 ft msl. It continued about 10 nm in that direction, during which it descended to an altitude of about 1,000 ft msl. The airplane then turned northwest and began to fly parallel to the coastline about 3 nm offshore. That track extended about 16 nm, and the latter portion was flown at altitudes that varied between 700 and 400 ft msl. The airplane turned to the west, then entered a left descending circle about 1 nm in diameter. The final radar return was recorded at 2102:18, near the completion of the circle.

That evening, a group of campers were at a campground about 30 miles west-northwest of WVI, about 1 mile inland from and with a direct view of the Pacific Ocean. They reported that, about 2100, while facing approximately west, they observed a "blinking white and green light," which they perceived to be a helicopter, flying roughly northbound over the ocean. They then saw it descend "straight down" to the water and observed a "large splash." They reported the event to local law enforcement, and two San Mateo County Sheriff's Office (SMCSO) officers responded to the campsite within the hour. The SMCSO communicated with the United States Coast Guard (USCG) and other agencies that evening and determined that no aircraft had been reported as being in distress or missing. About 2300, the USCG advised SMCSO that the "circumstances did not meet the criteria to initiate a search," and that the USCG would not be responding to the event.

The following day, a Santa Cruz Flying Club (SCFC) pilot who had scheduled the accident airplane for that day discovered that the airplane was not in its tiedown location and could not be located at the airport. SCFC used a self-dispatch system for its pilots and airplanes. Follow-up investigation by the SCFC president was unable to account for the airplane and one of the SCFC member pilots. The next day, the SCFC president notified the Watsonville Police Department and WVI management that the airplane was missing. Review of WVI surveillance video depicted an airplane similar in appearance to the accident airplane taxiing across a ramp at nightfall on June 26. The airplane registration number was not discernible in the image, and no further images of that airplane were captured. The SCFC president reported that this operation of the airplane was not scheduled or authorized.

The last radar return was located about 31 nm northwest of WVI, about 3.2 miles off the California coast at a transponder-indicated altitude of 0 ft and about 3.8 miles southwest of the land-based eyewitnesses. In response to the radar data findings, additional land and ocean searches were conducted on June 29 and 30. The USCG conducted a search in the region of the final radar return. No wreckage or other indications of the airplane were observed. A ramp check of Half Moon Bay Airport (HAF), Half Moon Bay, California, the next-closest airport to the final radar return, did not locate the airplane. A search of WVI located the pilot's vehicle with his mobile telephone inside. Law enforcement personnel did not locate the pilot at his residence, and communications with the pilot's next-of-kin also failed to locate him.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age:63, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Unknown
Other Aircraft Rating(s):None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present:
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam:11/09/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 300 hours (Total, all aircraft)

The pilot's personal flight records were not recovered.

The SCFC president reported that the pilot's most recent flight review was completed on July 10, 2017, and that the pilot then flew solo twice in SCFC airplanes, in July and October of 2017. The October 2017 flight was the pilot's last contact with SCFC until he returned in May 2019 in order to regain his flight currency. The pilot flew an SCFC airplane with an SCFC flight instructor twice, on May 29 and June 7, 2019. The instructor did not sign the pilot off to fly SCFC airplanes solo, and the pilot had scheduled several more sessions with SCFC airplanes. However, he did not conduct any additional flights in SCFC airplanes until the accident flight.

In his written statement to the NTSB, the instructor who flew with the pilot in 2019 did not cite any concerns about the pilot's behavior or attitude.

According to his FAA medical certificate applications, the pilot had at least three prior convictions for driving under the influence of alcohol, but was granted an eligibility letter to obtain an FAA medical certificate by the FAA Aerospace Medical Certification Division (AMCD) in June 2004; the letter required the continued abstinence from alcohol. The pilot had a family history of bipolar disease and major depression. In 2007, the AMCD determined that the pilot had no substance abuse or dependence, but he was found by AMCD to have "Adjustment Disorders with Depressed Mood." AMCD granted an eligibility letter on 05/24/2007, but that issuance did not require any FAA follow-up action with or by the pilot.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration:N3504A
Model/Series: 172 S
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:2005
Amateur Built:No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 172S8857
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats:4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/24/2019, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2299 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6275 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed
Engine Model/Series: IO360
Registered Owner: Gryphon Aire LLC
Rated Power:
Operator: Gryphon Aire LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None Meteorological Information and Flight Plan
Conditions at Accident Site: Unknown
Condition of Light:Dusk
Observation Facility, Elevation: WVI, 163 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 31 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2035 PDT
Direction from Accident Site: 135°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Unknown
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Unknown
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts:
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Precipitation
Departure Point: Pescadero, CA
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination:
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 2035 PDT
Type of Airspace: Unknown

The 2100 WVI automated weather observation included wind from 320° at 8 knots, visibility 10 miles, an overcast ceiling at 700 ft agl, temperature 14°C, dew point 13°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.06 inches of mercury.

Local sunset occurred at 2030, and twilight ended at 2101.

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire:Unknown
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion:Unknown
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 37.113333, -122.408056 (est)

Communications

The WVI common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) that was used for pilot self-reporting communications was not recorded by the airport. A review of a commercially available recording of the WVI CTAF for the relevant time period did not reveal any communications from any aircraft identified as N3504A. There were no known communications between the missing airplane and any air traffic control facilities during the accident flight.


Hugo Mar

WATSONVILLE, California (KGO) -- The mystery has deepened in the case of a stolen plane in Watsonville. Investigators believe it was stolen by 64-year-old Hugo Mar. They say the plane crashed with no survivors off the Santa Cruz County coast in late June after it was taken from the Watsonville Municipal Airport.

"We do have video surveillance the night the plane was stolen that show the plane taxiing the runway at about 10:30 p.m.," said" Michelle Pulido, press officer for the Watsonville Police Department.

On June 26, investigators believe the 64-year old Watsonville resident stole a single-engine Cessna and flew it out of the Watsonville Municipal Airport, before crashing into the ocean.

The FAA says the plane disappeared from radar about three miles out and over the ocean. However, the Coast Guard has stopped their search. To date, no wreckage or body has been recovered. Family members of Mar were at the press conference on Thursday, they appeared emotional and would not speak to media.

"Detectives did find Hugo Mar's car had been abandoned, was parked in a parking lot near the airport," said Pulido. "It's a parking lot commonly used by pilots."

Mar was an active member of the Santa Cruz Flying Club and had authorization to get into Watsonville airport. On the club's website, it states that Mar was in good standing with the club but failed to follow protocol by not making a reservation to use the plane on that night.

"We believe the airport is secure but someone that is authorized, does have access and has been a pilot before, we believe this is a tragic incident," said Rayvon Williams, director for the Watsonville Municipal Airport.

Mar has no history with police, investigators say they are looking for leads on why Mar would have stolen the plane.

"We're asking any person who may have had any contact or may have seen Hugo Mar to call the Watsonville Police Department," said Pulido.


https://abc7news.com


WATSONVILLE, California  - (UPDATE 06.28.19 10:15 p.m.): Federal investigators are in Watsonville looking for anyone involved in stealing a plane from the municipal airport Wednesday night. 

The plane is a 2001 Cessna 172 SP model aircraft with white paint and blue trim. 

Watsonville Police tells KION they have surveillance footage of the theft taking place Wednesday, and it was reported stolen the following day. 

A quick check into the FAA aircraft registry shows Gryphon Aire LLC out of Santa Cruz owns the single-engine fixed-wing Cessna. 

Watsonville Municipal Airport has 24-hour surveillance. Ella King, the owner of the restaurant Ella's at the Airport, says they stay open until 10 p.m., but anyone flying out a single plane when it is still light out would not arouse suspicion. 

King says in the years she has been at the airport, she has never heard of a plane getting stolen. She believes the only way it could have been stolen is if someone flew it out of the airport. 

"Pulling in a flatbed truck and thinking about lifting a plane onto a flatbed and then driving it out is really almost inconceivable," said King. "So it had to have been someone that had some prior knowledge maybe on the plane specific and obviously the ability to fly it out is also important." 

King says she comes from a family of pilots, with one of her relatives training pilots at the Watsonville Airport during World War II. She says the airport is exceptionally safe with wonderful staff.

The FBI and FAA are now involved in trying to solve who stole the plane. 

PREVIOUS STORY:

A plane was stolen from the Watsonville Municipal Airport, Wednesday. 

Watsonville Police tell KION that they confirmed the theft through surveillance footage, and reported the plane missing Thursday afternoon. 

The plane is a single-engine Cessna. 

The Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Federal Aviation Administration are now handling the investigation. 

Story and video ➤ https://www.kion546.com

Starduster Too SA-30, N2RG: Accident occurred June 28, 2019 at Lincoln Regional Airport (KLHM), Placer County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California

https://registry.faa.gov/N2RG

NTSB Identification: GAA19CA436
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 28, 2019 in Lincoln, CA
Aircraft: Stolp Starduster STARDUSTER TOO SA 30, registration: N2RG

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Hard landing collapsed landing gear.

Date: 28-JUN-19
Time: 21:28:00Z
Regis#: N2RG
Aircraft Make: STOLP STARDUSTER
Aircraft Model: STARDUSTER TOO SA-30
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LINCOLN
State: CALIFORNIA

Maule M-6-235 Super Rocket, N56512: Fatal accident occurred June 28, 2019 in Moose Pass, Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.
Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N56512

Location: Moose Pass, AK
Accident Number: ANC19FA029
Date & Time: 06/28/2019, 1607 AKD
Registration: N56512
Aircraft: Maule M6
Injuries: 3 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 28, 2019, about 1607 Alaska daylight time (AKDT), a float-equipped, Maule M-6-235 airplane, N56512, sustained substantial damage following a loss of control and impact with steep, mountainous, tree-covered terrain about seven miles northwest of Moose Pass, Alaska. The airplane was being operated by the pilot as a visual flight rules (VFR) flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, when the accident occurred. The commercial pilot and two passengers were fatally injured, and one pilot-rated passenger seated in the right front seat sustained serious injuries. Marginal visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. The flight departed an unknown location near Seward, Alaska, about 1529 destined for Lake Hood, Anchorage, Alaska.

At the time of the accident, the pilot was using a Garmin GPSMAP 496 GPS receiver, capable of storing route-of-flight data.

The National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge reviewed the archived GPS data logs for June 28, 2019, revealing that, about 1602 the airplane crossed Moose Pass at a GPS altitude of about 2,000 ft. The airplane continued northwest along the Sterling Highway at various GPS altitudes between 1,700 ft and 2,400 ft. About 1606, after passing the intersection of the Sterling and Seward Highways, a right 180° turn was initiated to the southeast, and shortly thereafter, the airplane began a descent to a GPS altitude of 1,215 ft. At 1607:00, the airplane began a left turn towards a northerly heading and initiated a climb. At 1607:34, the airplane was on a track of 354°, at an altitude of 2,032 ft and a groundspeed of 37 knots. The last fully recorded in-flight data point was at 1608:01, when the airplane was at a GPS altitude of 1,587 ft and 0 knot groundspeed on a track of 282°.

N56512 preliminary GPS ground track. 

According to the Alaska Rescue Coordination Center (AKRCC), a 406 MHz emergency locator transmitter (ELT) signal was received at 1614, and rescue personnel from the Air National Guard's 210th Air Rescue Squadron, Anchorage, began a search for the source of the 406 ELT. An Air National Guard HH-60G helicopter crew discovered the accident site, and the sole survivor was subsequently evacuated. The surviving passenger was transported to a medical facility in Anchorage, Alaska for treatment.

The NTSB IIC, along with personnel from the Alaska Mountain Rescue Group reached the accident site on June 30. The airplane impacted in a near vertical attitude in an area of alder brush and tundra-covered terrain, at an elevation of about 1,546 ft mean sea level, on a heading of about 314°. All the primary flight control surfaces were identified at the accident site, and flight control continuity was verified from the cockpit in the direct cables and balance cable to the left and right ailerons. Due to impact damage, flight control continuity could not be verified to the rudder and elevators. A detailed wreckage examination is pending following recovery of the airplane.

A review of Federal Aviation Administration weather camera images recorded from Moose Pass (52Z), about 7 miles southeast of the accident site, around the accident time, showed reduced visibilities in all directions as a result of smoke or haze in the area.


June 28, 2019, 1610 AKDT 52Z northwest

52Z northwest clear day image

A witness located near the intersection of the Seward and Sterling Highways stated that he was outside shortly after 1600 when he heard an airplane fly over. He said it sounded like the airplane was flying west to east, and as if it was "maneuvering under power". He stated that this lasted for about 15 seconds before all sound ceased. He said that the smoke from a nearby wildfire was very thick in the valley with a vertical visibility of about 100 ft and an estimated horizontal visibility of about ¼ of a mile.

The closest official weather observation station to the accident site was Seward Airport (PAWD), Seward, AK, located about 30 miles south of the accident site. At 1719, a METAR was reporting, in part, wind 160 degrees at 5 knots; visibility, 7 statute miles, haze; clouds and sky condition, overcast clouds 3,700 ft; temperature, 71°F; dew point 53°F; and an altimeter setting of 30.70 inches of mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Maule
Registration: N56512
Model/Series: M6 235
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Christy Michael S
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PAWD, 22 ft msl
Observation Time: 1719 AKD
Distance from Accident Site: 30 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / 12°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 160°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 3700 ft agl
Visibility:  7 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.7 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Seward, AK
Destination: Anchorage, AK

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 Fatal, 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 Fatal, 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 62.539444, -149.544167 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Michael Scott Christy 
(1945 - 2019)

Born in Benton Harbor Mich., Michael, known as Scott to friends and family, moved to Anchorage, Alaska, in 1980 to pursue his life's passions of geology, conservation, wildlife and the outdoors. Scott died suddenly near Moose Pass, Alaska, on June 28, 2019.

Scott, 73, and his 69-year-old wife, Jean Tam, are well-known in the conservation and wildlife community in Anchorage. A Celebration of Life for them both is planned for Friday, July 12, 2019, from 5 p.m. - 9 p.m., in the Odum Hangar at the Alaska Aviation Museum, with memorial tributes at 6 p.m.
Scott spent his childhood in St. Joseph, Mich., and graduated from Berrien Springs High School in 1964. He graduated from Central Michigan University with a bachelor's degree in biology in 1968. He attained a master's degree in geology from the University of Missouri in 1976, and a Ph.D. in geo-morphology from the University of Maryland in 1980. He moved to Anchorage in 1980, and was employed to work on the trans-Alaska pipeline. He later worked as a Geologist with the State of Alaska and retired in 2007.

Scott met his soul mate and love of his life while working for the State of Alaska and they married on June 22, 1991. They traveled extensively and made friends around the globe. They were both active with the Alaska Conservation Foundation and Scott was an adjunct professor at the University of Alaska, member of the Alaskan Airman's Association, and was the current President of the Lake Hood Pilot's Association.  Scott is predeceased by his older brother, David Christy; and father, Charles Christy.

He is survived by his mother, Marvel Christy of Stevensville, Mich.; sisters, Cheryl Stacey of Berrien Springs, Mich., Cynthia Weill of Kalamazoo, Mich., and Jane Glass of Benton Harbor, Mich.; brothers Douglas Christy of St. Joseph, and Ronald Christy of Covert, Mich.; and nieces and nephews in Michigan, Wisconsin, Indiana and Arizona.  In lieu of flowers, please make memorials to the Alaska Conservation Foundation.

Jean Tam  Christy
(1949 - 2019)

Jean Tam, born on Dec. 27, 1949, age 69 years, passed away suddenly in Moose Pass, Alaska, on June 28, 2019. Born in Detroit, Mich., her parents moved to Birmingham, Mich., in 1953 to take over Rose's Hand Laundry. Jean was of Chinese descent. She was a 1968 graduate of Birmingham Seaholm High School. She graduated from MIT in Boston, Mass., with a degree in physics and obtained a master's degree in forestry from Yale University. She moved to Alaska in 1985, and began working for the State of Alaska Geological Information Service in 1986. One of her accomplishments in this position was the mapping of the Valdez Oil Spill in 1989.

She met her husband, Michael Scott Christy, at work and they were married on June 22, 1991, at a lake resort. The wedding included a llama drawn carriage and a fly off in Scott's float plane. The wedding reception in Anchorage, Alaska, was held at a Chinese restaurant to honor Jean's parents.

As an active naturalist, Jean was the longest serving member of the Board of Directors of the Anchorage Audubon Society, a member of the Alaska Conservation Foundation and the Alaskan Native Plant Society. One of Jean's favorite projects was her famous Loon Cam, viewed by people around the world. She and Scott placed an artificial loon nesting platform in the lake near their home on Memorial Day and retrieved it on Labor Day every year.
Jean and Scott made many trips throughout the world, including a memorable trip to China, Jean's ancestral home. After retirement, Jean served as Scott's co-pilot, making many trips to visit family and friends in the Lower 48. Jean recently traveled to Michigan to attend her 50th high school reunion.

Jean is survived by her younger brother, George Tam of Troy, Mich., and several cousins. She was predeceased by her parents, Wah and Beck Tam; and older brother, Ford Tam.  A Celebration of Life will be held on Friday, July 12, 2019, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., in the Odum Hangar at the Alaska Aviation Museum, with memorial tributes at 6 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts may be made to the Alaska Conservation Foundation.


Joy Cooper and her roommate, Suzanne Glass (on left) right before the Maule M-6-235 Super Rocket aircraft accident. Please pray for Suzanne and family as her and her aunt and uncle did not make it. 


MOOSE PASS, Alaska — A Sterling, Virginia woman was among three killed in an Alaskan plane crash on Friday. The sole survivor was also from Sterling. 

Joy Cooper loves aviation. She's a private pilot, has a degree in air traffic controlling, and works as a supervisor at Dulles International Airport. On Friday, the Sterling woman nearly lost her life in a small plane crash in Alaska. 

Her co-worker has seen her post on Facebook Friday morning.

"Her and her friend were there, there were smiles.and it said, 'so ready to explore the Alaskan wilderness,'" said Shah Waqas, who works with Cooper at Dulles. 

Cooper, 28,  has posted a picture of herself with friend and roommate Suzanne Glass, 29, just before they boarded the float plane. Shortly after that post, the plane went down in heavy fog, crashing along Alaska's Kenai peninsula. The crash killed Glass, the pilot and his wife who were Glass's uncle and aunt. 

Cooper was the only survivor. Her brother Josiah Cooper, 29, said it's amazing she's alive. "I was shocked, especially after hearing more and more details about it. It's a miracle."

Josiah said Joy has 20-some broken bones and a collapsed lung. But it conscious and talking. He set up a Caring Bridge page to help pay for Joy's medical expenses. 

Joy's friend Waqas set up a Go Fund Me account to do the same. 

"She definitely lives by the Bible. She's a loving, caring person to everyone that she comes across. I know it's cliche but she definitely has a smile that can brighten up a room, and I feel like there's no better cause than to help a friend out in a time of need like this," said Waqas. 

The Alaska Department of Public Safety says the bodies of three people killed in a plane accident in Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula were recovered from the crash site on Sunday. 

Spokeswoman Megan Peters say the bodies were brought back from a mountain on the north side of Tern Lake near Moose Pass. They are being taken to the State Medical Examiner’s Office in Anchorage for autopsies.

Peters says the victims have been tentatively identified as pilot Michael Scott Christy, 73, his wife, Jean Tam, 69, both of Anchorage; and passenger Suzanne Glass, 29, of Sterling, Virginia.

The small plane crashed Friday into a mountain on the north side of Tern Lake near Moose Pass, Alaska State Troopers spokesman Tim DeSpain told the Anchorage Daily News.

The survivor, 28-year-old Andrea Joy Cooper of Sterling, Virginia, was on vacation in Alaska with friends when the plane crashed. Cooper suffered multiple broken bones and a partially collapsed lung, but was responsive in the hospital Saturday, her family told the Anchorage Daily News.

Story and video:  https://www.wusa9.com


Joy Cooper 

STERLING, Virginia  (ABC7) — Loved ones set up fundraising pages for Sterling woman who survived Alaska plane crash

"I had seen her post on Facebook about going to Alaska and I saw a small plane behind her and I didn't initially feel too good about the picture," said Waqas Shah.

When the Leesburg resident saw the photo of his friend and co-worker Joy Cooper he worried about her safety. Now he's praying for her recovery.

"She still has a lot of surgeries to go through because of the broken bones. She had a collapsed lung which they were able to stabilize as of now," he said.

28-year old Cooper suffered 13 fractures in the June 28th crash south of Anchorage near Moose Pass, Alaska. Local news agencies identify the three killed as 73-year old Michael Scott Christy and his 69-year-old Wife Jean Tam of Anchorage.

The two were the aunt and uncle of 29-year-old Suzanne Glass of Sterling, Virginia who also died in the crash. Glass and Cooper were roommates.

"I know that the health issues and medical bills are probably going to pile up when she makes it through this. So, I want to do my part and help her," Shah said.

Shah has started a GoFundMe page for his friend, while her family is raising money through a PayPal account.

"Anything that we can do to try to help her lessen the burden of the tough time she's going through. that's what I want to do," he said.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://wjla.com

Three people were killed Friday afternoon and a fourth was severely injured in a plane crash near Moose Pass, according to Alaska State Troopers.

The small plane crashed into a mountain on the north side of Tern Lake, near the junction of the Sterling Highway and the Seward Highway, around 4 p.m. Friday, troopers spokesman Tim DeSpain said Saturday.

Pilot Michael Scott Christy, 73, and his wife, Jean Tam, 69 — both from Anchorage — were killed, along with 29-year-old Suzanne Glass from Sterling, Virginia.

The survivor, 28-year-old Joy Cooper of Paris, Texas, was airlifted to Providence Alaska Medical Center in Anchorage in critical condition, troopers said.

Cooper’s family said she was on vacation in Alaska with some friends when the plane crashed. She suffered multiple broken bones and a partially collapsed lung but was responsive in the hospital Saturday, her family said.

The bodies of the passengers who were killed had not yet been recovered Saturday, DeSpain said. A helicopter was dispatched to retrieve them.

“Because of the terrain, and also it’s very smoky there as well, recovery efforts are challenging,” DeSpain said.

Smoke from the nearby Swan Lake wildfire has hampered visibility throughout Southcentral Alaska, and a dense smoke advisory is in effect for the Kenai Peninsula through Sunday morning.

The smoke has reduced visibility in the north Kenai Mountains to generally less than 5 miles, according to the Alaska Aviation Weather Unit.

Clint Johnson, chief for the Alaska region of the National Transportation Safety Board, said the plane was privately owned, but no information was available about what kind of plane it was, its origin or its intended destination.

An NTSB investigator was en route to the crash site Saturday. The agency will be pulling weather data and, ideally, interviewing Cooper and witnesses as it tries to determine the cause of the crash, Johnson said.

The wreckage will be taken to either Anchorage or Wasilla in the coming days, where investigators will be able to examine it more closely, Johnson said.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.adn.com

Aeronca 7BCM Champion, N9325H: Accident occurred June 29, 2019 near Zelienople Municipal Airport (KPJC), Butler County, Pennsylvania

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 


https://registry.faa.gov/N9325H


Location: Zelienople, PA
Accident Number: CEN19LA202
Date & Time: 06/29/2019, 1418 EDT
Registration: N9325H
Aircraft: Aeronca L16A
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 29, 2019, at 1418 eastern daylight time, an Aeronca L-16A (7BCM), N9325H, lost engine power shortly after taking off from Zelienople Municipal Airport (PJC), Zelienople, Pennsylvania. The private pilot made a forced landing in a hay field one mile north of PJC. He was not injured, but the airplane was substantially damaged when the right main landing gear buckled. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed near the accident site at the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from PJC about 1400.

In his accident report, the pilot indicated that prior to takeoff, all fuel tanks had been "topped off" with 19 gallons of 100-octane low-lead fuel. After practicing turns, he turned towards the airport with the intention of practicing takeoffs and landings. Approximately 15 minutes after takeoff while flying straight-and-level at 1,900 ft, the engine "abruptly" stopped. There was no warning or rpm changes or abnormal sounds. Attempts to restart the engine were to no avail. He made a "dead stick" forced landing into a nearby hay field. After rolling about 100 ft up the muddy field, the right main landing gear buckled and the airplane came to a halt. The pilot said there was an issue with the ventilator in the main fuel tank cap that would have been undetectable.

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspectors examined the airplane. The engine was a Continental C85-12 that had been modified in 2003 via STC00979AT with the installation of a crankshaft, connecting rods and pistons from a Continental O-200 engine. The inspectors confirmed engine control continuity, and noted spark from both magnetos and all plugs. The inspectors found fuel leaking from the filler cap. The salvage recovery crew told the inspectors that no fuel had been leaking prior to their loosening the fuel cap to prepare the airplane for transport. They said they drained 11 gallons from the fuel tanks.

The inspectors consulted an Aeronca mechanic and former FAA Inspector. He stated that if a lineman left the fuel nozzle resting in the filler neck instead of holding it, it would bend the filler neck. The fuel cap incorporates 4 vent holes around the circumference. If the cap was installed with a bent or deformed filler neck, the gasket around the filler neck would block the vent holes. This would cause the fuel not to be vented to atmosphere, resulting in fuel starvation to the engine.

The pilot later retained the services of another L-16 specialist and airframe and powerplant (A&P) mechanic. He told him that there was a known problem with the fuel cap on the L-16. The original cap isn't available, and the one most commonly used in its place is screwed on.  If the fuel tanks had just been topped off, the vent can become blocked and create a vacuum and the engine loses power.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Aeronca
Registration: N9325H
Model/Series: L16A 7BCM
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: BTP, 1248 ft msl
Observation Time: 1418 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / 19°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 4000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 160°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 8500 ft agl
Visibility:  7 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.1 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Zelienople, PA (PJC)
Destination: Zelienople, PA (PJC)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 40.857778, -80.195000