Sunday, January 09, 2022

Airbus A320: Incident occurred January 08, 2022 at Buffalo Niagara International Airport (KBUF), New York



CHEEKTOWAGA, New York — United Airlines Flight 1400 experienced some landing issues before it touched down safely on Saturday night, according to an NFTA spokesperson.

The flight from Chicago spent some extra time in the air, circling around Buffalo Niagara International Airport before landing. Emergency crews were called to the airport around 9 p.m. to assist but were not needed.

A spokesperson for United Airlines said the pilot reported some sort of landing issue while the plane was in the air and requested an emergency response as a precaution.

The plane landed, was taxied to the gate, then left without any further issues, according to the spokesperson. 



Cessna 172H, N8056L: Accident occurred January 09, 2022 near Whiteman Airport (KWHP), Pacoima, Los Angeles County , California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Los Angeles, California

Aircraft experienced engine issues and landed on railroad tracks.


Date: 09-JAN-22
Time: 22:10:00Z
Regis#: N8056L
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: SERIOUS
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: LOS ANGELES
State: CALIFORNIA


U.S. Rep. Tony Cardenas has issued a letter requesting a comprehensive safety review of Whiteman Airport in Pacoima, his office announced Wednesday, January 12, three days after a plane crashed near the facility and was hit by a train.

“The regularity of these incidents raises serious concerns for the safety of the communities and families surrounding Whiteman Airport, as well as the pilots, personnel and staff that have access to or are located at the airport,” wrote Cardenas, a Democrat whose 29th District includes Pacoima.

The letter addressed to the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board follows multiple plane crashes, including one on January 9, in which a Cessna 172H made an attempted an emergency landing on to a set of nearby tracks. Police managed to rescue the pilot and sole occupant of the wrecked aircraft moments before a Metrolink train slammed into it at full speed.

The pilot was taken to a trauma center by paramedics and treated for non-life threatening injuries, police said. No other injuries were reported among people on the ground or the 66 passengers aboard the train that struck the plane, Metrolink officials said.

That crash is already under investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board.

“Tragically, this latest incident reflects yet another example of the public safety threat Whiteman Airport continues to pose to my constituents, and why I’ve been a consistent voice for its closure,” Monica Rodriguez, Los Angeles City Councilwoman for the 7th District, said in a statement responding to the crash on Sunday.

Cardenas highlighted an earlier crash in November 2020, when a single-engine Cessna 182 approaching Whiteman knocked over power lines before falling onto parked cars on a residential street. That pilot, who died in the crash, was alone in the aircraft and a member of the Civil Air Patrol.

“Whiteman tower CAP439, we’ve got a loss of engine power here. We’re going to try and stretch it to the runway,” that pilot told air traffic controllers shortly before the fatal crash just over a year ago.

“Runway’s clear and you are clear to land,” airport staff responded.

“Hopefully we’ll make it,” the pilot replied.

In 2018, a 12-year-old was among two killed when a Cessna 150L that had taken off from Whiteman Airport crashed into a building. The pilot, who also died, was a 60-year-old flight instructor, according to media reports.

Cardenas said the NTSB’s database shows that 16 aviation accidents related to Whiteman Airport have taken place since 2009. He has requested a report regarding:

— All aircraft incident reports and/or citations made by the FAA regarding traffic in and out of the airport;

— A review of whether the airport meets all federal, state and local government safety and operation standards;

— An account of any prior issues in meeting federal safety and operating standards and regulations, including steps taken to mitigate those issues;

— Details on how safety trainings are conducted, the frequency of such training and an accounting of who is responsible for training those who have access to the airport and/or fly aircraft;

— A historical account of incidents and accidents at the airport or en route to and from the airport since it first opened, including a comparison with other similar general aviation airports;

— Specific information about the Jan. 9 accident, including any communications between the pilot and the airport as well as any communications between the airport and Metrolink railway before, during or after the incident;

— An account of what processes and/or procedures occur after such incidents to ensure that all operational safety standards were met before, during, and after aircraft incidents.

“All airports have a responsibility to meet necessary airport safety and operation standards in order to fulfill required certification and ensure that all safety practices are met to the full extent as required by the Federal Aviation Administration and relevant state and local agencies,” Cardenas said.

“Fair and transparent investigations like these keep communities safe, result in safer skies, prevent loss of life and ensure airports meet the necessary safety standards.”



























Incident occurred January 09, 2022 at Gerald R. Ford International Airport (KGRR), Grand Rapids, Kent County, Michigan

GRAND RAPIDS, Michigan — A small private airplane made an emergency landing Sunday morning at the Gerald R. Ford International Airport.

According to airport communications, the plane took off from the airport on Grand Rapids' southeast side bound for Florida early Sunday. The pilot then discovered there were problems with the landing gear, turned around and headed back to the airport.

An emergency warning was declared before "the aircraft landed without incident" around 10 a.m. Sunday, according to airport security.

"He was able to land fine," airport communications told FOX 17.

The emergency warning then was canceled.

Cessna 650 Citation VII, N682RS: Incident occurred January 07, 2022 at Destin Executive Airport (KDTS), Okaloosa County, Florida

 







Aircraft Resource Center Inc 

Titan Development and Investments of Florida LLC


Destin Fire Rescue -

Ladder 9 with an unusual call for assistance. 

A private plane at Destin Jet was unable to take off due to bird wire that was wrapped around the tail causing interference with flight. 

Ladder 9’s crew was able to successfully remove the wire allowing for a safe take off.

Great job and outside thinking by the crew!

Beechcraft 58 Baron, N585CK: Fatal accident occurred January 08, 2022 in Defiance, St. Charles County, Missouri

National Transportation Safety Board accident number: CEN22FA096

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; St. Louis, Missouri

Aircraft crashed under unknown circumstances.

Kalitta Charters LLC

AirNet II 


Date: 09-JAN-22
Time: 01:19:00Z
Regis#: N585CK
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 58
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Total Fatal: 2
Flight Crew 2 fatal
Pax 0
Aircraft Missing: No
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Aircraft Operator: AIR NET II
Flight Number: USC247
City: DEFIANCE
State: MISSOURI

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation may contact them by email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. You can also call the NTSB Response Operations Center at 844-373-9922 or 202-314-6290.


Amanda Youngblood
~

Dayton Aviation Services -

There are no words to describe this loss.

For anyone unaware, Amanda Youngblood was in an airplane crash Saturday evening. She was an FO on a commercial flight in a twin Baron out of the St. Louis airport KSUS when the aircraft began a sharp descent around 7:30 CDT.

Amanda was an amazing person who loved all of her family and friends deeply. She was a beloved fight instructor here and will be incredibly missed. Amanda was a wonderful mom, friend, and pilot who always knew how to light up a room with her adventurous spirit.

Our thoughts are with all of her family and friends as we all mourn the loss of this amazing woman.
 Mike Folkerts, National Transportation Safety Board air safety investigator, left, and Kurt Frisz, St. Charles County Police Chief.



MIAMI VALLEY — Two pilots from Ohio — including one from the Miami Valley — died during a plane crash in St. Charles County, Missouri.

Amanda Youngblood from Huber Heights and George King of Westerville died Saturday, according to the National Transportation Safety Board.

The NTSB said the two were flying to Denver to pick up cargo when the plane crashed about nine minutes after taking off.

Investigators are working to find out what caused the plane to go down after it reached 8,000 feet.

The pilots did not make a distress call before the crash, according to investigators, but they are looking into communications that may have indicated a problem with the flight.

Youngblood was a flight instructor at Dayton Aviation Services, based at the Moraine Airpark.

One of Youngblood’s friends told News Center 7 about the kind of pilot and person she will remember.

Sophia Lucas had been friends with Youngblood for a few years.

“It’s a huge loss for everyone that knew her, she was just an amazing person that cared so deeply,” Lucas said.

The two worked together when Youngblood was a flight instructor at Dayton Aviation Services.

“She was one of our best flight instructors, a huge, important part of the team,” Lucas said.

Lucas said Youngblood brought so much enthusiasm to everything she did, including being a mom to her three boys.

“I know she’s very proud of them, and she just wanted to be the best she could for them,” Lucas said.

There’s a saying in the aviation community. “They’ve flown west and we’ll see them again someday.”

“It’s something that we just all kind of gather around, they’ve flown west, they’ve gone out of our reach, but they’re still flying wherever they may be,” Lucas said.

As Youngblood’s family and friends mourn her loss, the NTSB is still working on its investigation into the crash to try and figure out how it happened.


May 31, 2019 
Ohio State Highway Patrol 
Please help us congratulate Sergeant George F. King, Aviation Unit, on his retirement from the Ohio State Highway Patrol. Major Joshua M. Swindell and Staff Lieutenant Justin W. Cromer presented him with his credentials.
~

ST. CHARLES COUNTY, Missouri — Federal investigators say two pilots from Ohio were killed in a deadly plane crash Saturday night in St. Charles County.

During a Tuesday morning briefing, National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration said the aircraft was operated by AirnetII, LLC out of Ohio and was on its way to pick up cargo in Denver. 

The pilots killed in the crash are identified as George F. King, 55, of Westerville, Ohio and Amanda D. Youngblood, 35, of Huber Heights, Ohio.

The Beechcraft 58 Baron was leaving the Spirit of Saint Louis Airport headed to Centennial Airport just outside of Denver, Colorado.  

The small plane crashed in a wooded area near Highway F in the New Melle area around 7 p.m. Saturday.

The airplane had climbed to about 8,000 feet on an instrument flight plan and then began a rapid descent that continued all the way to the crash site.

There was no communication from the flight crew after the descent began.

The NTSB says it appears the aircraft made a high-speed impact with the ground but there was no fire at the time of the crash.

The investigators also said there was no damage to structures on the ground.

Investigators will determine if the weather was a factor in the crash. They will also look into the operational background on the pilots, their flight training, as well as an autopsy and toxicology. 

The investigators will also look at the aircraft’s maintenance records as well as what was happening with the environment the air traffic controllers were working in at the time of the crash.

The NTSB says there was no flight recorded on the aircraft. recorded measurement was at 4,700 feet.

Investigators also said the plane’s previous flight was from Denver to St. Louis the Sunday before the crash. They also said Kennedy had more than 6,000 hours of flying time and Youngblood had 1,000 hours.

The NTSB said there is doorbell video of the accident site. They will be doing a sound spectrum analysis of the video.

Investigators are also asking anyone with information of evidence to contact them.

Loss of Control in Flight: 17-30A Super Viking, N8849V; fatal accident occurred January 07, 2019 in Soddy-Daisy, Hamilton County, Tennessee










Frank William Davey
Lynda Marie Vartan Marinello
~


Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Nashville, Tennessee
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Soddy-Daisy, Tennessee 
Accident Number: ERA19LA080
Date and Time: January 7, 2019, 13:34 Local
Registration: N8849V
Aircraft: Bellanca 1730
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight 
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Analysis

A witness saw the airplane fly over a lake and noted that the airplane made "a tight U-turn" at a low altitude, which he thought might have been an aerobatic maneuver. The airplane then spiraled straight down counterclockwise and impacted the lake. Video from a camera mounted to the airplane's right horizontal stabilizer confirmed that the airplane flew very low over water. Subsequent video showed that the airplane pitched up, rolled to the left, and entered a left spin before descending and impacting the lake. It is likely that the pilot had attempted a left wingover maneuver (in which the airplane makes a steep climb followed by a vertical turn and subsequent descent), but the airplane experienced an aerodynamic stall that led to the left spin near the top of the maneuver. The video revealed no evidence of a preimpact structural failure, flight control malfunction, or loss of propeller rpm. Additionally, postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no preimpact mechanical malfunctions that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot's toxicology results indicated that he had previously taken some cough and cold medications, including some that were potentially sedating. However, these medications were out of his system, as shown by the absence or low levels of these medications in the pilot's blood. Thus, the pilot's use of these medications was not likely a factor in this accident.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's improper decision to attempt an aerobatic maneuver at low altitude, which led to an aerodynamic stall and spin from which the pilot could not recover.

Findings

Personnel issues Decision making/judgment - Pilot
Aircraft Angle of attack - Not attained/maintained

Factual Information

History of Flight

Maneuvering-aerobatics Loss of control in flight (Defining event)
Maneuvering-aerobatics Aerodynamic stall/spin
Uncontrolled descent Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

On January 7, 2019, about 1334 eastern standard time, a Bellanca 17-30A, N8849V, was substantially damaged when it impacted Lake Chickamauga, while maneuvering near Soddy-Daisy, Tennessee. The commercial pilot and the passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was owned by the pilot who was operating it as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight, which originated from Dallas Bay Sky Park, Chattanooga, Tennessee, about 1328.

A witness stated that he was at his residence watching the accident airplane fly over the lake. He noted that the airplane appeared to make "a tight U-turn" at a low altitude, about two or three treetop lengths above the water, which he thought might have been an aerobatic maneuver. The airplane then spiraled straight down counterclockwise and impacted the lake. The witness contacted emergency services and assisted local responders in finding the wreckage.

A GoPro camera was mounted on both the left and right horizontal stabilizers. The cameras were forwarded to the National Transportation Safety Board's Vehicle Recorders Division, Washington, DC, for examination.

Review of the video files revealed that only the camera mounted on the right horizontal stabilizer captured the accident sequence. The video files from that camera revealed that the airplane took off about 13 minutes after the recording began. About 5 minutes later, the airplane flew over a body of water and descended closer to the water for about 1 minute and then remained level for 22 seconds. The airplane subsequently pitched up more than 30° above the horizon and began rolling to the left. The airplane continued to roll to the left and entered a left spin. During the spin, the right aileron and the flaps were in an up position. The airplane then departed controlled flight and impacted the water.

Review of the video showed no in-flight structural failure or loss of propeller rpm.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 67, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Multi-engine land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane; Helicopter 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 With waivers/limitations 
Last FAA Medical Exam: February 1, 2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: October 9, 2018
Flight Time: 3800 hours (Total, all aircraft), 357 hours (Total, this make and model)

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multiengine land, helicopter, instrument airplane, and instrument helicopter. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) second-class medical certificate was issued on February 1, 2018. At that time, the pilot reported a total flight experience of 3,800 hours.

According to an FAA inspector, the pilot's hard-copy logbook ended in 1985, and an electronic log for the airplane began in 2013. Information about the pilot's flight time between those dates was not available. According to the electronic log, the pilot had accumulated 357 hours of flight experience in the accident airplane make and model, of which 17 hours were flown during the 90 days preceding the accident.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Bellanca 
Registration: N8849V
Model/Series: 1730 A 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1971
Amateur Built:
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal 
Serial Number: 30376
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle 
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: June 1, 2018 Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3325 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 34 Hrs
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2156 Hrs as of last inspection 
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated 
Engine Model/Series: IO-520-K
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 300 Horsepower
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

The four-seat, low-wing, fixed-tricycle landing gear airplane was manufactured in 1971. It was powered by a 300-horsepower Continental IO-520 engine equipped with a constant-speed propeller. Review of the maintenance records revealed that the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on June 1, 2018. At that time, the airframe and engine had accrued 2,156 total hours since new.

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC) 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: CHA, 682 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 19 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 13:53 Local 
Direction from Accident Site: 200°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 15000 ft AGL
Visibility 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 30000 ft AGL
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 12 knots / 21 knots 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 170° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.12 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 4°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Chattanooga, TN (1A0) 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Chattanooga, TN (1A0) 
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 13:28 Local
Type of Airspace:

The recorded weather at 1353 at Lovell Field (CHA), Chattanooga, Tennessee, which was located about 19 miles southwest of the accident site, was wind from 170° at 12 knots gusting to 21 knots, visibility 10 miles, few clouds at 15,000 ft, few clouds at 20,000 ft, broken ceiling at 30,000 ft, temperature 19°C, dew point 4°C, and altimeter setting 30.12 inches of mercury.

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries:
1 Fatal Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 35.328609,-85.055557

The airframe was recovered from the lake; the empennage had been cut by recovery personnel for transport. An FAA inspector examined the airframe and noted that the cockpit and cabin area were crushed and that both wings were highly fragmented. The inspector confirmed control continuity from the elevator and rudder to the cockpit area. He also noted aileron cables extending from the cockpit area to their respective wing. The front seat four-point harnesses remained intact.

The engine was recovered about 5 months after the airframe. The crankshaft fracture surfaces exhibited jagged shear lips, and the exposed steel was covered with rust. The engine was examined by the engine manufacturer under the supervision of an FAA inspector. The engine's crankshaft was manually rotated via an accessory drive gear, and all six cylinders produced thumb compression. Corrosion was present on cylinder cooling fins and fuel system components. The rocker cover on cylinder No. 6 was broken and partially separated, exposing the exhaust valve stem and valve spring assembly. The rocker arm for the cylinder No. 6 exhaust valve had separated. All other rocker covers remained intact. An electronic borescope inspection was performed; all intake and exhaust valves were intact, and the valve faces exhibited normal combustion deposits. The propeller was not recovered.

Examination of the airframe and engine revealed no preimpact mechanical malfunctions that would have precluded normal operation.

Medical and Pathological Information

The Hamilton County, Tennessee, Medical Examiner performed an autopsy of the pilot. The autopsy results found that the pilot's cause of death was multiple blunt force injuries.

Toxicology testing was performed at the FAA Forensic Sciences Laboratory and detected dextromethorphan, a nonsedating cough suppressant, and its metabolite dextrorphan in the pilot's urine specimens but not in his cavity blood. Both chlorpheniramine and doxylamine, sedating antihistamines used for treating cold or hay fever symptoms, were also detected in the pilot's urine specimens; there were inconclusive detection results for these medications in the pilot's cavity blood. In addition, ibuprofen, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory pain medication, was detected in the pilot's urine specimens.

Loss of Engine Power (Total): Cessna T210L Turbo Centurion II, N2391S; accident occurred January 10, 2019 near Calhoun County Airport (KPKV), Port Lavaca, Texas




Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Port Lavaca, Texas
Accident Number: CEN19LA069
Date and Time: January 10, 2019, 16:50 Local
Registration: N2391S
Aircraft: Cessna T210
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Analysis

While on approach to land, the airplane’s engine lost total power. The pilot performed a forced landing to a soft field, resulting in substantial damage to the airplane. There was a delay in recovering the airplane, and fuel quantity and quality at the time of the accident could not be verified. An examination of the engine and engine components did not detect any anomalies which would have contributed to a loss of engine power.

The reason for the loss of engine power could not be determined.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
A total loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined based on the available information.

Findings

Aircraft (general) - Unknown/Not determined

Factual Information

On January 10, 2019, about 1650 central standard time, a Cessna T210L airplane, N2391S, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Port Lavaca, Texas. The pilot and passenger received minor injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

According to information collected by the Federal Aviation Administration, the pilot was at 2,800 ft mean sea level, and on a base leg to runway 14 at the Calhoun County Airport (PKV), Port Lavaca, Texas, when the engine suddenly stopped producing power. The pilot switched fuel tanks and attempted a restart twice and then turned on the fuel pump. Engine power was not restored, and the pilot prepared for a forced landing to a field. When the airplane touched down in the field, the nose gear sank into the soft soil and the airplane nosed over, coming to rest inverted. The pilot and passenger were able to egress with minor injuries.

Due to a U.S. Government furlough and wet accident site conditions, the airplane remained inverted for about 6 weeks before it was recovered. Once recovered, an examination was conducted on the engine. No anomalies were detected with the engine which would have precluded normal operation. Trace fuel was found in the fuel lines. However, due to the delayed recovery of the inverted airplane, fuel quantity and quality could not be verified.

The reason for the loss of engine power could not be determined.

History of Flight

Approach-VFR pattern final Unknown or undetermined
Approach-VFR pattern final Loss of engine power (total) (Defining event)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 35
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land 
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None 
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None 
Second Pilot Present:
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Unknown
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: Last
Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N2391S
Model/Series: T210 L
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1976
Amateur Built:
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal 
Serial Number: 21061267
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: IO-520-L
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 300 Horsepower
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC) 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPKV, 30 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 16:55 Local
Direction from Accident Site: 239°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 10 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 110° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  /
Altimeter Setting: 30.22 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 9°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Destination: 
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 
Type of Airspace: 

Airport Information

Airport: CALHOUN COUNTY PKV 
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 32 ft msl 
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: 14 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5004 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 28.67,-96.680831 (est)

Loss of Control in Flight: Robinson R44 Raven II, N484AB; accident occurred January 08, 2019 near Garner Field Airport (KUVA), Uvalde, Texas










Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  San Antonio, Texas

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Uvalde, Texas
Accident Number: CEN19LA065
Date and Time: January 8, 2019, 10:00 Local 
Registration: N484AB
Aircraft: Robinson R44
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight 
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

Analysis

The student pilot and flight instructor were conducting a local, instructional flight. The instructor reported that, as the student was transitioning the helicopter through effective translational lift about 40 knots airspeed, he raised the collective to increase the available power to the takeoff power setting. Shortly thereafter, he heard a loud "pop/bang sound," which was followed by an uncommanded right yaw and severe vibrations. Due to the low altitude and airspeed, the instructor immediately took the flight controls and initiated an autorotation. Upon touchdown, the helicopter tilted forward, and the instructor applied aft cyclic to correct; however, the main rotor blades contacted the tailboom, which resulted in the tailboom partially separating from the helicopter.

During postaccident examination of the helicopter, the clutch assembly lubricant was drained, and metallic debris was found in the strainer. Disassembly of the clutch assembly revealed galling of the sprags and the corresponding sprag contact surfaces on the clutch shaft and hub. It is likely that the excessive galling resulted in the sprag clutch slipping, which produced the uncommanded right yaw and led to the student's and instructor's inability to maintain helicopter control.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The slipping of the sprag clutch due to galling of the sprags and corresponding sprag contact surfaces within the clutch assembly, which rendered the helicopter uncontrollable.

Findings

Aircraft (general) - Malfunction
Aircraft (general) - Attain/maintain not possible

Factual Information

On January 8, 2019, about 1000 central standard time, a Robinson R44 II helicopter, N484AB, experienced a hard landing during an autorotation shortly after takeoff from Garner Field Airport, Uvalde, Texas. The flight instructor sustained minor injuries, the student pilot was not injured, and the helicopter sustained substantial damage. The helicopter was registered to and operated by a private individual as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

According to the flight instructor, all pre-takeoff checks were normal with no anomalies noted. Once the helicopter was through effective translational lift and about 40 knots airspeed, the collective was raised to increase the available power to takeoff power setting. Shortly thereafter, a loud pop/bang was heard followed by an uncommanded right yaw and severe vibrations. Due to the low altitude and airspeed, the flight instructor immediately initiated an autorotation. Upon touchdown, the helicopter tilted forward with the main rotor blades about 6 inches from contacting the ground. The flight instructor applied aft cyclic to correct, and the main rotor blades contacted the tailboom.

Postaccident examination of the helicopter revealed the tailboom was partially separated, and the tail rotor driveshaft system was damaged. During the examination, the clutch assembly lubricant was drained and an unusual amount of metallic debris was noted in the strainer. The clutch assembly was removed and sent to Robinson Helicopter Company for further examination.

Examination and disassembly of the clutch assembly revealed galling of the sprags and the corresponding sprag contact surfaces on the shaft and hub.

According to the Robinson R44 maintenance manual, the clutch assemblies are to be inspected for metallic flakes every 500 hours. The most recent inspection on the clutch assembly was completed on April 18, 2018, about 245 hours prior to the accident.

History of Flight

Initial climb Flight control sys malf/fail
Initial climb Loss of control in flight (Defining event)
Autorotation Off-field or emergency landing
Autorotation Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Flight instructor Information

Certificate: Commercial; Flight instructor 
Age: 30, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None 
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter 
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Helicopter; Instrument helicopter
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With waivers/limitations 
Last FAA Medical Exam: September 18, 2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: August 15, 2018
Flight Time: 2650 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1200 hours (Total, this make and model), 2600 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 250 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 150 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Student pilot Information

Certificate: Private 
Age: 39, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land 
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None 
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: April 4, 2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 400 hours (Total, all aircraft), 20 hours (Total, this make and model), 320 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 25 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Robinson 
Registration: N484AB
Model/Series: R44 II 
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 2006 
Amateur Built:
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal 
Serial Number: 11390
Landing Gear Type: N/A; Skid 
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: November 7, 2018 Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 245 Hrs 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1680.9 Hrs at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Not installed 
Engine Model/Series: IO-540-AE1A5
Registered Owner:
Rated Power: 205 Horsepower
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC) 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Distance from Accident Site:
Observation Time: 09:30 Local 
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.95 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C / 15°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Uvalde, TX (UVA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Uvalde, TX (UVA) 
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 10:00 Local
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Garner Field UVA
Runway Surface Type:
Airport Elevation: 941 ft msl
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 29.210277,-99.743057(est)





The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas


Location: Uvalde, TX
Accident Number: CEN19LA065
Date & Time: 01/08/2019, 1000 CST
Registration: N484AB
Aircraft: Robinson R44
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Flight control sys malf/fail
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional

On January 8, 2019, about 1000 central standard time, a Robinson R44 II helicopter, N484AB, experienced a hard landing during an autorotation shortly after takeoff from Garner Field Airport, Uvalde, Texas. The flight instructor sustained minor injuries, the student pilot was not injured, and the helicopter sustained substantial damage. The helicopter was registered to and operated by a private individual as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

According to the flight instructor, all pre-takeoff checks were normal with no anomalies noted. Once the helicopter was through effective translational lift and about 40 knots airspeed, the collective was raised to increase the available power to takeoff power setting. Shortly thereafter, a loud pop/bang was heard followed by an uncommanded right yaw and severe vibrations. Due to the low altitude and airspeed, the flight instructor immediately initiated an autorotation. Upon touchdown, the helicopter tilted forward with the main rotor blades about 6 inches from contacting the ground. The flight instructor applied aft cyclic to correct, and the main rotor blades contacted the tailboom.

Postaccident examination of the helicopter revealed the tailboom was partially separated, and the tail rotor driveshaft system was damaged. During the examination, the clutch assembly lubricant was drained and an unusual amount of metallic debris was noted in the strainer. The clutch assembly was removed and sent to Robinson Helicopter Company for further examination.

Examination and disassembly of the clutch assembly revealed galling of the sprags and the corresponding sprag contact surfaces on the shaft and hub.

According to the Robinson R44 maintenance manual, the clutch assemblies are to be inspected for metallic flakes every 500 hours. The most recent inspection on the clutch assembly was completed on April 18, 2018, about 245 hours prior to the accident.

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 30, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied:Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Helicopter; Instrument Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/18/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/15/2018
Flight Time:  2650 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1200 hours (Total, this make and model), 2600 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 250 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 150 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 39, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present:Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/04/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:   400 hours (Total, all aircraft), 20 hours (Total, this make and model), 320 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 25 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Robinson
Registration: N484AB
Model/Series: R44 II
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 2006
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 11390
Landing Gear Type: Skid;
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/07/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 245 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1680.9 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: IO-540-AE1A5
Registered Owner: Bodie Nunn
Rated Power: 205 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Distance from Accident Site:
Observation Time: 0930 CST
Direction from Accident Site: 
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction:  
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.95 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C / 15°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Precipitation
Departure Point: Uvalde, TX (UVA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Uvalde, TX (UVA)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1000 CST
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Garner Field (UVA)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 941 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 29.210278, -99.743056 (est)