Tuesday, December 10, 2013

No plans to search for plane at the Tops: Cessna 210, VH-MDX

There are no current plans to search the Dingo Tops, or Caparra areas for the wreckage of a plane that went missing in 1981, said Police Inspector Allan Fidick in a statement to the Chronicle. Inspector Fidick was the staff officer for superintendent Thurtell, the commander of Operation Wittenoom - a recent search operation for the plane at the Barrington Tops. 

After the search failed to find the missing plane local resident Hugh Gooding said he believed the plane would be found in the Dingo Tops area. Following our article, we were contacted by Gordon and Lyrian Martin who, like Hugh, heard a plane "labouring badly" the night VH-MDX disappeared. Gordon told police he heard the plane fly over his home at Marlee East at approximately 7.10pm and unfortunately Hugh could not be specific about the time.

"It probably was the same plane that some people saw out near Caparra, but it was probably still flying west at that stage, air traffic control were still tracking and talking with the plane for approximately another 30 minutes after 7.10pm," said inspector Fidick.

"The flight path of VH-MDX on the night of August 9,1981 was a generally westerly direction when it went out, path was north of Gloucester. The plane flew out west for a way, then turned and flew south the other side of Moonan Flat. At this stage the plane was in trouble with ice, so got permission to change course and flew in a generally south east direction, trying to find Maitland or Raymond Terrace. About 7.35pm the plane was south of Mt Alyn, and has changed course again and flew in a general north east direction. At 7.37pm the pilot broadcast the plane was at 6500 feet altitude, losing height. Last broadcast was at 7.38pm at 5000 feet. (That is 1500 ft in a minute!). The last recorded points on radar had the plane at 7.38pm (last broadcast as well) just southwest of the Chichester Range, near Wilsons River still bearing north east. Ground level of that range is about 4500 feet above sea level. The accuracy of the radar at the time was + or - 800 metres. The planned search area of Operation Wittenoom was to cover the projected flight path of the plane considering last known information, and the topography of the area.

"The primary search area this time was actually very similar to the first search area back in 1981. That year apparently the weather was bad for an extended period and he first large scale ground search was not able to be launched until early September." 


Source:  http://www.winghamchronicle.com.au

Lebanon Municipal (KLEB), New Hampshire: Airport slashes fares to land more money

WCAX.COM Local Vermont News, Weather and Sports-

LEBANON, N.H. -  Passengers hit the tarmac in Lebanon, N.H., from various destinations across the country. Jim Norris is returning home to Lyndonville.

"Went to Homer, Alaska, for a wedding," Norris said. "It was a great trip."

Connie Roberts, who is attending a wedding in Vermont, is coming from Ohio.

"I was going to take the bus from Boston and my sister got online and was checking out things and decided that flying would be the best way to go," Roberts said.

That's because Cape Air, the sole carrier in Lebanon, has reduced rates as part of a special promotion-- $49 to Boston, $99 to New York. The deal is to help increase annual departures from Lebanon over the 10,000-passenger mark by the end of the year. It's a crucial number for small airports.

"If we get 10,000, then our entitlement money that we get from FAA for safety and improvement increases from $150,000 a year to about a million," explained Rick Dyment, the manager of Lebanon Municipal Airport.

This is the second year in a row that prices have been slashed to boost ridership. Not exactly ideal for the airport, but in the meantime, officials say it is the passengers who are benefiting.

"A lot better than driving to Boston or even Manchester," Norris said.

"We would have been on the bus for three hours versus an hour," Roberts said.

Less time on the road and less hassle at the gate.

"If you are standing in a security line, there is never more than eight people in front of you because it is a nine-passenger plane," Dyment said.

As of Tuesday afternoon, the airport was 565 passengers away from that goal, but only three people boarded the early afternoon flight. Ten years ago, the airport was seeing three to four times as many travelers.

"Burlington and Manchester did significant airport improvements, added a lot more airlines, added a lot more destinations. So it is all competition," Dyment said.

Competition that's taken its toll. But officials say good rates are helping get the word out about the convenience Lebanon offers, so in the future, passenger numbers take off.

The money comes from the federal Airport Improvement Program which is paid for through fares and not tax dollars.


Story and Video:   http://www.wcax.com

Cessna 310R, N98BT, Hubaire LLC: Accident occurred December 08, 2013 in Jacksonville, Florida

http://registry.faa.gov/N98BT

NTSB Identification: ERA14FA068
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, December 08, 2013 in Jacksonville, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/30/2014
Aircraft: CESSNA 310R, registration: N98BT
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot filed an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan with flight services, and the briefer asked the pilot if he would like weather information. The pilot replied “no,” and stated that the weather “looked good”; however, at that time, the weather at the destination airport included visibility of 2 miles and a 400-foot overcast ceiling. The pilot proceeded on the approximate 1-hour night flight to the destination airport in low IFR conditions. During the instrument landing system approach, the pilot flew about 1 mile right of and 900 feet below the final approach fix. The tower controller issued a low altitude alert and instructed the pilot to check his altitude. The pilot acknowledged the instruction and confirmed that the airplane’s altitude was 600 feet, which was the altitude indicated on radar. He then flew the airplane left of the final approach course twice before intercepting it a third time, descending to 300 feet, and then reporting that he was going to conduct a missed approach. The published missed approach procedure was to climb to 700 feet and then to make a climbing right turn to 1,900 feet on a 180-degree heading. However, the tower controller instructed the pilot to fly a heading of 280 degrees, and the pilot acknowledged the instruction. The controller did not provide an altitude and was not required to do so. After the pilot acknowledged the instruction, the airplane made a climbing left turn to 900 feet before radar and radio communications were lost. The airplane subsequently descended and collided with a retaining pond near the last recorded radar target. Although the tower controller’s issuance of nonstandard missed approach instructions without specifying an altitude might have added to the pilot’s workload, radar data show an initial turn consistent with the instructions and an associated climb indicating that the nonstandard instructions were not a factor in the accident. Examinations of the airplane and engine revealed no preimpact mechanical malfunctions that would have precluded normal operation, and there was no evidence of medical impairment that would have affected the pilot’s performance. Given the night instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) with restricted visibility and the sustained left turn and climb, it is likely the pilot experienced spatial disorientation. The investigation could not determinate the pilot’s overall and recent experience in actual IMC; however, his inability to align the airplane with both the final approach fix’s lateral and vertical constraints is consistent with a lack of instrument proficiency.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot’s failure to maintain airplane control during a missed approach in night instrument meteorological conditions due to spatial disorientation and a lack of instrument proficiency.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On December 8, 2013, about 1821 eastern standard time, a Cessna 310R, N98BT, operated by a private individual, was destroyed when it collided with a pond, during a missed approach at Jacksonville Executive Airport (CRG), Jacksonville, Florida. The private pilot and two passengers were fatally injured. Night instrument meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed for the planned flight to CRG. The flight originated from St Lucie County International Airport (FPR), Fort Pierce, Florida, about 1715. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to information from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the airplane was in radio and radar contact with Jacksonville International Airport (JAX), Jacksonville, Florida, terminal radar approach control (Jacksonville Approach). At 1806, the controller advised the pilot of updated automated terminal information service (ATIS) information, which included visibility 1.5 miles with mist and ceiling overcast at 400 feet. At that time, the airplane was at 5,000 feet mean sea level and the pilot acknowledged the information. Between 1809 and 1812, the controller cleared the flight to descend to 3,000 feet and then 2,000 feet, which the pilot acknowledged and complied with.

At 1814, the controller informed the pilot that his position was 7 miles from the ADERR intersection (final approach fix), instructed him to fly a heading of 350 degrees and to maintain 2,000 feet until established on the localizer, which the pilot acknowledged. At 1815, the pilot was instructed to and changed radio frequency to the CRG tower. The CRG controller cleared the flight to land on runway 32 and provided a pilot report (PIREP) from a flight that landed 30 minutes prior. The PIREP, which included that lights were visible at 300 feet above ground level (agl) and the runway was in sight at 200 feet agl, was acknowledged by the pilot. At 1817, a low altitude alert was generated in the tower and the controller instructed the pilot to check his altitude. The pilot acknowledged the instruction and stated he was at 600 feet, which was the altitude indicated by radar. At 1819, the pilot advised that he was performing a missed approach.

The published missed approach procedure was a climb to 700 feet then a climbing right turn to 1,900 feet on a 180-degree heading. The tower controller instructed the pilot to fly a heading of 280 degrees, which would be a left, and the pilot acknowledged. The controller did not provide an altitude and told the pilot to contact Jacksonville Departure, to which the pilot did not reply. No further communications were received from the accident airplane.

The crossing altitude for ADERR was 1,900 feet msl. Review of FAA radar data revealed that the airplane passed ADERR about 1 mile right of localizer course and about 1,000 feet msl, which was 900 feet below the published crossing altitude. It then descended and leveled off about 600 feet, while twice proceeding left of localizer course and re-intercepting. During the third intercept, it descended to about 300 feet and then began a climbing left turn to 900 feet msl, before radar contact was lost

PILOT INFORMATION

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multiengine land, and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on August 2, 2013. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 1,600 hours. The pilot obtained his instrument rating in 2002 and his multiengine rating in 2007.

The pilot's logbook was not recovered. Review of an insurance application, dated July 30, 2012, revealed that the pilot reported 1,550 total hours; of which, 800 hours were in multiengine airplanes with 30 of those hours in the same make and model as the accident airplane. The application did not list instrument experience.

Review of a flight instructor's logbook revealed that he had provided the pilot a biannual flight review on June 30, 2012; however, no record of an instrument proficiency check or instrument experience was located.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The six-seat, low-wing, retractable-gear airplane, serial number 310R1582, was manufactured in 1979. It was powered by two Continental IO-550, 300-horsepower engines, equipped with McCauley propellers. According to maintenance records, the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on June 10, 2013. At that time, the airplane had accumulated 4,161.3 total hours of operation. The engines had accumulated 702.7 hours since major overhaul. According to the hour meter, the airplane had flown 9 hours from the time of the most recent annual inspection, until the accident, including the accident flight.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1611, the pilot telephoned flight service and filed an IFR flight plan for the accident flight. After filing the flight plan, the flight service specialist asked if he could check any weather for the pilot and the pilot replied no, that the weather "looked good." At that time, the recorded weather at CRG included visibility 2 miles in mist and ceiling 400 feet overcast.

The recorded weather at CRG, at 1833, was: wind 060 degrees at 4 knots; visibility 2.5 miles in mist; overcast ceiling at 200 feet; temperature 18 degrees C; dew point 17 degrees C; altimeter 30.20 inches Hg.

AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL

Review of FAA air traffic control (ATC) information revealed that when the JAX controller relayed the current ATIS information to the pilot at 1806, a newer special weather observation was recorded at the same time, which indicated an overcast ceiling at 200 feet (verses 400 feet). The updated weather was not communicated to the pilot by the JAX or CRG controller; however, the CRG controller relayed a PIREP, which included that lights were visible at 300 feet agl and the runway was in sight at 200 feet agl. Additionally, although the JAX controller's alternate missed approach instructions did not include an altitude, there was no requirement to do so and the pilot would be expected to climb to the altitude of the published missed approach and then turn to the alternate heading that was provided by the controller.

For more information, see the Air Traffic Control Group factual report in the public docket.

WRECKAGE INFORMATION

The wreckage was subsequently located about 1 mile south of CRG, submerged in a pond of a residential development. The wreckage was upright, intact, and oriented about a southerly heading. The leading edges of both wings and the nosecone exhibited impact damage. The main fuel tank and auxiliary fuel tank on each wing were breeched. The right wing fuel selector valve was positioned to the right auxiliary fuel tank. The left wing fuel selector valve was positioned to the left main fuel tank. The right flap remained attached to the right wing and was extended approximately 15 degrees. The right aileron remained partially attached to the right wing. The left flap remained attached to the left wing and was extended approximately 15 degrees. The left aileron remained partially attached to the left wing. The landing gear was retracted.

The empennage, horizontal stabilizer, and vertical stabilizer were undamaged. Elevator, elevator trim, rudder, and rudder trim cable continuity were confirmed from their respective flight control surfaces to the aft cabin area where the cables were cut by recovery personnel. Aileron and aileron trim cable continuity were confirmed from their respective flight control surfaces to the wing root area. Measurement of the elevator trim actuator corresponded to a 5-degree tab down (nose up) position. Measurement of the rudder trim actuator corresponded to a 5-degree tab left (nose right) position. Measurement of the aileron trim actuator corresponded to the neutral aileron trim position. The cockpit area was crushed. All four seats were ejected and the lapbelts and shoulder harnesses remained intact. The lapbelts in seat Nos. 1, 2, and 3 were buckled. The pilot's side of the instrument panel was equipped with an electronic flight instrument system (EFIS) with backup attitude indicator. The pilot's attitude indicator and turn and bank coordinator were removed and disassembled for inspection. The disassembly of both instruments revealed that their respective gyros exhibited rotational scoring. The throttle, propeller, and mixture controls were full forward. The altimeter indicated 200 feet with 30.19 displayed in the Kollsman window. The airspeed indicator needle displayed 130 knots.

The propeller remained attached to the right engine and all three propeller blades were bent aft. The top and bottom spark plugs were removed. The top spark plug electrodes were intact and gray in color. The bottom spark plug electrodes were intact and oil soaked. The propeller was removed from the right engine and the crankshaft was rotated by hand. Valve train continuity was confirmed and thumb compression was attained on all cylinders. The vacuum pump was disassembled and its vanes were intact. The vacuum pump housing exhibited rotational scoring. The engine driven fuel pump was removed, its drive coupling was intact, and the pump was reinstalled. The fuel screen in the metering unit contained fuel and was absent of debris. Oil was observed throughout the engine.

The propeller remained attached to the left engine with two of the propeller blades bent aft and the third blade was loose in the hub. The top and bottom sparkplugs were removed. The top spark plug electrodes were intact and gray in color. The bottom spark plug electrodes were intact and oil soaked. The propeller was removed from the left engine and the crankshaft was rotated by hand. Valve train continuity was confirmed and thumb compression was attained on all cylinders. The vacuum pump was disassembled and its drive shaft was sheared. The vacuum pump vanes were intact and the pump housing exhibited rotational scoring. The engine driven fuel pump was removed, its drive coupling was intact, and it was reinstalled. The fuel screen in the metering unit contained fuel and was absent of debris. Oil was observed throughout the engine.

Both engines were successfully test-run at the manufacturer's facility, under the supervision of an FAA inspector, on January 22 and 23, 2013. The EFIS, and a digital engine analyzer were retained and forwarded to the NTSB Vehicle Reorder Laboratory, Washington D.C., for data download. No data was recovered from either unit.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot on December 9, 2012, by the State of Florida District 4 Medical Examiner's Office, Jacksonville, Florida. The cause of death was noted as multiple blunt force trauma.

Toxicological testing was performed on the pilot by the FAA Bioaeronautical Science Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The results were negative for carbon monoxide, alcohol, and drugs.


NTSB Identification: ERA14FA068 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, December 08, 2013 in Jacksonville, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 310R, registration: N98BT
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 12, 2013, about 1821 eastern standard time, a Cessna 310R, N98BT, operated by a private individual, was substantially damaged when it collided with a retaining pond, during a missed approach at Jacksonville Executive Airport (CRG), Jacksonville, Florida. The private pilot and two passengers were fatally injured. Night instrument meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the planned flight to CRG. The flight originated from St Lucie County International Airport (FPR), Fort Pierce, Florida, about 1715. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to preliminary information from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the airplane was in radio and radar contact with air traffic control (ATC) as the pilot was performing an instrument landing system approach to runway 32 at CRG. The pilot subsequently reported to ATC that he was doing a missed approach and no further communications were received from the accident airplane. During the missed approach, the airplane climbed from approximately 325 feet mean sea level (msl), to 425 feet msl, before radar contact was lost.

The wreckage was subsequently located about 1 mile south of CRG, submerged in a retaining pond of a residential development. The wreckage was upright, intact, and oriented about a southerly heading. The leading edges of both wings and the nosecone exhibited impact damage while the empennage was undamaged. The wing flaps were extended approximately 15 degrees and the landing gear was retracted. The pilot's side of the instrument panel was equipped with an electronic flight instrument system (EFIS) with backup attitude indicator. Both engines, the EFIS, and a digital engine analyzer were retained for further examination.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multiengine land, and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on August 2, 2013. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 1,600 hours.

The recorded weather at CRG, at 1833, was: wind 060 degrees at 4 knots; visibility 2.5 miles in mist; overcast ceiling at 200 feet; temperature 18 degrees C; dew point 17 degrees C; altimeter 30.20 inches Hg.





From left, Tess Huber, Michael Huber and Abigail "Abbey" Huber 



Members of Temple Beth El Israel in Port St. Lucie came early Sunday morning to set up for the funeral service of Dr. Michael Huber and his two daughters. 

Seventeen-year-old Abigail Huber and twenty-year-old Tess are survived by their mother Roberta Huber.

Ted rodgers is among those preparing the temple including food for the reception. Dr. Huber was his dentist for over 30 years.

Rodgers says he was shocked by news of the crash.

He says Dr. Huber was a very respectful man and dedicated father.

Family and friends are expected to start arriving around 9:30 Sunday morning.

The service will begin at 10:00 am this morning followed by the burial at Beth El Memorial Park in Fort Pierce.

Story, Video and Photo: http://www.wptv.com




Members of Temple Beth El Israel in Port St. Lucie came early Sunday morning to set up for the funeral service of Dr. Michael Huber and his two daughters.






Obituary for Tess Rochelle Huber

Tess Huber, 20, beloved daughter of Roberta Abrams Huber and the late Michael Huber passed away on December 8, 2013.

Tess was a sophomore at the University of North Florida and a champion member of the ladies golf team. In addition to her mother, Tess is survived by her maternal grandparents, Norman and Lorraine Abrams, her Aunt Jackie Woodard, cousins, Cayla and Shelby Woodard, her uncle, Jon and aunt, Susan Huber and cousins, Trent and Stephanie Huber. 


Tess can be remembered for her academic accolades at Lincoln Park Academy including National Honor Society and graduated with high honors. Tess was named Golfer of the Year in 2010 Scripps Treasure Coast Golfers All Area, one of among several of her golf achievements. Tess loved horseback riding, painting, drawing, collecting skull jewelry and her long lucky earrings.

Tess played the viola in the Lincoln Park Academy Orchestra. Tess was an outstanding fundraiser, one of her favorite charities was Make a Wish Foundation. She participated in the PGA Learning Center Golf Team Learning Clinics. In 4H she entered her rabbit, Blossom, and won. Tess was always quick with her generous nature and contagious smile that will live in our hearts forever. This past weekend she made a special trip to cheer her best friend and sister in their shared loved of golf. Tess will be in our hearts forever.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to: Tess Huber Memorial Scholarship Fund for a Young Florida Female Athlete, C/O Eric Nappy, University of North Florida, 1 UNF Drive, Jacksonville, FL 32224, or Abbey Huber Scholarship Trust Fund for Young Female Athletes, C/O John Justice, Lincoln Park Academy, 1806 Avenue I, Fort Pierce, FL 34950, or to Abbey and Tess Huber Memorial Religious School Scholarship Fund, Temple Beth El Israel, 551 SW Bethany Dr., Port St. Lucie, FL 34986.

Services: A service will be held on Sunday, December 15, 2013 at 10:00 AM at Temple Beth El Israel, Port St. Lucie, FL. Burial will follow at Beth El Memorial Park, Fort Pierce. Arrangements are under the direction of Haisley Funeral & Cremation Service. An online guest book may be signed at www.haisleyfuneralhome.com


http://www.haisleyfuneralhome.com/Tess-Huber




Obituary for Abigail Sarah “Abbey” Huber

Abigail Sarah “Abbey” Huber, 17, beloved daughter of Roberta Abrams Huber and the late Michael Huber, passed away on December 8, 2013.


Abbey was a senior at Lincoln Park Academy and an accomplished young golfer. In addition to her mother, Abbey is survived by her maternal grandparents, Norman and Lorraine Abrams, her aunt, Jackie Woodard, cousins, Cayla and Shelby Woodard, her uncle, Jon and aunt, Susan Huber and cousins, Trent and Stephanie Huber.


Abbey earned academic accolades at Lincoln Park Academy including National Honor Society. Abbey Huber can best be remembered for her love of Irish step dancing, Paul Frank Monkeys, the Lincoln Park Academy Lady Greyhounds, ceramics and pottery, golf and The South Florida Junior Players Tour. Her kind words and encouragement for team members, friends, family and strangers will always be remembered. Abbey loved to bake cupcakes and cookies. Her mom will always remember the special heart shaped cake she baked just for her. Abbey loved music and played the violin in the Lincoln Park Academy Orchestra and was Editor of the Lincoln Park Academy Yearbook. Abbey was very active in Temple Beth El Israel, performing in several plays and other services and performances. On Abbey’s last golf tournament this past Saturday and Sunday in Jupiter, Florida she was the overall winner and was honored when the Golf Coach of Stetson University came to offer Abbey a spot on their team for next year. Her best friend in life was her big sister, Tess.


In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to: Tess Huber Memorial Scholarship Fund for a Young Florida Female Athlete, C/O Eric Nappy, University of North Florida, 1 UNF Drive, Jacksonville, FL 32224, or to Abbey Huber Scholarship Trust Fund for Young Female Athletes, C/O John Justice, Lincoln Park Academy, 1806 Avenue I, Fort Pierce, FL 34950 or to the Abbey and Tess Huber Memorial Religious School Scholarship Fund, Temple Beth El Israel, 551 SW Bethany Dr., Port St. Lucie, FL 34986.


Services: A service will be held on Sunday, December 15, 2013 at 10:00 AM at Temple Beth El Israel, Port St. Lucie, FL. Burial will follow at Beth El Memorial Park, Fort Pierce, FL. 


Arrangements are under the direction of Haisley Funeral & Cremation Service. An online guest book may be signed at www.haisleyfuneralhome.com


http://www.haisleyfuneralhome.com/Abigail-Huber




Obituary for Dr. Michael Jay Huber
Dr. Michael J. Huber, 60, of St. Lucie West, passed away with his beloved daughters, Tess and Abbey, on December 8, 2013 in Jacksonville, Florida.

Dr. Huber was born in Jacksonville, Florida and resided in Port St. Lucie, Florida. 


Michael was a graduate of Fort Pierce Central High School, Class of 1971, where he played trumpet in the band and was a self proclaimed Geek. He then attended college at the University of Florida. Thereafter, Michael received his DMD and training in dentistry at the University of Florida, College of Dentistry in 1982. He moved to Fort Pierce and began his private dental practice, serving his patients for 30 years. He was an avid golfer and played regularly with his two daughters, Tess and Abbey. He served as the women’s golf coach at Lincoln Park Academy while his daughters attended school there. He also loved doing golf tournaments with the Sheriff’s Department. Michael was an experienced pilot and enjoyed flying his plane with his friends and family. He was an active member of the community and ran for school board. He was a member of the PGA Golf Club in Port St. Lucie, and past member of the Fort Pierce Rotary Club. 


He is survived by his brother, Jonathan, and family of Wellington, FL. He was preceded in death by his parents, Clyde and Teresa Huber.

In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the Huber Scholarship Fund to help further higher education for graduating seniors of Lincoln Park Academy, Saint Lucie Education Foundation, 4204 Okeechobee Road, Fort Pierce, Florida 34947. www.educationfoundationstlucie.org

Services: A service will be held on Sunday, December 15, 2013 at 10:00 AM at Temple Beth El Israel, Port St. Lucie, FL. Burial will follow at Beth El Memorial Park, Fort Pierce, FL. Arrangements are under the direction of Haisley Funeral & Cremation Service. An online guest book may be signed at www.haisleyfuneralhome.com


http://www.haisleyfuneralhome.com//Michael-Huber




The victims were identified as Michael Huber (left) and his daughters,
Abby and Tess Huber, posted to Facebook on Sunday.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. - Among the things the National Transportation Safety Board will examine to determine what caused Sunday night's plane crash that killed the pilot and his two daughter will be the communications between the pilot and the tower at Craig Airport, where the Cessna 310 was supposed to land. 

 Michael Huber, 60, and his two daughters -- 17-year-old Abigail and 20-year-old Tess -- died when the twin-engine plane crashed into a retention pond about a mile southeast of the airport.

Channel 4 obtained a recording of that radio traffic and could identify four exchanges between Huber and the tower between 6:10 and 6:19 p.m.

NTSB officials say the plane crashed about 6:26 p.m. on approach to Craig. The wreckage was found in a retention pond of a Sandalwood neighborhood.

The first radio call from the tower to Huber clears his plane -- identified by its tail number, N98BT -- to land on Runway 32.

Then the controller tells him about another plane, a Piper Cherokee, that came in about 30 minutes before. The tower then talks about a ceiling breaking up at between 300 to 200 feet, to which Huber responds, "Roger, thank you much."

LISTEN:  Radio calls between Craig tower, Michael Huber's plane 


IMAGES: Wreckage of plane pulled from pond 

Huber communicates with the tower again three minutes later. It's hard to make out what is said, but you can hear Huber's response: "Ah, roger. Very good."

Then, at 6:15 p.m., Huber radioed the tower, possibly the last time.

"Hey, we're going to go around. We missed it," he said.

After that, the tower attempted to contact the plane four times: twice at 6:17, once at 6:18 and one last time at 6:19.

"They were apparently concerned as to why the plane disappeared from their radar screen," said Ed Booth, a lawyer who specializes in aviation issues. "They would have looked out to see if it on the runway not seeing it on the runway. The procedure would be to start calling on the radio frequency to see if the airplane will answer."

The Federal Aviation Administration has not confirmed this exchange of radio traffic, and said it will not while the investigation is ongoing. The agency says it will send its audio in a few months, when the final report on the crash is complete.


http://www.news4jax.com


Michael Huber





























JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- The National Transportation Safety Board says it'll be months before investigators know what led to a plane crash in a neighborhood in Arlington. 

The plane crashed Sunday evening into a retention pond in the Sutton Lakes subdivision, killing all three people on board.

One of the victims, Tess Huber, played golf for the women's golf team at the University of North Florida.

The NTSB said her father had a license to fly a twin engine plane.

Michael Huber, according to the NTSB, had a license with an instrument rating, which meant he had the training and qualifications to fly in certain meteorological conditions.

Robert Gretz, an NTSB spokesman, said crash investigators will look at all angles, including whether fog or low-hanging clouds had a role in the crash.

The twin engine Cessna crashed while approaching the runway at Craig Airport.  Gretz said another aircraft followed the same approach and landed at the airport without any problems about 30 minutes prior to the crash.

Crash investigators will also dig into the maintenance record of the plane.  They'll look at the pilot's experience and conduct toxicology tests.

A preliminary report is expected in 10 days.  The entire investigation could take anywhere from six to nine months to complete.





The dad was a Fort Pierce dentist and his daughters were star golf players.

FORT PIERCE, Fla. - Friends in St. Lucie County were devastated Monday to learn that Dr. Michael Huber and his two daughters Abby and Tess were killed when his plane crashed in Jacksonville Sunday. 

"They were a fixture here and they are really going to be missed," PGA Golf Learning Center Director Holly Taylor said.

Taylor says she has known the father and daughters for over five years and that they are at the golf course frequently.

They were golfing there as recently as Saturday. On Sunday, friends say Huber was flying his daughter Tess back to the University of North Florida. Abby was along for the ride.

The twin engine Cessna crashed about a mile from the runway into a pond near Jacksonville.

"This was a father and two daughters with a major bond. For something like this to happen is just shocking," golf pro Michelle Hupfer said.

Both girls were extremely talented at golf. Tess was on the golf team at UNF and Abby was already getting recruited from universities.

She was a senior at Lincoln Park Academy.

The St. Lucie County Schools Superintendent released a statement Monday saying the school would honor the memory of the students.

The girls mother is a speech pathologist for the school district.

"We are all just so sad and in disbelief. Our heart goes out to the family. We are going to miss them terribly," Taylor said.

Friends at the St. Lucie County International Airport where the plane took off from sat around a table inside the restaurant discussing the tragedy Monday morning.

"This was the second or third airplane he had. He flew frequently and everyone loved him," friend Dick Sinnott said at the airfield.

No funeral arrangements have been announced.

The investigation into what caused the crash is ongoing.

http://www.wptv.com


Aircraft crashed into a pond, the 3 persons on board were fatally injured, 2 miles from Jacksonville Executive Airport at Craig, Jacksonville, Florida. 



Huber family


Tess Huber

This photo of University of North Florida women's golf team member Tess Huber sits at the entrance to the Deerwood Golf and Country Club Monday morning only hours after she, her 17 year old sister and 60 year old father were killed in a plane crash into a retention pond near Craig. Team members and players at a charity golf tournament are all wearing UNF colored ribbons in memory of her today.


Tess Huber


 



JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- Dr. Michael Huber, 60, was flying with his daughters, 20-year-old Tess Huber and 17-year-old Abigail Huber, Sunday afternoon when investigators say the Cessna 310 they were in crashed into a retention pond in the Sutton Lakes subdivision

The trio was killed in the crash. 

The Superintendent of St. Lucie Public Schools, Genelle Zoratti Yost said Abigail Huber was a 12th grader at LPA where she was a IB Honor Roll student and member of the LPA Golf Team. 

Tess was a student and star golfer at the University of North Florida where she majored in Sports Management. 

According to Tess Huber's bio on UNF athletics website she:
  • Played in all four events for UNF finishing with a team-leading 75.27 average.
  • Collected three Top 20 finishes including a career best 3rd-place showing at the Courtyard Classic. 
  • Tallied a 2-1-0 record in Hughes Cup Match against Jacksonville 
  • Fired first collegiate career round under-par with a 71 in opening round of Courtyard Classic
  • Played six varsity golf seasons at Lincoln Park Academy
  • Competed in qualifying tournaments for the US Amateur, US Open, US Public Links and US Girls Junior

Tweets from UNF: 

"UNF mourns the loss of sophomore Tess Huber. Our thoughts & prayers go out to Tess' family and friends."

UNF Women's Golf:  

"Today is a sad day for the Osprey Golf Program. Our prayers and thoughts go out to the Huber Family." 

Coach Driscoll:
"Please pray for Huber family and @UNFOspreys family as we mourn loss of @OspreyWGolf Tess Huber in tragic plane crash ...Stay Blessed!!!"

UNF Athletic Director Lee Moon said "Tess was the most outgoing member of the team and loved the sport with all of her heart"

In addition, the previously planned golf fundraiser tournament at Deerwood Country Club will go on today in memory of Tess.

UNF said grief counseling is available to students, staff and faculty at the UNF Counseling Center by coming into the office located in Building 2, Founders Hall, Room 2300 or by calling 904-620-2602.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the victims were flying from from St. Lucie County International Airport to Craig Airport. Craig Airport is about three miles away from the crash site. 

Roberta Huber, the surviving mother of Abigail and Tess is a Speech/Language Pathologist within the St. Lucie Public school district. 





 



A Port St. Lucie father and his two daughters died Sunday in a plane crash in Jacksonville.

Michael Huber, 60, Tess Huber, 20, and Abigail Huber, 17, were on a Cessna 310 that took off from St. Lucie County International Airport in Fort Pierce. The plane was headed to Jacksonville Executive Airport, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office was notified around 6:30 p.m. that the plane crashed in the backyard of 1746 Nettington Court Drive in Sutton Lakes. The plane crashed on the edge of a retention pond and, when located, was underwater. Three people were on the plane, sheriff’s spokeswoman Melissa Bujeda said at a news conference Sunday night. It’s not yet known when the plane took off from Port St. Lucie.

Tess Huber, a graduate of Lincoln Park High School, was a sophomore at the University of North Florida where she was a member of the golf team.

“She was passionate about her golf, very studious. But she always had a smile on her face. She was always looking out for her teammates,” said Brian Morgan, UNF’s athletic director. “She was a big important member of this squad, of this family.”

Morgan said the Hubers regularly flew back and forth between Port St. Lucie and Jacksonville when Tess Huber wanted to come home for a weekend. This time, Tess Huber was returning to school for exams and a fundraiser for the golf team scheduled for today. The fundraiser has since turned into a memorial, Morgan said.

Michael Huber, a golf coach at Lincoln Park High, was a dentist and certified private pilot. A woman who answered the phone at Huber’s Fort Pierce dentistry office declined to comment.

The sheriff’s office dive team found two of the victims soon after the crash. The third wasn’t found until later that night.

Someone on the plane called the tower saying they couldn’t see the runway. The pilot was told to fly around. The plane started registering a low altitude and then crashed. At the time, there was a 3-mile visibility.

A person living in the Nettington Court Drive home saw the plane coming in and feared it was going to hit his house, Bujeda said.

There was no damage to any nearby homes.

The National Transportation Safety Board and the FAA are investigating the crash. The cause of death for the three on board will be released by the sheriff’s office.


http://www.palmbeachpost.com
 
UPDATE: Victims have been identified by the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office as Michael Huber-60, Tess Huber-20, and Abigail Huber-17. Victims are from Port St. Lucie.

A small plane crashed in a pond near Atlantic Boulevard in Jacksonville about 6:20 p.m. Sunday, killing three people on board, according to the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office.


A man and a woman died in the crash off Nettington Court, said Melissa Bujeda, a Sheriff’s Office spokeswoman, a few hours after the crash. A Sheriff’s Office dive team found a third victim, who appeared to be a female, in the water late Sunday night, Bujeda said.

She said the plane was en route to Jacksonville Executive at Craig Airport. Airport officials told police the pilot couldn’t see the runway. The pilot was told to fly around. The tower was soon alerted that the plane lost altitude, Bujeda said.

Bujeda said she wouldn’t speculate on whether fog in the area contributed to the crash.

“We know it crashed into the retention pond, and we’re very fortunate it did not hit any homes because it could be a lot more fatalities than we are talking about right now,” Bujeda said.

The plane flew out of St. Lucie County International Airport in Fort Pierce about 5:17 p.m.

Neighbors say they were cooking dinner or getting ready to put their children to bed when they heard a loud boom or crash. Then they learned a plane crashed into a drainage pond behind homes on Nettington Court and Coldfield Drive West.

Michael Jones lives on Coldfield Drive West.

He said he and his wife were cooking dinner just before they put the children to bed when the crash occurred.

“We heard a boom, and we heard that a plane had crashed,” Jones said.

Even though the airport is near, the thought of a plane crash doesn’t enter his mind often.

“We are right in the flight path of the airport so there’s the potential,” he said. “It was pretty loud. We thought somebody hit a car.”

Trish Goldsby lives a street away from the retention pond. She said she heard the plane’s engine cut off and then a loud boom.

“That’s when I came out, and next thing you know, I’m counting fire trucks,” she said.

Bujeda said the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration would investigate the reasons behind the crash.

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JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- Three people are dead after a small plane crashed into a retention pond in the Sutton Lakes subdivision on Sunday.

The Jacksonville Sheriff's Office said a man and two women who were aboard the plane are dead.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the CESSNA 310 model plane flew out of Fort Piece and JSO says it was heading to Craig Airport but crashed around 6:20 Sunday evening.

Local resident David Denais recorded video of the plane in the water. He says after seeing numerous emergency vehicles, he followed officials to the crash site.

"You could see the fuselage or the engine sticking out of the water, then there was other parts of the aircraft that were out of the water and I saw the guys dragging the body out of the water," said Denais.

JSO says the plane crashed into the retention pond and came in on the backyard property of a home on the 1700 block of Nettington Court.

"The tower has given us information that they [pilot] called into the tower saying that they couldn't see the runway. according to the JSO air unit it's about three mile visibility right now. They couldn't see the runway, a short time later they got an alert that it was low altitude for the airplane and then we started getting phone calls that the plane had crashed," said Melissa Bujeda, a spokesperson for the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office.

Stephen Meckes lives nearby and says he heard the plane crash.

"We heard like an engine taking off and then after that it was like a loud thud."

Craig Airport is about three miles away from the crash site.

"Now it makes me realize how close we are to Craig airfield and the flight patterns of aircrafts flying just over our subdivision, there's always concerns," said Denais.

NTSB and FAA will be handling the investigation.

According to the travel website FlightAware.com, the plane flew out of St. Lucie County International Airport in Fort Pierce about 5:17 p.m.

Police said fog may have played a role in the crash. First Coast News meteorologist Mike Prangley reports that visibility in the area was about two miles at the time.


http://www.firstcoastnews.com


A small plane crashed into a pond off Nettington Court near Atlantic Boulevard in Jacksonville about 6:20 p.m. Sunday, killing at least two on board, according to the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office.  

A man and a woman died in the crash, and a Sheriff’s Office dive team was looking for a possible third victim, said Melissa Bujeda, a Sheriff’s Office spokeswoman.

She said the plane was en route to Jacksonville Executive at Craig Airport. Airport officials told police the pilot couldn’t see the runway. The pilot was told to fly around. The tower was soon alerted that the plane lost altitude, Bujeda said.

Bujeda said she wouldn’t speculate on whether fog in the area contributed to the crash.

She said there was a third person listed in flight records, but that person hasn’t been found.

“We know it crashed into the retention pond, and we’re very fortunate it did not hit any homes because it could be a lot more fatalities than we are talking about right now,” Bujeda said.

Neighbors say they were cooking dinner or getting ready to put their children to bed when they heard a loud boom or crash. Then they learned a plane crashed into a drainage pond behind homes on Nettington Court and Coldfield Drive West.

Michael Jones lives on Coldfield Drive West. He said he and his wife were cooking dinner just before they put the children to bed when the crash occurred.

“We heard a boom, and we heard that a plane had crashed,” Jones said.

Even though the airport is near, the thought of a plane crash doesn’t enter his mind often.

“We are right in the flight path of the airport so there’s the potential,” he said. “It was pretty loud. We thought somebody hit a car.”

Trish Goldsby lives a street away from the retention pond. She said she heard the plane’s engine cut off and then a loud boom.

“That’s when I came out, and next thing you know, I’m counting fire trucks,” she said.

Bujeda said the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration would investigate the reasons behind the crash.
 

http://jacksonville.com






 





JSO on the scene of a deadly plane crash.

Letters: Craig airfield crash shows dangers of extending runway

CRAIG RUNWAY EXTENSION

Crash shows dangers

The recent letter writer who supports extending the Craig airfield runway lives in Ponte Vedra.

Move into our community of Sutton Lakes, which is in the direct path of the runway, and then give your approval.

The plane that crashed on Dec. 8 went into a retention pond. If it had crashed into a home, we do not know the extent of the damage it would have caused.

This area is served by natural gas. One plane could start a fire with jet fuel and natural gas, and we would not know how many homes would be involved.

We love our community and moved here knowing the airport was there and the planes were not big executive jets. Take your jets to JIA, and drive five minutes more. The runway is long enough to service what comes in now.

Judith Jones, Jacksonville


Source:   http://members.jacksonville.com/opinion  

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- No cause is listed in the National Transportation Safety Board's preliminary report released Wednesday on the small-plane crash in the Sutton Lakes neighborhood. But we are learning new details of the final moments.

Action News told you the pilot informed the tower at Jacksonville Executive at Craig Airport that he couldn't see the runway and would try again.

We now know Michael Huber was performing the missed approach in misty conditions before radar contact was lost.

"It just really does appear that this was potentially a loss of control of the aircraft," said Wayne Ziskal.

Ziskal has been flying for 48 years. He set a plane simulator to the exact weather conditions at the time of Huber's landing attempt to show Action News how severe the weather conditions were.

"Those conditions basically show you no runway. Because we are right at minimums of 200 feet. All we see is the approach lights," he said of the simulator that actually demonstrated the approach for Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, which he said has better lights than Craig Airport.

The report also outlines that Huber had a total flight experience of 1,600 hours. Ziskal tells me while that may make him legal to fly, it is not clear what his recent experience is.

"When was the last time he shot an approach like this? When was the last time he flew in the weather like this? What did he do in the last three, six months, we don't know," he said.

The report shows the wreckage was upright and intact. And Ziskal said the fact that one wing wasn't damaged more than the other is a sign neither engine went out -- pointing again to human error.

NTSB's final report will be completed in 6-9 months.


http://www.actionnewsjax.com

Oscar Burnside farewell Sunday: Cessna 182P Skylane, C-FIMQ

Oscar Burnside, 64, of Owen Sound, is the pilot missing over Georgian Bay after his single engine Cessna apparently crashed north of Wasaga Beach on Thursday Nov. 7 2013.


OWEN SOUND - A farewell gathering for friends and family of the missing Owen Sound pilot who is presumed to have died in a plane crash over Georgian Bay last month will take place Sunday at Stone Tree Golf and Fitness Club. 

Oscar Burnside was well known in various circles, including as a teacher, principal, realtor and businessman. Between 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. Sunday, his family invites anyone who knew him to come, listen to brief remarks at 2:30 p.m. and to share stories about him.

Burnside, 64, was flying in his single-engine Cessna plane back from Stowe, Vermont, Nov. 7. He'd stopped at Cornwall airport, then made his way back to Owen Sound about 5 p.m.

When he didn't arrive at Owen Sound airport, the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre out of Trenton was notified and a search of the bay began almost immediately. His last cellphone signal placed him in the Midland area.

Pieces of airplane consistent with his plane and bits of clothing began washing up on shore north of Wasaga Beach late the next day.

He has been with his wife, Lynne Parsons, for 30 years. There are no children.

Police efforts to find the plane and Burnside's body have been unsuccessful. Bad weather limited opportunities to search by boat and helicopter. Two weeks ago police announced with winter closing in, the search by water and air was suspended.

Sharon Burnside, of Oliphant, said Tuesday her brother-in-law made that flight from Vermont often. A better understanding of how the crash could have happened will have to wait until police find the plane and Burnside's body, she said. “There are so many things that could have happened, as I say, we may never know.”

Transportation Safety Board investigator Peter Machet said until the plane and body are found, he has little to explain the crash. There might not be much of an aircraft left to examine, he added.

Burnside's last contact with air traffic control was a request to reduce altitude. “But there was no urgency in the call. There was no distress. It was just a normal voice conversation,” Machet said. “And there was no further contact with him, there was no emergency calls from him. There was no indications there was any issues going on with him in the flight.”

Once police have a body, it will be up to a coroner to decide whether the case is closed, Machet said.

Sharon Burnside said Oscar's circle of friends was large but she couldn't guess how many would come to the farewell gathering.

Burnside had been principal of St. Vincent-Euphrasia school and Osprey Central and vice-principal at Georgian Bay Secondary School. He taught at OSCVI, John Diefenbaker Secondary School and at Sydenham school. In retirement, he also taught part-time at Georgian College.

In the late 1970s and early '80s, he owned Burnside Home Furnishings in Markdale and ran a business installing in-ground pools. Also, he was a partner in Choice Realty Solutions Inc.
 

Source:  http://www.owensoundsuntimes.com

China: Bar lowered for private pilots

A worker from an aircraft manufacturer assembles an airplane in Binzhou, Shandong province, in March. Experts say the new pilot requirements will encourage more people to take up flying.


China has eased requirements for trainee pilots hoping to fly private aircraft, a move experts say will boost the general aviation sector.

Changes have been made to the standards for theoretical exams, flight tests and physical condition that a flight student for private aircraft must meet before obtaining a certificate, the Civil Aviation Administration said in a statement.

"Before the standards were loosened, physical requirements for private aircraft pilots were as stringent as for those wishing to fly commercial aircraft," said Li Xiaojin, a professor at the Civil Aviation University of China.

"Because more and more people have begun to procure private aircraft or apply for flight certificates for business or recreational purposes, the adjustment came  at the right time."

In the past, flight students in China were subject to rigorous standards because most of them would fly military or commercial aircraft after they graduated from flight academies, he explained.

He added that equipment used on aircraft in the past were not as advanced as today, so pilots had to have a strong physique to handle flight controls.

Under the new requirements, those aged 17 or above who have received at least three years of education at a middle school will be eligible to apply for a private pilot's license, applicable only for noncommercial flights.

The biggest change made to the previous requirements is in the physical criteria an applicant must meet.

Requirements for height, weight and eyesight were altered and those who have chronic diseases, like diabetes, hypertension or coronary artery disease, which would disqualify them in the past, are allowed by the new rules to take flight courses.

"After the adjustment, physical requirements for the holder of a private pilot license have become as flexible as those for car drivers," the Civil Aviation Administration said.

After receiving a certified report of their physical fitness, flight students will also have to go through 40 hours of theoretical studies and another 40 hours of flight training before they sit final exams.

Passing the tests will allow them to hold a private pilot's license, the administration said, noting there are about 40 flight academies in China.

It added that those who obtained licenses can also become professional pilots by acquiring a commercial pilot's license, but that will be based on their flight time as a private pilot and will require higher levels of flight training.

Qian Wei, chairman of the AVIC Flight Academy, welcomed the new rules, saying they will help to encourage more people to pursue their dreams of flying.

"My academy rejected a young woman's application even though she was eager to study flying and would have made a good pilot based on her excellent condition," he said. "The only factor that disqualified the woman was the fact that she was 2 centimeters shorter than the required height. It was a shame but we couldn't do anything to help her."

Fewer than 100 Chinese people are receiving training for private licenses, and the relaxation will unleash a market that has huge potential, Qian said.

Zhong Ning, a spokeswoman for the Civil Aviation Administration, said only 345 people in China have private licenses.

She added the administration has published a succession of favorable measures for China's general aviation sector over the past month.

In an attempt to simplify procedures, the administration said that as of December, flights of general aviation aircraft would no longer need to submit applications to, and get approval from, authorities unless they were involved in nine specific scenarios.

These include entering or exiting China's territories, flying through restricted zones, and conducting aerial photography or surveys of military facilities.

In a previous announcement, it abolished the base fare for domestic flights, saying airlines can set their own prices.

The government will also design favorable policies for low-cost carriers and promote diversification in the industry, said Xia Xinghua, deputy director of the administration.

Gao Yuanyang, director of Beihang University's General Aviation Industry Research Center, said although the government has been gradually improving its policies and management, a degree of caution is still needed toward the industry's prospects.

"The rapid growth in this sector, which has been anticipated by many people, is far from occurring," he said. "The industry is still being hindered by the absence of specific policies, a lack of professionals and facilities, unbalanced allocation of airports, and outdated management methods."

http://usa.chinadaily.com.cn