Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Cessna 150, N5614E and Cessna 525C Citation CJ4, N511AC: Fatal accident occurred April 02, 2018 at Marion Municipal Airport (KMZZ), Grant County, Indiana


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Indianapolis, Indiana
Cessna; Wichita, Kansas 

CEN18FA132A  Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Kyle Hibst:  http://registry.faa.gov/N5614E

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Marion, IN
Accident Number: CEN18FA132A
Date & Time: 04/02/2018, 1509 EDT
Registration: N5614E
Aircraft: CESSNA 150
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On April 2, 2018, about 1709 eastern standard time, a Cessna 150 airplane, N5614E, registered to the pilot, was destroyed when it collided with a Cessna 525 business jet, N511AC, while taking off from runway 15 at the Marion Municipal Airport (MZZ), Marion, Indiana. The private pilot and passenger of the Cessna 150 sustained fatal injuries and the airline transport pilot and 4 passengers of the Cessna 525 were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area. Both flights were being conducted under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91. The Cessna 150 was departing on runway 15 at MZZ a local VFR personal flight and the Cessna 525 was landing on runway 22 after an IFR flight that originated from Jackson, Michigan.

Examination of the accident site showed that the Cessna 150 had struck the empennage of the Cessna 525 at the intersection of runways 15 and 22. Evidence at the intersection showed that the airplanes came together perpendicular to each other. The Cessna 150 then impacted the ground and a post-crash fire ensued. The Cessna 525 continued to roll out on runway 22. There were three witnesses to the accident, located in the airport lounge, within hearing distance of the UNICOM radio. Each witness reported seeing the Cessna 150 just airborne when it struck the empennage of the Cessna 525. Two of the witnesses stated that they heard the Cessna 150 pilot on runway 15 UNICOM frequency. The surviving pilot of the Cessna 525 stated that he did not see the departing Cessna 150 while he was on a straight-in approach to runway 22, nor did he see the 150 during the landing roll. He stated that he did not recall making a radio call on UNICOM, but did utilize his on board Traffic Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) system while on approach. He stated that the TCAS did not show any traffic on the airport. Passengers aboard the Cessna 525 were interviewed and all reported that they did not see the Cessna 150 on the approach or during the landing roll.

The reported weather at MZZ at the time of the accident was VFR with 4 miles of visibility due to haze. Also, at the departure and arrival ends of runway 15/33, there was a sign stating, "Traffic Using Runway 4/22 Cannot Be Seen, Monitor Unicom 122.7." At the departure and arrival ends of runway 4/22, there was a sign stating, "Traffic Using 15/33 cannot Be Seen, Monitor Unicom 122.7." The MKK airport does not have a control tower.

The Cessna 525 was equipped with a cockpit voice recorder (CVR). The CVR was removed and transported to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Lab, Washington, DC. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N5614E
Model/Series: 150 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MZZ, 858 ft msl
Observation Time: 1655 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 5°C / -1°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots, 140°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  4 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Marion, IN (MZZ)
Destination: Marion, IN (MZZ) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 40.490833, 85.679722

CEN18FA132B Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf



Avis Industrial Corporation:  http://registry.faa.gov/N511AC

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Location: Marion, IN
Accident Number: CEN18FA132B
Date & Time: 04/02/2018, 1509 EDT
Registration: N511AC
Aircraft: CESSNA 525C
Injuries: 5 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Business 

On April 2, 2018, about 1709 eastern standard time, a Cessna 525 business jet, N511AC, registered to Avis Industrial Corporation, of Upland, Indiana, sustained substantial damage when it was struck by a Cessna 150 airplane, N5614E, while rolling out after landing at the Marion Municipal Airport (MZZ), Marion, Indiana. The airline transport pilot and 4 passengers of the Cessna 525 were not injured and the private pilot and passenger of the Cessna 150 sustained fatal injuries . Visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area. Both flights were being conducted under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91. The Cessna 525 was landing on runway 22 after an IFR flight that originated from Jackson, Michigan, and the Cessna 150 was departing on runway 15 at MZZ a local VFR personal flight.

Examination of the accident site showed that the Cessna 150 had struck the empennage of the Cessna 525 at the intersection of runways 15 and 22. Evidence at the intersection showed that the airplanes came together perpendicular to each other. The Cessna 150 then impacted the ground and a post-crash fire ensued. The Cessna 525 continued to roll out on runway 22. There were three witnesses to the accident, located in the airport lounge, within hearing distance of the UNICOM radio. Each witness reported seeing the Cessna 150 just airborne when it struck the empennage of the Cessna 525. Two of the witnesses stated that they heard the Cessna 150 pilot on runway 15 UNICOM frequency. The surviving pilot of the Cessna 525 stated that he did not see the departing Cessna 150 while he was on a straight-in approach to runway 22, nor did he see the 150 during the landing roll. He stated that he did not recall making a radio call on UNICOM, but did utilize his on board Traffic Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) system while on approach. He stated that the TCAS did not show any traffic on the airport. Passengers aboard the Cessna 525 were interviewed and all reported that they did not see the Cessna 150 on the approach or during the landing roll.

The reported weather at MZZ at the time of the accident was VFR with 4 miles of visibility due to haze. Also, at the departure and arrival ends of runway 15/33, there was a sign stating, "Traffic Using Runway 4/22 Cannot Be Seen, Monitor Unicom 122.7." At the departure and arrival ends of runway 4/22, there was a sign stating, "Traffic Using 15/33 cannot Be Seen, Monitor Unicom 122.7." The MKK airport does not have a control tower.

The Cessna 525 was equipped with a cockpit voice recorder (CVR). The CVR was removed and transported to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Lab, Washington, DC. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N511AC
Model/Series: 525C C
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MZZ, 858 ft msl
Observation Time: 1655 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 5°C / -1°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots, 140°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  4 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Jackson, MI (JXN)
Destination: Marion, IN (MZZ) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 4 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 5 None
Latitude, Longitude:  40.490833, 85.679722

Kyle M. Hibst 
~
Kyle M. Hibst, age 31 of Elwood, passed away on Monday, April 2, 2018 in Marion following a tragic airplane accident at the Marion Municipal Airport. Kyle was the owner of Anytime Fitness in Elwood for the past 11 years and also an Area Field Manager for U-Haul. He was a volunteer fireman for Pipe Creek Volunteer Fire Department for 7 years, and was also honored to serve as an E.M.S. Chief and Treasurer of the department. He loved flying his airplane; fishing and being out on the lake; and snow skiing with family – especially his son. Kyle was an avid coin collector and was a devoted fan of Notre Dame Football. Quietly and without attention, Kyle was very charitable and always willing to help others in need. He will be remembered as an amazing husband, father, son, son-in-law, brother, grandson, uncle, and friend. 


David K. Wittkamper
~


David K. Wittkamper, age 31 of Elwood, went to his Heavenly home on Monday, April 2, 2018 in Marion following a tragic airplane accident.  David worked as a forklift operator at Red Gold, Inc. for the past 13 years and was a 17-year fireman at the Pipe Creek Volunteer Fire Department.  David was a 2004 graduate of Indiana Christian Academy in Anderson, and was currently in E.M.T. training.  He was an avid car enthusiast, and active member of the SRT-4 Car Club.  He always drove the nicest cars, and cared about his fashion.  David enjoyed remote control trucks and drones, and was an avid gun collector who enjoyed target practicing.  He was also a longtime collector of toy John Deere tractors, Hot Wheels, and every kind of shoe imaginable.  David cared about fitness, and was a member of Anytime Fitness in Elwood where he enjoyed working out.  More than anything, David loved his family; and he will be forever in their hearts. 



AUBURN, Ind. (WPTA21) -  A crash between two airplanes, killing two Elwood Indiana firefighters Monday, happened at the Marion Municipal Airport.

The airport has no control tower, something that's quite common for several thousand small to medium sized airfields in the U.S. 

There are, however, systems and procedures in place that help minimize dangers at smaller airports.

At the DeKalb County Regional Airport around noon on Tuesday, rain and clouds cut visibility and cut off virtually all flying activity.

Like the vast majority of airports nationwide, there's no air traffic control tower operating at DeKalb Regional.

But that doesn't mean such facilities are unsafe.

Pilots at the controls of all planes using the airport keep their eyes peeled for any sign of another plane arriving or departing, in the air and on the ground.

And those pilots use prescribed radio channels to announce their positions in preparation for taking off or landing, allowing the parties to make sure they don't get in each other's way.

"And you'll decide, well, I'm going to sit here and you'll tell them, I'm going to stay here for a minute, they'll land and then you'll taxi out behind them. So, the communication is two ways, the visual cues are two ways," said Russell Couchman, the airport's manager.

Like all facets of life where technology is advancing, more and more pilots these days have either laptops or iPads in the cockpit with them, that provide on a screen additional information to keep them safe.

A larger monitor in the airport's lobby gives you a better view of the GPS tracking feature, where pilots can see the movements of planes, as well as their positions, altitudes and air speeds, so they know where they stand in relation to other planes in the vicinity.

"It's still not a substitution for looking out the window, that's your first course of seeing someone, but yeah, there's a lot more information available to the general aviation pilot than there ever has been before," said Lara Gaerte, the owner of Century Aviation, which serves the small airport.

Computer applications of present day also provide detailed weather radar info, charting storm locations and their intensity, so pilots can stay on the straight and narrow, and not stray onto a path of disaster. 


Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wpta21.com


A fiery plane crash along a runway at Marion Municipal Airport took the lives of two Elwood men late Monday afternoon.

A small plane taking off and heading southeast on a runway collided with a larger private jet landing from the north at a point where the two runways cross at about 5 p.m.

On scene, Marion Fire Department extinguished the flames from the crash while Grant County Coroner Stephen Dorsey investigated the scene.

Kyle M. Hibst, 31, was piloting a Cessna 150 with his friend, David K. Wittkamper, 31, as his passenger, according to evidence gathered by Grant County Deputy Coroner Chris Butche.

Around 5 p.m., the Cessna 150 collided with a Cessna 525C Citation CJ4, a private jet owned by Avis Industrial Corporation in Upland. The small plane clipped the tail of the jet and crashed and burst into flames with debris coming to rest near the jet.

Piloting the jet was Richard Darlington, brother of Airport Manager Andy Darlington. Inside the plane was Richard Darlington’s wife and three passengers returning from a business trip in Michigan.

According to Butche, Wittkamper was ejected from the plane on impact and Hibst suffered burns in crash. Both were pronounced dead at the scene.

According to texts gathered during Butche’s investigation, Hibst and Wittkamper had planned on taking a leisurely flight in his plane that evening. Using pictures Hibst had sent of the plane in the hangar and phone conversations, police were able to determine who was piloting at the time of the accident.

Airport Mechanic Jeff McLaughlin said that while the Marion Airport is busy for its size, sometimes seeing between 20 and 30 planes a day, the two planes involved in the crash were the only two on the runway at the time.

The airport is a “non-tower” airport, meaning there is no one operating air traffic control for the landing and departing planes. Instead, McLaughlin said they use a radio frequency that all pilots in the region can hear.

“We use it to announce who is leaving, who is coming in, coordinates and things like that,” he said.

The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board plan to investigate the crash today and will be working to determine a cause.


Original article can be found here ➤  https://chronicle-tribune.com








(CNN) Two firefighters died when their light aircraft crashed into another plane at an Indiana airport, authorities say.

Pilot Kyle Hibst and his passenger David Wittkamper were firefighters with the Pipe Creek Township Fire Department in Madison County, the Madison County Emergency Management Agency said.

"A single-engine Cessna 150 collided on the ground this afternoon with a Cessna 525 CitationJet at Marion Municipal Airport in Marion, Indiana," the FAA said in a statement about Monday afternoon's incident.

"Preliminary information indicates that the Cessna 150 was attempting to take off about 5:09 ET when it struck the tail of the Citation, which had just landed. The Cessna 150 was carrying two people and the Citation had five aboard."

Marion Municipal Airport does not have a control tower, meaning pilots must communicate via radio, a pilot who keeps his plane at the airport told CNN affiliate WRTV.

Both Wittkamper and Hibst were married and had strong connections to the Pipe Creek firefighting community, the Pipe Creek Township Fire Department said in a statement.
Hibst had been a firefighter since 2011 and also served as EMS chief for the department, of which his wife was also a member. He leaves behind a young son.

Wittkamper's father and grandfather were past members and he had been a firefighter wince 2007. "David (Wittenkamper) grew up with the firefighters as his family," the department said.

WRTV said both men were aged 31 and from Elwood.

"Chief Richard Shepherd is saddened by the loss of these two great individuals who have given so much back to their family, community and this fire department. The members of the Pipe Creek Fire Department are all at a loss as they come together to help each other thru this difficult time.

"Chief Shepherd is grateful for the outpouring of support from the emergency services in Madison County. Please respect the privacy of our firefighters, and the families who have lost loved ones tonight," the statement concluded.

The department posted a tribute on Facebook early Tuesday, with a black band across its logo.

"It is with great sadness and sorrow we announce the passing of two of our own," it said. "Fire Fighters Kyle Hibst and David Wittkamper were taken from us due to a aviation accident yesterday afternoon. Words cannot express the pain and loss each of us feel. Our hearts go out to both families involved. Rest Easy Brothers we will take it from here.."

The FAA said its investigators were traveling to the scene and that the National Transportation Safety Board would be in charge of the investigation.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.cnn.com

21 comments:

Anonymous said...

Any reason this article did not make the daily list on the right side of the blog page? Only way to get here is to google it?

Anonymous said...

This is all on the Citation crew. TCAS? All well and good but whatever happened to the basics like announcing your intentions on the UNICOM frequency like you're SUPPOSED TO DO? Had they made a verbal announcement more than likely this accident wouldn't have happened. Lazy and complacent piloting.

Anonymous said...

I am not an expert by any means. But I’m NOT seeing this as the Citations fault. I wonder if 4 miles/haze visibility played a part in this incident? It was “barely” VFR for the C150 crew. If I recall from my reading -uncontrolled airports recommend but do not legally require radio communications. Also landing aircraft ALWAYS have the right of way over aircraft waiting to take off. And they crashed into the Citation. Not the other way around.

Anonymous said...

I am puzzled: From the photos, it would appear that the 150 struck the left side of the Citation's empennage and crashed in the grass near the intersection. The location of the jet's tail concurs with this. However, if the 150 was taking off to the southeast on 15 and the Citation had landed to the southwest on 22, the 150 would have struck the jet's RIGHT side... Also, the report says the collision occurred at the runway intersection and the jet continued its roll-out on 22. In the pictures, the jet has not yet reached the intersection, nor has the detached tail. Can anybody explain this, or are the details wrong?

Anonymous said...

I think the Citation has been towed back to it's location in the photos which is heading NE on RWY 22/04. Shadows concur with a NE heading of the jet in the pics. The sun set pretty much due west that evening. Crack patterns in the pavement compared to Google Earth are about the only other compass orientation info I can find.

Just found this pic which would also concur. https://chronicle-tribune.com/pics/NEP258485141785606127.jpg One of the above pics shows right engine damage to Citation which also makes me think the jet has been turned around.

I can see that look in my wife's eyes that says "You've spent too much time on this". Given the warnings signs regarding arrival/departure blind spots, it seems that local flyers would be adamant unicom users. Sounds like the 150 did, the Citation didn't.

Anonymous said...

Also seems the Citation wasn't monitoring 122.8 either, also last I remember 4 miles vis was VFR don't recall a barely VFR being in the regs.

Anonymous said...

I thought we were supposed to fly a traffic pattern at a uncontrolled airports, straight in was always frowned upon still is where I fly out of.

Anonymous said...

1) Uncontrolled airports are class G airpace... "Government free" i.e no need for 2 way comms unlike class B, C or D. Yes there are no electric Piper cubs in there!

2) Landing traffic has always right of way.

3) A citation jet has a huge workload for a single pilot which is the case here and he may have been on approach frequency until right before the touchdown.

Sloppiness is not illegal and the CJ most likely was legal to do what it did. It won't prevent a cluster poop of lawsuits down the line even if the NTSB faults the Cessna pilots as I suspect it will.

The Cessna also had 2 sets of eyes too to scan but as time and time again accidents have shown see and avoid is sometimes a joke due to human physiology.

The pilot in the Citation had a huge workload to contend with as well as being alone in that cockpit.

Anonymous said...

The jet rolled to a stop, turned around, and came back

CFIIIIII said...

Probable cause: The inadequate visual lookout by the pilot-in-command (PIC) of both aircraft. Contributing factors in the accident were: 1) Decision of the Citation pilot's unusage of the CTAF broadcast 2) the poor in-flight planning decision by the PIC of the Cessna 150 for his continuing to depart in marginal vfr conditions.

Anonymous said...

Straight in approach although not illegal is bad technique.
Flying the pattern and announcing position reports probably would have prevented these deaths.

The CVR has recovered and that will tell the tale as to whether the CJ pilot made any announcements or not.

Jim B said...


(Presumably) not using the radio is going to be a hard one to explain to the insurance company of the CJ.

Mentioning a TCAS is going to be a hard concept to explain to the deceased' families. The lawyers are going to have to unwind that one.

Two men died. They could be you or me in the future.

Workload is not a justifiable reason to ignore radio procedures for either aircraft. You do not get to do that at the "big" airports and there is no waiver for "little" airports. I am always keeping an eye out for the cubs and other aircraft who have knuckled their radio off-frequency. Ok, I have done it too.

If our aircraft and airports did not have blind spots the radio thing would be less of an issue.

If you study the airport layout it does not appear that trees block the view of both runways from each other but as the report states, signage on both runways is providing a warning. The advice of those that put those signs up must be respected for a reason.

Published approaches are not pattern entries. The "pattern only" folks are going to have to understand this. The CJ and the 150 are not compatible in a pattern.

4 SM visibility with clear sky is not unwise risk VFR. For lots of places it is called normal daily haze.

Bottom line, turn on all your lights day or night near an airport and use the radio correctly. Say something intelligent and use standard phrases. No exceptions.

More than once I have departed the pattern and come back later because someone was announcing their position incorrectly, out of position or stating intentions contrary to established procedures.

People make mistakes, including me. Drive/fly defensively.


Anonymous said...

There’s no excuse for radios not to be required at uncontrolled airfields. Wake the F up FAA! No electrical system in the plane? Get a handheld and mount it in the cockpit. Use your radios. Use your lights. Make yourself easier to be seen.

Anonymous said...

No excuse for not announcing your position on unicom. A cj on a visual "high workload?" Evidently you have never flown one. And yes, if you can't afford a handheld you can't afford to fly. Seen too many near misses by pilots not using radio at uncontrolled fields.

Anonymous said...

Criminal and reckless behaviour to land at an airfield with crossing runways and not transmitting on the airport frequency.

Anonymous said...

This one will most likely be placed on the C150 crew.

Radio transmission is not required on an uncontrolled field.
The CJ may have been on approach frequency.
Landing traffic ALWAYS has the right of way.
4 Miles visibility may have played a part in the C150 crew not seeing the CJ.


Could more have been done by both crews: sure.
But legally, I think think the C150 will be regarded as at fault.

Anonymous said...

Not sure how you came up with that. In your statement you can swap C150 with CJ and CJ with C150 and it would be just as correct. See and avoid applies to both parties.

Anonymous said...

The C150 crew certainly paid the price for this episode. Ultimately "fault" is moot with those two dead. Uncontrolled airport, crossing runways, haze, mismatched aircraft by speed and capability... It behooves all to do everything possible to reduce the risks of flying. Certainly the C150 crew could've made the decision not to fly then, or ever, but the CJ had way more opportunity to reduce risk exposure.

For a quick jet to land straight in without communicating may not be illegal, but it certainly was not upholding its end of the bargain in an uncontrolled and tricky airfield. Two are dead. I would think a fast craft knowing it was coming into a crossing uncontrolled field with posted cautions about blindspots would want to put eyes on the field prior to touchdown. At the very least a call to announce its presence and intentions would require little to no effort. I hope other pilots will be more considerate of the potential consequences of similar shortcuts and show care for the wellbeing of their fellow aviators.

Anonymous said...

QUOTE: "Not sure how you came up with that. In your statement you can swap C150 with CJ and CJ with C150 and it would be just as correct. See and avoid applies to both parties. "


Landing traffic ALWAYS has the right of way.
The C150 ran into a jet that was landing not vice-versa.
It is typical for Jets to do straight in approaches - not uncommon.






Anonymous said...

QUOTE: “Landing traffic ALWAYS has the right of way.
The C150 ran into a jet that was landing not vice-versa.
It is typical for Jets to do straight in approaches - not uncommon.”

Right of way does not mean that you can plow into anything in your path. “Right of way” is irrelevant in this accident. If the C150 had known about the presence of the CJ (which could have been greatly increased by the CJ pilot making radio calls and not making a straight in approach) and continued then right of way would be factor. You cannot yield to something you don’t know is there.

Also straight in for a jet being “not uncommon” doesn’t make it right. This accident is a perfect illustration of why it is, in fact, not right.

Both piston and jet pilots alike need to step up their game at nontowered airports and use the CTAF and traffic pattern to avoid accidents. It may not be legally required but if you don’t do these things and an accident results YOU have been negligent and will pay the consequences.

Anonymous said...

In regards to the above comment:
"QUOTE:
"Landing traffic ALWAYS has the right of way.
The C150 ran into a jet that was landing not vice-versa.
It is typical for Jets to do straight in approaches - not uncommon."

This statement is typical of pre-CRM professional and military aviation, essentially "Well, flying’s dangerous, people are going to die, no rules were broken, the deaths were unavoidable. Jets fly in fast, low, and silent because they do. Flying's dangerous, you wanna be safe, stay home."
So the plane on the ground should give way to things it can't detect, and that's the solution?
Beyond stupid. Callous and inhumane, and not even trying to figure out what was wrong with the system and address that, but instead focusing on pointing blame at pilots who had no chance detect what killed them. The sooner GA gets away from its ‘lone wolf’ mentality and embraces concepts like CRM which make US professional aviation a model for consistently safe operation in a hazardous environment the better.
The idea that pilots working together to create a safer aviation world somehow deprives some people of “rights” is ridiculous. There is no right to fly. And there is no right to kill someone through your own dangerous behavior.
The only strategy that allows the C150 crew to live is: 1. Don’t fly, or 2. Be luckier.
All the CJ had to do was make a call and show some consideration for the lives of others. Why does this even have to be a regulation? Here's hoping the CJ did make a call, at least for that pilot's conscience. I can't imagine anyone would take much solace from the fact they didn't break any regulations in a fatal accident.

2 good men are dead. Simply parroting truisms like “Landing traffic always has the right of way” does nothing to prevent this from happening again.