Saturday, August 25, 2018

North American T-28B Trojan, N215SF: Accident occurred August 23, 2018 at Anoka County-Blaine Airport (KANE), Minneapolis, Minnesota

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Minnesota

Crashed due to unknown circumstances.

Aviation Specialty LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N215SF

Date: 23-AUG-18
Time: 16:06:00Z
Regis#: N215SF
Aircraft Make: NORTH AMERICAN
Aircraft Model: T 28B
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: DESTROYED
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 91
City: MINNEAPOLIS
State: MINNESOTA



Authorities have identified the pilot in the Aug. 23 plane crash at the Anoka County-Blaine Airport as 65-year-old Charles Cook, of Ham Lake.

Cook is in the Hennepin County Medical Center in serious condition but is expected to survive after his plane crashed in Blaine, according to Blaine Detective Sgt. Mark Boerboom.

At 11:07 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 23, the Spring Lake Park-Blaine-Mounds View Fire Department received the call of a burning plane roughly 50 yards north of the end of the runway.

An engine based in the Blaine City Hall was first on the scene and began extinguishing the fire using a water and foam solution, SBM Fire Chief Charles Smith said.

It only took a couple of minutes from the first engine arriving on the scene to extinguish the plane as well as an approximately 1-acre grass fire, Smith said.

“It was aviation fuel, so it was a pretty good-sized fire,” Smith said. “We had some burning, combustible metal – magnesium or something like that as well.”

Cook was the only occupant of the plane. Two witnesses, Jonathan Wells and Kevin Potter, hopped the airport fence to render aid to Cook.

“They actually jumped the fence to go help the pilot and they pulled the pilot away from the flames,” Blaine Police Chief Brian Podany said.

Reached by phone, Wells said he was with his mother driving on Radisson Road when they saw the plane banking hard to the left. They lost sight when they passed some trees.

Wells then saw the plane on the ground in flames. He told his mother to pull over and he hopped the fence at the airport.

It is unclear if the pilot was ejected from the plane or climbed out himself but Cook was already out of the airplane and his flight suit, which had caught flame, had been extinguished by the time Wells got to him.

“By the time I arrived to him, he was already put out, and then I took off his parachute bag and drug him away from the flames because it was starting to get more engulfed in flames,” Wells said.

Cook was conscious when Wells reached him, instructing Wells to remove his parachute to make it easier for the pair of good Samaritans to drag Cook away.

“You don’t want to see someone get hurt or worse, so you do what you got to do to make sure they go home to their families,” Wells said.

In addition to Wells and Potter a third man who wishes to remain anonymous is said to have rendered aid, according to Boerboom.

Cook is based out of the Blaine airport with over 20 years of experience, was flying a vintage military aircraft (1955 T-28B Trojan) and is suspected to have approached the runway from the southeast, Podany said.


The cause of the crash is still under investigation. Neither Smith nor Podany could recall a similar crash at the airport in recent years.

https://www.hometownsource.com




The 65-year-old pilot involved in a plane crash at the Anoka County-Blaine Airport Thursday morning has been identified.

According to the Blaine Police Department, Charles Stephen Cook is expected to survive. He was still listed in critical condition at Hennepin County Medical Center Friday morning.

The crash happened just after 11 a.m. at the north end of the airport's runway.

Authorities said Cook has 20 years of experience flying and would fly weekly.

"The whole airport is here and we're rooting for him. We're with him," said Kurt Erickson, a mechanic at the same airport where Cook is based. "He's got a great heart. He wants everybody to enjoy that type of vintage aircraft."

Friends say Cook is known to be meticulous about safety. They say he always wore a flight suit and if there was something wrong with the plane, he wouldn't take it up.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.

Story and video ➤ https://kstp.com




Kevin Potter was running errands late Thursday morning near the airport in Blaine when he saw a plane coming in for a landing veer to the right and then left.

“It looked like he was in trouble,” said Potter, 41, of Andover.

He was.

An instant later, pilot Charles Cook, 65, of Ham Lake, crashed his vintage military trainer in a fiery blaze that threatened to engulf him until Potter and Jonathan Wells, 22, of Tucson, arrived.

Both men climbed a gate on a barbed wire fence and ran to Cook, who was rolling himself to put out the flames. They took off his parachute and dragged him away from the exploding aircraft.

Cook was coherent and talking, but “you could tell he was badly hurt,” said Potter, who had already called 911.

Cook was taken to Hennepin County Medical Center for treatment of burns on his face, hands and arms, they said. Wells said he mentioned pain in his arm.

Story and video ➤ http://www.startribune.com






BLAINE, Minn. (KMSP) - One person was injured when a plane crashed at the Anoka County Airport in Blaine, Minnesota Thursday morning. 

The plane crashed and caught fire while approaching the runway at 11:05 a.m. Two people driving by the airport saw the crash occur and jumped over the fence to render aid to the pilot, according to Blaine Police Chief Brian Podany. 

The pilot, a 65-year-old man from Ham Lake, suffered serious injuries and was transported to Hennepin Healthcare. 

The pilot’s identity has not been released, but Podany said he has more than 20 years of flight experience and flies weekly. 

The plane is a 1955 T-28B Trojan airplane based out of the Anoka County Airport. 

The cause of the crash remains under investigation. 

Story and video ➤ http://www.fox9.com

No comments: