Saturday, August 25, 2018

Piper PA-22-150, N6936B: Fatal accident occurred August 25, 2018 at John H. Boylan Airport (5B1), Island Pond, Essex County, Vermont and Accident occurred July 05, 2017 at Mount Washington Regional Airport (KHIE), Whitefield, Coos County, New Hampshire

Lt. Col. Mark C. Biron 


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N6936B

Location: Island Pond, VT
Accident Number: ERA18FA232
Date & Time: 08/25/2018, 1540 EDT
Registration: N6936B
Aircraft: Piper PA22
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 25, 2018, about 1540 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-22-150 airplane, N6936B, was destroyed when it collided with terrain while attempting to land at the John H. Boylan State Airport (5B1), Island Pond, Vermont. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight that was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The local flight originated at 5B1 about 1500.

A witness, who was also a pilot, was at his home when he heard the airplane depart and then later return to land at 5B1. When he heard the airplane returning, he used his binoculars and confirmed the airplane was owned by a pilot, who had the hangar next to him at the airport. The witness said the airplane was on the left-downwind leg for runway 32 and was at an altitude about 1,000 ft above ground level (agl). The airplane was in level flight and the engine "sounded great." There was no smoke trailing the airplane. The witness lost sight of the airplane while it was still on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern and it was not until later in the afternoon that he learned the airplane had crashed. The pilot told the witness two days before the accident that that the airplane had been flying "great." The witness described the wind conditions on the day of the accident as a southerly crosswind that was shifting about 10° left and right and were such that the pilot could have landed on either runway.

The airplane came to rest upright on airport property on a heading of 070° and was mostly consumed by post-impact fire. The initial impact was a ground scar located about 10 ft forward and to the left of where the airplane came to rest. Several pieces of broken Plexiglas were found in the ground scar. Another ground scar extended about 13 ft to the right of the initial impact scar. Imbedded in the ground at the end of the scar was an unburned section of the airplane's right-wing tip. All major flight controls were accounted for at the site and flight control continuity was established to the cockpit area. The left and right flaps were consumed by fire. The left and right-wing fuel tanks were breached and partially consumed by fire. The engine sustained impact and fire damage and remained partially attached to the airplane. The propeller spinner was crushed up and inward, and the engine was pushed into the firewall and cockpit area. The two-bladed propeller remained attached to the engine.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land, and instrument airplane. His last Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third class medical was issued on June 21, 2018. A review of copies of the pilot's logbook revealed he had accrued about 1,289 hours of total flight time, of which, about 362 hours were in the accident airplane.

Weather reported at Caledonia Airport (CDA), Caledonia, Vermont, about 16 miles southwest of the accident site, at 1535, was reported as wind 120° at 8 knots, visibility 10 miles, and clear skies. Temperature was 79° F and the dewpoint was 57° F, with an altimeter setting of 30.23 inHg.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N6936B
Model/Series: PA22 150
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCDA, 1188 ft msl
Observation Time: 1535 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 16 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 14°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots / , 120°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.23 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Island Pond, VT (5B1)
Destination: Island Pond, VT (5B1)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  44.790000, -71.826389 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

ISLAND POND — There was no apparent reason for a single-engine aircraft to crash and kill a popular local pilot at the John H. Boylan State Airport in Island Pond last month, according to the preliminary accident report from the National Transportation Safety Board.

Mark C. Biron, 60, of Island Pond, who died in the fiery crash at 3:40 p.m. Aug. 25, devoted his life to serving the country and community through his service in the military, with U.S. Customs and in local positions.

Much of the plane, including the left and right flaps, was destroyed by the post-impact fire about 100 yards off the grass runway. The plane landed upright, but the left and right wing fuel tanks were breached and were partially consumed by flames, according to the preliminary report obtained by The Caledonian-Record.

A witness, who also is a pilot, said he heard the plane approaching the rural airport and checked to see if it was Biron returning from a 3 p.m. takeoff, the NTSB report said. The witness used his binoculars to confirm it was Biron and indicated the plane was about 1,000 feet above ground.

The witness said the plane “sounded great” and was on a level flight with no smoke showing, according to the report.

The witness, who was at his home, said he eventually lost sight of the plane, but learned later in the afternoon it had crashed. The witness, who is not identified by name in the NTSB report, recounted that two days earlier Biron had indicated the airplane had been flying “great,” the report noted. The two pilots had adjoining hangars at the airport, the NTSB said.

The plane had been built in 1956, according to Essex County State’s Attorney Vince Illuzzi, who said he had had several conversations with Biron about the aircraft. Illuzzi said Biron had said he bought the plane in Alaska. Biron indicated it took four days to fly from Anchorage to Vermont, Illuzzi said.

Illuzzi, who was called to the crash site on Vermont 105 by state police, said Sunday it looks like it will be many months before a cause might be known and provided in the final investigation report.

“We look forward to hearing the final conclusion. This preliminary report there is no apparent conclusion,” said Illuzzi when reached by phone.

Family and friends were aware the evening of the crash that it was Biron, whose truck was parked at the airport. Officials also contacted Biron’s family, but it took state police three days to issue a preliminary identification, pending verification by the medical examiner.

The day after the crash the remains of the plane were cut up and hauled away to an undisclosed site to allow federal investigators to continue their examination.

The two-page NTSB report said Biron’s logbook showed he had accrued about 1,289 hours of flight time, including about 362 hours in the plane, which was described as a Piper PA-22-150.

The witness said the low wind speed would have allowed the plane to land on either runway, the report said.

The report noted the weather at the nearby Caledonia Airport, about 16 miles southwest of the accident, showed the wind at about 9 miles per hour and visibility at 10 miles with clear skies.

The Brighton Volunteer Fire Department responded to the crash.

Biron served as president of the Island Pond Historical Society for 12 years and was a former commander of the local American Legion Post 80.

The Norwich University graduate had a distinguished military career for 31 years, including with the 2nd Armored Division in Germany as a tank commander and as an army photographer in Macedonia. He later completed two tours, one in Iraq and one in Afghanistan where he was awarded the Bronze Star Medal for heroic achievement and heroic service.

Among Biron’s various citations and awards the Legion of Merit medal for outstanding services and achievements.

He also worked as a U.S. Customs Officer in Vermont and later as a Public Relations advisor at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. He also served as an editor for an army base newspaper in Alaska.

Northeast Kingdom historian Scott Wheeler said Biron was the one of the keepers of Island Pond history and made it his mission to ensure the history was preserved. Biron and his wife helped with the purchase of the former Ted’s Market so the Island Pond Historical Society could move from second story of the former train station.

Biron often performed Taps at most local military funerals.

Biron and his wife lost their residence to a fire last year and had moved into a new home earlier this year.

A Mass of Christian burial for Biron was held at St. James Catholic Church in Island Pond followed by full military honors. Interment was planned for later at Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia.


https://www.caledonianrecord.com


Lt. Col. Mark C. Biron 

Lt. Col. Mark C. Biron, 60, of Island Pond died on August 25th, 2018 in Island Pond, Vt. He was born on July 21, 1958 in Newport, Vt. to Clifford F. Biron and the late Pauline (Henry) Biron. On May 12, 2007 he married his wife, Sharon, at Fort Meyer, in Arlington, Virginia.

Mark was a graduate of Norwich University Military College. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree. Mark had a long, exemplary, and distinguished military career. He served with the 2nd Armored Division in Germany as a tank commander, as an army photographer in Macedonia, and later completed two tours, one in Iraq and one in Afghanistan where he was awarded the Bronze Star Medal for heroic achievement and heroic service. Among the many citations and awards Mark received was the Legion of Merit medal for outstanding services and achievements.

Mark also served as a US Customs Officer in Vermont and later as a Public Relations advisor at the Pentagon in Washington, DC. where he was involved with Strategic Plans and Policy making. Mark later became editor of the base newspaper on Fort Wainwright, Fairbanks, Alaska. where he also qualified as an aviation mechanic and volunteered with the Alaska Civil Air Patrol.

Besides serving his country for 31 years Mark was president of the Island Pond Historical Society for 12 years, had recently become the IPHS museum curator, and had been IPHS Newsletter editor for more than 20 years. Mark was a past commander of American Legion Brighton Post 80, and a member of the Vt. and NH civil air patrol where he taught air cadets.

Mark was a gifted musician and photographer, woodsman, and an aviation and outdoors enthusiast who loved flying and working on his planes, keeping fit, and walking his beloved dogs, Theo and Ellie. Mark was loyal, devoted to his wife and family, hard-working, and a beloved husband, brother, and son. Mark is survived by his grieving wife Sharon Biron of Island Pond, Vt.. by his father Clifford F. Biron of Island Pond, Vt., by his siblings: Alexander Biron of Valencia, Calif., Cynthia Biron of Brookline, Mass. by his parents-in-law Terence and Frances Chin, by his cousins and aunts and uncles, and flying buddy Dr. Manfried H. Rieder.

On Tuesday, Aug. 28, Mark was posthumously awarded the title of President Emeritus of the Island Pond Historical Society, alongside fellow President Emeritus, the late John Carbonneau.

Mark was predeceased by his mother Pauline Biron, his sister Lona Biron, his brother Christopher Biron, and his brother-in-law Paul Chin.

Friends may call from 6-8 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 30, 2018 at the Curtis-Britch-Converse-Rushford Funeral Home, 1199 Railroad Street, Island Pond, Vt.. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 31, 2018 at St. James Catholic Church in Island Pond where a mass of Christian burial will be celebrated. Full military honors will follow at the Church.

Interment will take place at a later date at Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia.

Online condolences at curtis-britch.com. Arrangements are entrusted to the care of Curtis-Britch-Converse-Rushford Funeral Home, locally family-owned and operated.


https://www.caledonianrecord.com


The pilot killed in an Essex County, Vermont, airplane crash Saturday has been identified.

Dead is Mark Biron, 60, of Brighton, Vermont, state police said Tuesday.

The Caledonian Record reported Biron was a former commander of an American Legion post. He was also secretary of the Island Pond Historical Society.

Biron's single-engine aircraft went down at about 3:45 p.m. Saturday near John H. Boylan Airport in Island Pond. A caller to E-911 reported a large fire about a football field's distance from the airport runway.

The Chief Medical Examiner's Office in Burlington conducted an autopsy Monday.

Both the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board have sent investigators to Island Pond, the Northeast Kingdom community where the crash occurred.


https://www.burlingtonfreepress.com

ISLAND POND, Vt. —  Officials are investigating a fatal airplane crash.

Emergency officials were notified around 3:45 p.m. Saturday of a large fire about 100 yards from the John H. Boylan Airport runway.


Emergency crews found a small single-engine aircraft had been badly burned.


The sole occupant of the plane was found dead, Vermont State Police said.


Officials are working to confirm the individual's identity.


National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration officials are expected to be at the scene Sunday. 


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.mynbc5.com

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Location: Berlin, NH
Accident Number: GAA17CA392 
Date & Time: 07/05/2017, 1255 EDT
Registration: N6936B
Aircraft: PIPER PA22
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, during the landing roll, the airplane veered to the left off the runway. He added that he applied full power and "managed to maneuver the plane out of the ground loop but started taking out runway lights" as he maneuvered the airplane back toward the runway. The airplane impacted a runway light and two taxiway signs, damaging the main landing gear. The airplane then "flew over the runway," landed, and the main landing gear collapsed.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and left wing lift struts.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll.

Findings

Aircraft
Directional control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Runway/taxi/approach light - Contributed to outcome

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Loss of control on ground (Defining event)

Landing-landing roll
Runway excursion
Attempted remediation/recovery
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
Landing gear collapse

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 58, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Waiver Time Limited Special
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/06/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/13/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 1239 hours (Total, all aircraft), 346 hours (Total, this make and model), 1212 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: PIPER
Registration: N6936B
Model/Series: PA22 150
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1957
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 22-4215
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 12/01/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2660 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-320 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBML, 1158 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1652 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 215°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Light and Variable /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.22 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point:  26°C / 6°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: ISLAND POND, VT (5B1)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Berlin, NH (BML)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1155 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Airport Information

Airport: BERLIN RGNL (BML)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1161 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 36
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5200 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  44.577500, -71.177500 (est)

Preventing Similar Accidents  

Stay Centered: Preventing Loss of Control During Landing

Loss of control during landing is one of the leading causes of general aviation accidents and is often attributed to operational issues. Although most loss of control during landing accidents do not result in serious injuries, they typically require extensive airplane repairs and may involve potential damage to nearby objects such as fences, signs, and lighting.

Often, wind plays a role in these accidents. Landing in a crosswind presents challenges for pilots of all experience levels. Other wind conditions, such as gusting wind, tailwind, variable wind, or wind shifts, can also interfere with pilots’ abilities to land the airplane and maintain directional control.

What can pilots do?

Evaluate your mental and physical fitness before each flight using the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) “I'M SAFE Checklist." Being emotionally and physically ready will help you stay alert and potentially avoid common and preventable loss of control during landing accidents.

Check wind conditions and forecasts often. Take time during every approach briefing to fully understand the wind conditions. Use simple rules of thumb to help (for example, if the wind direction is 30 degrees off the runway heading, the crosswind component will be half of the total wind velocity).

Know your limitations and those of the airplane you are flying. Stay current and practice landings on different runways and during various wind conditions. If possible, practice with a flight instructor on board who can provide useful feedback and techniques for maintaining and improving your landing procedures.

Prepare early to perform a go around if the approach is not stabilized and does not go as planned or if you do not feel comfortable with the landing. Once you are airborne and stable again, you can decide to attempt to land again, reassess your landing runway, or land at an alternate airport. Incorporate go-around procedures into your recurrent training.

During landing, stay aligned with the centerline. Any misalignment reduces the time available to react if an unexpected event such as a wind gust or a tire blowout occurs.

Do not allow the airplane to touch down in a drift or in a crab. For airplanes with tricycle landing gear, do not allow the nosewheel to touch down first.
Maintain positive control of the airplane throughout the landing and be alert for directional control difficulties immediately upon and after touchdown. A loss of directional control can lead to a nose-over or ground loop, which can cause the airplane to tip or lean enough for the wing tip to contact the ground.
Stay mentally focused throughout the landing roll and taxi. During landing, avoid distractions, such as conversations with passengers or setting radio frequencies.

Interested in More Information?

The FAA’s “Airplane Flying Handbook” (FAA-H-8083-3B), chapter 8, “Approaches and Landings,” provides guidance about how to conduct crosswind approaches and landings and discusses maximum safe crosswind velocities. The handbook can be accessed from the FAA’s website (www.faa.gov).

The FAA Safety Team (FAASTeam) provides access to online training courses, seminars, and webinars as part of the FAA’s “WINGS—Pilot Proficiency Program.” This program includes targeted flight training designed to help pilots develop the knowledge and skills needed to achieve flight proficiency and to assess and mitigate the risks associated with the most common causes of accidents, including loss of directional control. The courses listed below can be accessed from the FAASTeam website (www.faasafety.gov).

Avoiding Loss of Control
Maneuvering: Approach and Landing
Normal Approach and Landing
Takeoffs, Landings, and Aircraft Control

The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association Air Safety Institute offers several interactive courses, presentations, publications, and other safety resources that can be accessed from its website (www.aopa.org/asf/).

The NTSB’s Aviation Information Resources web page, www.ntsb.gov/air, provides convenient access to NTSB aviation safety products.

The NTSB presents this information to prevent recurrence of similar accidents. Note that this should not be considered guidance from the regulator, nor does this supersede existing FAA Regulations (FARs).

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