Monday, July 7, 2014

Cessna R172K Hawk XP, N7390K, High Planes Flyers Inc and American Champion 7GCBC, N162CG: Accident occurred July 07, 2014 near Landmark USFS Airport (0U0), Landmark, Idaho

NTSB Identification: WPR14FA283A 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, July 07, 2014 in Landmark, ID
Aircraft: AMERICAN CHAMPION AIRCRAFT 7GCBC, registration: N162CG
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Minor.

NTSB Identification: WPR14FA283B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, July 07, 2014 in Landmark, ID
Aircraft: CESSNA R172K, registration: N7390K
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 7, 2014, at 0733 mountain daylight time, an American Champion 7CGBC, N162CG, and a Cessna R172K, N7390K, collided over Landmark US Forest Service (USFS) airstrip, Landmark, Idaho. The American Champion, registered to the pilot, made a dead stick approach along the edge of an open meadow and struck a tree during the landing, which resulted in substantial damage to the airplane. The Cessna, registered to High Plane Flyers, Inc., impacted terrain and was consumed by a post crash fire. The commercial pilot operating the American Champion received minor injuries and the private pilot operating the Cessna received fatal injuries. Both airplanes were operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The American Champion departed McCall Airport at 0715, and the Cessna departed Flying A ranch at 0715. The destination for both airplanes was Sulfur Creek Ranch Airport, Idaho.

The pilot of the American Champion stated that she and the Cessna pilot were going to meet at Sulfur Creek Ranch Airport the morning of the accident. After departing McCall she stated that she had a visual on the Cessna as it departed Flying A Ranch. It was below her at the 5 o'clock position. They both were in radio communications with each other. The Cessna pilot stated that his ground speed was 129 knots and she stated that hers was 101 knots. She reported that she was 10 miles west of Sulfur Creek at 7,800 feet, and the Cessna pilot reported that he was 5 miles west of Sulfur Creek, at 6,800 feet. By this time she had lost visual contact with the Cessna and over the radio the Cessna pilot stated that he had passed her. At that point, 10 miles west of Sulfur Creek, the American Champion pilot said that she saw the Cessna appear under her left wing, overtaking her from behind and below. The Cessna appeared to be climbing and she had no time to react before the airplane struck her propeller and then disappeared downward. Her engine stopped, she tested the flight controls, made a mayday radio transmission, then executed a forced landing into an open area.

The wreckage of the Cessna was located about 1 mile south of where the American Champion had made its forced landing. The Cessna had been subjected to a post accident fire, and a small debris field consisting of camping equipment, personal bags, right wing lift strut, and right horizontal stabilizer was distributed to the northwest, extending out approximately 700 feet from the main wreckage.




A 45-year-old Colorado man has been identified at the pilot who died following a plane collision in the skies over Valley County Monday morning.

The victim was Michael A. Bond, Valley County Coroner Nathan Hess said Thursday. Hess said Bond's family has been notified. Hess did not have a hometown for Bond. Hess said Bond had been working with a flight instructor the day of the crash.

Bond had held a pilot's license since at least 2001, according to the Federal Aviation Administration pilot database.

Bond died after an 8 a.m. Monday after his plane collided with another plane about 30 miles east of Cascade. The other pilot, 52-year-old Amy Hoover of Ellensburg, Wash., was able to land her plane.

Hoover has held a pilot's license since 2003, FAA records show. She is a licensed commercial pilot and flight instructor.

Bond's plane crashed about 2.5 miles south of the Landmark Airstrip. Hoover landed in a grassy area about 1.5 miles southeast of the airstrip. She was treated at a local hospital and released.

National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration officials are investigating the cause of the crash.

Read more here: http://www.idahostatesman.com


 N162CG AMERCIAN CHAMPION 7GCBC AIRCRAFT AND N7390K CESSNA 172 AIRCRAFT COLLIDED MIDAIR UNDER UNKNOW CIRCUMSTANCES, THE 1 PERSON ON BOARD N7390K CESSNA 172 WAS FATALLY INJURED AND THE AIRCRAFT CRASHED AND BURNED, THE N162CG LANDED WITH MINOR INJURIES TO THE THE 1 PERSON ON BOARD AND MINOR DAMAGE, LANDMARK AIRSTRIP, 30 MILES FROM CASCADE, ID 


Flight Standards District Office: FAA Boise FSDO-11 


HIGH PLANES FLYERS INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N7390K  

HOOVER AMY LYNN:    http://registry.faa.gov/N162CG

CASCADE, Idaho (KBOI) -- One person has been killed after two small airplanes crashed in mid-air at a remote airstrip east of Cascade.

 The U.S. Forest Service says the crash occurred at the Landmark Airstrip, which is located at about 30 miles east of Cascade. Officials say the surviving pilot, 52-year-old Amy Hoover of Ellensburg, Wash., was able to land her plane and walk away.

She was later treated at a hospital in McCall.

The other aircraft, however, crashed about a two and a half miles south of the airstrip. A small fire started as a result of the crash, which was reported at about 8 a.m. Hoover was treated a hospital in McCall.

The name of deceased has not been released. The Valley County Sheriff's Office will release the name once next of kin is notified.

Story and Photo Gallery:  http://www.komonews.com

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