Saturday, January 04, 2020

Cirrus SR22 GTS, N323SR: Accident occurred January 02, 2020 near Duplin County Airport (KDPL), Kenansville, North Carolina

Willa and Abby after the Cirrus SR22 GTS crash.

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro

Aircraft lost power and deployed the emergency parachute system (Ballistic Recovery System).

Cornerstone Aviation LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N323SR

Date: 02-JAN-20
Time: 15:25:00Z
Regis#: N323SR
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR22
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EMERGENCY DESCENT (EMG)
Operation: 91
Aircraft Operator: SKYLINE FLIGHT (6SKA)
Flight Number: SKL10
City: KENANSVILLE
State: NORTH CAROLINA

There were two people, the pilot Ken Brown and his wife Becca, and two dogs on the plane, and officials say none were injured. Ken Brown says the flight appeared to be going normal until he heard silence. 












DUPLIN COUNTY, North Carolina (WITN) - A pilot whose plane crashed this morning in one Eastern Carolina county says the aircraft emergency parachute system was their lifesaver.

Emergency officials in Duplin County tell WITN News that everyone made it off the plane safely.

The crash happened off Tram Road, between Red Hill Road and Hunting Club Road, in the northern part of the county.

The FAA says a Cirrus SR22 GTS went down in a grove of trees around 10:25 a.m. The plane is suspended in trees about five feet off the ground.

Two people and two dogs were on board and the pilot deployed the aircraft emergency parachute system to help it land after an engine failure.

Ken Brown and his wife were on the plane. He said they were flying along and the engine just quit.

"In the moments before -- what was going on? Nothing -- boring -- boring -- boring -- flying along -- as we've done many times -- 6,500 feet about as boring as you can get -- until there was silence -- engine quit and beyond a couple of things of trying to figure out why the engine quit -- there's not an awful lot to do -- except figure out where you're going to end up," Brown said.

The plane left Southbridge, Massachusetts this morning and was headed to Venice, Florida. They had planned to land in Elizabethtown to refuel.

Brown, who has been flying for about 25 years, said the runway at the Duplin County Airport was within sight, but they weren't quite able to make it that far.

He said he was aiming to land in a field just beyond the trees and they came down a little shy of that goal. Brown said it's a miracle that he and his wife, and their two dogs, are okay.

In addition to the FAA, the National Transportation Safety Board is also investigating the crash.

Story and video ➤ https://www.witn.com

10 comments:

  1. Adorable Goldendoodles... Loveable!

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  2. As Agent 86 Maxwell "Max" Smart would say, "Missed it by that much!" Glad they're all ok.

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  3. They did well. Coming in level on the chute and bending the limbs as it came to a stop was gentle. Sometimes the flat landing on clear space is harsh, and there were T-posts that could puncture if they had landed on the wrong fence.

    Some chute landings make you wonder about head/spine discomfort:
    https://youtu.be/nJO6j3eP0Tk?t=7

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  4. That field looks like a great landing spot

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  5. Without the Cirrus airframe parachute this might not have been a "miracle."

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  6. Almost made it to his fuel stop. Hmmm!!

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  7. from 6500 feet sure looks like that field would have made a nice runway
    but if your paying for insurance and a parachute might as well use them

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  8. Fly 700 miles and ran out of fuel 20 minutes from your scheduled refueling airport.

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  9. Owned by a charter company but flown Part 91. Oops, at least there were no fare paying customers aboard.

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