Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Cessna 172S Skyhawk, N294ME, registered to Hickory Lane Corp and operated by 30 Aviation Inc doing business as Nassau Flyers: Accident occurred January 29, 2018 in Babylon, Suffolk County, New York



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Farmingdale, New York 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N294ME


Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Babylon, NY
Accident Number: ERA18LA074
Date & Time: 01/29/2018, 0928 EST
Registration: N294ME
Aircraft: CESSNA 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 3 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On January 29, 2018, about 0930 eastern standard time, a Cessna 172S, N294ME, was substantially damaged during an emergency landing on the Robert Moses State Park Beach in Babylon, New York. The flight instructor, student pilot, and passenger were not injured. The airplane was registered to Hickory Lane Corp. and operated by 30 Aviation Inc., doing business as Nassau Flyers under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight, which originated from Republic Airport (FRG), Farmingdale, New York, about 0835.

According to the flight instructor, the student pilot completed multiple ground reference maneuvers, and as they were headed back to FRG, the student requested to practice an emergency procedure. The flight instructor agreed, climbed the airplane to about 2,000 ft above ground level (agl), reduced engine power to idle, and had the student perform the "engine failure in-flight checklist." Subsequently, the student continued the simulated event by proceeding to the "unable to start engine checklist," and as part of the checklist, moved the mixture control knob about 75% toward idle-cut-off. The flight instructor stopped the student pilot from moving the control knob any further and returned the mixture to full rich, and the student continued the checklist, with the flight instructor making sure the student did not actually "touch anything" further.

About 1,000 ft agl, the flight instructor told the student to increase power, and as he did so, the engine produced about 1,500 rpm and then returned to idle, as the throttle was increased further. The flight instructor immediately took the flight controls, pulled throttle to idle, then increased the throttle to full power, which produced the same engine performance. Subsequently, he "turned the magnetos off and pulled the mixture [to idle-cut-off] to turn the engine off." He then turned the electric fuel pump on for two seconds, "started the engine again," and "applied the throttle to the same effect."

About 700 to 800 ft agl, the flight instructor identified a clearing on the beach, extended the flaps to 30° and touched down about 62 knots. He reported that the airplane slowed much faster than he had anticipated, and he gently applied brakes to slow the airplane down further. As he continued to apply the brakes, the nose wheel sunk into the sand and the airplane nosed over.

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector's examination of the airplane revealed that the fuselage and right wing sustained substantial damage during the landing. The inspector examined the wreckage at the accident site and found that the fuel-shutoff-valve (SOV) located between the two pilot seats, near the floorboards, was partially pulled toward the closed position. After the airplane was recovered, an engine test run was performed. The FAA inspector observed the engine start and run continuously at multiple power settings up to 2,000 rpm without interruption, with the engine utilizing the airplane's own battery and fuel system. During the test, the fuel SOV was moved to the position it was found at the accident site (partially pulled toward closed) and the engine also produced 2,000 rpm with no abnormalities observed. The inspector added that no abnormalities were observed during a functional on/closed test of the fuel SOV.

During a postaccident interview, the FAA inspector asked the student pilot if he had moved the fuel SOV during flight, and the student reported that he had not. The flight instructor also could not recall if anyone had moved the fuel SOV during flight, or during the evacuation. The flight instructor also reported that he and student pilot did not discuss simulated engine failure procedures during preflight.

According to FAA airworthiness records, the four-seat, high-wing, single-engine airplane was manufactured in 2000. It was equipped with a Lycoming IO-360-L2A, 180-horsepower engine. The engine had accumulated 1,420 hours, and the airframe had accumulated 6,097 hours. The most recent annual and 100-hour inspection was performed on December 22, 2017.

A Nassau Flyers Cessna 172S normal and emergency procedures checklist was found in the airplane. The following emergency procedure actions were highlighted in red on the checklist:

ENGINE FAILURE DURING FLIGHT

Pitch (Best Glide) 68 KIAS
Landing Site Select
Fuel Shutoff Valve ON
Fuel Selector Both
Aux Fuel Pump ON
Mixture Full Rich
Magnetos Both/ Start

The weather conditions reported at FRG airport, about 9 miles northwest of the accident site, included wind from 050° at 11 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, clear skies, temperature 4°C, and dew point -2°C. 

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 26, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/20/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 01/10/2017
Flight Time:  541 hours (Total, all aircraft), 273 hours (Total, this make and model), 460 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 98 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 26 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: None
Age: 16, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: None None
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 
Flight Time: (Estimated) 4 hours (Total, all aircraft), 4 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N294ME
Model/Series: 172 S
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2000
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: 172S8552
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 12/22/2017, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2550 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6097 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT:  Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-L2A
Registered Owner: HICKORY LANE CORP
Rated Power:  180 hp
Operator: 30 Aviation Inc.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Does Business As: Nassau Flyers
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFRG, 80 ft msl
Observation Time: 0953 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 9 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 315°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 4°C / -2°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 11 knots, 50°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.21 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: FARMINGDALE, NY (FRG)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: FARMINGDALE, NY (FRG)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 0835 EST
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 None

Latitude, Longitude:  40.621389, -73.273333 (est)


Location: Babylon, NY
Accident Number: ERA18LA074
Date & Time: 01/29/2018, 0920 EST
Registration: N294ME
Aircraft: CESSNA 172
Injuries: 3 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On January 29, 2018, about 0920 eastern standard time, a Cessna 172S, N294ME, operated by Nassau Flyers, was substantially damaged during an emergency landing on the Robert Moses State Park Beach in Babylon, New York. The flight instructor, student pilot, and passenger were not injured. The instructional flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight, which originated from Republic Airport (FRG), Farmingdale, New York, about 0840.

According to the flight instructor, the student pilot completed multiple ground reference maneuvers, and as they were heading back to FRG, the student requested to perform a simulated engine failure. The flight instructor agreed, climbed the airplane to about 2,000 ft. above ground level (agl), reduced power to idle, and had the student execute the "engine failure in-flight checklist." Subsequently, the student continued the simulated event by proceeding to the "unable to start engine checklist," and as part of the checklist, moved the mixture control knob about 75% toward idle-cut-off. The flight instructor stopped the student pilot from moving the control knob any further and returned the mixture to full rich, and the student continued the checklist, with the flight instructor making sure the student did not actually "touch anything" further.

About 1,000 ft. agl, the flight instructor told the student to recover and increase power, and as he did so, the engine produced about 1,500 rpm and then returned to idle, as the throttle was increased further. The flight instructor immediately took the flight controls, pulled throttle to idle, then increased the power, which produced the same engine performance. Subsequently, he "turned the magnetos off and pulled the mixture [to idle-cut-off] to turn the engine off." He then turned the electric fuel pump on for two seconds, "started the engine again," and "applied the throttle to the same effect."

About 700 to 800 ft. agl, the flight instructor reported that he contacted air traffic control and informed them that the airplane had experienced an engine failure and that he would be landing on a beach. After identifying a clearing on the beach, he extended the flaps to 30° and touched down about 62 knots. He reported that the airplane slowed much faster than he had anticipated, and he gently applied brakes to slow the airplane down further. As he continued to apply the brakes, the nose wheel sunk into the sand and the airplane nosed over. The airplane's right wing and fuselage sustained substantial damage.

According to FAA records, the pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single and multi-engine land, and instrument airplane. He also held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single and multiengine, as well as instrument airplane. His most recent FAA first-class medical certificate was issued in December 2017, and he reported 506 total flight hours at that time.

The student did not hold a student pilot certificate, nor was he required to, as this was his third instructional flight.

According to FAA records, the four-seat, high-wing, single-engine airplane was manufactured in 2000. It was equipped with a Lycoming IO-360-L2A, 180-horsepower engine.

The airplane was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N294ME
Model/Series: 172 S
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Nassau Flyers
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFRG, 80 ft msl
Observation Time: 1353 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 9 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 4°C / -2°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 11 knots, 40°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.22 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: FARMINGDALE, NY (FRG)
Destination: FARMINGDALE, NY (FRG) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 None
Latitude, Longitude:  40.621389, -73.273333 (est)



BABYLON -  A small plane was forced to make an emergency landing Monday on the beach at Robert Moses State Park.

The Cessna 172S Skyhawk was carrying a pilot and two 16-year-old students on an instructional flight when it landed at Field 2. State park officials say everyone was able to get out safely, and the beach was mostly empty at the time.

The plane flipped over on the sand after it landed.

Steve Fratelolo was on his morning walk along the beach and saw the incident unfold.

"I heard a plane and it sounded pretty low," he recalls. A former navigator aboard a B-52 bomber, Fratelolo says he knew there was trouble. He watched the plane struggle to land on the beach.

"They came in level, but the nature of the sand made the nose dip, and when the nose dipped the nose hit the sand and they flipped over," Fratelolo says.

Flight data shows the plane left Republic Airport in Farmingdale just before 9 a.m. and headed south toward the beach.

State park officials say they indicated that they had some sort of mechanical issue. An exact cause hasn't been determined,  but the FAA is now investigating the incident.

According to the tail number of the plane, it is used as a trainer by Nassau Flyers, a flight training company at Republic Airport. It had no comment about the emergency landing.


Story, video and photo:  http://longisland.news12.com








A pilot and two 16-year-old passengers survived unscathed after their small plane made an emergency landing and flipped on the beach at Robert Moses State Park on Monday, officials said.

The pilot was giving the teenagers a flight lesson in the airspace around the park in Babylon when the four-seater Cessna 172 experienced mechanical failure, officials said.

The plane landed along the shoreline and came to a stop upside down on Field 2 about 9:20 a.m.

The aircraft was discovered by the park’s manager while he was on a beach patrol, said George Gorman, deputy regional director of New York State Parks.

“When I got here and saw the plane upside down, I thought ‘thank goodness,’ ” Gorman said. “The pilot landed safely but it could’ve been much worse.”

The park manager reported that the pilot said it was like “slow motion” when the plane flipped, Gorman said.

As the plane taxied on the beach, the moving tires caused the sand to build up and the plane eventually hit the sandy mound, the park official said.

“The combination of the rolling of the plane and the wind in all likelihood flipped the plane,” Gorman said. “ . . . It didn’t smash into the sand and that’s why there weren’t any injuries.

“They opened the door and got out.”

The passengers, a boy and a girl, were taken to Good Samaritan Hospital in West Islip as a precaution because of their ages, officials said.

Hospital spokesman Tim Kelchner said the teens were “perfectly fine” and had been checked out and discharged before 10:30 a.m.

“It’s unbelievable they were able to survive and walk away so easily from that,” Kelchner said.

Officials did not identify the pilot and passengers but a source familiar with the crash confirmed the pilot’s name is Brandon Sax.

The pilot is affiliated with Nassau Flyers, an aviation company based at Republic Airport in East Farmingdale, a representative said. He is 26 and a resident of Port Washington, said his father, Charles Sax.

“I told him, ‘what you did was very heroic, you saved the lives of everyone on the plane including your own’ and he said he just brought the plane down.”

The pilot is affiliated with Nassau Flyers, an aviation company based at Republic Airport in East Farmingdale, a representative said.

Students taking private pilot lessons with Nassau Flyers must be at least 17 years old, but the company also offers other types of flight trainings, according to the flight school’s website. People can earn a student pilot certificate as early as age 16, according to the FAA.

Another flight school at the airport, Hickory Lane Corp., owns the plane and leased it out to Nassau Flyers, CEO Donald Vogel said.

Both Vogel and the Nassau Flyers representative, who declined to give her name, said their companies are fully cooperating in the investigation. They said they could not provide more details.

The airspace over the park is commonly used for recreational flights and flight schools, Gorman said.

The Federal Aviation Administration and State Park Police are investigating the landing.

The plane will be towed from the beach after the FAA concludes its investigation on scene, Gorman said. 

Story, video and photo:  https://www.newsday.com



A small plane flipped in the sand after making an emergency landing on Robert Moses State Park beach on Long Island Monday morning, authorities say. 

The Cessna 172 landed on the beach in Babylon just after 9:15 a.m., according to the Federal Aviation Administration. New York State Parks spokesman George Gorman says the plane landed right side up but the wind flipped the plane over before it came to a stop. 

Officials say an instructor and two junior teen pilots were on board the plane, which had flown out of Republic Airport. 

Witness Steve Fratello was startled when he saw the plane flying low toward the dunes.

"I thought maybe at first they were having a thrill," he said. 

When the got to the plane, the two 16-year-old students -- a boy and a girl -- walked out unfazed, along with their instructor.

"They were incredibly calm," he said. 

One of the students was flying when there was a mechanical issue, and the instructor took over and landed the plane on the beach, officials said. 

"I don't want to say it was a good time for it to land, but in fact, they landed, there was no one on the beach, and no one was injured," said Gorman. 

The two students were taken to Good Samaritan Hospital to be evaluated, and the instructor remained on site to speak to investigators.

The FAA says it's looking into the cause of the mechanical problem. 

Story and video:  https://www.nbcnewyork.com

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