Saturday, August 26, 2017

Piper PA-22-135, N8195C: Fatal accident occurred July 02, 2015 in Carey, Blaine County, Idaho

Neil “Spud” Wright MacNichol 





The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boise, Idaho
Piper Aircraft Corporation; Lakeland, Florida
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Neil W. MacNichol: http://registry.faa.gov/N8195C



NTSB Identification: WPR15FA206
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 02, 2015 in Carey, ID
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/09/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA 22-135, registration: N8195C
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot stopped at an intermediate airport during a cross-country personal flight, and added 22 gallons of fuel to the airplane. The family reported the airplane overdue, and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an alert notice (ALNOT). The wreckage was located the following day.

On site examination by FAA inspectors indicated that the airplane was intact when it hit the ground in a nose low attitude with a rotational component.

The toxicology report contained findings for ethanol detected in the lung, heart, and blood. N-propanol was detected in heart, lung, and blood. The report noted putrefaction. The NTSB's medical officer noted that ethanol is the type of alcohol present in beer, wine, and liquor, and can cause impairment at low doses. Generally, the rapid distribution of ethanol throughout the body after ingestion leads to similar levels in different tissues. A small amount of ethanol can be produced in tissues by microbial action post mortem, often in conjunction with other alcohols such as N-propanol, acetone, and methanol. With the information available, it was not possible to determine how much, if any, of the identified ethanol was from ingestion.

Examination of the wreckage revealed no anomalies that would have precluded normal operation of the airframe or engine.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
Undetermined because examination of the airplane wreckage did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 2, 2015, at an undetermined time, a Piper PA22-135 airplane, N8195C, collided with terrain near Carey, Idaho. The commercial pilot sustained fatal injuries, and the airplane was destroyed. The pilot/owner was operating the airplane as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. The flight departed Malad City Airport (MLD), Malad City, Idaho, about 1105 mountain daylight time with a planned destination of Stanley, Idaho. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot originated the flight from the Canyonlands Field Airport (CNY), Moab, Utah; he then stopped at MLD, and added 22 gallons of fuel to the airplane.

A SPOT device, which is a handheld GPS tracking device that uses a satellite network enabling text messaging and GPS tracking services, was present on the airplane. Records from the satellite messaging provider contained four data points on July 2, including a test point at 0814:57 MDT was near CNY; a test point at 0959:11 about 23 nautical miles (nm) east of Ogden, Utah; a test point at 1046:14 was in the ramp area of MLD; and a final test point at 1214:36 about 13 nm southwest of the wreckage location.

An iPhone 5c that was found in the wreckage was examined. The pilot sent a text message at 1122:07 indicating his estimated time of arrival at Stanley would be 2 hours later. When the pilot did not arrive in Stanley when he was expected, the family reported the airplane overdue, and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an alert notice at 1907. The Civil Air Patrol located the wreckage at 1018 on July 3.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The first identified point of contact was a principal impact crater (PIC) that was several feet in diameter with narrow ground scars extending in opposite directions from the center. The propeller was separated from the engine, and was partially buried in the PIC. A lens cap cover and red lens fragments were found at the end of the narrow ground scar farthest from the main wreckage. The main wreckage was upright, about 50 ft away from the PIC, and oriented perpendicular to the narrow ground scars with the nose pointing toward the PIC. Due to the condition of the wreckage, FAA inspectors were unable to establish flight control continuity.

There was a black liquid stain that led to the oil cooler.

The engine was under the cabin area, which was severely crushed and deformed.

The right wing remained in its position, but had sustained heavy aft crush damage.

The left wing had rotated about 70° clockwise from its position.

The airframe had buckled 90° down immediately forward of the leading edge of the vertical stabilizer, and twisted 90° counterclockwise. The trailing edges of the left elevator and rudder were on the ground; the outboard half of the right elevator and horizontal stabilizer were above the right wing. The examination of the airframe and engine revealed no anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Blaine County Coroner conducted an autopsy of the pilot, and the cause of death was reported as blunt force trauma.

Toxicology testing of the specimens from the pilot by the FAA's Bioaeronautical Science's Research Laboratory were negative for carbon monoxide and tested drugs.

The testing detected 64 (mg/dL, mg/hg) ethanol in lung, 62 (mg/dL, mg/hg) ethanol in heart, and 61 (mg/dL, mg/hg) ethanol in blood. N-propanol was detected in heart, lung, and blood. The report noted that putrefaction of the specimens had occurred.

Ethanol is the type of alcohol present in beer, wine, and liquor, and can cause impairment at low doses. Generally, the rapid distribution of ethanol throughout the body after ingestion leads to similar levels in different tissues. A small amount of ethanol can be produced in tissues by postmortem microbial action, often in conjunction with other alcohols such as N-propanol, acetone, and methanol.

NTSB Identification: WPR15FA206
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 02, 2015 in Carey, ID
Aircraft: PIPER PA 22-135, registration: N8195C
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On July 2, 2015, at an undetermined time, a Piper PA22-135, N8195C, collided with terrain near Carey, Idaho. The pilot was operating the airplane under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The commercial pilot sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was destroyed during the accident sequence. The cross-country personal flight departed Moab, Utah, at 1726 mountain daylight time with a planned destination of Stanley, Idaho. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.


The family reported the airplane overdue, and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an alert notice (ALNOT) at 1907 MDT.


The Civil Air Patrol informed the FAA at 1018 MDT on July 3 that they had located the wreckage.


FAA inspectors from the Boise, Idaho, Flight Standards District Office examined the wreckage on scene. They reported that the propeller had separated in the principal impact crater; the main wreckage was less than 50 feet away.


The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for a follow-up examination.

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