Saturday, August 26, 2017

Piper PA-24-250 Comanche, N88F: Accident occurred December 04, 2015 at Millville Municipal Airport (KMIV), Cumberland County, New Jersey

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA061
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, December 04, 2015 in Millville, NJ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/02/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA-24, registration: N88F
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot and flight instructor were conducting an instructional flight. The pilot reported that, before the flight, he conducted a preflight inspection and before-takeoff check, which were normal. During the initial climb and when the airplane was about 150 ft above ground level, the engine lost total power. The pilot chose to land the airplane straight ahead between two taxiways on the airport. The airplane impacted a grassy area and sustained substantial damage to the left wing and fuselage. 

An examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal any evidence of preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions that would have precluded normal operation, and there was sufficient fuel onboard at the time of the accident. Although the weather conditions at the time of the accident were conducive to serious carburetor icing at glide power, the pilot applied full power for takeoff; therefore, it is unlikely that carburetor ice formed during the takeoff sequence. The investigation could not determine the reason for the total loss of engine power.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The total loss of engine power during initial climb for reasons that could not be determined because postaccident examination of the engine revealed no anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N88F




NTSB Identification: ERA16LA061 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, December 04, 2015 in Millville, NJ
Aircraft: PIPER PA-24, registration: N88F
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 4, 2015, about 1245 eastern standard time, a Piper PA-24-250, N88F, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a total loss of engine power near Millville, New Jersey. The private pilot/owner incurred minor injuries and the flight instructor was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight, which originated from Millville Municipal Airport (MIV), Millville, New Jersey, about 1245, and was destined for South Jersey Regional Airport (VAY), Mount Holly, New Jersey. The instructional flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilots, they had flown the airplane earlier in the day with no anomalies noted. Then, after a brief break, the private pilot/owner of the airplane completed a preflight inspection and engine run up with no anomalies noted. Then, they departed runway 32. After takeoff, about 150 feet above ground level, the private pilot/owner retracted the landing gear, and then the engine experienced a total loss of power. The private pilot/owner lowered the nose and noted that the airplane was "too low and fast to try a restart." He elected to land the airplane straight ahead between two taxiways on the airport. The airplane impacted a grassy area and sustained substantial damage to the left wing and fuselage.

A postaccident examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the left and right fuel tanks contained an undetermined amount of fuel, and no debris was noted in the fuel. All three propeller blades remained attached to the propeller hub, exhibited chordwise scratching, and were bent in the aft direction.

An examination of the engine revealed that there were no obvious oil or fuel leaks. In addition, the FAA inspector reported that the carburetor contained approximately two tablespoons of fuel. The auxiliary fuel pump was placed in the "ON" position and fuel was noted flowing from the carburetor drain plug. Throttle control cable continuity was confirmed to the engine. Both the left and right magnetos produced spark on all leads when rotated manually. The ignition leads were normal in appearance. All spark plugs appeared to be in "normal" condition with no fouling or damage. Suction and compression was observed on all cylinders when the engine crankshaft was rotated manually. The fuel system appeared normal and there were no contaminants in the tanks.

According to FAA records and maintenance logbooks, the airplane was manufactured in 1960, and registered to the private pilot/owner on November, 9, 2015. It was powered by a Lycoming O-540 series, 250-hp engine. The most recent annual inspection was completed on November 30, 2015, at a tachometer reading of 152.7 hours, and a total time of 3455.47 flight hours. The tachometer indicated 154.3 hours at the time of accident.

According to the 1254 weather observation at the airport, the temperature and dew point were 50 degrees F and 32 degrees F, respectively. According to the carburetor icing probability chart in FAA Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin CE-09-35 (Carburetor Icing Prevention), dated June 30, 2009, the temperature/dew point at the time of the accident was conducive to the formation of serious icing at glide power.

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA061
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, December 04, 2015 in Millville, NJ
Aircraft: PIPER PA-24, registration: N88F
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 4, 2015, about 1245 eastern standard time, a Piper PA-24-250, N88F, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a total loss of engine power near Millville, New Jersey. The private pilot incurred minor injuries and the flight instructor was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight, which originated from Millville Municipal Airport (MIV), Millville, New Jersey, about 1240 and was destined for South Jersey Regional Airport (VAY), Mount Holly, New Jersey. The instructional flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilots, the private pilot/owner of the airplane completed a preflight and engine run up and no anomalies were noted. Then, they departed runway 32. After takeoff, about 150 feet above ground level, the private pilot/owner retracted the landing gear, then the engine experienced a total loss of power. The private pilot/owner lowered the nose and noted that the airplane was "too low and fast to try a restart." He elected to land the airplane straight ahead in a field. The airplane impacted a grassy area and sustained substantial damage to the left wing and fuselage.

A postaccident examination of the airplane, by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector, revealed that the left and right fuel tanks contained an undetermined amount of fuel. Fuel samples were retained from each tank. All three propeller blades remained attached to the propeller hub, exhibited chordwise scratching, and were bent in the aft direction. The engine was retained for further investigation.

According to Federal Aviation Administration records and maintenance logbooks, the airplane was manufactured in 1960, and registered to the private pilot/owner on November, 9, 2015. It was powered by a Lycoming O-540 series, 250 hp engine. The most recent annual inspection was completed on November 30, 2015, at a tachometer reading of 152.7 hours, and a total time of 3455.47 flight hours. The tachometer indicated a time of 154.3 hours at the time of accident.

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