Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Cessna 172RG Cutlass, N5424V: Accident occurred June 20, 2017 at Gillespie Field Airport (KSEE), El Cajon and Incident occurred April 29, 2015 at Montgomery Field Airport (KMYF), San Diego, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA372
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, June 20, 2017 in El Cajon, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/17/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 172RG, registration: N5424V
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The flight instructor reported that, during a stage check for the commercial pilot training course, the private pilot student completed the “G.U.M.P. [gas, undercarriage, mixture, propeller] check” on downwind in the traffic pattern. He added that, before the turn to the base leg, “everything was normal, and the gear was selected down by the student.” He added that he observed three green landing gear extended indication lights illuminated. He further added that, after a normal landing touchdown, when the airplane slowed to 40 knots in the ground roll, the right main landing gear collapsed, and the airplane veered off the runway to the right. He reported that he did not visually check to see if the right main landing gear were extended.

The private pilot reported that, “on downwind we followed the G.U.M.P. checklist and verified that the landing gear were down. My instructor checked the right [main landing gear] and I checked the left [main landing gear].” He added that, on base, he “checked the landing lights with green [lights].” He further added that, after a normal touchdown, the right main landing gear collapsed, and the airplane veered off the runway to the right. The right elevator sustained substantial damage.  

The Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Safety Inspector performed a functional test of the airplane’s landing gear system 1 day after the accident. The inspector observed the landing gear retracting, extending, and locking down into place “several times.” He added that, during two gear extension cycles, he “simulated an air load on the right main landing gear by pulling back on it as it extended; the gear extended and locked down properly without discrepancies.”  

According to a commercial pilot witness, while he was driving a car along an airport perimeter road, he had a “head-on-view of the aircraft landing.” He added that he observed a “red and white C172RG” airplane on final approach that “appeared to not have the gear down.” He added that he stopped his car and continued to watch the airplane, and as it passed off to his right, he observed the “front wheel” down and both main landing gear “hanging.” He subsequently observed the airplane touch down on the left main landing gear first and then skid off the runway to the right. 

It is likely that the landing gear selector was moved to the “down” position on short final approach, which did not allow sufficient time for the right main landing gear to fully extend and lock into place.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to extend the landing gear with sufficient time to allow the landing gear to fully extend and the flight instructor's failure to visually check to see if the right main landing gear were extended.

The flight instructor reported that, during a stage check for the commercial pilot training course, the private pilot student completed the "G.U.M.P. [gas, undercarriage, mixture, propeller] check" on downwind in the traffic pattern. He added that, before the turn to the base leg, "everything was normal, and the gear was selected down by the student." He added that he observed three green landing gear extended indication lights illuminated. He further added that, after a normal landing touchdown, when the airplane slowed to 40 knots in the ground roll, the right main landing gear collapsed, and the airplane veered off the runway to the right. He reported that he did not visually check the right main landing gear to see if it was extended.

The private pilot reported that, "on downwind we followed the G.U.M.P.S checklist and verified the landing gear was down. My instructor checked the right [main landing gear] and I checked the left [main landing gear]." He added that, on base he "checked the landing lights with green [lights]." He further added that after a normal landing touchdown, the right main landing gear collapsed, and the airplane veered off the runway to the right. 

The right elevator sustained substantial damage. 

The Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Safety Inspector assigned to the accident performed a functional test of the accident airplane's landing gear system one day after the accident. The inspector observed the landing gear retracting, extending, and locking down into place "several times." He added that during two gear extension cycles, he "simulated an air load on the right main landing gear by pulling back on it as it extended; the gear extended and locked down properly without discrepancies." 

According to a commercial pilot witness, while he was driving a car along an airport perimeter road, he had a "head-on-view of the aircraft landing." He added that, he observed a "red and white C172RG" airplane on final approach that "appeared to not have the gear down." He added that, he stopped his car and continued to watch the airplane, and as it passed off to his right, he observed the "front wheel" down and both main landing gear were "hanging." He subsequently observed the airplane touch down on the left main landing gear first, and then skid off the runway to the right.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Registered Owner: Sorbi Aviation Inc

Operator: California Flight Academy

http://registry.faa.gov/N5424V

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA372
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, June 20, 2017 in El Cajon, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 172RG, registration: N5424V
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The flight instructor reported that, during a stage check for the commercial pilot training course, the private pilot student completed the "G.U.M.P. [gas, undercarriage, mixture, propeller] check" on downwind in the traffic pattern. He added that, before the turn to the base leg, "everything was normal, and the gear was selected down by the student." He added that he observed three green landing gear extended indication lights illuminated. He further added that, after a normal landing touchdown, when the airplane slowed to 40 knots in the ground roll, the right main landing gear collapsed, and the airplane veered off the runway to the right. He reported that he did not visually check the right main landing gear to see if it was extended.

The private pilot reported that, "on downwind we followed the G.U.M.P.S checklist and verified the landing gear was down. My instructor checked the right [main landing gear] and I checked the left [main landing gear]." He added that, on base he "checked the landing lights with green [lights]." He further added that after a normal landing touchdown, the right main landing gear collapsed, and the airplane veered off the runway to the right. 

The right elevator sustained substantial damage. 

The Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Safety Inspector assigned to the accident performed a functional test of the accident airplane's landing gear system one day after the accident. The inspector observed the landing gear retracting, extending, and locking down into place "several times." He added that during two gear extension cycles, he "simulated an air load on the right main landing gear by pulling back on it as it extended; the gear extended and locked down properly without discrepancies." 

According to a commercial pilot witness, while he was driving a car along an airport perimeter road, he had a "head-on-view of the aircraft landing." He added that, he observed a "red and white C172RG" airplane on final approach that "appeared to not have the gear down." He added that, he stopped his car and continued to watch the airplane, and as it passed off to his right, he observed the "front wheel" down and both main landing gear were "hanging." He subsequently observed the airplane touch down on the left main landing gear first, and then skid off the runway to the right.

April 29, 2015:  Aircraft landed gear up.
 
Blossom Valley Aviation LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N5424V

Date:    29-APR-15
Regis#: N5424V 
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172RG
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA FSDO: FAA San Diego FSDO-09
City: SAN DIEGO
State: California






 
SAN DIEGO — A small-plane pilot and passenger made a safe belly-landing at Montgomery Field April 29, 2015, a fire official said.

The pilot of a single-engine Cessna 172 radioed the tower that he was having landing gear problems about 11 a.m., said San Diego Fire-Rescue Department Capt. Joe Amador.

Only one wheel descended as the plane headed for the runway. 

When the plane touched down, the single wheel retracted back inside and the aircraft skidded about 50 yards on its belly, Amador said.

The pilot kept the Cessna on the runway and neither he nor his passenger were injured, Amador said. 

The plane sustained some damage to its propeller and underside.

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