Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Cessna 441 Conquest II, VH-XMJ, Rossair Charter Pty Ltd: Fatal accident occurred May 30, 2017 near Renmark Aerodrome, Riverland, South Australia

NTSB Identification: WPR17WA115
Accident occurred Tuesday, May 30, 2017 in Renmark, Australia
Aircraft: CESSNA AIRCRAFT COMPANY 441, registration:
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.


On May 30, 2017, about 1630 Australian central standard time, a Cessna 441, equipped with Garret TPE331 series turboprop engines, registration VH-XMJ, collided with terrain shortly after takeoff from Renmark Aerodrome, Renmark, SA, Australia. The three crew were fatally injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage.


The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB)is investigating the accident. As the state of manufacture of the airplane and engines, the NTSB has designated a US accredited representative to assist the ATSB in its investigation.


All inquiries concerning this accident should be directed to the ATSB:


Australian Transport Safety Bureau

62 Northbourne Avenue
Canberra ACT 2601
https://www.atsb.gov.au/

Aviation safety investigation & report: https://www.atsb.gov.au/

Collision with terrain involving Cessna 441, VH-XMJ near Renmark Airport, South Australia on May 30, 2017

Investigation number: AO-2017-057
Investigation status: Active 
Investigation in progress

Summary:
The ATSB is investigating a fatal aircraft accident involving a Cessna Conquest 441 aircraft, registered VH-XMJ, that occurred near Renmark Airport, South Australia on 30 May 2017.

The aircraft was reportedly conducting a training flight and collided with terrain shortly after departure from runway 25. All three occupants on board were fatally injured.

The ATSB has deployed a team of five investigators to the accident site with expertise that includes aircraft operation and maintenance.

While on site the team will be examining the site and wreckage, gathering recorded data including radio and radar, and interviewing witnesses.

The ATSB will issue a preliminary report outlining the facts of the accident within 30 days and present the findings of its investigation in the final report, due out within 12 months.
 


Rossair plane crash victim Paul Daw was praised for his skills as a pilot during a crash landing at Parafield Airport on May 25, 2002.

A joy flight on a replica of the famous Southern Cross aircraft almost ended in disaster after the plane’s undercarriage snapped.

The $5 million aircraft, modelled on the plane flown by Sir Charles Kingsford Smith across the Pacific in 1928, was forced to make a belly flop landing.

Earlier, Mr Daw, a co-pilot and six passengers were forced to circle above Outer Harbor for 90 minutes to burn up fuel.

The broken front right wheel and strut was torn and thrown from the plane during the emergency landing.

Despite the crash, all passengers and crew walked away without serious injuries and grateful for their escape.

Mr. Daw and his co-pilot were praised by the Southern Cross Replica Association for their handling of the aircraft and cool demeanour during the drama.

Speaking to the media after the successful landing, Mr Daw said he became aware of a problem with the flight when he “heard a bang’’.

“(The) passengers were calm, we kept them informed from time to time, advising them of the situation,’’ he said.

Veteran pilot was retiring this week
By Elizabeth Henson

PAUL Daw was due to retire from his role as chief pilot at an Adelaide-based flying school on Friday.

However the experienced pilot was not ready to hang up his wings just yet and had planned to take on a few casual shifts with Rossair in his retirement.

It was this decision that saw him take to the sky on Tuesday in what would become his final flight.

Mr Daw, 65, was undertaking a training flight as part of his induction into Rossair when the Cessna Conquest crashed near Renmark, killing Mr Daw and two others on-board.

The Hawthorn resident was to retire from his role as chief pilot at the Bruce Hartwig Flying School at Parafield Airport on Friday but planned to return to Rossair, where he had worked in the past, as a pilot on a casual basis.

The late Paul Daw was praised for his skills as a pilot during a crash landing at Parafield Airport 15 years ago.


Bruce Hartwig Flying School has confirmed Mr Daw, who was also a keen aviation photographer, was finishing up his role with organisation at the end of the working week.

“Typical of Paul, at 65 he had no intention of retiring from being a pilot, so he was working with Rossair to continue his unrelenting passion for all things aviation,” the company wrote on its Facebook page.

“Hartwig’s and the aviation community will not only grieve at the passing of a tremendous individual, but also for the significant loss his family suffers.

“Paul was a very well-known, highly experienced and respected senior pilot. We will all miss our dear friend and valued colleague. May he rest in peace.”

The tribute was one of many posted on social media for Mr Daw.

The South Australian Aviation Museum, of which Mr Daw was member, posted its condolences on its Facebook page, saying it was “devastated” by the loss of its long-serving member and collection manager.

“Paul will leave a huge gap in our organisation and our hearts,” it wrote.

“We offer our sincere condolences to Paul’s wife Anne, daughters Emma and Rachel, son Simon and brother Nigel.”

Mr Daw’s friends have also taken to Facebook to pay their respects.

“Rarely in your life do you come across someone, who you give your utmost regard and respect for as a legend, a great leader, and even rarer that you can call them a friend … Captain Paul Daw was one of them,” Maikha Ly wrote.

“Paul was this to many people in the aviation community and industry, especially here in South Australia.

Read more here:   http://www.adelaidenow.com.au

Martin Scott 

Stephen Guerin

Paul Daw



A pilot in the fatal Renmark plane crash was due to retire from his role as chief pilot at an Adelaide-based flying school on Friday, it has emerged.

It comes as tributes begin to flow for Paul Daw, 65, Rossair chief pilot Martin Scott, 48, and Civil Aviation Safety Authority representative Stephen Guerin, 56, who died in the crash at Renmark on Tuesday.

The Bruce Hartwig Flying School has confirmed Mr Daw was finishing up his role at the Parafield Airport-based organization on Friday.

“Paul was retiring from his role as Hartwig Air’s Chief Pilot this Friday, with Shaun Felleger assuming the role,” it said.

“Typical of Paul, at 65 he had no intention of retiring from being a pilot, so he was working with Rossair to continue his unrelenting passion for all things aviation.

“Hartwig’s and the aviation community will not only grieve at the passing of a tremendous individual, but also for the significant loss his family suffers.

“Paul was a very well-known, highly experienced and respected senior pilot. We will all miss our dear friend and valued colleague. May he rest in peace.”

The school stated counselling would be made available to staff and students affected by his death.

It is understood Mr Daw, who was also an aviation photographer, was undertaking induction training during the fatal flight.

The South Australian Aviation Museum, of which Mr Daw was member, posted its condolences on its Facebook page this morning.

“We are devastated to learn that our long-serving member and Collection Manager, Paul Daw, was killed in the Rossair crash near Renmark yesterday afternoon,” it said.

“We offer our sincere condolences to Paul’s wife Anne, daughters Emma and Rachel, son Simon and brother Nigel.

“Paul will leave a huge gap in our organization and our hearts. RIP Paul.”

Mr Daw’s friends have also taken to Facebook to pay their respects.

“Rarely in your life do you come across someone, who you give your utmost regard and respect for as a legend, a great leader, and even rarer that you can call them a friend … Captain Paul Daw was one of them,” Maikha Ly wrote.

“Paul was this to many people in the aviation community and industry, especially here in South Australia.

“His strong, driven and long serving passion for aviation is reflected both professionally, with his very wide experience over 40 years of flying here and overseas, and the countless (was told well over 70!) aircraft types in his logbook, ranging from the small light aircraft onto the jet airliners.

“As a man, generosity and passion is described to all whom met him, and he gave his time and energy to all those he met whom shared the same driving passion for aviation he did with much kindness and selflessness.

“He is a great example of someone who has dedicated his life to a field, with enthusiasm and grace.”

Another friend Shane Field described Mr Daw’s death as a “great loss”.

“I personally had the pleasure and good fortune to not only have trained with Paul but also be able to call him friend,” he wrote.

“My condolences to his family and all at Hartwig and Rossair.”

Rossair said Mr Daw was an “exceptionally experienced pilot” who had gained “considerable respect in the aviation profession”.

Meanwhile, the Civil Aviation Safety Authority has issued a statement to pay tribute to Stephen Guerin, 56, who was its Adelaide-based flying operations inspector.

“Mr Guerin joined CASA in April 2008 and worked as a flying operations inspector and acted as a team leader on a number of occasions,” it read.

“Prior to joining CASA Mr Guerin worked for a number of aviation operators as a pilot.

“Mr Guerin was observing a check flight being conducted by Rossair as part of routine safety work undertaken by CASA.

“Mr Guerin is remembered by CASA colleagues as passionate about aviation, meticulous about

safety and widely respected.

“He was active in community service and known as a “true gentleman”.

It is understood Mr Guerin was a father of three and a scout leader in Adelaide.

Rossair has also paid tribute to Mr Scott as more details are being learned about the experienced pilot.

It said during his time with Rossair, Mr Scott helped “take the charter group in that time through an expansionary phase involving additional pilots,

an expanded fleet and larger aircraft capacity”.

“To lose any pilot in such circumstances is an extraordinarily upsetting outcome but more so when it is our well respected and experienced Chief Pilot in Martin Scott,” the Rossair statement read.

“The role of any Chief Pilot in an aviation organisation is one that requires leadership, mentoring and robust flying skills – and Martin delivered on all those accounts – particularly as we are evolving into a larger flying operation.”

According to his LinkedIn profile, Mr Scott had been Rossair’s chief pilot since September 2015.

Before this, he was the general manager of WA-based KAS Helicopters for three years.

Mr Scott, who graduated with a Master of Engineering in Communication, Information, and Electronic Engineering from Plymouth University in 1991, has worked for various flying companies including East Air in Townsville and Logistic Air.

His first aviation job, according to his profile, was as an air traffic engineer with National Air Traffic Services in London.

In an earlier statement released this morning, Rossair described the devastating crash as an “extremely sad event”.

“It is with great sadness that we have to report the loss of our own personnel — the first fatal incident for Rossair in five decades of flying operations around Australia but particularly through SA and the Northern Territory,” it read.

“Our staff are in deep shock at our loss and our deepest sympathies are with the family members concerned.

“This is an extremely sad event.

“Rossair will work with aviation authorities to determine the cause of the crash.”

Federal Infrastructure and Transport Minister Darren Chester said he was “saddened” to learn of the crash and also paid tribute to Mr Guerin.

“Mr Guerin was regarded as a well-respected aviation professional, and I extend my sympathies to his family and work colleagues,” he said.

“On behalf of the Australian Government I would also like to extend thoughts and prayers to the family and loved ones of all those on board.”

Read more here:  http://www.adelaidenow.com.au


Paul Daw




By Geoffrey Thomas 

An Australian aviation expert feels there are five likely factors that tragically brought down a Rossair flight over the Riverlands on Tuesday.

BIRD STRIKE: A probable cause as bird strikes pose a constant safety threat, especially for regional airports. In a 10-year period to 2016 there were 16,000 aviation incidents involving bird hits — many causing engine problems and cockpit window implosions.

FUEL: Highly unlikely. The  Cessna 441 Conquest II had been flying throughout the day without any problems so the chances of contaminated fuel being a factor is rare.

PILOT ERROR: Extremely unlikely given the exemplary flying record and experience of the pilots Paul Daw and Martin Scott.

MEDICAL: It remains a possibility. If a chief pilot of a light plane suffers a heart attack and collapses onto the controls, it could spell disaster.

ENGINE FAILURE: Definitely a possibility, but unlikely because of the pilots’ experience they should have been able to keep the plane airborne despite engine loss.

SUMMARY: I have a feeling this could be a one-in-a-billion accident, not unlike the Whyalla Airlines disaster in 2000, which eight people died.

In that instance, the engine suffered a freak catastrophic failure after metal fatigue cracking caused the crankshaft to fail — and had nothing to do with the pilot or the plane’s overall maintenance.

■ Geoffrey Thomas is an Australian aviation expert

Read more here:  http://www.adelaidenow.com.au


Rossair chief executive Warren Puvanendran speaking to the media on Wednesday.


Three men killed in South Australia’s worst plane accident in 17 years have been identified as aviation specialists who were passionate about their jobs.

The 10-seater plane crashed yesterday afternoon and a search party found the wreckage around 4km west of the Renmark Aerodrome, north east of Adelaide, at 7.10pm.

Rossair’s chief pilot, 65-year-old Martin Scott, Civil Aviation Safety Authority officer Stephen Guerin, 56, and re-training pilot Paul Daw, 48, died in the crash.  The men were the only passengers on board at the time.

CASA paid tribute to Mr Guerin, a "true gentleman" who was passionate about safety and his job.

"Mr Guerin is remembered by CASA colleagues as passionate about aviation, meticulous about safety and widely respected," the statement said.

The South Australian Aviation Museum also paid tribute to their Collection Manager, Paul Daw, and honored his wife and children.

"Paul will leave a huge gap in our organization and our hearts," a statement read on the museum’s Facebook page. 

Rossair confirmed they have now grounded their entire fleet while they work to determine what happened on board the 37-year-old aircraft.

Australian Transport Safety Bureau Duty Officer Nev Blyth said the authority understands the flight was for training purposes, and that one of the passengers was an officer from CASA.

"It's not unusual at all to have flight testing officers from CASA or indeed the airline itself to oversee new pilots or trainee pilots," Mr Blyth said.

Police remain at the crash scene while several ATSB investigators are travelling there from Adelaide, Canberra and Sydney.

Those investigators are expected to spend at least three days at the site trying to piece together what happened.

Rossair said the plane had earlier departed from Adelaide, and was on a return trip from the Riverland region when it crashed.

The company said in a statement the tragedy was a "profound" loss for the families concerned and all employees.

Premier Jay Weatherill and other politicians have paid tribute to the men killed in the crash.

"I offer my heartfelt sympathies to the families of those who have died," he said.

Renwick-born South Australian senator Anne Ruston tweeted the crash was "horrible, horrible news".

"My thoughts & prayers with loved ones who have tragically lost family members tonight in a plane crash in Renmark".

Original article can be found here:  http://www.9news.com.au








Three Adelaide men killed after their light aircraft crashed near Renmark yesterday, in SA’s worst plane accident since 2000, have been named.

An SA Police search party found the plane wreckage about 4km west of the aerodrome at 7.10pm last night.

Three men on board the nine-seat Rossair charter plane, which was on a check and training flight, were killed in the crash.

The men, all experienced pilots from Adelaide, were aged 65, 56 and 48. They have been named as chief pilot Martin Scott, CASA officer Stephen Guerin and re-training pilot Paul Daw.

CASA this morning paid tribute to Mr. Guerin, calling him “a true gentleman” who was passionate about aviation, meticulous about safety and widely respected”.

Rossair — which has now grounded its entire fleet — confirmed in a statement last night its 37-year-old aircraft had been involved in the fatal crash.

“The loss of company personnel was profound for the families concerned and all company employees,” the statement read.

“The aircraft, a Cessna Conquest, was on a training flight from Adelaide to the Riverland and return.”

This morning a statement from Rossair described the tragedy as “a devastating blow for the families involved, the Company and the group’s 30 employees”.

“Our staff are in deep shock at our loss and our deepest sympathies are with the family members concerned. This is an extremely sad event. Rossair will work with aviation authorities to determine the cause of the crash,” it said.

The incident is the worst plane crash in South Australia since eight people on board a Whyalla Airlines flight were killed when it crashed into the Spencer Gulf on May 31, 2000.

A line of inquiry may be whether the crew were undertaking exercises during the takeoff, which could have included a simulated engine failure. These exercises are banned on larger aircraft because they are regarded as too dangerous and because pilots can use simulators.

But the exercises are still done on smaller aircraft where the engine is retarded but not turned off.

The Cessna Conquest 2 took off from Renmark Aerodrome after 4pm and the alarm was raised when the plane activated its emergency beacon about 4.30pm.

An SA Police spokesman confirmed a report by AusSAR (Australian Search and Rescue) of an ELT (Emergency Locator Transmitter) aboard a Cessna Conquest.

Police Major crash investigators are at the scene and are expected to be relieved by air crash investigators early this afternoon.

Specialist investigators from Sydney and Canberra will join their Adelaide counterparts for the indepth analysis.

Around 20 SES members helped search for the wreckage.

The last time three people were killed in an aviation accident in South Australia was when an ABC helicopter crashed while filming a documentary on flooding at Lake Eyre in August 2011.

Media are being held at a cordon about 2km from the crash site, which is in sparse scrub kilometres off Santos Rd.

Emergency personnel are using a dirt track through the scrub to access the scene.

The activity log of the plane — which operates with the registration code VH-XMJ — shows that it completed several flights earlier in the day.

It first left Parafield Airport at 7.46am yesterday en route to Beverley uranium mine in the state’s Far North. It then flew back from Beverley to Parafield at 9.13am.

The plane then did another return trip from Parafield to Beverley, before making a five-minute flight from Parafield to Adelaide Airport.

It left Adelaide Airport bound for Renmark at 3.24pm.

The Renmark Aerodrome is unattended, without any air traffic controllers, and relies on pilots co-ordinating landing and takeoff between themselves.




SHOCKED REACTION

News of South Australia’s worst plane crash since the Whyalla Airlines disaster prompted widespread shock.

Premier Jay Weatherill said: “This is tragic news. I offer my heartfelt sympathies to the families of those who have died”.

South Australian Liberal Senator Anne Ruston, who was born in Renmark, tweeted her devastation.

“Horrible, horrible news. My thoughts & prayers with loved ones who have tragically lost family members tonight in a plane crash in Renmark,” she wrote.

Local MP Tim Whetstone said the news was devastating.

“Tragic news to hear three people have lost their lives in a plane crash in Renmark,” he said.

“My warm, heartfelt feelings go out to the family and friends of those involved,” he said.

A regular Adelaide-based Rossair traveller, Phil Egel, also expressed his shock and sadness.

“I fly regularly with this great SA charter company and many times on the plane that went down,” he posted on social media.

“RIP to those who have lost their lives, and sincere sympathies to their families and friends.”

Renmark Paringa Council mayor Neil Martinson said he did not believe the people involved were from the area but could not be certain.

He said training flights regularly came from Parafield, touched down at Renmark, then returned to Adelaide.

Air Services Australia which is responsible for Australia’s airspace management including aviation communications is aware of the disaster.

“We don’t believe there was any contact with air traffic control,” a spokeswoman said.

“We are aware of the incident and at this stage local police and the Air Transport Safety Bureau are investigating.”




HISTORIC COMPANY

Adelaide-based Rossair, established in 1963, is Australia’s second longest continually operating air charter company, after Qantas.

Its fleet ranges from 10-seaters to 30-seat aircraft and it recently branched out into charter tourism services.

In Adelaide, flights depart from a private flight lounge at Adelaide Airport where passengers walk straight onto the tarmac.

The company specialises in the oil, gas and mining industries.

In November 2013, it merged with Air South, another South Australia-based charter company.

At that time Rossair’s Belinda Lindh told The Advertiser a focus on safety, cost efficiency and the ability to deliver personnel to outback areas comfortably and efficiently had been the philosophy behind Rossair’s success.

“Rossair had always tended to focus on the 10 seater market while Air South, with its larger 19 seat aircraft, had been more involved in regional fly in fly out operations with a larger number of personnel,” she said at the time of the merger.

“It made a lot of sense to bring the two businesses together formally to allow the group to be able to service both markets better.”

Original article can be found here:  http://www.adelaidenow.com.au



Charter company Rossair has grounded its fleet of aircraft as a precaution after a plane crash killed three people in South Australia’s Riverland Tuesday afternoon.

Chief pilot Martin Scott and two passengers – Paul Daw, who was re-training, and CASA representative Stephen Guerin – were on board the nine-seater Cessna Conquest, which left Adelaide about 4:00pm on Tuesday.

A Rossair spokesperson said Mr Scott was the company’s chief pilot.

The plane was on a training flight between Adelaide and the Riverland.

Police said an emergency beacon was activated about 4:30pm and a search started a short time later.

The wreckage was found in scrubland about four kilometres west of Renmark Airport just after nightfall.

Major Crash investigators from Adelaide arrived at the scene last night, and an Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) team will arrive there this morning.

Australian Transport and Safety Bureau’s Neville Blythe said early information suggested the plane did not explode on impact, and that was expected to be a big help for investigators.

“We do understand there hasn’t been a post impact fire, which is very good from an investigation point of view,” he said.

“It doesn’t destroy evidence and that type of thing so we will be again taking our time to forensically go through everything in relation to the aircraft.”

In a statement, the company said it would work closely with authorities to determine what went wrong.

Rossair primarily flies in South Australia and runs charter flights including for tourism ventures and mining companies.

The company has been running for 50 years and this is the first fatality it has ever had.

Original article can be found here: http://thenewdaily.com.au




Three people are confirmed dead after a Cessna aircraft crashed near Renmark in South Australia's Riverland.

The pilot and two passengers were on board the Cessna 441 Conquest II, which left Adelaide about 4:00pm on Tuesday.

Authorities said an emergency beacon was activated about 4:30pm, and a search started within a short time after.

SA Police said Riverland local patrols located wreckage after nightfall in scrubland about four kilometres west of Renmark Airport.

Charter operator Rossair said the aircraft was on a training flight from Adelaide to the Riverland.

"The loss of company personnel was profound for the families concerned and all company employees," it said in a statement.

It said family members were being contacted.

Major Crash investigators from Adelaide are heading to the crash scene to help an Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) team, which is expected to arrive there on Wednesday morning.

ATSB duty officer Neville Blythe said any witnesses to the tragedy would be encouraged to contact them.

"There will be a team of three or four investigators, they will proceed to the site to examine the wreckage and the associated area. They will also be looking for any witnesses to the event," he said

"We will be looking at maintenance records for the aircraft and all those types of things."

Rossair said it would work closely with authorities to determine what went wrong.

Renmark is just over 200 kilometres northeast of Adelaide, close to the border with Victoria.

Original article can be found here: http://www.abc.net.au








Three people killed in a plane crash in regional South Australia is a “profound” loss, the charter flight company says.

Rossair confirmed it owned the Cessna Conquest which crashed a few kilometres from the Renmark Aerodrome at about 4.30pm on Tuesday.

A search party found the wreckage a few kilometres from the Renmark Aerodrome about 7.10 pm.

Local media has reported a pilot, an overseer pilot and another person were on board during the training flight.

A Rossair spokesman confirmed the plane had earlier departed from Adelaide, and was on a return trip from the Riverland region.

Families were being contacted by the company, the Rossair statement said.

The Australian Maritime Safety Authority said the fixed wing aircraft sent out a distress signal shortly after taking off from the unmanned regional airport west of Adelaide.

“We became aware there might be an issue shortly after take off when a distress signal was detected,” she said.

SA Premier Jay Weatherill said the crash was “tragic news”.

“I offer my heartfelt sympathies to the families of those who have died,” he said on Tuesday.

Renmark-born South Australian Senator Anne Ruston tweeted her condolences.

“Horrible, horrible news. My thoughts & prayers with loved ones who have tragically lost family members tonight in a plane crash in Renmark,” she wrote.

The local Liberal MP for Chaffey Tim Whetstone said the news was devastating.

“My warm, heartfelt feelings go out to the family and friends of those involved,” he said.

Major Crash investigators are making their way to the scene north-east of Adelaide to assist the Australian Transport Safety Bureau.

Around 20 SES members aided in the search, and more volunteers were requested before the wreckage was discovered.

No details about the pilot or passengers have been released. 

Original article can be found here: https://thewest.com.au

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