Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Grumman-Schweizer G-164C, N6674K, Richter Aviation Inc: Accident occurred May 26, 2017 in Delevan, Colusa County, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA305
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Friday, May 26, 2017 in Maxwell, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/03/2017
Aircraft: GRUMMAN ACFT ENG COR-SCHWEIZER G-164, registration: N6674K
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, a few minutes after takeoff for an agricultural application flight, while maneuvering to a field he intended to spray, the engine lost power and that he then attempted to land on a dirt road. He added that the airplane bounced on touchdown and “went off the road and struck a ditch.” He further added that when the engine lost power, the fuel gauge indicated about half full. Postaccident, the pilot reported that the fuel gauge was “stuck in the middle,” that he did not visually check the fuel quantity before flight, and that he had exhausted the fuel supply.   

The fuselage and both wings sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The Federal Aviation Administration Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge stated, in part:

Fuel Gauges

The fuel quantity gauges indicate the amount of fuel measured by a sensing unit in each fuel tank and is displayed in gallons or pounds. Aircraft certification rules require accuracy in fuel gauges only when they read “empty.” Any reading other than “empty” should be verified. Do not depend solely on the accuracy of the fuel quantity gauges. Always visually check the fuel level in each tank during the preflight inspection, and then compare it with the corresponding fuel quantity indication. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to visually check the fuel quantity during the preflight inspection and ensure that sufficient fuel was onboard for the flight, which resulted in a total loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Richter Aviation Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N6674K


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA305

14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Friday, May 26, 2017 in Maxwell, CA
Aircraft: GRUMMAN ACFT ENG COR-SCHWEIZER G-164, registration: N6674K
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that a few minutes after takeoff during an aerial application flight, while maneuvering to a field he intended to spray, the engine lost power and he attempted to land on a dirt road. He added that the airplane bounced on touchdown and "went off the road and struck a ditch." He further added that when the engine lost power, the fuel gauge indicated about half full. Postaccident, the pilot reported that the fuel gauge was "stuck in the middle", he did not visually check the fuel quantity prior to flight, and had exhausted the fuel supply.

The fuselage and both wings sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The Federal Aviation Administration Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge stated in part:

Fuel Gauges

The fuel quantity gauges indicate the amount of fuel measured by a sensing unit in each fuel tank and is displayed in gallons or pounds. Aircraft certification rules require accuracy in fuel gauges only when they read "empty." Any reading other than "empty" should be verified. Do not depend solely on the accuracy of the fuel quantity gauges. Always visually check the fuel level in each tank during the preflight inspection, and then compare it with the corresponding fuel quantity indication.

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