Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Siai-Marchetti SM 1019, N421EB: Incident occurred May 31, 2016 in Rindge, Cheshire County, New Hampshire

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Date: 01-JUN-16
Time: 00:30:00Z
Regis#: N421EB
Aircraft Make: SIAI MARCHETTI
Aircraft Model: SM1019
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Portland FSDO-65
City: RINDGE
State: New Hampshire

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING ON A LAKE, BOUNCED AND FLIPPED OVER, LAKE MONONAC, RINDGE, NEW HAMPSHIRE.
  
http://registry.faa.gov/N421EB



RINDGE, N.H. —A seaplane crashed in the area of Conifer Road in Rindge on Tuesday night around 8:30.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, a Siai-Marchetti SM 1019 Experimental Amphibian aircraft landed on Lake Monomonac in Rindge.

The aircraft flipped over and there are no reported injuries. The FAA will investigate the incident.


According to the FAA's website, the plane is registered to Earl J. Robertson of Rindge.


Southwestern New Hampshire Fire Mutual Aid confirmed that they were assisting at the scene.


Source:  http://www.wcvb.com





RINDGE, N.H. (WHDH) — A small plane crashed into a lake in New Hampshire Tuesday evening.

The FAA said the experimental aircraft crashed into Lake Monomonac at around 8:30 p.m. Officials said the plane was trying to land on the lake when it flipped over.

People were on the plane at the time of the crash but no injuries have been reported.

Source:  http://whdh.com 




RINDGE, NH (CBS) – A small plane flipped over while landing on Lake Monomonac in Rindge, New Hampshire on Tuesday night.

The Fire Chief says two men on board got out of the water and suffered only minor injuries.

When the plane flipped, 40 gallons of fuel spilled into the lake. 

The FAA says it will investigate what caused the Siai-Marchetti SM 1019 Experimental Amphibian aircraft to flip over.

The plane will be removed from the lake on Wednesday.

Source:  http://boston.cbslocal.com

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

This one on the surface appears easy to diagnose. Gear down on the floats while doing a water landing.