Saturday, November 30, 2019

Pilatus PC-12/47E, N56KJ: Fatal accident occurred November 30, 2019 near Chamberlain Municipal Airport (9V9), Brule County, South Dakota

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration; Accident Investigation; Washington, District of Columbia
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Rapid City, South Dakota
Swiss Transportation Safety Board; Payerne, Switzerland
Pilatus Aircraft Ltd; Stans, Switzerland
Pilatus Aircraft (USA); Broomfield, Colorado

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

https://registry.faa.gov/N56KJ 

Location: Chamberlain, SD
Accident Number: CEN20FA022
Date & Time: 11/30/2019, 1233 CST
Registration: N56KJ
Aircraft: Pilatus PC12
Injuries: 9 Fatal, 3 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On November 30, 2019, at 1233 central standard time, a Pilatus PC-12/47E airplane, N56KJ, was destroyed during an impact with terrain near the Chamberlain Municipal Airport, (9V9), Chamberlain South Dakota. The pilot and 8 passengers were fatally injured, and three passengers were seriously injured. The airplane was registered to Conrad & Bischoff, Inc. and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and the flight was operated on an instrument flight rules flight plan. The flight originated from 9V9 shortly before the accident and was destined for Idaho Falls Regional Airport (IDA), Idaho Falls, Idaho.

The pilot and passengers flew from IDA to 9V9 the day before the accident, arriving at 9V9 about 0927. At 0936, the pilot purchased 150 gallons of fuel from the automated fuel pump at 9V9. The airplane remained parked outside on the ramp and the group stayed at a local lodge for the night. The following morning, the pilot and one passenger were driven to the airport. Witnesses reported that they worked removing the snow and ice from the airplane for approximately 3 hours, and were joined by the remaining passengers shortly before the accident flight. The witnesses reported the visibility was limited by snow at the time of the accident.

The pilot contacted Minneapolis Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) at 1224 and requested an instrument flight rules (IFR) clearance from 9V9 to IDA. The pilot advised he planned to depart from runway 31 and would be ready in 5 minutes. At 1227, Minneapolis ARTCC issued an IFR clearance to the pilot with a void time of 1235. No radio communications were received from the pilot, and radar contact was never established. About 1240, Minneapolis ARTCC contacted the airport manager at 9V9 who advised that the airplane departed about 10 minutes earlier. Minneapolis ARTCC subsequently contacted the Brule County emergency dispatch center and advised them of the overdue aircraft. An alert notice (ALNOT) was issued.

A witness located about 1/2-mile northwest of the airport reported hearing the airplane takeoff. It was cloudy and snowing at the time. He was not able to see the airplane but noted that it entered a left turned based on the sound. He heard the airplane for about 4 or 5 seconds and the engine seemed to be "running good" until the sound stopped.

The property owner discovered the accident site about 1357. The site was located approximately 3/4 mile west of the airport in a dormant corn field. The debris path was approximately 85 ft long and was oriented on a 179° heading. The engine was separated from the firewall. The left wing was separated from the fuselage at the root. The engine and left wing were both located in the debris path. The main wreckage consisted of the fuselage, right wing and empennage.

Preliminary data recovered from the Lightweight Data Recorder (LDR) installed on the airplane revealed that the accident takeoff began from runway 31 about 1231:58. The airplane lifted off 30 seconds later and immediately entered a left turn; the airplane rolled left to about 10° during the takeoff rotation. The roll decreased to about 5° left as the airplane climbed through about 170 ft. above ground level (agl), and then reversed to about 5° right before rolling left again, reaching 64° left at the airplane's peak altitude of approximately 460 ft agl. The airplane then entered a descent that continued until impact. The airspeed varied between 89 and 97 knots (kts) during the initial climb; however, it decayed to approximately 80 kts as the airplane altitude peaked at 460 ft agl and the roll angle reached 64° left. The stall warning and stick shaker became active approximately 1 second after liftoff. The stick pusher became active about 15 seconds after liftoff. All three continued intermittently for the duration of the flight. The data ended about 1233:00. In addition to parametric data, the LDR also recorded cockpit audio and the NTSB will convene a group of technical experts to produce a transcript of recorded sound.

At 1235, the Automated Weather Observing System (AWOS) located at 9V9 recorded overcast clouds at 500 ft agl and 1/2-mile visibility in moderate snow, with wind from 020° at 6 kts. The temperature and dew point were both 1°C, and the altimeter setting was 29.30 inches of mercury. A review of the 5-minute observations recorded at 1215 and 1220 indicated light snow with 3/4-mile visibilities. At 1225, the observation included 1/2-mile visibility in light snow. From 1230 until 1310, the observations included 1/2-mile visibilities in moderate snow. Winds were from the north-northeast (010° to 020°) at 7 kts or less during that entire time period. Freezing rain and snow were observed in the vicinity of 9V9 the previous afternoon and overnight before the accident flight.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Pilatus
Registration: N56KJ
Model/Series: PC12 47E
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: 9V9, 1696 ft msl
Observation Time: 1235 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 1°C / 1°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 20°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 500 ft agl
Visibility:  0.5 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.3 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Chamberlain, SD (9V9)
Destination: Idaho Falls, ID (IDA) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 8 Fatal, 3 Serious
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 9 Fatal, 3 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 43.765556, -99.337222

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 




The pilot and a passenger worked for three hours “to remove snow and ice from the airplane,” according to a National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) preliminary report, prior to a deadly plane crash late last month in South Dakota that claimed the lives of nine passengers and injured three others.

The National Transportation Safety Board said a witness recalled having seen the efforts to clear the Pilatus PC-12/47E before the plane took off and then crashed within a mile of takeoff in Chamberlain, South Dakota, November 30th.

“If you have the proper equipment it shouldn’t take three hours, especially for a plane that size,” Ethan Klapper, a journalist and licensed aircraft dispatcher, told AccuWeather. “Sounds like something improper happened here. Also, they were clearing the snow while it was still snowing. So likely there was additional accumulation that was occurring during this, and they took off with still more snow that accumulated on the aircraft.”

Chamberlain, and much of South Dakota, was under a Winter Storm Warning from the National Weather Service at the time of the crash. Winds of 7 mph and moderate snow were reported at the time of the flight with overcast conditions and half-mile visibility, according to the report. Freezing rain and snow were observed at the Chamberlain Municipal Airport the previous afternoon and overnight. 

The plane arrived in Chamberlain Friday at about 9:30 a.m. CST, according to an earlier NTSB statement. The airplane remained parked on the airport ramp until the accident a day later.

“It seems a classic case of no deicing chemicals were sprayed or that there was some kind of buildup of new snow on the wings,” said AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Alex Sosnowski. “Or is it possible the airspeed indicator was clogged with, or again became clogged with, snow and ice? Or, did they damage something on the plane while clearing it of snow and ice?”

Ice and snow need to be properly removed from a plane for the flight to be legal, and if that doesn't happen, the consequences can be dire. Variations in drag and lift could be substantial if a plane is not properly de-iced, an aviation expert confirmed with AccuWeather. 

Three of the plane’s warning systems – the stall warning, stick shaker and stick pusher – activated within 15 seconds after liftoff, the NTSB report noted. The airplane immediately rolled about 10 degrees to the left after takeoff. The plane then reversed to five degrees to the right before it “ultimately entered a 64-degree left bank as the airplane reached its peak altitude of 460 feet above ground,” according to the report. 

It’s also possible the time taken to clear the plane’s snow and ice affected pre-flight preparations. The pilot and passenger worked for three hours before being joined by the remaining passengers shortly before the flight, according to the National Transportation Safety Board report. The pilot requested clearance from Minneapolis Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) at 12:24 p.m., saying he’d be ready in five minutes. At 12:27 p.m., he received clearance with a void time of 12:35 p.m. No radio communications were received from the pilot and radar contact was never established. At 12:40 p.m., Minneapolis ARTCC contacted the Chamberlain airport manager, who advised the plane had departed about 10 minutes earlier. An alert notice was then issued.

Another factor that could have contributed to the crash was a possible load imbalance. The Pilatus PC-12 pilot's information manual notes the "maximum number of occupants is 9 passengers" plus 1-2 pilot(s). According to the National Transportation Safety Board report, there were 12 people on the plane. 

The data recorder captured cockpit sound, the report noted; the National Transportation Safety Board will convene a group of technical experts to produce a transcript. The preliminary report does not include analysis or a probable cause for the accident. Probable cause will be determined at the end of the investigation, which could take between 12-14 months to complete. 

According to Travis Garza, president of wellness company Kyani, the company's two founders, Jim Hansen and Kirk Hansen, were among the crash victims. The other seven passengers who died were their relatives; three passengers survived.

There were 393 U.S. civil aviation deaths in 2018, an increase from 347 in 2017, according to the National Transportation Safety Board. Most aviation deaths in 2018 took place during general aviation operations – all civilian flying except scheduled passenger airline service – when 381 were killed, compared to 331 in 2017.

Original article ➤ https://www.accuweather.com


Houston James Hansen
January 24, 2014 ~ November 30, 2019 (age 5)

Houston James Hansen passed away in a tragic plane accident with his loving father Jake, grandfather Jim, great-grandfather Jim Sr., and five other beloved family members on November 30th, 2019, in Chamberlain, South Dakota at the tender age of 5.

Houston was born January 24th, 2014, in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to Jacob James Hansen and Chelsie Tueller Hansen. We anxiously awaited Houston’s arrival and felt so blessed to have our beautiful baby boy bring such a sweet spirit into our home. All of his aunts, uncles, and especially his grandparents adored our little Houston. Jake was so excited and proud to have a son to carry on the Hansen name as the fourth generation. He loved the name Houston Hansen because it sounded like a superhero.

Houston wanted to do whatever Jake was doing. He was like his dad and had a love for horses at a very young age. He loved to feed the horses no matter how cold it was outside.  Houston begged to go to work with his dad and looked forward to Jake driving him to school. They enjoyed doing so many things together including playing and watching sports, fishing, hunting, riding dirt bikes and snow machines, and definitely going to Jazz games. Houston also loved swimming, surfing behind the boat, and all kinds of outdoor adventures with the cabin as home base. Houston was the best little traveler and enjoyed experiencing new things with his mom and dad.

Houston attended Miss Natalie’s preschool for two years and then kindergarten with Mrs. Dallimore at Cloverdale Elementary. Houston had an electric smile that would light up a room. He was a sweet friend and part of the school’s Junior Hero Service Club. He worked hard in school and earned his alphabet crown, which he was so proud of. School was exciting to Houston, and he was eager to learn. He liked his homework and enjoyed reading to anyone who would listen. He loved trying to teach his brother the new things he was learning in school and would patiently work with Cooper on words and sounds. He was the brightest little boy whose classmates appreciated him for being an instant friend to anyone he met.

Houston was so excited when he became a big brother to Cooper and welcomed him with open arms and an endless amount of love and energy. Houston was the best helper when it came to feeding, changing, or even being quiet while Cooper napped. He told everyone about his baby brother.

Houston had a creative little mind, and he most recently loved to make artwork for all to see, often mailing it to loved ones. He painted pictures with watercolors that had every color combination you could imagine. He loved new coloring books and writing his name in chalk on the driveway. Houston would find random words to create his own sentences and have us read it to him. 

Houston loved to attend church and go to his primary classes where he was blessed with the best teachers. He happily learned new songs and enjoyed performing in primary programs. He attended youth activities with his dad and wanted to be just like the older boys that he befriended there. Houston showed love for his Heavenly Father by the way he treated others. He spread happiness everywhere he went and would quickly light up a room with his big smile and contagious laugh. He emulated so many qualities of the Savior as he was naturally loving, kind, thankful, helpful, and quick to forgive. Houston always seemed older than he was.

We’re so thankful for the time we were blessed to spend with Houston and look forward with faith to a happy reunion with him someday.

Houston is survived by his loving mother, Chelsie Tueller Hansen; brother, Cooper Jacob Hansen; grandparents, LeAnn Hansen and Todd and Susan Tueller; great-grandparents, Coralie Hansen, Evelyn Hart, Brent and Kaye Tueller, and L. Wade and Dorothy Ball; his adoring aunts and uncles, cousins, teammates, and friends.

Services for Houston Hansen will be combined with services for his father, Jake Hansen, and his grandfather, Jim Hansen, and will take place at 11:00 a.m. Monday, December 23, at the Ammon Foothills Stake Center (3934 E 49th S). The family will visit with friends on Sunday from 6:00-8:00 p.m. and Monday 10:00-10:45 a.m. prior, both visitations at the church. Burial will be in the Ammon Cemetery. 

Services will also be broadcast at the Ammon Blackrock Building, 7118 S Ledgerock Drive.  If you would like to donate to Houston’s family during this time, donations may be given at the Bank of Commerce to the Jake and Houston Hansen Memorial Fund. 


Logan LaGrande Hansen 
June 18th, 2007 ~ November 30th, 2019 (age 12)

Logan LaGrande Hansen, 12, of Idaho Falls passed away in a tragic accident on November 30, 2019, near Chamberlain, South Dakota, with beloved family members at his side. Logan was born June 18, 2007, in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to Kirkland Rigby Hansen and Rebecca Kunz Hansen. He was welcomed into a family with two older sisters and three older brothers and was the bundle of joy that made our family feel complete. He was a beautiful little boy, and the family greeted him with open hearts and open arms. His brothers and sisters were so proud of him and thought he was the most perfect little boy who had ever been born. He was protected and adored by all of his siblings. He was an uncle at age eight and was so proud to be called "Uncle LoLo." His niece and nephews thought he was the funniest and most entertaining boy in the world. He grew up in Idaho Falls and attended Westside Elementary and was currently attending Eagle Rock Middle School, where he was excited to try out for the 7th grade basketball team. He loved school and had a wonderful group of friends that influenced each other for good.


Logan was a great student and enjoyed reading, art, and learning new things. He loved to set goals and work to achieve them. Logan carried a natural kindness in his soul. His humor and easy-going nature drew people to him. His positivity and bright demeanor attracted many good friends who spoke of his sense of humor, goodness, and example, with one friend noting that Logan "was the purest soul [he'd] ever known." 


Logan loved athletics and spent much of his time with a ball in his hands. Baseball, football, basketball, or tennis- Logan loved them all. When he wasn't playing in one of his own games, he was cheering on his brothers. The Hansen boys were each other's biggest fans. Being happy was his nature, and he loved to laugh and joke with his family and friends. He loved being a boy scout, family adventures in the outdoors, and movie nights and popcorn with the whole family together. Some of his absolute favorite things were simply jumping on the trampoline with his niece and nephews and playing backyard football and other games with his brothers. He was a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints with a great desire to serve a mission. He faithfully wore his "Future Missionary" wristband and shared his testimony by the way he lived his life. He was loved by all that knew him and will be sorely missed. He lived what he believed and looked forward to regular temple trips with his friends. Logan never hesitated to give of himself and serve. He was known for leaving little notes on our pillows and wouldn't turn his light out until we'd had our hug and kiss good night. He loved to remind us of the meaning of his middle name, "LaGrande"-meaning the great... he lived true to his name, he truly was one of the GREAT and noble spirits of our Father in Heaven! We feel blessed for the 12 years we have had the privilege to be his family here on earth and are grateful to know that Families can be Forever. 


Logan is survived by his loving Mother, Rebecca Kunz Hansen; sisters, Jessica Hansen Dennert and Alexis Hansen Naylor, brothers Zach and Josh Hansen; grandparents Neil and Lana Kunz and Coralie Hansen; his adoring nephews and nieces, and many aunts, uncles, cousins, teammates, and friends.


Services for Logan Hansen will be combined with services for his father Kirkland Rigby Hansen and brother Stockton Hansen, and will take place at 11:00 a.m. Monday, December 16, at the Eagle Rock Stake Center, 2020 S. Charlotte Drive, in Idaho Falls. The family will visit with friends Sunday from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. at the stake center. Burial will be in the Ammon Cemetery. A broadcast of the service will also be available at the Village Park Ward, 1345 Clarence Drive, in Idaho Falls. Condolences may be sent to the family at woodfuneralhome.com.


Stockton Kirkland Hansen
October 14th, 1997 ~ November 30th, 2019 (age 22)

Stockton Kirkland Hansen, 22, of Idaho Falls passed away in a tragic accident on November 30, 2019, near Chamberlain, South Dakota, with beloved family members at his side. He was a loving husband, sweet son, loyal brother, fun uncle, faithful friend, and a valiant son of our Father in Heaven.

Stockton was born on October 4, 1997, in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to Kirkland Rigby Hansen and Rebecca Kunz Hansen. He was the third child and first son in the Hansen family. He was all boy and his sisters loved him from the start. He quickly had us all wrapped around his finger and was the happiest little guy; he was pure sunshine in our family. Stockton was a peacemaker and his kindness and calm demeanor were evident from the beginning. Consistent and reliable in his good choices, he quickly became an anchor and positive influence among his family and friends. 

Stockton had a magnetic personality and drew people to him from a very early age. He loved to play sports including basketball, football, tennis, and baseball. He spent countless hours outside playing sports with his brothers and dad where they always had some kind of game going. His brothers would often tease him about changing the rules so he could win, but Stockton would just grin at them. He was a natural at everything he did. He loved his teammates and coaches, and they loved him.

Stockton excelled at Skyline High School where he played basketball, tennis, and served as Student Body President his senior year. He was so proud to be a Skyline Grizzly and treasured the friendships he had throughout high school. Students and faculty alike remember Stockton for his positive attitude, example, and being a friend to all. He truly radiated the love of Christ and made everyone feel like they mattered.

After graduating from Skyline High School, he served an honorable mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the Oslo Norway mission where he formed many cherished friendships. He was known throughout the mission as being a devoted disciple of Jesus Christ. He brought light and happiness wherever he served and loved every day of his mission. He truly learned how to serve with all of his heart, might, mind, and strength. Stockton had great faith in his Heavenly Father and served in many areas of responsibility within the church. His example and friendship had a significant impact on many around him, inspiring many to change their lives for the better.

Upon his return, Stockton began his education at BYU-Idaho, majoring in Business Finance. He was excited to help in the family business and was enthusiastic about his future. He waited impatiently for his High School sweetheart, Hannah Hanson, to return from her own mission in Oklahoma. Upon her return, the sparks flew and they were engaged shortly thereafter. They were married for time and all eternity in the Idaho Falls Temple on April 13, 2019. They were inseparable. They had more fun in their short time together than most people do in a lifetime. They found joy in every moment and lived life to the fullest. He treated Hannah with kindness and respect and loved to see her smile.  He was the sweetest husband. He adored Hannah and was so proud of their life together. Hannah said it perfectly when she said, “There aren’t enough Stocktons in this world.” 

Stockton was a wonderful, kind, reliable, hardworking man who loved life. He was always on the go and made an adventure out of everything he did. He respected, loved, and brought out the best qualities in everyone around him. Stockton loved family adventures and found great joy in a day on the lake boating, fishing, camping, hunting with his brothers, and other outdoor fun. He honored his mother and father and deeply loved his brothers and sisters. 

Stockton will truly be missed by all who knew him. Stockton is survived by his sweet wife, Hannah Hansen; loving mother, Rebecca Hansen; sisters, Jessica Dennert and Alexis Naylor; brothers, Zach Hansen and Josh Hansen; grandparents, Neil and Lana Kunz and Coralie Hansen; his adoring niece and nephews, and many aunts, uncles, cousins, and friends.

Services for Stockton Hansen will be combined with services for his father, Kirkland Rigby Hansen, and younger brother, Logan LaGrande Hansen, and will take place at 11:00 a.m. Monday, December 16, at the Eagle Rock Stake Center, 2020 S. Charlotte Drive, in Idaho Falls. The family will visit with friends Sunday from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. at the stake center. Burial will be in the Ammon Cemetery. A broadcast of the service will also be available at the Village Park Ward, 1345 Clarence Drive, in Idaho Falls. Condolences may be sent to the family online at www.woodfuneralhome.com.


Tyson Barry Dennert
October 2nd, 1993 ~ November 30th, 2019 (age 26)

Tyson Barry Dennert passed away suddenly on Saturday, November 30, 2019, in a plane crash along with his father-in-law, three brothers-in-law, and four other extended family members.

He was the joy and light of our life. Tyson was born on October 2, 1993, in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to Barry and Lori Dennert. He was the supportive husband of his high school sweetheart, Jessica Hansen Dennert, and father of two, soon to be three, children. 

Tyson was taught early to have a solid work ethic. He was passionate and dedicated to sports, education, family, and the gospel. He spent countless hours practicing sports with his dad and his friends. When no one else was available, he could be found in the backyard dropping back and firing passes into the family hammock. He also spent countless hours playing basketball in the driveway. He loved playing quarterback his senior year at Skyline High School, which provided fond memories of the sport and cherished friendships. As quarterback, the Post Register stated in 2011 that, “Tyson Dennert [is] rewriting the record books at Skyline.” Tyson was involved in student government, as well as having played football, basketball, and baseball for Skyline High School. Tyson’s love for sports continued well past high school. He played intramural flag football, basketball, and softball throughout his time at both BYU and UW School of Dentistry. A few weeks before his death, Tyson Dennert quarterbacked his Dental School team to the Intramural Championship final games--where they won. 

After high school, Tyson served a mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to Saltillo, Mexico. He loved serving in Mexico, loved speaking the Spanish language, and especially loved the people. A part of Tyson’s heart will always remain in Mexico with the people and the companions with whom he served.  

After his mission, Tyson attended Brigham Young University in Provo. With dedication and many hours of studying, Tyson was able to graduate with a Bachelor's Degree in Microbiology in just over three years -- while maintaining his full academic scholarship. Even with the hectic class and study schedule, Tyson was able to marry the girl of his dreams, start a family, and attend every home BYU football game. During his time at BYU, he also worked many side jobs, including night shift as a janitor at BYU, instructor at the MTC, and cared for his special needs friend. Working with this special needs friend was one of the most rewarding and life changing jobs Tyson ever had. 

Jessica Hansen fell in love with Tyson as a young girl. She would often tell her friends and family, “Tyson loves me -- he just doesn’t know it yet.” During their senior year, the affection became mutual, and they dated until Tyson left on his mission. During that year, they were all but inseparable. The photographer taking Tyson’s senior pictures noted, “I would never have believed a high school kid knew what love was, but Tyson Dennert knew love like the air he was breathing.” Tyson talked to everyone who would listen about Jessica and his big plans to marry her after his mission. 

In March of 2015, Tyson and Jessica were married and sealed together forever in the Idaho Falls LDS Temple. Tyson and Jessica loved marriage and believed that they were made for each other. Tyson wanted nothing more than to make Jessica feel loved and cherished every day of her life. They welcomed their daughter, Hanley, in August of 2016, and then their son, William, in April 2018. Written in an essay by Tyson in January of 2018, “Hanley … is the joy of our life. Nothing makes me happier than spending time with my family and knowing that they are happy as well. My experience as a father is nothing like I expected. In some aspects, it is much harder than I signed up for, but at the same time, nothing is easier than loving your own child. In fact, we love being parents so much, we have a new one on the way, coming April 2018.”… and now again in April 2020. Tyson was remembered by friends and classmates as someone who would work as hard and quick as he could so he could get home to his family. Tyson would sprint home from school each day because he couldn’t wait to hug Jessica and wrestle with Hanley and William. He would also rub Jessica’s belly and sing to their little girl in the womb. Being a father and husband is where Tyson was his best and truest self. 

Tyson was currently in his second year of Dental School at the University of Washington in Seattle. His goal was to specialize after dental school and become an orthodontist. Tyson’s long-term plans centered around Jessica, a bunch of kids, a house on a big plot of ground, and making endless memories together. Tyson had already purchased basketball shoes for Hanley and Will, even though the kids will have to grow a few more years before they will fit. He couldn’t wait to coach them, take them on trips, and buy them a couple of dogs, which he had already named. Tyson’s only concern about having another baby was if his busy dental school schedule would allow him to give three kids all the love, time, and attention that he wanted them to have. There is no doubt that his children will know how important and meaningful they each were to him. 

Tyson is survived by his sweetheart, other half, and wife, Jessica Hansen Dennert. Tyson and Jessica have been blessed with two children: daughter, Hanley Jessica, and son, William Barry. Their family will add a new baby girl, due in April. Tyson is also survived by his parents, Barry and Lori Dennert, and three sisters, Jordan (Colter), Jessica, and Brittney. 

Funeral Services will be at 11:00 a.m. Saturday, December 14, 2019, at the Eagle Rock Stake Center, 2020 South Charlotte Drive, in Idaho Falls. The family will visit with friends Friday from 6:30-8 p.m. at the Village Park Ward building, 1345 Clarence Drive, and Saturday from 10-10:45 a.m. at the stake center. Burial will be in the Ammon Cemetery.

If you would like to share memories and stories with Tyson’s children, please email them to: tyson.dennertmemorial@gmail.com. Anyone wishing to donate monetarily to Tyson’s children can donate at Zion’s Bank to the Tyson Dennert Memorial Fund. Funds can also be mailed to Zion’s Bank at 1235 South Utah, Idaho Falls, ID 83402. Condolences may be sent to the family at woodfuneralhome.com.


M. Kyle Naylor
December 27th, 1990 ~ November 30th, 2019 (age 28)

Matthew Kyle Naylor, husband, father, son, brother, uncle, and friend, was born to Jerry Naylor and Brenda Goff Naylor in Twin Falls, Idaho, on December 27, 1990. He passed on November 30, 2019, in Chamberlain, South Dakota. 

Kyle was born and raised in Twin Falls, Idaho. After graduating from Twin Falls High, he served an honorable mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the Washington DC South mission. Upon returning home, he continued his education at BYU-Idaho in Rexburg, and met the love of his life, Alexis Hansen. After a year of courtship, they were married in the Idaho Falls Temple on August 29, 2014. Alexis always brought out the best in Kyle and they loved each other unconditionally. In 2015, Kyle and Alexis welcomed their oldest son, Karter Kyle, into the world, followed a few years later by Brogan Kirkland in 2018. After finishing his Bachelor's Degree at BYU-Idaho, Kyle was accepted to the UNLV Dental School in Las Vegas, Nevada, where he started in the Fall of 2018.

Kyle loved his family and was an amazing husband and father. He always treated Alexis with kindness and respect, putting her first in everything he did, being careful to always consider her feelings first. Kyle also loved his boys and would do anything to put a smile on their faces. He was always patient, loving, and kind no matter the circumstances. No matter how busy he was, the most important thing was always his family.

Kyle was a wonderful son who loved his parents dearly. He expressed his love often with kind words and actions. Even during his busiest times in dental school, he never failed to call his parents at least weekly with family updates and to check on their well-being. 

Kyle was a wonderful man who loved life and always made the most of it. He loved to work hard and play hard. He thought he could do anything, and he did. He loved being with friends and doing the things he enjoyed most. Winter was his favorite time of year and skiing was his favorite activity. It was nothing to take an all-day drive for a good day on the slopes or to hike the back country and ski fresh powder.  

Kyle became a good friend to everyone he met, and most would say an instant friend upon meeting him. He treated everyone with respect and kindness. Those who came to know Kyle would often say how much he impacted their lives. Kyle was honest, respectful, and showed integrity in all that he did. He was a religious man who had faith in God and practiced what he preached. He lived his religion with all his heart and taught those beliefs to his family and all who would listen through his words and deeds. Whenever there was an opportunity to serve others, he did so willingly and always gave his all. Kyle will truly be missed by all who knew him.

Kyle is survived by his wife, Alexis Hansen Naylor; two children, Karter Kyle and Brogan Kirkland; parents, Jerry and Brenda Naylor; siblings, TaSha Thompson, Ashley Brusman, and Miles Naylor.

The funeral service will be held on Wednesday, December 11, 2019, at 11:00 a.m. at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints building located adjacent to the Temple at 2085 S. Temple Drive in Twin Falls, Idaho. The viewing will be starting at 9:30 a.m. prior to the service. Burial will be in the Ammon Cemetery in Ammon, Idaho.

In lieu of flowers, please make any donations to Alexis Naylor for the Kyle Naylor Memorial Fund in support of Alexis and her children. Donations may also be made to Wood Funeral Home, 273 N. Ridge Ave, Idaho Falls, ID 83402, and all  funds will be given to Kyle's children.  Condolences may be sent to the family at woodfuneralhome.com.


Jake Hansen
October 26, 1989 ~ November 30, 2019 (age 30)

Jacob James Hansen passed away in a tragic plane accident with his son Houston, father, grandfather, and five other beloved family members on November 30, 2019, in Chamberlain, South Dakota, at the age of 30. He was a loving husband, father, son, uncle, and friend. 

Jake was born to very happy parents Jim and LeAnn Hansen on October 26, 1989. He was a beautiful baby and Jim’s pride and joy. Starting at a young age, Jake loved to laugh and make others laugh too. Everyone loved being around him. As a child, Jake enjoyed listening to his parents read to him and dreamt of becoming a cowboy, so much so that he would wear his cowboy hat, chaps, holster, toy pistols, and cowboy boots as much as possible. He loved horses so much that, besides collecting many toy horses, he would often be found out by the fence feeding them apples and begging his dad to let him saddle up and go for a ride. Even on the coldest winter nights, when it came time to feed the horses, Jake would be there all bundled up to make sure his dad did the job right.

Jake and his dad were inseparable. With the exception of when Jim was at work, Jake thought that they should go everywhere together. They would frequently venture out on rides together where Jake would exercise his gift of gab. Jim would just listen with a grin and greatly cherish riding with his sweet boy.

When Matt joined the family, Jake and Matt were instant buddies, which continued throughout their lives. Sisters Jordan and Jamie came along, and Jake was a huge help to his mom. Despite some obligatory sibling teasing, Jake loved them with all his heart. As the oldest of the four, his younger siblings idolized him. Starting at young ages, they learned to work hard in the family business together, bagging ice at service stations and hand-pumping oil out of the rail cars into barrels at the tank farm.

Jake absolutely loved to play sports, especially basketball, baseball, and football. Not only did he love to play, but from a young age, he was also an ardent student of sports—becoming an expert on the game, strategy, and execution. When he wasn’t playing, he was cheering loudly for his favorite teams, including the New York Yankees, Utah Jazz, and San Francisco 49ers, whom he grew to love from attending games with his grandparents. In another life, he could easily have been a sports broadcaster, providing analysis during games and talking all day long about sports to anyone that would listen. He would even follow news about his friends’ teams just as closely as his own so they could talk about them the next day.

Jake proudly attended Hillcrest High School in Idaho Falls where he excelled in school and sports. He was proud to be a Hillcrest Knight that graduated as a varsity athlete. After graduating high school in 2008 with high honors, he served a mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the Little Rock Arkansas Mission. He always held a firm belief in his Heavenly Father and served the Lord faithfully in many assignments throughout his life.

By the time he was a young adult, Jake had transformed his natural gift of gab into being a highly skilled communicator. He could talk to anyone, young or old, with ease and confidence. He could approach strangers and make friends easily. He made people feel loved, appreciated, and valued. 

In January 2011, Jake met his sweetheart, Chelsie Tueller, at BYU-Idaho. The couple was married for time and all eternity in the Idaho Falls Temple in August of that year and welcomed their first son, Houston, in January of 2014. Much like his father, Jake was so proud to have a son. In 2017, they welcomed another handsome boy, Cooper, to the family. For Jake, it was exciting to think about Houston and Cooper having a bond similar to his and Matt’s.

Jake was a natural father and a great leader to his boys. He quickly began instilling in them a love of sports, hard work, and family fun. By the way he treated Chelsie, Jake taught his sons how to love and respect others. Jake would make daily comments to his boys about how beautiful Chelsie looked. Determined to teach Houston how to be aggressive in sports, he coached him in basketball, t-ball, and soccer. He was so proud of his boys. Besides sports, Jake loved to travel and take his family on adventures to see new places.

Jake had the wonderful opportunity to work in the family business alongside his dad and uncle Kirk at Conrad and Bischoff as Chief Operations Officer. Jake was responsible for the company’s rail facilities in both Idaho Falls and Nampa. He was great with numbers, worked hard, and frequently learned new things to help the company grow. Jake felt strongly that it was his responsibility to carry on the legacy that his grandfather Jim Sr. had started.

Besides building meaningful relationships with employees and customers, Jake was even more passionate about his love of family, which he considered life’s greatest blessing. Whether it was on the golf course, basketball court, or living room, he was happiest when he was spending time with Chelsie, his boys, other family members, and friends. Our hope and faith is in the Savior Jesus Christ and His plan for eternal families, and we look forward to our precious reunion with Jake.

Jake is survived by his wife, Chelsie Tueller Hansen; son, Cooper Hansen; mother, LeAnn Hansen; brother, Matt Hansen; sisters, Jordan (Thomas) Long and Jamie Hansen; grandparents, Coralie Hansen and L. Wade and Dorothy Ball; his aunts and uncles, cousins, and friends.

Services for Jake Hansen will be combined with services for his son, Houston Hansen, and his father, Jim Hansen, and will take place at 11:00 a.m. Monday, December 23, at the Ammon Foothills Stake Center (3934 E 49th S). The family will visit with friends on Sunday from 6:00-8:00 p.m. and Monday 10:00-10:45 a.m. prior, both visitations at the church.  Burial will be in the Ammon Cemetery.   A broadcast of the service will also be available at the Ammon Blackhawk Ward (7118 S. Ledgerock Drive).

If you would like to donate to Jake’s family during this time, donations may be given at the Bank of Commerce to the Jake and Houston Hansen Memorial Fund.   Condolences may be sent to the family at www.woodfuneralhome.com.


Kirkland "Kirk" Rigby Hansen
April 13th, 1971 ~ November 30th, 2019 (age 48)

Kirkland Rigby Hansen passed away with eight other beloved family members on November 30, 2019, in a tragic accident in South Dakota at the age of 48. He was a loving husband, son, father, and grandfather and will be remembered for his kindness, love, and devotion to his family and the gospel of Jesus Christ. He was a man of integrity, virtue, and faith and was loved by his family and friends.

Kirk was born in Salt Lake City, Utah, on April 13, 1971, to Jim and Coralie Rigby Hansen. He was the youngest of three children and was adored by his older brother and sister. 

Kirk was raised in Idaho Falls and attended Bonneville High School where he made lasting friendships. He was an athletic and competitive young man who loved sports and the thrill of the game.  As a young man, Kirk frequently took on tasks and responsibilities well beyond his age, often heading to work instead of joining his friends at the ballfield. He loved his family fiercely and wanted to do his part in the family business.

As a young man, Kirk was taught by goodly parents that work was a privilege and a mark of integrity. He loved to work hard, and he loved to play equally as hard. Some of his favorite activities included hunting, boating, fishing, and biking. All of these activities were centered around his family—the people he loved the most. Because of his strong upbringing, he introduced his own children to the love of work and the satisfaction of a job well done. Kirk was a wonderful son who loved his parents dearly. He expressed his love often with kind words and actions. Even during his busiest times, he never failed to call his parents to check on them and let them know how much he loved them.

Following graduation, he attended Ricks College and studied Business Finance. Toward the end of that year and after receiving his mission call to serve in the France Paris Mission, he met his sweetheart, Rebecca Kunz. It didn’t take long for the two of them to fall head-over-heels for each other. They spent countless hours together talking, laughing, and dreaming of their future. Kirk left for his mission in May of 1990 and seven months later, Rebecca received her call to serve in the Switzerland Zurich Mission. They wrote countless letters back and forth, supported one another, and encouraged each other to serve faithfully. 

Kirk would often share how tempting it was as he looked at the train schedule in Paris and notice that Zurich was just an hour away.  He loved his mission, was a valiant missionary, and served with his whole heart. He had many leadership opportunities and loved serving with President Jones as the Assistant to the President. Kirk came home from his mission in June of 1992, and Rebecca returned in July of that year.  In true “Kirk style,” they were engaged just two weeks later and married for time and all eternity in the Idaho Falls Temple on December 19, 1992.

Kirk and Rebecca had a special relationship. They truly felt they were guided to each other. They welcomed six beautiful children into their family: Jessica, Alexis, Stockton, Zachary, Joshua, and Logan. Words can’t describe the love and devotion Kirk showed to his family. He spent much of his seemingly endless energy providing experiences and learning opportunities for his children. Kirk taught them by example how to learn, how to work, how to have fun, and most importantly how to be disciples of Jesus Christ. 

Kirk could often be found in the backyard with his boys throwing a football, playing one-on-one, or helping them find the strike zone. When the backyard got locked down in the Idaho winters, Kirk would often bring the boys and the balls in the house, much to Rebecca’s dismay. He loved his sweet daughters and beamed as he watched them in their dance recitals, piano performances, and especially as he watched them become mothers. His children were his pride and joy. Seeing them gain confidence, chase their dreams, and achieve their goals brought Kirk his greatest joys. He loved being a PaPa to his 4 grandchildren. We all delighted watching him roll around with them on the trampoline and play steamroller.

Kirk genuinely loved working in the family businesses—Conrad and Bischoff, KJ’s Super Stores, Kyäni, and other ventures—and was instrumental in their growth and success. Kirk was just as comfortable on a backhoe as he was in a boardroom. Kirk was competitively driven.  He truly loved the challenges and rewards that came from driving a business forward. He left the house every morning with anticipation and excitement -- he seldom had a bad day. He was known for his work ethic, tenacity, and mentorship to other aspiring entrepreneurs and enjoyed decades-long business partnerships with many close friends. Kirk was instrumental in building his family’s business from a small-town operation into many successful enterprises, one of which spans over 60 countries and 20 languages. He had great vision and was driven to do his part in making the world a better place. 

Kirk loved his Heavenly Father and served faithfully in the church in many capacities. One of the hallmarks of Kirk’s character was how quickly he responded when others were in need. He was extraordinarily generous with his time, resources, and love, but often did so discreetly without praise or recognition. The impact of Kirk’s ministry during his short time on earth will be felt for generations to come. He was ever young and had an incredible faith and belief in the youth of this world. He knew how to lift burdens, strengthen the weak, and remind them that our Heavenly Father has a divine plan for each of us.

Kirk loved life on many levels; he loved to have fun and was always willing to share his humor and bring everyone to his “happy place.” Oh, how he loved to watch an old movie and share the familiar one-liners. Christmas was his favorite time of the year. Kirk always found pleasure in the excitement of the season and the love he had for family and his Savior. He was quick to laugh and to smile but was just as apt to blot a tear when touched by the kindness of others, the joy of his loved ones, and when his testimony burned bright.Kirk is survived by his loving wife of 27 years, Rebecca Kunz Hansen; daughters, Jessica (Tyson) Dennert and Alexis (Kyle) Naylor; sons, Zachary Hansen and Josh Hansen; daughter-in-law, Hannah (Stockton) Hansen; grandchildren, Karter and Brogan Naylor, and Hanley and William Dennert; mother, Coralie (James) Hansen; sister, Lauralie (Scott) Seedall; and many adoring in-laws, nieces, and nephews.

Services for Kirk Hansen are combined with services for his sons, Stockton Hansen and Logan Hansen, and will take place at 11:00 a.m. Monday, December 16, at the Eagle Rock Stake Center, 2020 S. Charlotte Drive, in Idaho Falls. The family will visit with friends Sunday from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. at the stake center. Burial will be in the Ammon Cemetery. A broadcast of the service will also be available at the Village Park Ward, 1345 Clarence Drive, in Idaho Falls. Condolences may be sent to the family at woodfuneralhome.com.


Jim Hansen Jr.
June 27, 1965 ~ November 30, 2019 (age 54)

Cary James Hansen passed away in a tragic accident along with eight other beloved family members on November 30th, 2019, in Chamberlain, South Dakota, at the age of 54. Jim was a loving husband, father, grandfather, son, brother, uncle, and friend.

Jim’s fervent belief and testimony in the gospel of Jesus Christ was the foundation of his life.  He was known as a man of integrity and generosity and showed great compassion for the less fortunate. He’ll be remembered for his genuine kindness, enduring love, charitable service, and unwavering devotion to his family and friends.

Jim was born in Logan, Utah, on June 27, 1965, to James D. and Coralie Rigby Hansen. The first of three children, Jim was raised in Idaho Falls, Idaho, and began working in the family business at an early age. He was an extremely hard worker who took on tasks and responsibility without hesitation, usually choosing work over spending time with friends after school or on weekends. Jim loved his family and was fiercely dedicated to helping the family business succeed. From his earliest years, Jim’s parents taught him that the opportunity to work was both a blessing and a privilege.

Jim attended Bonneville High School where he made lasting friendships. As an athlete, he thrived on the competition, the camaraderie of the team, and the thrill of the game. As an outdoor enthusiast with a deep love of nature, he enjoyed being in the mountains and around water. He would often remark about what a beautiful place we were blessed to live in and how our Father in Heaven did some of his best work here in Eastern Idaho.

Following graduation, Jim attended Ricks College for one year before he was called to serve in the Japan Fukuoka Mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He was a valiant missionary who served the Lord and the people of Japan with all of his might, mind, and strength. He served in many leadership roles including Branch President for much of his time there. 

In January of 1986, Jim returned home and resumed studies at Ricks College where he soon met his sweetheart, LeAnn Ball. After their first blind date, the two of them were inseparable.  They were sealed for time and all eternity in the Idaho Falls Temple on September 18, 1987. Together they welcomed four beautiful children, Jake, Matt, Jordan, and Jamie, into their family. Jim and LeAnn had a special relationship and truly understood and supported each other in their roles as spouses, parents, and grandparents. Jim was LeAnn’s rock and always brought her great happiness. With his incredible sense of humor, Jim would make LeAnn laugh like no one else could. This became particularly meaningful when Jim’s well-timed quips could brighten LeAnn’s day as she battled cancer in 2016.

After college, Jim continued work in the family business. Always finding great satisfaction in a job well done, Jim would rise early in the morning to make sure he was first to arrive and get a jump start on the day. Jim also taught the importance of work to his children and was overjoyed when his two sons, Jake and Matt, were old enough to work full-time with him in the family business. Jim would often say his favorite part of the day was going on lunchtime rides with his father, Jim Sr., and brother, Kirk. As the years went by, the rides evolved into outings with his sons, Jake and Matt, and in recent months, his nephew Stockton was added to the trio.

Words will never be adequate to describe the devotion Jim had for his family. He was focused and driven to provide, teach, and love his children with all of his heart. By his example, Jim taught them how to work and play together, to have integrity, to be the very best person they could be at all times, to love the Gospel, and to be disciples of the Savior Jesus Christ. Whenever one of the children had a problem, Jim would offer advice and counsel followed by his coined phrase, “We’re Hansens, that’s just what we do!” Those simple words spoke volumes about who he was and what he expected his family to do.

Jim spent countless hours coaching his sons’ various sports teams, practicing with them in the yard or on the basketball court, and traveling all over the region to watch them play ball. He took great pride when they graduated with high honors from high school and was overjoyed when they received mission calls to serve the Lord.

Jim adored and loved his sweet daughters and enjoyed attending their many piano performances, dance recitals, choir concerts, and would cheer them on while watching them play sports. He enjoyed teasing them about boys, tormenting their dates, and always told them how beautiful they looked as they left the house for formal dances.

Although his children were his pride and joy, he beamed even greater when grandchildren Houston, Jackson, and Cooper were born. He found tremendous satisfaction in seeing his children become parents themselves. He loved being a grandpa and enjoyed playing ball with them, going to Houston’s games, taking them on rides or to the cabin, reading to them at bedtime when they would sleep over, and receiving endless hugs and kisses followed by a, “Love you buddy.”

Jim loved his parents dearly and treasured the time he was able to spend with them. Throughout his life, he cherished spending time with his father on hunting and fishing trips in many scenic places. He especially loved and cared for his dear mother and was always quick to take her arm or hand to steady and help her.

Jim was a faithful member of the church who loved our Father in Heaven and our Savior, Jesus Christ. Steadfast in his faith and commitment, he served in many church callings and in various leadership positions. Besides his love of family and his dedication to work, he found great joy in serving those around him, always being the first one to roll up his sleeves and find a way to tackle a problem and get the job done. He loved helping and comforting those in need, focusing on strengthening the weak, and ministering in countless ways to many. It can truly be said of Jim that he followed the example of our Savior as he “went about doing good” (Acts 38:10) to friends and strangers alike.
Jim loved the youth of the church, and he desired for them to reach their full and divine potential. He had an abiding passion for missionary work and was always searching for opportunities to teach the gospel of Jesus Christ. Jim was greatly blessed with the gift of sharing his testimony with ease, power, and conviction. He was always generous with his time and resources and never expected recognition or praise. Jim’s service in the church and ministry to countless people will have a lasting impact for generations.

Jim is survived by his loving wife of 32 years, LeAnn Ball Hansen; son, Matt Hansen; daughters, Jordan (Thomas) Long and Jamie Hansen; grandchildren, Jackson Long and Cooper Hansen; mother, Coralie (James) Hansen; sister, Lauralie (Scott) Seedall; and many adoring in-laws, nieces, and nephews. 

Services for Jim Hansen are combined with services for his son, Jake Hansen, and grandson, Houston Hansen, and will take place at 11:00 a.m. Monday, December 23, at the Ammon Foothills Stake Center, 3932 E. 49th S. in Ammon. The family will visit with friends on Sunday, December 22, from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. and Monday from 10:00 to 10:45 a.m. prior to the funeral, both visitations at the stake center. Burial will be in the Ammon Cemetery. A broadcast of the service will also be available at the Ammon Blackhawk Building, 7118 S. Ledgerock Drive.


James "Jim" D. Hansen Sr.
July 15th, 1938 ~ November 30th, 2019 (age 81)

James D. Hansen, beloved husband, father, grandfather, and great grandfather, was born July 15, 1938, in Paradise, Utah. He passed away November 30, 2019, in Chamberlain, South Dakota. 

Jim was raised on a small family farm in Cache Valley, Utah, where he spent his days working with his dad, developing his dislike for milk cows and thinning beets, and his love for hunting, especially duck hunting. Anyone who spent time with Jim was fortunate enough to hear his many stories of hunting ducks in the river bottoms and marshes. After graduating from South Cache High School, he enlisted in the United States Army. During his service, he was a member of the Competitive Marksman Team. While stationed in Missouri, he was able to first attend a New York Yankees game, which grew into a lifelong family-wide love affair with the team. 

Jim served a mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the Northern California Mission, with a great deal of his time assigned to serve in Medford, Oregon. Following his mission, he was recalled into the Army. While he was home on leave in the winter of 1961, Glen Roundy, a former mission companion, introduced him to Coralie Rigby. After their first double date, he asked her to please write to him. She did, a long-distance courtship began, and they were married in the Logan, Utah Temple on December 14, 1962. After completion of his military service, he enrolled at Utah State University, graduating in 1965. Just after graduation, he and Coralie welcomed their oldest son, Cary James Hansen. 

Jim accepted a position as a Territory Sales Representative with Phillips Petroleum, covering Utah, Nevada, and Idaho. In August of 1967, they had their only daughter, Lauralie. In 1971, things continued to change for their small family as their youngest son, Kirkland Rigby Hansen was born, and Jim was transferred to Idaho Falls. In 1974, he purchased Conrad & Bischoff, Inc., a decision that would shape his family's future for generations to come. For over thirty years, Jim worked to build Conrad & Bischoff into a successful and thriving business. From very humble beginnings, he, along with Jim and Kirk, expanded their businesses to include not only wholesale and retail petroleum sales, but also commercial real estate, and later, Kyani, Inc., a global health and wellness company. He always focused on the little details, and there were always plenty of "ten-minute jobs" that needed to be done. Despite what most would view as remarkable success, Jim never forgot his humble beginnings. He was an extremely generous person, who many times quietly and anonymously helped those in need. 

Jim was a faithful member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and throughout his life, served in numerous leadership positions in his local ward and stake, as well as at Brigham Young University-Idaho. He was also an officiator in the Idaho Falls Temple. Jim and Coralie served missions in San Francisco, California, and Edinburgh, Scotland.

Jim's favorite thing in the world was his family. Whether at the cabin, hunting, fishing, traveling, going on long rides together, or attending a Yankee or Jazz game, he loved spending time with his wife, children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren. He was proud of each of them and viewed them as his greatest treasure. He is survived by his wife, Coralie Rigby Hansen; his daughter, Lauralie (Scott) Seedall; daughters-in-law, LeAnn (Jim) Hansen and Rebecca (Kirkland) Hansen; as well as 11 grandchildren and 9 great grandchildren. 

Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Wednesday, December 18, 2019, at the Ammon 8th Ward, located at 2055 S. Ammon Road, in Ammon, Idaho. The family will visit with friends Tuesday from 6-8 p.m. at Wood Funeral Home East Side, 963 S. Ammon Road, and Wednesday from 10-10:45 a.m. prior to services at the church. Burial will be in the Ammon Cemetery. Condolences may be sent to the family online at www.woodfuneralhome.com.



​WASHINGTON (December 17, 2019) — The National Transportation Safety Board issued its preliminary report Tuesday for its investigation of the Nov. 30, 2019, crash of a Pilatus PC12 in Chamberlain, South Dakota, which killed the pilot and eight passengers and injured three others.

The airplane was registered to Conrad & Bischoff, Inc., and operated by the pilot as a personal flight from Chamberlain Municipal Airport destined for Idaho Falls Regional Airport, Idaho.

According to preliminary data recovered from the data recorder installed on the airplane, the accident takeoff began from runway 31 about 12:31 p.m. central standard time. The airplane immediately rolled about 10 degrees to the left after takeoff. The roll decreased to about five degrees left as the airplane climbed through about 170 feet above ground level and then reversed to about five degrees right. The airplane ultimately entered a 64-degree left bank as the airplane reached its peak altitude of 460 feet above the ground. The cockpit stall warning and stick shaker became active about one second after liftoff and the stick pusher became active about 15 seconds after liftoff. They continued intermittently for the duration of the flight. The data recording ended about 12:33 p.m.

No radio communications were received from the pilot, and radar contact was never established.

The recorder also captured cockpit sound. The NTSB will convene a group of technical experts to produce a transcript.

Weather at the time was recorded as being overcast with clouds at 500 feet, 1/2-mile visibility in moderate snow, with wind from the direction of 20 degrees at 6 knots. The temperature and dew point were both 1 degree Celsius, and the altimeter setting was 29.30 inches of mercury. Freezing rain and snow were observed in the vicinity of the airport the previous afternoon and overnight before the accident flight, which was operated on an instrument flight rules flight plan.

Witnesses reported that the pilot and a passenger worked for three hours to remove the snow and ice from the airplane before the accident flight. The witnesses reported that visibility was limited by snow at the time of the accident.

The accident site was located at 1:57 p.m. approximately three-fourths of a mile west of the airport in a dormant corn field. The debris path was approximately 85 feet long and was oriented on a 179-degree heading.

The preliminary report details facts uncovered during the on-scene investigation and does not include analysis or a probable cause for the accident. Probable cause will be determined at the end of the investigation, which could take between 12-24 months to complete. No conclusions about the cause of the accident should be made based on the information contained in the preliminary report, which can be found at https://go.usa.gov/xpfsq

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is an independent federal agency charged with determining the probable cause of transportation accidents, promoting transportation safety, and assisting victims of transportation accidents and their families.

IDAHO FALLS, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) - UPDATE 11:57 P.M. 12/7/19: Thomas Long, one of the three survivors from the November 30th plane crash, has been released from the hospital and is now at home in Idaho Falls resting comfortably.

The spokesperson confirmed this information to Local News 8 and KIDK Eyewitness News 3.

They add that Matt Hansen remains in the hospital in South Dakota under the care of a fabulous medical team.

ORIGINAL STORY: The first of three plane crash survivors has returned to Idaho Falls.

We have confirmed Josh Hansen is back home in Idaho Falls.

He is the son of Kirk and Rebecca Hansen and is one of three survivors from the deadly plane crash last Saturday in South Dakota.

His father and eight others died that day.

The first two funerals are set for next week in Idaho Falls and Twin Falls.

The other survivors, Thomas Long and Matt Hansen, are still in a South Dakota hospital.  Their families say they are receiving kind and loving care, but the families haven't commented on their condition.



Original article can be found here ➤ https://localnews8.com

Piles of drifted snow surrounded the Chamberlain Municipal Airport on Monday — evidence of a blizzard that swept through western and central South Dakota on Friday and Saturday.

The sun glared off ice that was scattered on the runway, where a small-engine plane took off on Saturday, carrying 12 Idaho family members on an annual South Dakota hunting trip back home.

But the Pilatus PC-12 only made it a mile before crashing in a field south of Chamberlain around 12:30 p.m. shortly after takeoff, killing nine and injuring three, authorities say.

Three of the men who died in the crash were Kirk Hansen and James Hansen, Jr. — founders of the nutritional supplement company, Kyani, Inc. — and their father James Hansen, Sr., according to a letter released from Kyani’s president, Travis Garza. All three were prominent businessmen in the Idaho Falls area and executives with Conrad & Bischoff, Kyani and KJ’s Super Stores.

Garza also said the crash killed Kirk Hansen's two children, Stockton and Logan, as well as Kirk’s  son-in-law Kyle Naylor and son-in-law Tyson Dennert. James Hansen, Jr.'s son Jake Hanson and grandson Houston also died in the crash.

The three victims who survived the crash include Josh Hansen, Kirk Hansen's son; Matt Hansen, Jim Hansen, Jr.'s son; and Thomas Long, Jim Hansen, Jr.'s son-in-law, according to Garza. 

They are in stable condition at Sanford USD Medical Center in Sioux Falls. 

The family had arrived in Chamberlain on Friday around 9:30 a.m. for the hunting trip, according to a National Transportation Safety Board press release. Shortly after arrival, the pilot purchased 150 gallons of Jet A fuel from an automated fuel pump.

The Hansen’s regularly stayed at the Thunderstik Lodge in Chamberlain for their annual hunting trip, said Carey Story, the managing partner of the lodge.

"My family, the Thunderstik family, is deeply affected by this tragedy," Story said. "They're a wonderful family. They were here for all the reasons you hope people come to South Dakota to hunt. They were sharing the outdoors with their family and were just fabulous people — four generations deep."

Although a pilot has not been identified, Kirk Hansen was a certified private pilot, according to the FAA. The airplane was registered to Conrad and Bischoff Inc. of Idaho Falls.

“The legacy of Jim Hansen, Kirk Hansen and their father, Jim Hansen Sr., will be preserved and will flourish through their families and established Business Partners today, tomorrow and into the future,” the Hansen family released in a statement.

NTSB arrives to investigate

According to the Pilatus website, the PC-12 can be flown by one pilot and carry up to 10 passengers.

NTSB officials arrived in Chamberlain on Monday afternoon and plan to document information at the crash site over the next three to five days, said Paul Knudson with the NTSB. A preliminary report will be released in a few weeks while the full investigation will take between 12 and 24 months, he said.

"There's a lot of stuff that needs to be dug into," Knudson said.

The pilot filed an instrument flight rules plan with the FAA and received a clearance to fly from Chamberlain to Idaho Falls around 12:30 p.m. on Saturday, according to a press release from the NTSB. The FAA issued an alert for a missing airplane when the pilot didn't activate the flight plan after departure.

The airplane was equipped with an automated dependent surveillance broadcast system, which records parameters that will help investigators look at the flight track, altitude and speed during takeoff and the plane's flight, according to the news release.

The plane's flight log shows frequent flights in the past month, including trips to Everett, Washington; Las Vegas, Nevada; and Nampa, Idaho, according to FlightAware.

Conditions poor at time of crash

Though the cause of the crash hasn't been released, Chamberlain and central south-central South Dakota were under a winter storm warning at the time.

Along with visibility at a half a mile and light winds reported at the airport at 12:30 p.m., there was also low-level windshear and clear air turbulence conditions with overcast skies, according to the NTSB news release. The base of the cloud layer was 500 feet above the ground, according to the news release. 

The Chamberlain airport was not closed on Saturday afternoon, but two notices were issued that there was ice and snow on the runway, said Chamberlain City Engineer Greg Powell. The airport does not have de-icing equipment on scene, he said.

Since there is not air traffic tower at the Chamberlain airport, Powell said he does not know if the pilot tried to communicate distress before the crash.

Timeline of crash

9:30 a.m., Friday: Airplane arrives at Chamberlain Municipal Airport. The plane stays parked at the airport while family members take part in an annual hunting trip.

12:20 p.m., Saturday: Airplane scheduled to depart from the airport based on flight plan.

12:26 p.m.: Airplane departs on runway 31. The pilot should have activated the set flight plan after departure, according to procedure. When that didn’t happen the FAA issued a missing plane alert.

12:35 p.m.: The Chamberlain Municipal Airport weather station recorded northeast winds at 7 mph, half a mile visibility with moderate snow and icing, and low-level windshear and clear air turbulence conditions.

Emergency responders found the crash about a mile from the airport.

Family issues statement

According to EastIdahoNews.com, the Hansen family issued a statement on Sunday evening:

The outpouring of love and expressions of concern for the welfare of the Hansen, Dennert, and Naylor families in the aftermath of the tragic accident on Nov. 30, 2019, have been overwhelming. The families wish to express their deepest gratitude for the numerous friends, family and Business Partners who have reached out with support, prayers and best wishes during this trying time.

The legacy of Jim Hansen, Kirk Hansen and their father, Jim Hansen Sr., will be preserved and will flourish through their families and established Business Partners today, tomorrow and into the future.

Condolences can be submitted to remembrance@kyani.com.

While flowers are a wonderful expression of love and support for Leann, Rebecca, Coralie, and all other family members affected by this tragedy, the family asks that, in keeping with the Hansen’s goal of helping people in need, and providing opportunities for others to grow temporally and spiritually on the path to become Christ-like disciples, that donations be tendered to the established Caring Hands Program developed by the Kyani Corporation to help people in need both at home and abroad.

With love and deepest gratitude,

The Hansen Family

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.argusleader.com

IDAHO FALLS — The legacy of Kirk and Jim Hansen will continue at Kyäni and the company moves forward with its mission and vision.

That’s the message Kyäni president Travis Garza sent to business partners Sunday as he announced the names of those involved in a fatal plane crash Saturday. They include four generations of the Hansen family.

“We are deeply sad to announce that yesterday, we lost our precious founders Jim and Kirk in a tragic plane crash in Chamberlain, South Dakota,” Graza wrote. “James Hansen, Jim and Kirk’s father, unfortunately, died in the same accident.”

Other victims include:

Stockton Hansen – son of Kirk and Rebecca
Logan Hansen – son of Kirk and Rebecca
Kyle Naylor – son-in-law of Kirk and Rebecca
Tyson Dennert – son-in-law of Kirk and Rebecca
Jake Hansen – son of Jim Jr. and Leann
Houston Hansen – grandson of Jim Jr. and Leann

Those injured in the crash who are recovering include:

Josh Hansen, son of Kirk and Rebecca
Matt Hansen, son of Jim Jr. and Leann
Thomas Long, son-in-law of Jim Jr. and Leann

Kirk and Jim Hansen were executives with Conrad & Bischoff, Kyäni and KJ’s Super Stores. They were with their family on a weekend hunting trip when their plane crashed, according to relatives.

“Although these developments are very sad for the Kyäni family, the family was smart enough to build a solid team that can move this company now and in the future,” Garza wrote. “Kirk and Jim’s legacy will continue to be protected by everyone who is related to Kyäni, and by making a better life possible through their mission and vision.”

Garza said Carl Taylor will work with the Kyäni executive team and lead daily operations as the company moves forward.

Hansen family statement


The Hansen family issued the following statement Sunday evening:

The outpouring of love and expressions of concern for the welfare of the Hansen, Dennert, and Naylor families in the aftermath of the tragic accident on Nov. 30, 2019, have been overwhelming. The families wish to express their deepest gratitude for the numerous friends, family and Business Partners who have reached out with support, prayers and best wishes during this trying time.

The legacy of Jim Hansen, Kirk Hansen and their father, Jim Hansen Sr., will be preserved and will flourish through their families and established Business Partners today, tomorrow and into the future.

Condolences can be submitted to remembrance@kyani.com.

While flowers are a wonderful expression of love and support for Leann, Rebecca, Coralie, and all other family members affected by this tragedy, the family asks that, in keeping with the Hansen’s goal of helping people in need, and providing opportunities for others to grow temporally and spiritually on the path to become Christ-like disciples, that donations be tendered to the established Caring Hands Program developed by the Kyani Corporation to help people in need both at home and abroad.

With love and deepest gratitude,

The Hansen Family

Original article ➤ https://www.eastidahonews.com



IDAHO FALLS — The Idaho Falls community “has a dark cloud over it” following a plane crash that killed nine family members and injured three others Saturday.

That’s how Brian Wood describes his thoughts one day after Jim Hansen Sr., his sons, Kirk and Jim Hansen Jr., and six others, including two children, died in the South Dakota crash. The Hansens were executives with Conrad & Bischoff, Kyäni and KJ’s Super Stores.

Wood is the owner of Wood Funeral Home and calls the Hansens “pillars in the community.”

“Oftentimes people that lose a loved one are not financially prepared to pay for the many things surrounding their final expenses,” Wood wrote in a Facebook post. “Many, many times through the years I received a text message from Jim or Kirk asking if there was anyone having a hard time paying their bill. When there was, they’d give me their credit card number without a second thought and pay the bill for them.”

The Hansen family is now preparing for the funerals of those generous men and the others who perished in the crash. They were on a weekend hunting trip and returning home to Idaho Falls when the Pilatus PC-12, which was carrying them went down near the Chamberlain Municipal Airport. The area was under a winter storm warning with visibility a half of a mile at the airport, according to the National Weather Service.

Three National Transportation Safety Board investigators were en route to the scene Sunday morning but were unable to get to the crash site because all of the roads were closed, Peter Knudson, a spokesman for the NTSB, tells EastIdahoNews.com. A preliminary report on the plane crash should be released in about a week.

Family members in Idaho Falls traveled to South Dakota Saturday evening to visit the three survivors in the hospital, relatives say. Their conditions have not been released and EastIdahoNews.com is not reporting their names or the names of the other fatalities at this time.

Tributes to the Hansen brothers are being shared through phone calls, text messages and on social media. It seems everyone who knew them has a positive story to share. Not only were they well-known businessmen but they served in prominent positions with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, including bishoprics and stake presidencies.

“Jim Sr. was asked to lead a bunch of rowdy, ill-behaved 16-year-old boys in the neighborhood church. I was one of them,” Darin Skidmore recalls. “It is Jim Sr. who talked me into trying waterskiing. I got up my very first try, which brought a smile to his face. Over the years, Jim Sr. always kept track of me and made time for a conversation…Most people will never know just how much good the Hansen family has done.”

Skidmore adds, “The city of Idaho Falls is a better place because of them…I believe God puts people like them on the earth to help people like me and you. The loss of these great men will never be recovered.”

Tony Blakeslee and his family attended church with Jim Sr., a man who had a special love for children.

“They always set aside a bag of Halloween treats for our kids every year,” Blakeslee tells EastIdahoNews.com. “This was the first time in 15 years we missed them because they were at their kid’s house late. This accident is just so tragic and unreal.”

Kevin Call, the owner of Farr Candy Company, describes the news of the plane crash as “heartbreaking.”

“They were our good friends,” Call says. “Their influence in the community and church will be heavily felt. They weren’t showy but quiet, heavy contributors.”

The accident has turned into a national story with dozens of news outlets, including NBC News, The Daily Mail, Fox News and others, posting articles about it. The influence of the Hansens is being felt around the world and those who knew them best are praying for their families.

“Jim Sr.’s wife, Coralee, is a tough but tender matriarch. Her family is the most important thing she has, and she lets everyone know it,” Skidmore says. ” She will lead her family through the pain and suffering of this tragedy.
Please keep this great family in your prayers, lift up their hands when they hang down, and strengthen their knees should they become feeble.”

Original article ➤ https://www.eastidahonews.com


Harsh wintry weather is keeping federal investigators from reaching the site in South Dakota where a Pilatus PC-12/47E crashed, killing nine people and injuring three others.

Peter Knudson with the National Transportation Safety Board says three investigators are stuck Sunday in Sioux Falls, about 140 miles (225 kilometers) east of the crash site in Chamberlain.

Knudson says the Pilatus PC-12/47E was bound for Idaho Falls, Idaho, and crashed within a mile after takeoff on Saturday.

He says federal investigators will likely reach the crash site on Monday, December 2nd.

Authorities haven’t released the names of the victims. Brule County emergency manager Katheryn Benton told the Sioux Falls Argus Leader that the passengers ranged in age from 7 to 81. She said the three survivors were three men ages 28, 27 and 17.

Sunday, December 1st  at  9:22 a.m.

Nine people died and three more were injured when a single-engine plane bound for Idaho crashed shortly after takeoff in South Dakota.

Peter Knudson with the National Transportation Safety Board told The Associated Press 12 people were aboard the Pilatus PC-12/47E when it crashed about 12:30 p.m. Saturday, shortly after taking off in Chamberlain, about 140 miles (225 kilometers) west of Sioux Falls.

Knudson said nine people were killed and three were injured. The small plane was bound for Idaho Falls, Idaho.

Authorities have not released the names of the victims. Brule County emergency manager Katheryn Benton told the Sioux Falls Argus Leader that the passengers ranged in age from 7 to 81. She said the three survivors were three men ages 28, 27 and 17.

Original article ➤ https://abcnews.go.com



IDAHO FALLS — A weekend hunting trip turned to heartbreaking tragedy Saturday afternoon when nine members of an eastern Idaho family were killed in an airplane crash.

Jim Hansen Sr., his sons, Kirk and Jim Hansen Jr., and six other family members died when their plane went down in a field near Chamberlain, South Dakota, according to relatives. The Hansens were executives with Conrad & Bischoff, Kyäni and KJ’s Super Stores.

Twelve people were on the Pilatus PC-12 that took off shortly before 12:30 p.m. CST from the Chamberlain Municipal Airport on its way to Idaho Falls. The Chamberlain area was under a winter storm warning and the National Weather Service said visibility was a half of a mile at the airport.

The plane crashed shortly after takeoff about a mile from the airport, the Federal Aviation Administration said in a statement. The pilot and two children were among the nine who perished. The three survivors were hospitalized in Sioux Falls, according to Brule County State Attorney Theresa Maule.

The Brule County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the crash, alongside the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board. The cause of the crash has not been determined.

The Hansens have been actively involved in the Idaho Falls community. In 2017, EastIdahoNews.com spoke with Kirk Hansen when Kyäni was recognized for partnering with Idahoan in developing and distributing the Potato Pak – a fortified meal with essential nutrients including protein, fatty acids and vitamins.

Jim Sr. and his two sons have served in prominent positions with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, including bishoprics and stake presidencies.

“The men and women of law enforcement, first responders and medical professionals should be commended in their heroic actions to rescue the victims in extreme weather conditions,” Maule said. “Our entire community has been praying for the individuals involved and their families.”

This is the second fatal airplane crash involving eastern Idahoans this month. Mike and Robin Quinn, owners of Heise Hot Springs, died when their plane went down Nov. 22 near Elko, Nevada.

Original article ➤ https://www.eastidahonews.com




BRULE COUNTY, South Dakota (KSFY) - UPDATE 9:45 p.m. - KIFI reports members of an Idaho Falls family were killed Saturday afternoon in a South Dakota plane crash near Chamberlain.

The crash took nine lives, including prominent businessmen Jim and Kirk Hansen, the pilot, 2 young children, and four other males.

Three others survived the crash and are being treated at a local hospital.

The Hansen's own K & J Super Stores, oil company Conrad and Bischoff and founders of the health and wellness company Kyani.

The plane crashed shortly after takeoff from the Chamberlain Municipal Airport around 12:30 p.m. in a nearby farm field.

Family friends told KIFI the men were on a traditional Thanksgiving hunting trip in South Dakota and were returning home.

ORIGINAL STORY -

According to Brule County State's Attorney Theresa Maule, nine people died in a plane crash Saturday afternoon in rural Brule County south of Chamberlain.

The pilot and two children are among the dead. 12 people were on board the plane and three were transported to Sioux Falls for medical treatment.

The Pilatus PC-12 single-engine plane was leaving from Chamberlain, South Dakota to Idaho Falls, Idaho and crashed shortly after takeoff.

The area of the crash was under a winter storm warning with a few inches of snow according to the National Weather Service.

Spokesman Peter Knudson with the National Transportation Safety Board tells KSFY News that local officials near Chamberlain are still investigating the crash and gathering information.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.ksfy.com



IDAHO FALLS, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) - Members of an Idaho Falls family were killed Saturday afternoon in a South Dakota plane crash.

The crash claimed the lives of 9 people, including prominent businessmen Jim and Kirk Hansen, the pilot, 2 young children and four other males.

Three others survived the crash and are being treated at a local hospital.

The Hansen own K & J Super Stores, oil company Conrad and Bischoff and founders of the health and wellness company Kyani.

The plane crashed shortly after takeoff from the Chamberlain Municipal Airport around 12:30 p.m. in a nearby farm field.

Family friends said the men were on a traditional Thanksgiving hunting trip in South Dakota and were returning home.

Local News 8 and KIDK Eyewitness News 3 are not releasing the other victim names at this time.

ORIGINAL STORY:

IDAHO FALLS, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) - A group of Idaho Falls residents were killed today when their small plane crashed in South Dakota.

According to Theresa Maule, the Brule County State's Attorney said 12 people were on board the plane. Nine of them were killed including 2 children and the pilot. Three were rescued in extreme weather conditions.

The Pilatus PC-12 plane is owned by Conrad and Bischoff Inc. of Idaho Falls.

Initial reports indicate that it crashed shortly after take-off from the Chamberlin Municipal Airport with a destination to Idaho Falls.

Severe weather and high winds were reported at the time of the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤  https://localnews8.com




Authorities say nine people were killed Saturday afternoon after a plane crashed near Chamberlain.

Peter Knudson with the National Transportation Safety Board said the Pilatus PC-12 had 12 people on board when it crashed at about 12:30 p.m., shortly after taking off from Chamberlain. 

Nine people were killed in the crash and three were injured. The plane was bound for Idaho Falls, Idaho, Knudson said. EastIdahoNews.com reported the passengers were from eastern Idaho.

Theresa Maule Rossow, Brule County State's Attorney, said two children were among the fatalities.  She said the location of the crash was a rural area south of Chamberlain.

One survivor was admitted to the hospital in Chamberlain, another was taken to Avera Queen of Peace in Mitchell and the most critical was taken to Sioux Falls by ambulance, Brule County emergency manager Katheryn Benton said. 

The ages of the passengers ranged from 7 to 81. The three survivors are three men who are 17, 27 and 28 years old, Benton said.

The bodies have been removed from the wreckage, which is in a cornfield south of Chamberlain, Benton said. She said the area will likely be shut down for at least the next 24 hours.

Weather appears to have been a main factor in the crash, Benton said, adding that planes were unable to land in Chamberlain at the time of the crash.

According to the Pilatus website, the PC-12 can be flown by one pilot and carry up to 10 passengers.

The plane flew into Chamberlain from Idaho Falls on Friday morning, according to FlightAware. Its flight log also shows frequent flights in the past month, including trips to Everett, Washington; Las Vegas, Nevada and Nampa, Idaho.

Conditions poor at time of crash

Though the cause of the crash hasn't been released, Chamberlain and central south-central South Dakota were under a winter storm warning at the time.

The NWS said visibility was a half a mile with light winds reported at the airport at 12:30 p.m. There have been no snowfall totals reported for Chamberlain, but Gregory, which is south of Chamberlain, reported eight inches of snow as of 2 p.m., the NWS said.

Interstate 90 has been closed all day from the Wyoming border to Chamberlain.

Chamberlain is about 140 west of Sioux Falls in central South Dakota. 

"The men and women of law enforcement, first responders and medical professionals should be commended in their heroic actions to rescue the victims in extreme weather conditions," Maule Rossow said.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.argusleader.com

Kirk Hansen and Pilatus PC-12/47E N56KJ

106 comments:

  1. Ironic how the same traits that can make an individual so successful in life on the ground often kill those same people when they venture into the sky....

    Killing yourself through foolishness or willfulness is forgivable, killing others is not.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Weather history for time of accident does not show high winds at Chamberlain, but does appear to have been 500 ft ceilings, 1/2 mile visibility, and snowing hard.

    https://w1.weather.gov/data/obhistory/K9V9.html

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  3. 12 people in a 10 seat plane flying out of an airport that you couldn't fly back into.

    Recipe for disaster.

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  4. One must respect the weather as it can be a deal breaker. Sounds like there was some "get-home-itis" to put added pressure on the pilot. This tragedy sounds eerily similar to the piston-twin crash in FL that took off in the fog and crashed shortly after killing his family members on their way for New Years eve celebrations. Sad, RIP and my condolences to the family.

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  5. ....piston-twin crash in FL that took off in the fog ? Yup, I remember reading that fog so thick that day in FL, he was towed to the runway.

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    Replies
    1. And today is Clear skies/VFR and light winds. Sad but a reminder to always have a plan B

      Delete
  6. With twelve occupants onboard, weight and balance will certainly be a critical factor. Investigators will obtain the weights of all occupants and any cargo they may have had onboard, they'll then map the weight of each occupant and cargo to its location on the plane and determine if it was properly loaded. A tail heavy plane can be very sensitive to pitch for example. I'd be curious if the fuel had an icing inhibitor added such as Prist. Takeoff into low ceilings can be challenging as it is a likely way to compromise one's senses of motion and balance. There have been numerous crashes in the past due to spatial disorientation, when an airplane has simply been allowed to settle back down to impact, with the pilot being totally unaware. The 2016 CitationJet crash into Lake Erie at night comes to mind. Still, it's just speculation at this point. My condolences to the friends and families of the victims and a speedy recovery to the injured. What an awful thing to happen on the Holidays.

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  7. Ten years ago in Hayden Colorado a remarkably similar accident happened in a PC12 shortly after takeoff. Only two killed though.
    https://aviation-safety.net/wikibase/58471
    Rest In Peace.

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  8. Sorry, the FL crash occurred on Christmas eve 2017 (not New Year's eve). It was a Cessna 340.

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  9. That was a high work load for any pilot. Dealing with the weather, load of the aircraft and passengers. As an atp pilot, I would have delayed or postponed the whole thing.I lost two jobs in my career for not departing when the boss wanted to. I came to realize my life was more important than keeping someone happy. With the load on that aircraft all you need is one little problem to pop up and things will go South real fast. The whole thing is sad.

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  10. https://aviation-safety.net/wikibase/58471

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  11. I wonder if he departed with snow on the wings.

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  12. ^ Not according to the accident investigators. The severe weather kept the investigators from reaching the crash site. They will attempt to travel to the site tomorrow. Please, let's wish them the very best of luck of safe travels planned for Monday.

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  13. This morning and into late afternoon is was very hazardous, plus snow blowing across the area.
    NTSB go-team and FAA you are in my thoughts.

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  14. https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief.aspx?ev_id=20090111X45527&key=1
    NTSB Identification: CEN09FA126
    14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
    Accident occurred Sunday, January 11, 2009 in Hayden, CO
    Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/27/2011
    Aircraft: PILATUS AIRCRAFT LTD PC-12/45, registration: N604WP
    2 Fatal.
    The airplane’s Pilot Operating Handbook and Airplane Flight Manual contained the following limitation: "The aircraft must be clear of all deposits of snow, ice and frost adhering to the lifting surfaces immediately prior to takeoff."
    Probable Cause: The pilot's loss of control due to snow/ice contamination on the airplane's lifting surfaces as a result of his decision not to deice the airplane before departure.

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  15. He departed from a small airport (9V9) so it's unlikely they had the ability to de-ice the airplane. He should of had the airplane stored in a heated hanger while on the hunting trip so he didn't have to worry about the snow unless it was snowing so heavy that it built up quickly. A quick look out the cockpit window at the wings could confirm it. I have a feeling weather/pilot will be the cause of this one, so sad and preventable. I know a lot of private pilots that say "If you absolutely have to be somewhere on such and such date, take a commercial flight and leave the flying to the pros". I would have just waited for improved weather.

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  16. None of us are perfect, or immune from mistakes, or able to resist external pressures. It falls to each of us pilots to recognize the accident chain and act to break it before it results in an undesirable outcome. Such a tragic loss of life, and so preventable... Here’s hoping those of us left to read this are able to absorb the lessons to be learned here, and have the strength of character to listen to that small voice when it says “no.”

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  17. To the above commenter: This is the main reason I read this blog, to learn from the mistakes of others and god-willing not end up on here myself someday. I would also like to give a big THANK YOU to the men & women of the NTSB & FAA that have to go out in all kinds of weather conditions to investigate these accidents and put together the pieces to give us a determination of what went wrong.

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  18. NO de-ice services 9V9 Chamberlain Municipal Airport Chamberlain, South Dakota

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  19. PC-12s are not turbofans so do not require a type rating, just high performance and complex airplane endorsements. Same as a MU-2B only required all that plus being multi-engine rated until the high accident rate created a new set of standards.
    Me say weather is 99% of it... with a sprinkling of spatial disorientation or icing issues.

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  20. I'm a corporate pilot and have flown the boss with hunters into this airport many times over the past 20 years. We never leave the airplane overnight as there are no hangars. In fact there isn't much at all at this airport. If the airplane set out all night there would have been no way to get the snow and ice off of it. Maybe some could have been brushed off the wings but remember the PC12 has a very high tail.

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  21. Family member as PIC, 33F temperatures, no de-icing available at 9V9, aircraft not in heated hangar, exposed to 90 minutes of light snowfall before takeoff roll. Those impressive de-ice boots on leading edges and the powerful turbine could easily create a false expectation that some snow on upper surfaces is acceptable and aircraft will "power through".

    However, NTSB alerts and accident reports advise "pilots should be aware that no amount of snow, ice or frost accumulation on the wing upper surface can be considered safe for takeoff", as has been pointed out in comments and links from Gretnabear and others. See also:
    https://www.ntsb.gov/safety/safety-alerts/Documents/SA_006.pdf

    Australia CASA similarly advises "frost, ice or snow with the thickness and surface roughness of medium or coarse sandpaper reduces lift by as much as 30 per cent, and increases drag by 40 per cent. Even a small area can significantly affect the airflow" (Per link below)
    https://www.casa.gov.au/sites/g/files/net351/f/_assets/main/lib91138/26-29.pdf

    NASA training for aircraft snow accumulation, under "Anticipating Contamination Cues" says this: "Snowfall at near freezing temperatures, roughly -2°C to +2°C (28.4F to 35.6F) is likely to have very high moisture content, and can stick to your airframe. It is unlikely to “blow off” during the takeoff roll. On the other hand, snow at very cold temperatures, roughly -10°C (14F), will not stick to a cold, dry aircraft." (Per link below & scroll down to the "Snow Adherance" tab)
    https://aircrafticing.grc.nasa.gov/2_2_2_1.html#c10
    Full info on subject is at: https://aircrafticing.grc.nasa.gov/

    Taking off during continued 33 degree F snowfall in a plane that sat cold soaked at 33F was an unfortunate operating condition for a fully loaded aircraft. And a photo of N56KJ from February 2016 appears to show a white paint scheme, further impeding the visual cues. https://www.jetphotos.com/photo/8438999

    The cause of this accident is not yet known, so please understand that the quotes and links above are offered only in the hope that someone finds it informative for their own flight decisions or knowledge.

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  22. Funny, when things go to crap I usually say it goes "North".

    I suppose it is a matter of perspective.

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  23. How ironic would it be if the cause was hit a flock of ducks

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ducks are smart enough not to attempt to fly in such conditions.

      Delete
  24. KIRKLAND RIGBY HANSEN

    2738 W HONEY SUCKLE LN
    IDAHO FALLS ID 83402-5392
    County: BONNEVILLE
    Country: USA
    Medical Information:
    Medical Class: Third Medical Date: 1/2019
    BasicMed Course Date: None BasicMed CMEC Date: None
    Certificates
    PRIVATE PILOT

    Certificates Description
    Certificate: PRIVATE PILOT
    Date of Issue: 4/16/2008

    Ratings:
    PRIVATE PILOT
    AIRPLANE SINGLE ENGINE LAND
    AIRPLANE MULTIENGINE LAND
    INSTRUMENT AIRPLANE


    Limits:
    ENGLISH PROFICIENT.

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  25. Can I add snow ingestion into engine degrading performance ? remember too external de-icing is not always sufficient,overnight ice will form inside the structures of wings,the unseen dangers lurking within.

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  26. "Snow ingestion" PT6 is a reverse flow turbine with good FO rejection. Brush operators
    should carry or have access to glycol & and portable sprayer, a lightweight stainless
    steel sprayer could accomodate a 12v "coffee/immersion" heater to heat the fluid while enroute to airport, or just heat the fluid at the hotel room...might save the day.

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  27. MarcPilot, while you're correct about the PC-12 not requiring a type rating, remember that the A/C's insurer may have required an annual recurrent and sim time. Such was certainly the case for my uncle as he regularly traveled from HOU to DFW to visit FlightSafety when he flew N7YR when it was under private ownership. Of course, I have no way of knowing if this applied to N56KJ, but I have to think if it did, the outcome might've been different.

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  28. ONE: YOU DON’T HAVE TO GO! Landings are mandatory; takeoffs are not. Of course, airplanes are made to takeoff and fly. Ultimately there is no way to guess which ones will go smoothly and which ones will become a notation in a yearly air safety report, but you can improve your odds significantly.

    TWO: REMEMBER THE SIX PS — PRIOR PERFORMANCE PLANNING PREVENTS PATHETICALLY POOR PERFORMANCE Right after takeoff is the wrong time to find out you did your weight-and-balance wrong or miscalculated your bird’s takeoff performance.

    http://www.pilatusowners.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/POPA-Winter2013Mazazine.pdf

    ReplyDelete
  29. I was a copilot aboard a corporate B200 King Air that "had to" pick up the Boss and wife
    from a small, snowy airport in Southern Illinois. About 2" of snow on the runway,snowing moderately, quick turn.
    We were light but barely got enough speed to rotate with 2 PT6s. I selected Gear up and it was full of snow and went halfway. Flew back to Rockford at 16,000 and 140 kts....the damage to the gear motors was around 15K, way back in the 80s. Pressure on the Captain to pick up his Boss. It could have been a disaster.

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  30. I have been to 9V9 over 1000 times in my career. there are no hangar options for a PC12 there nor is there any deice options. I flew all day in the SD that same day in a SE turboprop. The wx didnt kill them. The aircraft would have been exposed to much rain ice and snow while it sat there for over a day. I would guess they made attempts to remove some by hand but didnt do well in that job. I am sure the airport manage will have much insight as i heard he was a witness Add a private pilot owner operator as the pilot and its a disaster. LEAVE PILOTING TO THE PROFESSIONALS in these type of airplanes and condition.!!!

    ReplyDelete
  31. just saw pictures on the national news that purported to show the crash site. The propeller (five blades I assume) had at least two of the blades undamaged; i.e. no s-bending, no scratches. Would seem to indicate the engine was not producing power at impact.

    ReplyDelete
  32. six said… "LEAVE PILOTING TO THE PROFESSIONALS in these type of airplanes and condition.!!!"
    20/20, Conrad & Bischoff's corporate pilot could have and should have flown the family from Sioux Falls, ID to Chamberlain, SD (140 miles - 225 kilometers), returned to Sioux Fall, hangared their $4 million Pilatus overnight, then return for a pickup, quick turn around and departure.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I doubt the company's professional pilot would have agreed to carry 12 persons in a 10 person aircraft, especially as his own self would have increased that to 13 persons. THAT may be the very reason the private pilot (amateur) family member assigned himself to the role of pilot.

      Delete
  33. Tragic. Read: https://www.ntsb.gov/investigations/AccidentReports/Reports/AAR1105.pdf

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  34. I for one highly doubt it was a mechanical malfunction based on the history of crash report conclusions/causes of the PC-12. That and the fact the plane is made of course in Switzerland which has notorious challenging winter flying conditions in mountainous terrain. Of course, we'll all only know for sure when the NTSB releases its final report a few years from now.

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  35. https://www.ntsb.gov/news/press-releases/Pages/nr20191202.aspx

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  36. I'm surprised that there wasn't more damage to the prop.

    Tragic loss of some really good people. RIP to those lost and recovery for those injured.

    7C

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  37. Plan parked at airport overnight during the winter storm .. no hangar as stated.
    Major Ice / Snow accumulation
    Then took off in the middle of a winter storm warning.
    How as a pilot in charge can you have your children and grandchildren on board and not have some sense of a red flag here ?
    To that effect ... how could the other family members (some with their own children aboard) not at the very least question their relatives regarding the decision to depart in such marginal conditions.
    According to personal accounts these were all very intelligent, level headed and caring individuals.
    This is a senseless tragedy.
    For the life of me I do not understand it... :(
    Prayers to family and RIP to all

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  38. One of my former flight instructors told me that pilots that are killed in bad weather are usually buried in sunshine.

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  39. I could not even imagine losing 9 immediate/close family members at once. Very tragic.

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  40. This is just one reason, of many, why our firm does not permit executives, corporate officers, directors, board members to travel on the same aircraft at the same time. The reliability of air travel (private and commercial) makes the unthinkable seem impossible. Yet it may take one aircraft accident, one malfunction, or even a chain of the most unlikely events to spawn disasters and bring a company to its knees.

    ReplyDelete

  41. The airplane was parked overnight in winter conditions at an airfield w/o de-icing equipment and departed in low vis conditions and moderate snow fall.
    The PC-12 has a T-tail which is 14 ft above ground. Even if the pilot tried to remove snow and ice contamination from the wing surfaces
    I have serious doubts that he was able to reach the horizontal stabilizer.
    In any way the airplane was not flyable.

    The Pilatus PC-12 is meant to be flown by professionals. Preferrably double crew.

    The personality traits that make successful business men are not desirable in aviation and do not make safe pilots (as countless high profile accidents have proven in the past).

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  42. Lots of news media attention with this aircraft accident, it's in The Wall Street Journal.

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  43. Photo of crashed engine/propeller. Tips straight on two shown.
    https://images.kdlt.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/chamberlain-plane-crash-NTSB-768x576.jpg

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  44. Lordy, all ready posturing to blame someone else for poor decision making. “Aircraft had clearance to take off”. Where did personal responsibility end up?

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  45. This aircraft had the Hartzell four blade prop HC-E4A-3D/E. Agree with a previous post no tip curl evident on the photo of two blades.

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  46. over weight
    snow and ice on the runway and airplane
    1/2 mile vis
    turbulence reported
    500 ft ceiling
    what could possibly go wrong

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  47. the poster who said someone should have gone to Sioux falls with the aircraft for the night was spot on. if they had the foresight to do this they would all still be alive. you can't leave any airplane out overnight in winter at a Podunk airport like this with no hangar and no deice equipment. there is no way to get ice off the airframe with a frost scraper like you would in your car where you only need to get enough ice off to see out the windshield. this airplane should have been stuck there indefinitely since waiting for warmer outside air temp is the only way to get the ice and snow off at this airport. to the poster mark who commented on the twin Cessna accident at florida,.....no airplane is ever towed to the runway opey. he had it towed to the FBO NOT the runway. if you can't drive it to the runway you can't take off period! think about it, if he can't drive to the runway at 5 mph or less how on earth would he ever get it to 80 knots for takeoff? do you understand now?

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  48. Propeller blade 12 o'clock on the hub: No tip curl, heavy bend close to hub, clockwise.
    Propeller blade 3 o'clock on the hub: No tip curl, no visible bends at all.
    Propeller blade 6 o'clock on the hub: No tip curl, smooth bend overall, but counterclockwise.
    Propeller blade 9 o'clock on the hub: No tip curl, heavy bend close to hub, counterclockwise.
    (Look left of the man's 5.11 Tactical label on his britches and you can see the 9 o'clock blade.)

    The bend pattern suggests very low rpm (if any) when the dirt took over and "smooth bent" three but not four blades, with 12 o'clock blade bent opposite direction from 3 and 6 o'clock blades.

    Here is the same plane, showing the Hartzell 4 blade: https://www.jetphotos.com/photo/8438999

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  49. I don't know what all of the debate is about. The pilot made several bad decisions that any low time private pilot would have questioned and the results were tragic. We read this stuff every day. The weather was awful and the plane was loaded to the gills. A totally predictable but sad outcome. Money can't buy good ADM.

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  50. "The bend pattern suggests very low rpm (if any) when the dirt took over and "smooth bent" three but not four blades, with 12 o'clock blade bent opposite direction from 3 and 6 o'clock blades."

    This is pretty much what I was thinking when I first saw the picture and made the comment.

    7C

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  51. A 2009 accident of a Pilatus PC-12 in Butte, MT, was attributed to fuel system icing. The lack of damage to two blade tips makes this a possibility here.

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  52. Yes, and the 2009 Butte accident report has interesting info regarding fueling and lack of anti icing additive on pdf page 11 and 12, here:
    https://www.ntsb.gov/investigations/AccidentReports/Reports/AAR1105.pdf

    The 150 gallon Jet-A fill on arrival at 9V9 using the automated pump does bring up the question of whether the additive was used and quality of fuel supplied in this case. NTSB examination will go through all of that.

    Discussing possible fuel icing does not discount the poor decision making on this accident flight. The heavy load (including 1020 lbs fuel weight added at 9V9), snow accumulation (still visible on the horizontal stabilizer in the 2-days later NTSB photo) and departing in terrible conditions are serious errors. Bringing the PC-12 in for a turnaround instead of parking at 9v9 was the way to have done it.

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  53. It certainly does look like another bad case of pilot makes some very poor decisions and kills himself and most of his family. It happens regular as clockwork, often to business or medical professionals.

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  54. well now looks like another possibility and very good point bringing up the PC 12 crash at Butte, Mt. that pilot picked a big load of passengers at a small airport similar to this one. they only had card lock fuel as well which is unlikely to have prist in it. the PC12 has no fuel to oil heater such as the beech king air has so it is required to have prist in the fuel to prevent it from turning to slush before it can reach the igniters. in my opinion the 2 most likely reasons for this crash are no prist in the fuel or airframe contamination.

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  55. Far from and expert but I’ve been flying and maintaining 3 PC12s since 2001.
    Yep 56 annual inspections and 4000 hrs PIC.
    The prop blade everyone thinks is straight is not. All blades are feathered at the hub, that happens when the oil pressure is removed.
    If the blade on the right side was normal, we would only see the leading edge feathered.
    Secondly the fuselage in the background shows no snow or contamination from blowing snow on the massive cargo door sticking up on the left side of wreckage. The elevator however, at the same angle, has a lot of frozen slush/snow on the upper surface. So does the flap seen in the photo.
    I have taken off with light dry snow on wings and made sure it blew off before rotation but this frozen slush appears stuck well.
    This aircraft will fly controllably well over gross and out of CG but not with frozen slush on the horizontal stabilizer and elevator.

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  56. As i mentioned above the PC-12 can be flown by a PPL with a SEL. And as far as insurance they may have just had corporate general liability on it. No hull or specialized aircraft insurance which isn't even legally required in the US. If the plane was brought cash then no lender to force it either and any loss would be deducted as a business loss.
    The consensus here is clear: poor adm combined with bad weather.

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  57. For those who are wondering about the possible similarity to the Butte, MT crash as regards fuel icing, it doesn't appear that this is applicable in the current situation. I read very early on that FSII is 'premixed' with the self-serve fuel. (I believe the airport manager had been interviewed about this, but may have been from another knowledgable source.)

    Before posting from memory alone, I looked up 9V9's fueling web page and it confirms that FSII is indeed already included in the fuel. See: http://www.airnav.com/airport/9V9/AUTOMATED_FUELING_SYSTEMS

    How and whether human error may have played into adding the proper amount of FSII to the tanks is another story, of course. But, as noted earlier, NTSB testing will document whether the supplier did its job correctly.

    Hopefully, this will answer one of the questions everyone is asking.

    Concerning the over weight situation, it appears that the plane delivered those same 12 pax, plus winter clothes, plus guns, etc from Idaho Falls to Chamberlain without incident. Would dressed pheasants tip the balance into overload on the flight home? That's difficult to believe, imo.

    But that original load plus exterior icing? Yikes.

    Pilot error notwithstanding, my prayers extend to all affected. Just awful.

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  58. In regards to the photos of the snow/ice on the tail and flaps, my understanding is the NTSB did not get to the scene till the following day. Also, it was snowing during the time of the crash. So it's hard to concluded if the snow/ice was present during the accident flight or if it accumulated after the crash because it was snowing at the time.

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  59. Yes it is actually two days later, but with the horizontal stabilizer oriented knife edge/near vertical in the post crash photo, the clumped snow sticking to the surface behind the de-ice boot should not have adhered in such a manner from after crash snowfall. Consider the area shielded below that piece of dislocated fairing sticking up at the stabilizer's midpoint ridge. That strongly suggests pre-flight accumulation.

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  60. 12:34 hours, 30 Nov weather:
    12:34 PM 32.2 F 32.0 F 99 % North 9.3 mph 11.2 mph 29.32 in 0.00 in
    6 miles north @ https://www.wunderground.com/dashboard/pws/KSDOACOM4/graph/2019-11-30/2019-11-30/daily

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  61. I have a question for those of you with more experience at this sort of thing than I have. I have lots of PT-6 experience from flying King Airs, C90s through 1900s, and I just started flying a PC12 for a local company. The question of why the propeller blades aren’t demolished is a perplexing one which leads me to my question. The PT-6 is a free turbine engine, the propeller being connected to the power turbine with a planetary gear box. It seems to me that, other than the propeller, there isn’t a lot of rotational inertia on the power side of the engine. Let’s say that this guy stalled and spun the plane and that it hit the ground in a fairly flat attitude. Prop speed is only 1700 RPM, 28 revs per second, is it possible for the propeller to hit the ground is such a way that the propeller stops almost instantly? That the top blades never touch the ground?

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  62. My last job was as a corporate pilot, flying a fun little Citation 501/SP. The relevance of this is that my boss was a narcissistic, barely literate clown, with a surfeit of money. I was paid exactly $1,500 a month, plus $300 a flying day (in 2006). I didn't need the money, but loved the airplane, and the engineers of one of his companies.
    We used to fly to Winterset and Watertown, SD, on pheasant hunting trips. An 8 day trip guaranteed icy weather and I always insisted that the airplane be protected in a heated hangar, which made my boss angry every time. I didn't care.
    My last trip was such a hunting trip.
    I refused to take off in an over gross airplane, complete with overweight, sedentary engineers and their gear, not to mention a few hundred pounds of pheasants.
    On our last trip, I issued an ultimatum. Either 300 pounds of pheasant bodies, or at least one of our passengers had to be left behind, or the airplane would stay on the ramp.
    We left the pheasant with the nice people of Watertown (which is a gorgeous town, complete with the Ridlen art museum).
    I flew us all back and was soon out of my job.
    If we don't respect weather, when our job is to fly in it, it will always win.

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  63. Regarding the question whether the propeller could be stopped in the dirt "between blades" it would seem to depend on entry angle/rpm/forward travel speed/how it came into contact with the dirt. The prop hub is assembled as two pieces fastened together and you can see (if you zoom in) that the halves are not together at the 3 o'clock blade position. Looks like it has opened up a half inch of space in what should be hub halves in contact together. So the undamaged blade not returning to feather on spring response is no surprise after the hub opened up at that blade. Imagine the dynamic forces required to open up the hub assembly like that.

    As for RPM, if control response to elevator and aileron was bad during that short mile of flight, the pilot may have reduced power and been trying to make a landing. He was familiar with the airport and would have awareness of the cornfield being there, even if visibility was low. If there was a fuel or other power problem, RPM could be low.

    Very difficult to diagnose the prop damage from this photo. and the engine and prop being separated from the fuselage includes secondary additional impact before it all came to rest.

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  64. Seems like there would have to be significant RPM during ground contact to generate enough overturning force at the blade roots to pry apart the hub halves. Hub through bolting and nuts would have to fail in tensile pull or by threads shearing. Huge forces required.

    The blade showing above the NTSB persons head is the only one with a clockwise bend, which is consistent with inertia/power overrunning that blade IF it clobbered the dirt and full stopped. Something had to pry the hub halves apart in order to create the gap that shows in the photo.

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  65. "Michael Gaff said...
    ...I flew us all back and was soon out of my job.
    If we don't respect weather, when our job is to fly in it, it will always win."

    I can relate to that. Was harassed by the owner until I finally quite because Delta was able to land but I missed and went to the alternate and came back the next morning and landed vfr... No one on board but me ... Caused no one a delay but me.

    I went to minimums and didn't see what I needed in the Senaca I ... Delta was a CAT III autoland.

    Still way too much of this type of crap in this business.

    7C

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  66. "The National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) views its most important responsibility as advancing business aviation safety and fostering development of industry safety best practices. Thanks to ongoing commitments to safe operating practices by NBAA and the professionals involved in business flying, the industry has achieved a level of safety comparable to that for the commercial airlines.

    One measure of the industry’s safety record can be found in the accident data made available each year by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB). The data is divided into two categories – “corporate” and “business” operations which are designations that mostly relate to crew requirements, but are not related to the type of business involved.

    For example, flights under a “corporate” designation are those in which the aircraft is flown by a two-person, professional crew. For these types of operations, the accident rate in 2013 was 0.07 per 100,000 hours – which is better than that of the scheduled air carriers (0.107 per 100,000 hours). For flights conducted under the “business” category, in which a two-person professional crew is not required, the NTSB’s accident rate was 0.64 per 100,000 hours. General aviation was 6.3"

    https://nbaa.org/aircraft-operations/safety/statistics/

    added data at http://www.ibac.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/IBAC-Safety-Brief-13.pdf

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  67. Jet fuel doesn't freeze until around minus 40 degrees Fahrenheit so whether the fuel had prist or not should not be a factor when the temps were close to freezing.

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  68. Fuel system ice inhibitors (FSII) usage is about handling moisture, not combating the lower temperature limit of pure fuel where it would begin to gel. The FSII product is mixed into the fuel to bind up water molecules so that the moisture content won't freeze and clog aircraft lines and filters. It does not have to be wintertime for the aircraft to experience temperatures below the freezing point of water at flight level capabilities of turboprops.

    From the chemistry perspective, FSII products such as Prist are "diethylene glycol monomethyl ether" in accordance with MIL-DTL-85470/ASTM-D4171. Glycol ethers have both an alcohol and ether functional group in the same molecule, which is how the additive is able to take up moisture and still act as a solvent that is compatible with fuel and acceptable for combustion (within established limits of usage).

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  69. Photograph of the fuel storage tanks at the Chamberlain Municipal airport can be seen at 1:15 of the video in this article:

    https://www.keloland.com/news/local-news/a-look-inside-the-ntsbs-chamberlain-plane-crash-investigation/

    Nice view of the FBO layout in the video at 1:46.

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  70. TomK, LexPilot and Anonymous noted that ice buildup was likely on the top of the T-tail, and appeared to be evident on the horizontal stabilizer and elevator in the photo. How would ice on the top surface of the horizontal stabilizer affect flying characteristics of the PC-12? Would it create any unusual aircraft responses or require different recovery techniques? Could it cause the tailplane to stall first, or have aerodynamic forces different from design, and how would that affect control, particularly with the rearward C.G. and overweight conditions? I had wondered if control problems led the pilot to reduce power even while dealing with degraded performance from ice or snow buildup while overweight. This pilot was likely fighting a couple of simultaneous battles.

    It's a tough field when you have to choose between putting your life on the roulette wheel vs. a job. My hat is off to those of you that had to make the choice of being safe at the cost of your job.

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  71. @JimW- Some thoughts on your question about effects on flying characteristics from a frozen slushy accumulation on the upper surface of the tail:

    Visualize a wind tunnel test of a clean-surface horizontal stabilizer/elevator in level flight with flow indicator smoke streams going. The elevator, located at the aft edge, would be in smooth airflow and any elevator movement would be predictably responsive, giving a pilot the expected correction and normal feel in both directions of pitch control. The takeoff trim setting for the horizontal stabilizer on the Pilatus would deliver the performance that was expected.

    Now add thick, frozen-on slushy snow accumulation to the top surface. Include a step profile on the forward edge of the accumulation (just aft of where the accumulation has been cracked off by operation of the black leading-edge inflatable de-ice boot, which is easy to see in the post-crash photo). The elevator would now be in disturbed airflow (on its upper surface) due to the accumulation on the horizontal stabilizer.

    Disturbed airflow (detached or turbulent flow) over the horizontal stabilizer/elevator upper surfaces would require increased elevator deflection to achieve the desired aircraft response for pitch up. Pitch down response would likely be near normal due to clean bottom surface. The effect of the accumulation on horizontal stabilizer performance relative to the intended takeoff trim setting is another factor to consider.

    Degraded pitch response to elevator movement combined with stabilizer performance not matching the trim setting could result in pilot induced oscillation or loss of control after rotation.

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  72. @JimW
    We are talking about contamination of the horizontal stabilizer.
    In conventional aircraft (like the PC-12) the center of gravity of the airframe is located forward of the wing lift center. In flight we need a downward force in the aft in order to balance the plane in flight. This downward aerodynamic force is provided by the horizontal stabilizer.
    In other words: the horizontal stabilizer does not create upward lift like the wing surfaces, instead it is actually the opposite.
    If the stabilizer is contaminated by ice and snow we have a very high risk of an in flight tail plane stall (with subsequent crash).

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  73. NTSB should not have 'Questions may go unanswered.' Three adults survived and should be able to provide the decision making that led to this tragic fatal accident!

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  74. Many, if not most, non professional pilots consider approach and landing in poor conditions to be the most challenging phase of flight but I do not agree. For me it is a low visibility takeoff that I find most challenging. Transitioning from the visual runway environment to the instrument environment in the blink of an eye is tough and I find myself terribly stressed when I have to do this. The flight director HAS to be properly set up and the aircraft has to be IMMEDIATELY flown into the flight director after takeoff. Hesitation, sloppiness, doubt, fear, all can be fatal. I fly a PC12 single pilot and I don’t touch ANYTHING until 1000 ft AGL, I focus on keeping the airplane in the flight director. At 1000 ft AGL I start breathing again.

    I wonder if this guy even bothered with the TOGA button, I don’t understand why he was so slow.

    Flying airplanes is really really easy until it’s not, then you die.

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  75. If you get a stall warning 1 second after liftoff, is there a chance to chop the power and land straight ahead? They were past V1 which dictates continuing the takeoff. But what would be the outcome of an abort?

    A torn up airplane and some injuries, but no fatalities?

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  76. I would rather go off the end of the runway at 50 knots than auger in at 100 plus.

    Better chances.

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  77. Does anyone know the exact GPS coordinates of the crash?

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  78. Aircraft accident site latitude,longitude
    43.765556, -99.337222

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  79. Although I have been very critical of Kirk's decisions here, I admit that I have done much the same, or worse. I can get into "high dudgeon" on the morning after, but "there for the grace of God," to quote the Christians, was I, more than a few times. Thirty years after the fact, when I get into an unfortunate discussion with my wife, she kindly reminds me of the time I took off in a piece of crap Duke, on a grass airstrip with 7 people and baggage. My copilot was a great guy, who happened to be a Delta 737 captain.
    We both thought it "looked about right." Unfortunately, our weight and balance calculations have been destroyed in the sands of time.
    It was on a private grass strip near Griffin, Georgia.
    When we landed in Sebring, Florida, we noted that someone had shoved a few branches and leaves into the landing gear.
    I had more than a few scares with Dukes, but can tell you that every unfortunate occurrence was due to my ignoring the state of the airplane or circumstances.
    I came to love all of the King Airs and Barons.
    It makes me sick to think about what could have happened.
    My wonderful wife, our daughter, my friend Glenn and his wife, not to mention a clown I could barely stand, and his ugly wife, should have been killed.
    I will not proselytize any further.
    Stuff happens.

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  80. “It seems a classic case of no deicing chemicals were sprayed or that there was some kind of buildup of new snow on the wings,” said
    AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Alex Sosnowski.
    “Or is it possible the air speed indicator was clogged with, or again became clogged with, snowand ice? Or, did they damage something on the plane while clearing it of snow and ice?”

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  81. There are many pilots that should NOT be pilots. When you don't fully understand the physics involved you will get yourself into these predicaments.

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  82. There are some pilots who place too much trust in their aircraft, and take extreme risk. Read the story below about a very daring Pilatus pilot.

    Gebhard Locher is a highly intelligent and skilled pilot, but I wonder if his passengers understand the risks of landing at his "one-way runway;" one way in, and NO GO-AROUNDS!.

    Search YouTube for video titled
    "Pilatus PC12 shortest takeoff Locher Airfield"

    Also watch the last two minutes of video
    "PC 12 Sardinia Weekend 4K" on YouTube's "TheTurbopropChannel"

    Look for video "Locher Sarentino Airfield Landing Guide" by "Darren Fern"

    Locher Airfield is located in the Italian Alps near: 46.599134-N, 11.379770-E
    46°35'56.9"N 11°22'47.2"E

    Street address: 36 Localita' Grosso, Sarentino, BZ 39058, Italy

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  83. european comment here

    probable causes - combination of:
    - primary
    - single pilot ifr ops (!) allowed by faa part 91 rules (political pressures).
    - contributing
    - lack of oversight by faa / atc for this type of flights (who cares attitude)
    - single engine aircraft
    - no proper de/anti-icing
    - exceeding passenger capacity ( W&B issues )
    - departure from high elev airport in icing conditions, defying relevant warnings
    - lack of knowledge of aircraft limitations and weather
    - ignorance and/or defiance on 'carbon-copy' accidents and 'overconfidence'



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  84. @ our European friend above:

    - Identifying single pilot IFR ops allowed by part 91 is not part of the probable cause. Does it increase pilot workload? YES. Cause planes to crash, no. At best, it would be a contributing factor as the PIC no doubt had his hands full
    - Lack of oversight by the FAA and ATC? I don’t think you understand much about aviation in the US (or at all). There are too many loopholes in that assessment to address it seriously. Needless to say, none of these are contributing factors. I’d bet my career on it...
    - The number of engines on this aircraft is not the reason this short flight ended in tragedy. Non-factor.
    - The rules were broken by having one extra person on board (a 5-year child), but despite fuel and passenger weight estimates (which are still just guesses at this point), we don’t truly know whether the aircraft exceeded weight and CG limits. It seems likely, but there is no guarantee they exceeded either. Additionally, as other PC-12 pilots have mentioned, it’s surprising how far out of limits the PC-12 can operate. They departed from a higher elevation airfield (KIDA, by 3,000 feet) to 9V9 but on a 9,000 ft long runway. They picked up additional weight in the form of dressed pheasants and ice. Do you really think that tipped the scale into an overloaded situation? I think W&B is a contributing factor, but MAYBE not THE cause. Snow and ice also add weight, but this is an aside from preflight W&B loading. The conditions of the runway make this factor a critical one even if W&B was not exceeded, unless the plane was so far aft of CG or over gross that it could not fly.


    Are you familiar with ADM (aeronautical decision making)? I think the risk factors for this flight were present before the aircraft was loaded and boarded, which would point to the “Swiss cheese theory,” enabling insidious, seemingly innocuous factors to combine with the result of this tragedy. There are a lot of points at which this accident seems to have been preventable. We’ll likely learn of more.

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  85. ADM is contributing, for certain. The evaluate portion of ADM should also be exercised during pre-trip planning. Imagine for a moment that you are the family PIC planning this winter trip:

    One set of choices for this fight is for the corporate pilot to be along as PIC, with first day's flight dropping off pax at 9V9 and taking the airplane to Sioux Falls (FSD) where corp pilot gets a hotel room. Alternately, no corp pilot, where the family PIC does that drop off and flight to FSD and then makes the 2 hour/142 mile road trip from FSD to 9V9. Both choices preclude risk of parking at 9V9 with exposure to snow/ice. Since no hangar or de-ice capability was available at 9V9, aircraft could easily become grounded by ice/snow accumulation there.

    It is a given that for aircraft parking at FSD, the entire pax group must make a snowy 2 hour road trip from 9V9 to FSD for boarding if 9V9 runway snow/ice contamination from overnight and ongoing conditions preclude a land/load/fly turnaround at Chamberlain.

    A return flight origin from FSD would of course have had the benefit of hangar protection and airline-grade professional de-ice. IF there was a condition of overweight, balance, malfunction, prolonged takeoff roll or other performance problem that somehow caused the de-iced/clean-surface aircraft to be on stall warning and stick shaker at rotation, the 8000 foot or 8999 foot runway being used at FSD would easily accommodate aborting takeoff compared to the 4400 foot Chamberlain runway. Service to diagnose and rework any problem could be obtained at FSD.

    Making that better choice during pre-trip ADM/planning for this case includes accepting some realities: The corporate pilot would likely require that the family pax count be reduced after counting seats and calculating load and balance. Corp pilot would have to work the holiday weekend (early to bed Thanksgiving evening, Friday night hotel at FSD, full day Saturday before plane is back at home airport). Entire pax group would have to make the 2 hour road trip between 9V9 and FSD on Saturday due to WX that actually occurred at 9V9. Road closures may have delayed completion of that road trip and the FSD departure.

    There certainly are a lot of points at which this accident seems to have been preventable. Some were real time ADM. The risk factor of unmanageable ground contamination on this trip was put in place by the decision to park at 9V9.

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  86. All i can say is Kirk - WTF were you thinking. A flight sim pilot knows better than to take off in those conditions. Unbelievable how bad this guy's judgement was on this day.

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  87. What WAS available was a Wal-Mart that has RV antifreeze, isopropyl alcohol, and a $9 pump-sprayer (poor-man's deicing fluid). There are three Wal-Mart stores within a 1-hour driving radius of Chamberlain Municipal Airport. I'm curious if this would have saved their lives. EVERY pilot knows that even FROST on the wing can significantly reduce lift. Yet another easily preventable tragedy. I've done the poor-man's deicing fluid concoction a few times when I was caught with heavy snow or ice build-up on my non FIKI aircraft...

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  88. Poor-man's deicing with RV potable water antifreeze and IPA done thoroughly can produce a clean airplane for takeoff in improving weather conditions. That works when the accumulation is not going to continue or re-occur after the cleaning effort is completed.

    The expectation that it will be possible to make an airplane flyable this way is a trap to fall into when weather is not improving and new accumulation starts up before departure. The effort and determination to clean and go creates a bias that can result in acceptance of "a little bit of contamination" after working so hard to make ready. Misconceptions about power, speed and whether moist snow will blow off can further bias decision making toward risk acceptance.

    There has not been any report that explains the reasoning behind the decision to park at 9V9. It would be unfortunate if the decision was influenced by awareness of C180 bush pilots and similar aircraft using a sprayer to clean off and fly after weather passes by.

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    Replies
    1. Dec 24 commenter: Poor man's deicing = Smart man's deicing. Me, a southerner, I'm scared of the white frozen stuff, rime, clear, glaze, you name it, I'm scared of it. Call me a whimp, but that's the way I feel. I've got boots on one bird, but boots are not going to help in the Chamberlain take off situation here. A few gallons of fluid sprayed on at least the T-tail probably would have made the difference in this take off being successful, I don't know, but I think I'm more right than wrong. Sublimation would have helped cure the rest of the problems prior to landing at their home base. God rest your soul Kirk, if you were PIC, which it looks like. I know he was proud of that airplane, and it was truly one of the best money can buy. But perhaps overconfidence, or having done similar BEFORE successfully, (that bird flew a lot), was the deciding link in the chain leading to tragedy.

      Delete
    2. @Unknown - The continuous snowfall occurring in the period before and during takeoff only needed a few minutes accumulation to significantly reduce lift. Heated fluid applied by for-purpose equipment to the whole aircraft followed by immediate takeoff would be the minimum "smart de-icing". Scurrying around and squirting that plane by hand won't make it pass a visual or tactile check while wet snow is falling.

      In your 4 January comment, you mention "Kirk, if you were PIC, which it looks like." You must not have done much reading here to not know that answer, so maybe you did not read about the snowfall timing or temp/dew point measurements before commenting.

      Delete
  89. anonymous said "The flight director HAS to be properly set up and the aircraft has to be IMMEDIATELY flown into the flight director after takeoff. Hesitation, sloppiness, doubt, fear, all can be fatal"
    Seriously, if you need a FD to fly IFR you should NOT be a pilot. I get so sick of this. Stop using crutches and fly IFR (hard) with no FD or AP. Avionics these day are making shitty pilots.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you! I agree, pilots are to reliant on automation.

      Delete
  90. Kirk made a terrible mistake. Terrible, terrible lapse in judgment, but it does not make him a terrible man.

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  91. Being from a “winter state,” one of the most important factors I think about is runway condition. Snow can hide ice, and it looks like both were present in precipitation in the 24 hours prior to the accident flight. The following NOTAMS were issued just prior to the crash:

    9V9 11/010 9V9 RWY 31 FICON(Field Condition report) 3/3/3 100 PCT 2IN WET SN OBS AT 1911301816. 1911301816-1912011816
    9V9 11/009 9V9 RWY 13 FICON(Field Condition report) 3/3/3 100 PCT 2IN WET SN OBS AT 1911301815. 1911301815-1912011815

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  92. It is also worth noting that the PC-12 has some really gnarly stall characteristics that provide insight into how the final moments of this short flight played out. These stalls were done at altitude; I can’t imagine seeing this play out from the left seat (or anywhere else, for that matter) at 500 ft AGL. Only in-flight breakups at altitude scare me more.

    PC-12 Stalls: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=VNRK2aUmWWI

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  93. It appears this plane was in a stall condition from essentially the moment it left the ground which also means that recognizing said condition immediately and putting the plane back on terra firma from 10ft.AGL would have lead to some frustrated, but very much alive, pilot and passengers.

    Now I am just a surgeon and definitely not a pilot.
    However one thing I notice amongst some of my colleagues (and highly successful individuals in general) is an overwhelming sense of self'belief.

    We all have it to one degree or the other if successful in our respective fields but in some it is taken to the extreme to the point where the expertise experienced in one field is expected in all endeavors.
    With life, nature, and especially gravity we know this is not often the case.

    Unexpected or tragic outcomes can never be eliminated but one factor involved in every one of them is a chain of events and decision points that in the end left unbroken will lead to said tragedy.
    One simply must have the intelligence, experience and TRUE SELF AWARENESS to identify, analyze and answer each of these crucial decisions independently of the other to be able to recognize the danger and "break the chain" to avoid disaster.

    Some who have achieved great things in life have the same answer to every problem or question thrown their way no matter the field or experience in said field and that is "Yes .. it can be done"

    What I have learned from very hard experience in the chain of tragedy is that sometimes "No" is the best and safest answer.

    May all the families be blessed and may all who have passed Rest In Peace.

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  94. Stick Shaker and Stall Warning activated within seconds after liftoff and continued intermittently until the crash....case closed. Heavy airplane, loaded with ice/snow that was not adequately removed despite the 3 hours work. All accidents are the result of a chain of events and bad decisions....the person who posted parking the airplane in a heated hangar at Sioux Falls had it right...that one decision would likely have broken the chain and averted this tragedy. For whatever reason the pilot did not choose to do that and then made multiple bad decisions to "get home on his schedule" - end result...tragic death of innocent people due to poor decision making and judgement.

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  95. "Now I am just a surgeon and definitely not a pilot.
    However one thing I notice amongst some of my colleagues (and highly successful individuals in general) is an overwhelming sense of self'belief.

    We all have it to one degree or the other if successful in our respective fields but in some it is taken to the extreme to the point where the expertise experienced in one field is expected in all endeavors.
    With life, nature, and especially gravity we know this is not often the case."


    I think the doctor has it figured out ... The one thing that none of us can avoid is the 'Human Factor'.

    May those lost RIP, those injured recover, the surviving family members find peace and the rest of us learn from the tragedy.

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  96. Possibly a good choice would have been for the pilot to take the airplane a couple of times around the pattern in "test pilot mode" to make sure the airplane performance was up to spec after the de-icing. That way only one life would have been risked, plus the airplane would be farther from gross.

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  97. Pilot would not have been able to go up for a test hop before noon due to that three hour de-icing activity. Snowfall and deteriorating visibility kicked on at noon and runway had not been cleared of overnight snow/ice accumulation, so not a nice afternoon to practice VFR iced-runway landings.

    Any pilot-only takeoff from 9V9 accomplished on the accident day would benefit from going on to Sioux Falls and loading passengers there.

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  98. Anyone know how the three pax that survived are doing?

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    1. Nothing new publicized since local news had reported two of the three got back to Idaho around 8 December. Third was still in Sioux Falls hospital at the time. There is a family legacy page on Facebook, but nothing posted there about their recovery progress.

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