Thursday, February 14, 2019

Cirrus SR22 GTS, N592BC: Accident occurred June 11, 2017 near Bartow Municipal Airport (KBOW), Polk County, Florida


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida
Cirrus Aircraft; Duluth, Minnesota
Continental Motors Inc; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N592BC 



Location: Gordonville, FL
Accident Number: ERA17LA201
Date & Time: 06/11/2017, 1200 EDT
Registration: N592BC
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 11, 2017, about 1200 eastern daylight time, a Cirrus SR22, N592BC, was substantially damaged when it impacted a power pole, trees, and terrain while on approach to Bartow Municipal Airport (BOW), Bartow, Florida. The private pilot, who was also the owner of the airplane, was seriously injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight which departed Gainesville Regional Airport (GNV) about 1120. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot was not immediately available due to his injuries, but was later interviewed by a police detective. During that interview, the pilot stated that he had "disoriented" himself by holding the airport diagram "upside down" as the airplane approached BOW. Once oriented, he turned the airplane on to the downwind leg of the traffic pattern, noticed he was "high" and disconnected the autopilot. During the final approach, the airplane was descending "rapidly" and the pilot added power to complete the landing, but "nothing happened" as he "hadn't reset [the] mixture." According to the pilot, he lacked the time and the altitude to "remedy the problem."

In a telephone interview, an air traffic controller stated that the accident airplane contacted the tower north of BOW and was instructed to report entering a left base for landing on runway 9L. Instead, the pilot reported the airplane was on a left downwind for runway 9L and was cleared to land. There were no further communications from the pilot. The final radar target was recorded about 1 mile from the threshold of runway 9L at 700 feet and 130 knots groundspeed. The airplane came to rest in a church yard about 1/2 mile from the threshold of runway 9L.

On-scene examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed substantial impact damage to the entire airframe, but no fire damage. There was evidence of fuel, and control continuity was established from the cockpit to the flight control surfaces. Initial visual examination of the engine did not reveal any anomalies. The engine was forwarded to the manufacturer for a detailed examination. Flight and multifunction displays, as well as components from the autopilot system were retained for examination in the NTSB recorders laboratory.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent FAA third class medical certificate was issued on March 9, 2011. The pilot reported 750 total hours of flight experience on that date.

The four-seat, low-wing, tricycle-gear airplane was manufactured in 2005 and was powered by a Continental IO-550, 310-horsepower engine. The airplane's hobbs meter displayed 2101.6 aircraft hours. The maintenance records were not reviewed, and the maintenance history could not be verified. The aircraft recovery company in possession of the airplane requested the maintenance records from the owner. He reported that the records were "in a storage facility" and that he could not access them due to his injuries. A copy of the most recent annual inspection forwarded by the pilot's attorney revealed the inspection was completed October 28, 2016 at 2065.3 total aircraft hours.

At 1545, weather reported at BOW included a broken ceiling at 3,000 ft, wind from 050° at 4 knots, and 10 statute miles of visibility. The temperature was 27° C, the dew point was 21° C, and the altimeter setting was 30.15 inches of mercury.

The engine was removed from the airframe and placed in a test cell at the engine manufacturer's facility in Mobile, Alabama. The engine started immediately, accelerated smoothly, and ran continuously at all power settings with no anomalies noted. 


Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 61, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/09/2011
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 
Flight Time: 750 hours (Total, all aircraft), 100 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP
Registration: N592BC
Model/Series: SR22 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2005
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 1519
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/28/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection: 36 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2065 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: IO-550 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 310 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None  


Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: BOW, 125 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1145 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 270°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 3000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR): 
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 50°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting:
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 21°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Ganesville, FL (GNV)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Bartow, FL (BOW)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1120 EDT
Type of Airspace: Unknown 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 27.945556, -81.798611 (est)





















NTSB Identification: ERA17LA201
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 11, 2017 in Gordonville, FL
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N592BC
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 11, 2017, about 1200 eastern daylight time, a Cirrus SR22, N592BC, was substantially damaged when it impacted a power pole, trees, and terrain while on approach to Bartow Municipal Airport (BOW), Bartow, Florida. The private pilot, who was also the owner of the airplane was seriously injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight which departed Gainesville Regional Airport (GNV) about 1120. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot was not immediately available due to his injuries, but was later interviewed by a police detective. During that interview, the pilot stated that he had "disoriented" himself by holding the airport diagram "upside down" as the airplane approached BOW. Once oriented, he turned the airplane on to the downwind leg of the traffic pattern, noticed he was "high" and disconnected the autopilot. During the final approach, the airplane was descending "rapidly" and the pilot added power to complete the landing, but "nothing happened" as he "hadn't reset [the] mixture." According to the pilot, he lacked the time and the altitude to "remedy the problem."

In a telephone interview, an air traffic controller stated that the accident airplane contacted the tower north of BOW and was instructed to report entering a left base for landing on runway 9L. Instead, the pilot reported the airplane was on a left downwind for runway 9L and was cleared to land. There were no further communications from the pilot. The final radar target was recorded about 1 mile from the threshold of runway 9L at 700 feet and 130 knots groundspeed. The airplane came to rest in a church yard about 1/2 mile from the threshold of runway 9L.

On-scene examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed substantial impact damage to the entire airframe, but no fire damage. There was evidence of fuel, and control continuity was established from the cockpit to the flight control surfaces. Initial visual examination of the engine did not reveal any anomalies. The engine was forwarded to the manufacturer for a detailed examination at a later date. Flight and multifunction displays, as well as components from the autopilot system were retained for examination in the NTSB recorders laboratory.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent FAA third class medical certificate was issued on March 9, 2011. The pilot reported 750 total hours of flight experience on that date.

The four-seat, low-wing, tricycle-gear airplane was manufactured in 2005 and was powered by a Continental IO-550, 310-horsepower engine. The airplane's hobbs meter displayed 2101.6 aircraft hours.

At 1545, weather reported at BOW included a broken ceiling at 3,000 ft, wind from 050° at 4 knots, and 10 statute miles of visibility. The temperature was 27° C, the dew point was 21° C, and the altimeter setting was 30.15 inches of mercury.

1 comment:

Jim B said...

Too much airplane. Not enough pilot.