Thursday, February 14, 2019

Cessna 172N Skyhawk, registered to and operated by How Inc, N6013E: Accident occurred April 19, 2017 in Yankeetown, Levy County, Florida

Coast Guard crew members from Station Yankeetown, Florida, are shown at the station with two plane crash survivors in front of the station's 24-foot Special Purpose Craft-Shallow Water, April 19th, 2017. The boat crew used the SPC-SW when the Cessna 172N Skyhawk force landed near Yankeetown. 


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N6013E



Location: Yankeetown, FL
Accident Number: ERA17LA160
Date & Time: 04/19/2017, 2045 EDT
Registration: N6013E
Aircraft: CESSNA 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On April 19, 2017, about 2045 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172N, N6013E, was substantially damaged during a forced landing to the Gulf of Mexico near Yankeetown, Florida. The private pilot and passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight that was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight originated from George T. Lewis Airport (CDK), Cedar Key, Florida, around 2025 and was destined for Orlando Sanford International Airport (SFB), Orlando, Florida.

According to the pilot, prior to the flight he observed 29 gallons of fuel on board the airplane and performed an engine run-up with no anomalies noted. The airplane departed and leveled off about 5,500 ft mean sea level. About 15 minutes after takeoff, the engine "failed" and "violently" shook. The pilot declared an emergency and searched for a place to land. He attempted to restart the engine four times prior to ditching the airplane in the water. The pilot and passenger egressed without injury.

According to Federal Aviation Administration records, the airplane was manufactured in 1978. It was equipped with a Lycoming O-320-H2AD, a 160-hp, engine. According to the airframe maintenance logbook, the most recent annual inspection was dated August 27, 2016, at a total time of 10,961.6 hours. The pilot reported that the engine had a total time of 7,378 hours, and 1,299 hours since overhaul.

An examination of the airplane revealed that the right wing was substantially damaged. The engine remained attached to the airframe through all engine mounts.

Examination of the engine revealed that crankshaft continuity when rotating the propeller by hand. All cylinders remained attached to the engine and were not damaged. Thumb compression was attained on all cylinders when the propeller was rotated by hand. The propeller remained attached to the engine and no damage was noted on the blades. All spark plugs were examined and no anomalies were noted with the electrodes. The oil screen was free of debris. The carburetor was examined, and no anomalies were noted. Fuel consistent with 100 low-lead (LL) aviation fuel was noted in the carburetor bowl, with traces of water. There was no debris noted in the fuel strainer, which also contained 100LL fuel with traces of water. The engine starter operated without anomaly when the key was turned in the ignition. The magnetos were removed, inspected, and were full of water. The magnetos were rotated by hand; however, spark could not be generated.

The 2055 recorded weather observation at Crystal River Airport – Captain Tom Davis Field (CGC), Crystal River, Florida, located about 13 nautical miles southeast of the accident location, included wind from 100° at 6 knots, visibility 10 miles, clear skies, temperature 26°C, dew point 13°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.15 inches of mercury.

The carburetor icing probability chart from Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB): CE-09-35 Carburetor Icing Prevention, June 30, 2009, showed a probability of serious icing at glide power at the temperature and dew point reported at the time of the accident. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 19, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/24/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/02/2016
Flight Time:  120 hours (Total, all aircraft), 117 hours (Total, this make and model), 70 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 20 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 7 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N6013E
Model/Series: 172 N
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1978
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: 17271983
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/27/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2299 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 44 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 10961.6 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-320-H2AD
Registered Owner: HOW INC
Rated Power: 160 hp
Operator: HOW INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: CGC, 10 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site:  13 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2055 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 128°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 100°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.15 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 13°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: CEDAR KEY, FL (CDK)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: ORLANDO, FL (SFB)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 2025 EDT
Type of Airspace:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 29.001667, -82.762222 (est)

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA160
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, April 19, 2017 in Yankeetown, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N6013E
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 19, 2017, about 2045 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172N, N6013E, was substantially damaged during a forced landing to the Gulf of Mexico near Yankeetown, Florida. The private pilot and passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight that was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight originated from George T. Lewis Airport (CDK), Cedar Key, Florida, around 2025 and was destined for Orlando Sanford International Airport (SFB), Orlando, Florida.

According to the pilot, he performed an engine run-up with no anomalies noted. The airplane departed and leveled off about 5,500 ft mean sea level. About 15 minutes after takeoff, the engine "failed" and "violently" shook. The pilot declared an emergency and searched for a place to land. He attempted to restart the engine four times prior to ditching the airplane in the water. The pilot and passenger egressed without injury.

An examination of the airplane revealed that the right wing was substantially damaged. The engine remained attached to the airframe through all engine mounts.

Examination of the engine by an NTSB investigator revealed that crankshaft continuity was obtained when rotating the propeller by hand. All cylinders remained attached to the engine and were not damaged. Thumb compression was attained on all cylinders when the propeller was rotated by hand. The propeller remained attached to the engine and no damage was noted on the blades. All spark plugs were examined and no anomalies were noted with the electrodes. The oil screen was free of debris. The carburetor was examined, and no anomalies were noted. Fuel consistent with 100 low-lead (LL) aviation fuel was noted in the carburetor bowl, with traces of water. There was no debris noted in the fuel strainer, which also contained 100LL fuel with traces of water. The engine starter operated without anomaly when the key was turned in the ignition. The magnetos were removed, inspected, and were full of water. The magnetos were rotated by hand; however, spark could not be generated.

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