Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Registered to and operated by Dean International Inc: Piper PA-34-200 Seneca, N16281 and Cessna 172N Skyhawk, N6428D, fatal accident occurred July 17, 2018 near Miami Executive Airport (KTMB), Kendall, Miami-Dade County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miramar, Florida
Piper Aircraft; Vero Beach, Florida 
Textron; Wichita, Kansas 

N16281 Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N16281


Location: Miami, FL
Accident Number: ERA18FA194A
Date & Time: 07/17/2018, 1259 EDT
Registration: N16281
Aircraft: Piper PA34
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On July 17, 2018, at 1259 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-34-200, N16281, and a Cessna 172N, N6428D collided in midair about 9 miles northwest of Miami Executive Airport (TMB), Miami, Florida. The Piper was destroyed and the private pilot and designated pilot examiner (DPE) were fatally injured. The Cessna was destroyed and the flight instructor and student pilot were fatally injured. Both airplanes were registered to and operated by Dean International Inc. The Piper flight was an evaluation flight for a commercial pilot certificate and the Cessna flight was an instructional flight. Both flights were conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plans were filed for the local flights. The Piper departed TMB about 1250 and the Cessna departed TMB about 1200.

According to preliminary information from the Federal Aviation Administration, the Piper was en route to a nearby training area at an altitude about 1,500 feet mean sea level (msl) and no longer communicating with TMB tower as it was outside the Class D airspace. The Cessna was returning from the training area at an altitude about 1,500 feet msl and had contacted the TMB tower just prior to collision. The controller acknowledged the transmission and issued a traffic advisory, but no further communications were received from the Cessna. Review of radar data revealed the two targets converged nearly straight on. At the time of the collision, the Piper was flying northwest and the Cessna was flying southeast.

The Piper main wreckage was located about 620 feet west of the collision point indicated by radar data. The wreckage was mostly intact and upright, with the vertical stabilizer and outboard section of right wing separated. The vertical stabilizer was located about 50 feet west of the main wreckage and the outboard section of right wing was located by aerial drone about 220 feet north-northeast of the main wreckage. Both engines remained attached to the airframe and the propellers remained attached to their respective engine. The right engine propeller was in a feather position and the corresponding cockpit controls for both engines were in the aft position, consistent with impact damage. One right propeller blade exhibited little damage and the other right propeller blade was bent forward. One left engine propeller blade exhibited little damage and the other was bent aft. The landing gear selector handle was in the down position and the landing gear was found mid-extension. The flaps were in the retracted position. Flight control continuity was confirmed and measurement of the stabilator trim jackscrew corresponded to a nose-up trim setting midrange between neutral and full nose up. Measurement of the rudder trim shaft corresponded to an approximate neutral rudder trim. The two front seats were equipped with lapbelts and should harnesses. The right seat restraint was unlatched by rescue personnel and the left seat restraint was cut by rescue personnel.

The Cessna main wreckage was located about 1,340 feet southeast of the collision point indicated by radar data. The wreckage came to rest upright and it's left wing had separated. The left wing was located by areal drone about 1,320 feet northwest of the main wreckage. The engine remained attached to the airframe and the propeller remained attached to the engine. One propeller blade exhibited little damage and the other blade was bent aft and exhibited chordwise scratches. The flaps were found in the retracted position and flight control continuity was confirmed. Measurement of the elevator trim jackscrew corresponded to an approximate 5° trim tab up (nose-down) position. The two front seats were equipped with lapbelts and should harnesses. The right seat restraint was not recovered and the left seat restraint was separated consistent with overload.

During the wreckage examinations, red and blue paint transfer was found on a top inboard section of Cessna right wing. Cessna tire marks were found on the Piper right wingtip and the left main landing gear tire of the Cessna was not recovered. Additionally, the right upper strut attach fitting from the Cessna was found in the Piper tailcone. The Cessna left front wing spar carry-through fitting (near left wing root) was found in the outboard right wing of the Piper. In addition, a section of Cessna right wing spar fragment was found in the Piper vertical stabilizer.

The Piper was a six-seat, low-wing, retractable tricycle gear airplane, manufactured in 1973. It was powered by two counter-rotating Lycoming IO-360, 200-horsepower engines, both equipped with two-blade Hartzell constant-speed propellers. Review of maintenance records revealed that the Piper's most recent annual inspection was completed on June 19, 2018. At that time, the airframe had accumulated approximately 10,153 total hours of operation. The left engine had accumulated about 10,207 total hours of operation; of which, 1,147 hours were since major overhaul. The right engine had accumulated about 11,401 total hours of operation; of which, 1,147 hours were since major overhaul.

The Cessna was a four-seat, high-wing, fixed tricycle gear airplane, manufactured in 1979. It was powered by a Lycoming O-320, 160-horsepower engine, equipped with a two-blade McCauley fixed-pitch propeller. Review of maintenance records revealed that the Cessna's most 100-hour inspection was completed on June 13, 2018. At that time, the airframe had accumulated approximately 18,447 total hours of operation. The engine had accumulated about 13,256 total hours of operation; of which, 2,541 hours were since major overhaul.

The pilot of the Piper held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. Her most recent first-class medical certificate was issued on September 29, 2017. According to her application for a commercial pilot certificate, dated July 17, 2018, she reported a total flight experience of 253 hours. The DPE held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane single-engine sea, airplane multiengine land, and airplane multiengine sea. He also held a commercial pilot certificate with a rating for glider. Additionally, he held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine, airplane multiengine, and instrument airplane. His most recent second-class medical certificate was issued on August 26, 2017. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 26,000 hours.

The pilot of the Cessna held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. He also held a flight instructor certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine. His most recent first-class medical certificate was issued on December 15, 2014. According to his application for a flight instructor certificate, dated March 18, 2018, he reported a total flight experience of 311 hours. The student pilot's most recent first-class medical certificate was issued on March 20, 2018. According to the student pilot's logbook, he had a total flight experience of 52 hours.

The recorded weather at TMB, at 1253, was: wind from 120° at 5 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, scattered clouds at 3,500 feet and 4,200 feet, temperature 32° C, dew point 24° C, altimeter 30.10 inches of mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N16281
Model/Series: PA34 200
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Dean International Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: TMB, 10 ft msl
Observation Time: 1253 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 9 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C / 24°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 3500 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 120°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.1 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Miami, FL (TMB)
Destination: Miami, FL (TMB) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  25.757778, -80.556944 (est)

N6428D  Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N6428D

Location: Miami, FL
Accident Number: ERA18FA194B
Date & Time: 07/17/2018, 1259 EDT
Registration: N6428D
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On July 17, 2018, at 1259 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-34-200, N16281, and a Cessna 172N, N6428D collided in midair about 9 miles northwest of Miami Executive Airport (TMB), Miami, Florida. The Piper was destroyed and the private pilot and designated pilot examiner (DPE) were fatally injured. The Cessna was destroyed and the flight instructor and student pilot were fatally injured. Both airplanes were registered to and operated by Dean International Inc. The Piper flight was an evaluation flight for a commercial pilot certificate and the Cessna flight was an instructional flight. Both flights were conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plans were filed for the local flights. The Piper departed TMB about 1250 and the Cessna departed TMB about 1200.

According to preliminary information from the Federal Aviation Administration, the Piper was en route to a nearby training area at an altitude about 1,500 feet mean sea level (msl) and no longer communicating with TMB tower as it was outside the Class D airspace. The Cessna was returning from the training area at an altitude about 1,500 feet msl and had contacted the TMB tower just prior to collision. The controller acknowledged the transmission and issued a traffic advisory, but no further communications were received from the Cessna. Review of radar data revealed the two targets converged nearly straight on. At the time of the collision, the Piper was flying northwest and the Cessna was flying southeast.

The Piper main wreckage was located about 620 feet west of the collision point indicated by radar data. The wreckage was mostly intact and upright, with the vertical stabilizer and outboard section of right wing separated. The vertical stabilizer was located about 50 feet west of the main wreckage and the outboard section of right wing was located by aerial drone about 220 feet north-northeast of the main wreckage. Both engines remained attached to the airframe and the propellers remained attached to their respective engine. The right engine propeller was in a feather position and the corresponding cockpit controls for both engines were in the aft position, consistent with impact damage. One right propeller blade exhibited little damage and the other right propeller blade was bent forward. One left engine propeller blade exhibited little damage and the other was bent aft. The landing gear selector handle was in the down position and the landing gear was found mid-extension. The flaps were in the retracted position. Flight control continuity was confirmed and measurement of the stabilator trim jackscrew corresponded to a nose-up trim setting midrange between neutral and full nose up. Measurement of the rudder trim shaft corresponded to an approximate neutral rudder trim. The two front seats were equipped with lapbelts and should harnesses. The right seat restraint was unlatched by rescue personnel and the left seat restraint was cut by rescue personnel.

The Cessna main wreckage was located about 1,340 feet southeast of the collision point indicated by radar data. The wreckage came to rest upright and it's left wing had separated. The left wing was located by areal drone about 1,320 feet northwest of the main wreckage. The engine remained attached to the airframe and the propeller remained attached to the engine. One propeller blade exhibited little damage and the other blade was bent aft and exhibited chordwise scratches. The flaps were found in the retracted position and flight control continuity was confirmed. Measurement of the elevator trim jackscrew corresponded to an approximate 5° trim tab up (nose-down) position. The two front seats were equipped with lapbelts and should harnesses. The right seat restraint was not recovered and the left seat restraint was separated consistent with overload.

During the wreckage examinations, red and blue paint transfer was found on a top inboard section of Cessna right wing. Cessna tire marks were found on the Piper right wingtip and the left main landing gear tire of the Cessna was not recovered. Additionally, the right upper strut attach fitting from the Cessna was found in the Piper tailcone. The Cessna left front wing spar carry-through fitting (near left wing root) was found in the outboard right wing of the Piper. In addition, a section of Cessna right wing spar fragment was found in the Piper vertical stabilizer.

The Piper was a six-seat, low-wing, retractable tricycle gear airplane, manufactured in 1973. It was powered by two counter-rotating Lycoming IO-360, 200-horsepower engines, both equipped with two-blade Hartzell constant-speed propellers. Review of maintenance records revealed that the Piper's most recent annual inspection was completed on June 19, 2018. At that time, the airframe had accumulated approximately 10,153 total hours of operation. The left engine had accumulated about 10,207 total hours of operation; of which, 1,147 hours were since major overhaul. The right engine had accumulated about 11,401 total hours of operation; of which, 1,147 hours were since major overhaul.

The Cessna was a four-seat, high-wing, fixed tricycle gear airplane, manufactured in 1979. It was powered by a Lycoming O-320, 160-horsepower engine, equipped with a two-blade McCauley fixed-pitch propeller. Review of maintenance records revealed that the Cessna's most 100-hour inspection was completed on June 13, 2018. At that time, the airframe had accumulated approximately 18,447 total hours of operation. The engine had accumulated about 13,256 total hours of operation; of which, 2,541 hours were since major overhaul.

The pilot of the Piper held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. Her most recent first-class medical certificate was issued on September 29, 2017. According to her application for a commercial pilot certificate, dated July 17, 2018, she reported a total flight experience of 253 hours. The DPE held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane single-engine sea, airplane multiengine land, and airplane multiengine sea. He also held a commercial pilot certificate with a rating for glider. Additionally, he held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine, airplane multiengine, and instrument airplane. His most recent second-class medical certificate was issued on August 26, 2017. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 26,000 hours.

The pilot of the Cessna held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. He also held a flight instructor certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine. His most recent first-class medical certificate was issued on December 15, 2014. According to his application for a flight instructor certificate, dated March 18, 2018, he reported a total flight experience of 311 hours. The student pilot's most recent first-class medical certificate was issued on March 20, 2018. According to the student pilot's logbook, he had a total flight experience of 52 hours.

The recorded weather at TMB, at 1253, was: wind from 120° at 5 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, scattered clouds at 3,500 feet and 4,200 feet, temperature 32° C, dew point 24° C, altimeter 30.10 inches of mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N6428D
Model/Series: 172 N
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Dean International Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: TMB, 10 ft msl
Observation Time: 1253 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 9 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C / 24°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 3500 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 120°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.1 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Miami, FL (TMB)
Destination: Miami, FL (TMB) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  25.757778, -80.556944 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should emailassistance@ntsb.gov. 

Mayor Gimenez calling Miami-Dade aviation chief Lester Sola after learning of the midair collision involving two Dean International aircraft.

Nisha Sejwal



The rescue mission ended Wednesday morning as a fourth victim was pulled from the watery Everglades, a day after the midair collision of two small aircraft. Searchers, though, continued to scour the razor-like sawgrass and pluck through the muck in hopes of finding clues to help explain what caused the deadly accident.

“Now comes the official FAA [Federal Aviation Administration] and NTSB [National Transportation Safety Board] investigation, as to why the crash occurred and how it happened,” said Miami-Dade Detective and spokesman Alvaro Zabaleta. “We’re done.”

Late Wednesday morning Miami-Dade rescuers pulled the body of Carlos Alfredo Zanetti Scarpati, 22, from the Everglades. Also killed in the crash were Jorge Sanchez, 22, Ralph Knight, 72, and Nisha Sejwal, 19. Their bodies were recovered on Tuesday, not long after a Piper PA-34 and a Cessna 172 collided about nine miles west of Miami Executive Airport.






Scarpati’s body was found just before 10 a.m., near a plane flown by Sanchez, according to Zabaleta. He said Knight, a subcontracted inspector for the FAA, and Sejwal were flying together in the other plane. Sejwal, Zabaleta said, was doing a routine flight check in order to maintain her certification.

The county police spokesman said the swampy, mushy Everglades made the search for the victims difficult. One of the planes, Zabaleta said, broke into several pieces. 

“So, we’re going to have to search for parts to be able to piece the puzzle together,” he said. Zabaleta said victim advocates are already working to comfort grieving family members.

Both planes, according to Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez, belonged to Dean International Flight School based out of the airport at 12800 SW 145th Ave. FAA records show there have been 26 accidents or incidents involving aircraft from the same flight school since 2007.

The midair crash shut down Tamiami Trail for most of the day Tuesday as law enforcement from Miami-Dade police, fire rescue, Miccosukee police, the Florida Highway Patrol and National Park Rangers raced to the scene. Nearby airboat operators who operate along the trail also scurried into the Everglades to help in the search.

From a staged area a few miles from the crash site, Zabaleta said Tuesday that homicide detectives had determined that the two planes were likely training. The federal NTSB and FAA are investigating. 

A family member of Knight, the 72-year-old killed in the crash, said he was an experienced pilot who taught his two sons how to fly.

“They all grew up around flying,” said Knight’s daughter-in-law Diedre Knight, who was on her way to the airport Wednesday morning to pick up her husband. “He [Ralph] was a private pilot” who often flew to the Bahamas.

Daniel Miralles, an angler who frequently spends afternoons fishing in canals near the airport, said he looked up in time to see the planes collide and record video of falling debris on his cellphone.

“I heard a weird sound. It sounded like a plane, but it it sounded too close. It sounded like an 18-wheeler going 100 mph down the street,” said Miralles.

The planes came down in a remote area reachable only by airboat. Dozens of emergency vehicles assisting in the rescue efforts gathered at Coopertown Airboat, 227th Avenue and Southwest Eighth Street about a dozen miles northwest of Executive Airport.

“Our crews were actually out here this morning training for incidents just as this,” said Miami-Dade Fire Marine Chief Andy Alvarez on Tuesday.

Alvarez said when crews arrived they boarded their fire rescue airboats and others from private companies willing to help and searched for debris. About a half mile in they found a downed plane. They tagged the debris and marked the GPS location, Alvarez said.

“About that point and time, we started receiving phone calls of a possible second aircraft and a possible explosion in the air, which led us to believe there was a midair collision,“ Alvarez said. Crews, with the help from air rescue, then found the second debris site about 400 yards away.

Rescuers continued to search the two wreckage sites late into the afternoon. The hum of airboats could be heard throughout the evening behind a thick brush between the wreckage site and Southwest Eighth Street, the main drag through the Everglades.

Just before 6 p.m., rescue crews hauled in industrial lighting. The area is void of buildings and streetlights and goes pitch black at night.

With little information available Tuesday afternoon, friends and family of pilots at Dean International waited anxiously for information at Executive Airport. Michael Coppo stood outside the flight school awaiting information about Sanchez, an old friend he met in Miami Dade College’s aviation program.

Coppo said Sanchez was on a “cross-country trip,” meaning he was traveling 50 nautical miles to another airport with a student and then returning. Coppo said Sanchez left at 9 a.m. and should have been back by 1 p.m., around the time of the crash.

Coppo used to fly from Dean, but stopped about a year ago. He estimated that he and Sanchez flew 100 hours together before Coppo left the flight school.

Sanchez’s black Ford Mustang, with an “I’d Rather Be Flying” license plate frame, sat in the parking lot outside the school.

His older brother, Julio Sanchez, said Jorge was about four or five months short of reaching the required 1,500 hours flying time a pilot must have by federal law before applying to a regional airline.

“In his mind, he was a pilot the minute he was born,” Sanchez said of his brother.

The younger Sanchez began his aviation training in high school and then at George T. Baker Aviation Technical College, before going on to receive his private, commercial and instructor’s pilot licenses at Miami Dade College, his brother said. Julio Sanchez, who is also a pilot, said he’ll continue training in honor of his brother.

“He was on his way to accumulating all the hours toward his goal. It was his and my dream, the road map we were both taking,” said Julio, 28. “I was following in his footsteps. And I’ll continue in his honor.”

Another victim, Sejwal, enrolled in Dean International in September 2017, according to her Facebook page.

Her love of flying is evident from her Facebook posts, which include hashtags #aviationforlife and #pilotlife.

Dean International’s website says it offers primary instruction for student pilots, advanced instruction for private and commercial pilots and training for multi-engine flights. What it doesn’t say is that FAA records showed more than two dozen accidents and incidents from 2007-2017.

In May, a Cessna 152 from Dean went down in the Everglades, putting two people in the hospital. A year ago, a Cessna 172 out of Dean International crash-landed on Crandon Boulevard in Key Biscayne the week after a Cessna 152 with a student pilot flying solo crashed in the Everglades. The student pilot, working on an advanced certification, died. 

Story and video ➤ https://www.miamiherald.com

Piper PA-34-200 Seneca, N16281, Dean International Inc: Incident occurred October 13, 2017 at Miami Executive Airport (KTMB), Kendall, Miami-Dade County, Florida 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Aircraft landed gear up.


Dean International Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N16281


Date: 13-OCT-17

Time: 15:25:00Z
Regis#: N16281
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA34
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: KENDALL
State: FLORIDA

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