Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Beech 19A Musketeer Sport, N6142N, wreckage likely to remain on mountain: Fatal accident occurred July 28, 2017 in Waipi'o, Hawaii

HONOLULU (AP) — The wreckage of a single-engine aircraft that crashed near Kunia this summer, killing all four Oahu residents on board, likely will stay in the state-owned Honouliuli Forest Reserve where it went down.

National Transportation Safety Board spokesman Keith Holloway said the decision to recover the wrecked Beech 19A falls to its owner, Jahn Mueller.

Mueller, owner of Aircraft Maintenance & Flight School Hawaii, said last month he is not required to remove the wreckage from the mountain and has no plans to do so, the Honolulu Star-Advertiser reported (http://bit.ly/2gBn9XM ).

The state Department of Land and Natural Resources, which has jurisdiction of the reserve, says it has determined the wreckage is not an environmental hazard and does not plan to retrieve it.

Holloway said if the wreckage is recovered, the National Transportation Safety Board would send an investigator to examine it.

But critics are questioning the decision to leave the wrecked Beech, considering another of Mueller's planes, a Piper PA 28-140, crash-landed in a Mapunapuna stream under a Moanalua Freeway bridge June 30, seriously injuring the three people on board.

"I believe the wreckage should be retrieved for the sake of my friends' lives," said Devlyn Perugini, who was friends with the Beech passengers. "It should be a priority to explore every possibility. I'm not trying to be spiteful or attack anyone, but there are too many things left unanswered."

Robert Katz, a Dallas-based flight instructor and 36-year pilot who tracks nationwide plane crashes, said unusual factors in the fatal Beech crash warrant wreckage recovery and a full investigation.

"Not making Mr. Mueller recover this plane is like allowing the fox to guard the henhouse," Katz said. "Two crashes in such a short time is a red flag. There are a lot of loose ends here. Not enough scrutiny."

Original article can be found here  ➤ http://www.mysanantonio.com

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu, Hawaii

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, July 28, 2017 in Waipi'o, HI
Aircraft: BEECH 19A, registration: N6142N
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 28, 2017, about 1852 Hawaii standard time (HST), a Beech BE-19A, N6142N, collided with terrain near Waipi'o, Hawaii. The airplane was registered to a private individual and operated by Aircraft Maintenance Hawaii as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. The private pilot and three passengers sustained fatal injuries; the airplane sustained substantial damage. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. The local flight departed Honolulu International Airport (HNL), Honolulu, Hawaii, about 1837 HST.

The Federal Aviation Administration issued an alert notice (ALNOT) at 1322 HST, July 29, when family members reported that the flight was overdue. The US Coast Guard located the wreckage later that day on steep, mountainous terrain at the last identified latitude and longitude .

A review of recorded air traffic control communications indicated that the airplane departed HNL runway 04R. Recorded radar data displayed the airplane's secondary beacon code as it departed and made a left turn to the northwest. After flying about 9 minutes along that course, the target made a left turn, and was at a mode C reported altitude of 1,800 feet mean sea level (msl). It made descending and climbing turns during the next 6 minutes. During the last minute, it climbed and was at a maximum mode C altitude of 2,000 feet when the target disappeared.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu, Hawaii

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aircraft Maintenance Hawaii:  http://registry.faa.gov/N4244T

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA138
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 30, 2017 in Honolulu, HI
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-140, registration: N4244T
Injuries: 3 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 30, 2017, about 1330 Hawaii standard time, a Piper PA-28-140, N4244T, sustained substantial damage following a loss of engine power and subsequent hard landing near Honolulu, Hawaii. The private pilot and two passengers sustained serious injuries. The pilot was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The local personal flight departed Honolulu International Airport at 1320. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot reported that shortly after takeoff from runway 04L, the engine lost power about 300 feet agl. He made an emergency landing at the nearest clear area, which was a river bed. The airplane impacted the ground and came to rest under a highway bridge and caught fire.

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