Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Piper J3C-65, N98550: Accident occurred August 13, 2017 in Salisbury, Litchfield County, Connecticut -and- Accident occurred July 05, 2011 near Walter J. Koladza Airport (GBR), Great Barrington, Massachusetts

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Enfield, Connecticut
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Berkshire Aviation Enterprises Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N98550

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA275
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 13, 2017 in Salisbury, CT
Aircraft: PIPER J3C, registration: N98550
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 13, 2017, about 1700 eastern daylight time, a Piper J3C-65, N98550, operated by Berkshire Aviation Enterprises Inc., was substantially damaged during a forced landing into trees, following a total loss of engine power in cruise flight near Salisbury, Connecticut. The flight instructor and student pilot incurred minor injuries. The local instructional flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a visual flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Walter J Koladza Airport (GBR), Great Barrington, Massachusetts, about 1640.

The flight instructor reported that he was providing an introductory flight to the student pilot in that particular make and model airplane. About 20 miles south of GBR at 2,800 feet mean sea level, the airplane experienced a total loss of engine power. The flight instructor took control of the airplane from the student pilot and positioned the carburetor heat to on. He also verified that the fuel selector was in the on position and the magneto switch was set to both, but the engine did not regain power. There were no suitable landing areas nearby and the flight instructor elected to perform a slow landing into treetops. The airplane subsequently collided with trees and came to rest nose-down entangled in the trees.

The airplane was equipped with a Continental Motors C90, 90-horspower engine. Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. When the inspector rotated the crankshaft by hand, he was unable to confirm thumb compression to two cylinders or continuity to the rear accessory section.

The engine was retained for further examination.





SALISBURY, Conn. — An afternoon flying lesson turned dangerous on Sunday, but nobody was seriously injured.

A yellow 1946 Piper J-3 Cub crashed into South Pond Road in Salisbury, Conn., at 5 p.m. on Sunday.

The plane was being used in a lesson and had been in the air for some time. The craft took off from the Walter J. Koladza Airport in Great Barrington, where it was hangared.

It was unclear who was flying the plane when the engine failed, though the instructor was in control during the emergency landing.

"They walked away from the crash," said a woman who lives near the crash site and gave her name as "Dale."

South Pond Road is a spur off of Mount Riga Road in Salisbury.

The crash took place near Mount Riga State Park.

The plane was damaged beyond repair.

"I heard a plane engine, then no engine, then what sounded like earth moving equipment taking down trees," said Dale.

The plane's owner, Richard Solan, was not in the plane when it crashed. Solan is a co-owner of the Great Barrington airport.

On Monday, a work crew from the Haupt Tree Co. of Sheffield was on site removing the plane from the top of a cherry tree. Solan, Connecticut state police and officials from the Federal Aviation Administration were also on hand. None of them were available for comment.


http://www.berkshireeagle.com



State police from the Canaan barracks and firefighters from Salisbury are on the scene of a small aircraft crash off Mount Riga Road. 

The crash was reported about 5 p.m.

The aircraft was reportedly hung up in a tree. 

The two men onboard the plane were able to get out of it. They were taken to Sharon Hospital to be evaluated, state police said.

State Department of Energy and Environmental Protection crews were headed to the scene because of a fuel leak, police said.

The aircraft is a 1946 Piper Cub and was flown out of Great Barrington Airport in Massachusetts. The owner is a Great Barrington resident. The same aircraft crashed in July 2011, according to National Transportation Safety Board records.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.courant.com

Two people suffered minor injuries in a plane crash in Salisbury on Sunday.

According to Connecticut State Police, a single-engine plane crashed into a tree on Mount Riga Road in Salisbury around 5 p.m. The occupants of the plane were able to escape and were found on the ground. They were transported to Sharon Hospital for evaluation.

Lakeville Hose Company Fire Chief Jason Wilson told NBC Connecticut two men were on board at the time of the crash. According to the men, they lost their engine and were looking for an open spot to land the plane. The men said they missed a field and crashed into a cherry tree. 

According to Wilson, the men were able to exit the plane with help from a neighbor and had cuts and bruises, but no serious injuries. 

Information on the plane's make or model has not been released yet.

The crash is being investigated by the FAA. 

Sunday’s crash is the eighth airplane crash in Connecticut this year. While only minor injuries were reported Sunday, five of the crashes were fatal.

On Friday, a Cessna 172 that left Danbury Municipal Airport crashed at the end of runway 17-35 at Candlelight Farms Airport in New Milford. A 57-year-old flight instructor, Anthony Morasco, was killed and two other people were seriously injured.

On July 30, a small plane crashed while taking off from the Danbury Airport. The 63-year-old pilot, Mark Stern, died. 

Dr. Joseph Tomanelli, a Cheshire doctor, was killed in a plane crash at Meriden Markham Airport on April 24 and his son, 21-year-old Daniel Tomanelli, was seriously injured. 

A student pilot, 31-year-old Pablo Campos Isona, of East Haven, was killed in a plane crash in East Haven on Feb. 22.  


Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.nbcconnecticut.com

SALISBURY, CT (WFSB) -  Two people were injured in a single-engine plane crash in Salisbury on Sunday afternoon.

Connecticut State Police and Salisbury Fire Officials said the single engine piper plane crashed into a tree at the intersection of Mount Riga Road and Wells Rd., at about 5 p.m. 

The Salisbury Fire Chief said told Eyewitness News the a pilot and a trainee lost power to the engine, and could not regain control. The Fire Chief says the two tried to land the plane but overshot their landing. 

"First unit to arrive on scene was a Connecticut State Trooper and myself," said Lakeville Hose Company Chief Jason Wilson. "Discovered a single engine, two-seater plane that was lodged in a large cherry tree."

The two occupants of the plane were able to climb out of the plane which was about 10 feet off the ground with the help of a neighbor who brought a ladder, police said. The two men suffered minor injuries and were taken to the hospital for evaluation, police said, they are expected to make a full recovery.

"I was quite amazed that it was still hung up in the tree, and that there was two gentlemen standing in a field below it. It's not a site you see often here in Salisbury. The last plane crash that we've seen here in Salisbury was approximately 25 years ago," Wilson said. 

The plane reportedly flew out of Great Barrington, Ma. Police said the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection is responding for a fuel leak.

"Very calm and collected actually, you could tell they were a little shaken up but in really good shape, mentally and physically and it was amazing that they came out unscathed," Wilson said. 

This plane crash comes just two days after a deadly plane crash on Friday.

A co-pilot died in this crash and two passengers were hurt after the single-engine plane crashed near an airport in New Milford on Friday morning.


Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wfsb.com

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Windsor Locks, Connecticut

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA11LA379
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 05, 2011 in Egremont, MA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/30/2014
Aircraft: PIPER J3C-65, registration: N98550
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that the accident flight was the first flight in the airplane in 6 months. During the initial climb, the engine experienced a partial loss of power. The pilot checked the magnetos and carburetor heat but was unsuccessful in his attempts to regain full engine power. Subsequently, he chose to land the airplane between two houses. A postaccident engine compression test revealed that the Nos. 1 and 4 cylinders had low compression. The No. 1 rocker cover was removed, and the rocker arm was tapped with a mallet, which brought its compression to within normal range. Disassembly of the No. 4 cylinder revealed that it was leaking past the exhaust valve and through the exhaust system. In addition, disassembly revealed a scored intake valve stem and valve guide. The intake valve would not operate and had to be forcefully removed from the valve guide. According to the engine overhaul manual, scored valve stems can cause the engine to produce low power. The pilot did not report performing any of the procedures to return the engine to service from indefinite storage (that is, more than 90 days). Therefore, it is also likely that the engine was never prepared for indefinite storage and, thus, was not stored improperly for the 6 months it was not used before the accident flight. During storage, the No. 4 intake and exhaust valves most likely became lodged in the valve guides, which resulted in a partial loss of engine power and subsequent forced landing to a field. It is likely that, if the engine had been properly stored, the recommended lubrication would have prevented the valves from sticking and scoring and that, if the engine had been properly removed from storage, the scored valves may have been detected and replaced, either of which action could have prevented the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A partial loss of engine power due to the No. 4 intake and exhaust valves becoming lodged in the valve guides, which resulted from a lack of use, improper engine storage preparation, and improper return to service from indefinite storage.

On July 5, 2011, about 1700 eastern daylight time, a Piper J3C-65, N98550, registered to a private individual, experienced a partial loss of engine power and collided with trees shortly after takeoff from the Walter J. Koladza Airport (GBR), Great Barrington, Massachusetts. The personal flight was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 with no flight plan filed. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed. The airline transport pilot was not injured and passenger received minor injuries. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

According to the pilot, the accident flight was the first flight in the airplane in 6 months and he performed an extensive engine run up, visually checked the fuel level and quality, noted 7 gallons of fuel prior to takeoff, and did not note any anomalies with the airplane. Then, he performed a "normal" takeoff and about 150 feet above ground level, the engine rpm decreased from takeoff power, around 2200 rpm, to 1700 rpm. The pilot decreased the pitch angle of the airplane and began searching for a place to land. He unsuccessfully attempted to regain full engine power by checking the magnetos and the carburetor heat. In addition, the pilot noted the gauges that indicated the oil pressure and temperature were within "normal" ranges. He elected to land the airplane between two houses. During the landing roll, the airplane subsequently struck underbrush and trees, and then came to rest in trees and foliage. 

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the airplane came to rest about 3,000 feet from the departure end of runway 29. The fuselage skin was punctured by a tree branch. A fuselage tube was broken at the lower fuselage tubing cluster and the tube was bent aft. The left wing leading edge was impact damaged and dented in several locations. The upper engine cowl and engine baffling was impact damaged. The carburetor was examined and fuel was noted inside the carburetor and there was no debris in the fuel screen. The tachometer located in the cockpit indicated time of 689.6 hours. 

According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 1946, and most recently registered to an individual in 2010. It was equipped with a Continental Motors C90-8F, 90-horsepower, engine. The most recent annual inspection was performed on December 10, 2010, and at that time it had accumulated 1,776 total hours of flight time and a tachometer time of 689 hours. In addition, the mechanic who performed the annual inspection completed a compression check on the engine cylinders. The compression test results indicated that the cylinders had compression that ranged from 74 to 78. The most recent overhaul of the engine was noted as June 5, 1994, at a tachometer time of 221.5 total hours. 

A postaccident engine examination revealed that the No. 2 and No. 3 cylinders did not display any anomalies when a compression test was performed. During the compression test, cylinder No. 1 was leaking out of the exhaust valve through the exhaust system and resulted in a compression ratio of 50/80. The No. 1 rocker cover was removed and the rocker arm was "tapped" with a mallet. A compression test was performed again to the No. 1 cylinder and the compression came up to a ratio of 60/80. The No. 4 cylinder compression test resulted in a compression ratio of 42/80. Disassembly of the No. 4 cylinder revealed that the exhaust valve was leaking out through the exhaust system. In addition, it revealed a scored intake valve and valve guide. The intake valve would not operate and had to be removed from the valve guide with a mallet and drift. 

According to the engine overhaul manual, in a section labeled "engine troubles and service repair," it indicated that if the engine produced low power, it could be a result of scored valve stems. 

In addition, the engine overhaul manual stated "obviously even then proper steps must be taken on engines used infrequently to lessen the possibility of corrosion. This is especially true if the aircraft is based near the sea coast or in areas of high humidity and flown less than once a week. In all geographical areas the best method of preventing corrosion of the cylinders and other internal parts of the engine is to fly the aircraft at least once a week long enough to reach normal operating temperatures which will vaporize moisture and other by-products of combustion. Aircraft engine storage recommendations are broken down into the following categories: Flyable Storage (7 to 30 days) Temporary Storage (up to 90 days) Indefinite Storage."

Indefinite storage of the engine included a procedure of replacing the engine oil with oil that has anticorrosive properties, installing cylinder dehydrator plugs, sealing all openings in the engine. The process of returning the engine to service after storage included removing the engine seals, removing the cylinder dehydrator plugs, draining the corrosion preventive mixture and reservicing the engine with the recommended lubricating oil. The entire process can be found in the engine manual excerpt in the docket for this case.

No comments: