Sunday, April 30, 2017

North Wing Sport X2-N, N366DN: Accident occurred April 30, 2017 in Boulder City, Nevada

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Las Vegas, Nevada

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms
 
http://registry.faa.gov/N366DN


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA250
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 30, 2017 in Boulder City, NV
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/20/2017
Aircraft: NORTH WING UUM INC SPORT X2-N, registration: N366DN
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot of the weight-shift-control aircraft reported that, while practicing touch-and-go landings on a dried lake bed, the flight instructor was controlling the throttle inputs, and she “controlled the wing.” She added that, just before the accident, she observed three dust devils to the east and that, during a final pass near the north end of the lake bed, they came upon “strong localized turbulence.” The aircraft impacted the ground and rolled to the left. 

The flight instructor reported that, during the turbulence encounter “about 4-6 ft” above the ground, the “wing stalled,” which resulted in a “hard nose wheel landing.”
The weight-shift-control aircraft sustained substantial damage to both wings.
The flight instructor reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the weigh-shift-control aircraft that would have precluded normal operation.

The flight instructor reported that the wind was light and variable and that the temperature was 70°F at the accident location. A review of recorded data from the automated weather observation station located about 6 miles northeast of the accident site reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was calm, and the temperature was 64°F.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilot’s exceedance of the weight-shift-control aircraft’s critical angle of attack and the flight instructor’s delayed remedial action and failure to maintain the proper airspeed after encountering localized turbulence during approach, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall.

The student pilot of the weight-shift-control aircraft reported that while practicing touch-and-go landings on a dried lake bed, the flight instructor was controlling the throttle inputs and she "controlled the wing". She added that just before the accident, she observed three dust devils to the east and during a final pass near the north end of the lake bed, they came upon "strong localized turbulence". The aircraft impacted the ground and rolled to the left. 

The flight instructor reported that during the turbulence encounter "about 4-6 ft" above the ground, the "wing stalled" which resulted in a "hard nose wheel landing".

The weight-shift-control aircraft sustained substantial damage to both wings.

The flight instructor reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the weigh-shift-control aircraft that would have precluded normal operation.

The flight instructor reported the wind was light and variable, and the temperature was 70°F at the accident location. A review of recorded data from the automated weather observation station located about 6 miles northeast of the accident site reported that about the time of the accident the wind was calm and the temperature was 64°F.

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA250
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 30, 2017 in Boulder City, NV
Aircraft: NORTH WING UUM INC SPORT X2-N, registration: N366DN
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot of the weight-shift-control aircraft reported that while practicing touch-and-go landings on a dried lake bed, the flight instructor was controlling the throttle inputs and she "controlled the wing". She added that just before the accident, she observed three dust devils to the east and during a final pass near the north end of the lake bed, they came upon "strong localized turbulence". The aircraft impacted the ground and rolled to the left.

The flight instructor reported that during the turbulence encounter "about 4-6 ft" above the ground, the "wing stalled" which resulted in a "hard nose wheel landing".

The weight-shift-control aircraft sustained substantial damage to both wings.

The flight instructor reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the weigh-shift-control aircraft that would have precluded normal operation.

The flight instructor reported the wind was light and variable, and the temperature was 70°F at the accident location. A review of recorded data from the automated weather observation station located about 6 miles northeast of the accident site reported that about the time of the accident the wind was calm and the temperature was 64°F.

LAS VEGAS - A plane flipped over after landing near Boulder City on Sunday, according to Ian Gregor of the FAA. 

The incident happened on the El Dorado Dry Lake Bed around 7:30 a.m. 

Two people were in the plane when it flipped, but it is unknown if they were injured at this time, Gregor said. 

The plane is a North Wing Sport X-2 with tail number N366DN.

The Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the crash.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.lasvegasnow.com

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